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What’s the difference between my two chargers?

peregrina2000

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I have two chargers with a Spanish plug, both have USB connections. I only need one, and for fun I weighed them. The Apple charger weighs 26 g. The Qualcomm Quick Charger 3.0 weighs 56 g and is bigger. I have no idea what explains the difference in weight, and it’s not a big deal, but I am curious. I’ve used both chargers before, and no obvious differences in performance pop into mind. Any ideas?
 
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I have two chargers with a Spanish plug, both have USB connections. I only need one, and for fun I weighed them. The Apple charger weighs 26 g. The Qualcomm Quick Charger 3.0 weighs 56 g and is bigger. I have no idea what explains the difference in weight, and it’s not a big deal, but I am curious. I’ve used both chargers before, and no obvious differences in performance pop into mind. Any ideas?
I always learned to use the charger that belong to your phone.
This is for safety reasons. 🙏🏻
 
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Impossible to answer, sorry. You'd have to have some kind of electrical engineer run tests and take them apart to get a good answer.
Some possible explanations:
- Heavier charger is designed for faster charging
- Heavier charger is designed more sturdily (but charges just as fast or even slower)
- Heavier charger is designed worse or involving older technology
- Heavier charger is designed with newer technology (GaN is heavier)
- Heavier charger is designed with added weights for a more premium feeling

guess there can be more, but you get what i mean. If the lighter charger works well for you, take it.
 
I have two chargers with a Spanish plug, both have USB connections. I only need one, and for fun I weighed them. The Apple charger weighs 26 g. The Qualcomm Quick Charger 3.0 weighs 56 g and is bigger. I have no idea what explains the difference in weight, and it’s not a big deal, but I am curious. I’ve used both chargers before, and no obvious differences in performance pop into mind. Any ideas?
Hi Laurie:
Take a look at the specifications written on the side of the chargers. There you will find the information of the Input Voltage (that’s the voltage provided from the wall plug) and the Output Voltage, since these are phone chargers, the output should be 5V (5 volts) and amperage. The higher the amperage number is, the faster it will charge the battery.
Now, all you have know is is the phone battery is in your phone battery accepts fast charging, otherwise the battery will degrade faster.
Hope this helps in your decision.

Iván
 
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The heavier unit is drawing more amps to provide more charging power. It also has a better charge controller to monitor and control the amount of current charging the phone. Usually that means a faster charging rate, but that rate is solely dependent on the state of charge and charging parameters the phone's battery allows.
 
Hi Laurie:
Take a look at the specifications written on the side of the chargers. There you will find the information of the Input Voltage (that’s the voltage provided from the wall plug) and the Output Voltage, since these are phone chargers, the output should be 5V (5 volts) and amperage. The higher the amperage number is, the faster it will charge the battery.
Now, all you have know is is the phone battery is in your phone battery accepts fast charging, otherwise the battery will degrade faster.
Hope this helps in your decision.

Iván
Just read your reply after posting my own. Sorry, I repeated it without reading the thread first. :eek:
 
The basic early chargers were rated 5 watt, 10w or even more. They all used standard 5 volt charging voltage and had various component weights.

The Quick chargers are different. They communicate with compatible devices and vary the charging voltage to charge faster if compatible. If your devices aren't compatible with Quick chargers, there is no reason to carry the extra weight.
 
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That would be a good solution if I had a plug adaptor that would allow me to plug these Spanish chargers into a US outlet. :p

Obviously not a big deal, I was just wondering, and will go with the lighter one, which is also an Apple product.
I think you should always go with the Apple product. My nephew and my Godson are both in computer security and huge nerds and they both agree that especially with Apple products you should use apple accessories, ie chargers
 
At the end of my Frances I was in Santiago and noticed that the adaptor I was using all month was now running extremely hot. So hot it failed and got the bin!
Beware of adaptors that are not bought with the device!
Now…. I remember the time in the Himalayas when the charger was loose in the wall, had to be held in place with a towel balanced on a rucksack…… got awfully hot ….. 🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️
 
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The larger charger might be suitable for charging a laptop, while the smaller one might not. It might also have more ports allowing you to charge several devices at once.

It doesn't necessarily mean it will charge your phone any faster.

Take the smaller charger.
 
I have two chargers with a Spanish plug, both have USB connections. I only need one, and for fun I weighed them. The Apple charger weighs 26 g. The Qualcomm Quick Charger 3.0 weighs 56 g and is bigger. I have no idea what explains the difference in weight, and it’s not a big deal, but I am curious. I’ve used both chargers before, and no obvious differences in performance pop into mind. Any ideas?
Size/weight of step down transformer and other components to handle higher current, would be my guess.
 
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Apple products seem to have a policy of working with Apple products only.
Non-Apple chargers may work now but on the next software update they may stop. Then they are scrap.

This may sound unbelievable in the modern reduce-reuse-recycle world but it seems to be their company policy. There are groups trying to stop this resulting in Apple having to change over to the universal USB-C charging port in Europe at any rate.

We had to scrap four perfectly good cables in the house here last week.
 
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The smaller Apple charger is almost certain not a fast charger.

My 2 last phones (Samsung, now Motorola) had both QC-Chargers, the 60W of the Motorola weighs almost double the 30W charger of the Samsung at almost the same size!

Both do charge on different Voltages (5V, 9V, 12V output, 110-240V input), depending on the used chargingcable and device to charge. Many manufacturers tend to a coloured (orange or red) USB-lid inside the connector to give note to the user that the adapter is using high power to charge.
 
When I was a boy, chargers were very simple devices. I could make one without much difficulty. Today a ludicrous thought.

But now, briefly, they are not. The lightest weight should not be the priority (see FIRE below)

In the last few years they have become quite exotic with an extensive amount of computing power particularly with the high power/speed versions. These high speed versions come in a few type eg, QC. PD each with sub versions, (and perhaps more), all with the objective of maximising the charging rate whilst trying to avoid your phone from catching fire, and also to communicate with the phone to vary charge rate to extend the battery life. and probably more stuff ??.

Some of the cheap chargers take short cuts and don't always achieve the NOT CATCH FIRE objective. Stick with mainstream brands.

Of course there is the added confusion about USB A and USB C cables not doing what you assume they might do.

A: If you have a dumb smartphone, don't think too much just try and avoid the fire risk.

B: If you have a newer high speed charging phone:-
1. see what the maximum charge rate the phone will take and get a charger of sufficient power to deliver that
2. get the charger type QC or PD to suit your phone and maybe see if there are subtypes of QC that your phone prefers - possibly the one you already have when you purchased it.
3 get a charger that meets 2 above and has additional ports (commonly USB A although USB C is becoming the universal standard) for your other gadgets that need power and maybe a spare one just in case, including for someone else in need who is less prepared than they should be, or a shortage of power points. Charging everything at once is very convenient.
 
Different phones use different charging technologies to speed up the process, that works best when paired with an appropriately designed charger.

So if you'd be leaving it plugged in overnight either way, choose the lighter one.

If you care about being able to top off your battery ASAP when you snag an outlet, then it would be better if you told us what type of phone (or other device) you're planning to charge. (Brand, and preferably model too.)
 
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The heavier unit is drawing more amps to provide more charging power. It also has a better charge controller to monitor and control the amount of current charging the phone.
Do you have auditable objective evidence demonstrating that that is fact, or is it speculation?

I was for 35 years a fully trained and qualified professionally-Certified Engineering Technologist (now retired), employed as a procurement quality assurance auditor, performing technical quality audits on a wide variety of equipment, and formal ISO 9000 Quality Management System audits. I have encountered many horrifying problems. Rule number one was "never assume anything".

Those who are considering the use of aftermarket chargers for their device(s) might find the series of Youtube videos by Clive Mitchel to be quite informative. I understand him to be a qualified British journeyman electrician with many years of industrial experience. He performs on-screen technical tear-downs of electrical devices (including retail USB chargers), shows how they are built, and discusses the safety significance of his findings. Many of the aftermarket devices that he has taken apart on-screen were of shockingly-dangerous construction.

Clive Mitchell's channel:
 
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The following is most of one of my previous posts. It is a bit related to this thread's subject.


Apple's very expensive cords have a lot of electronics hidden within them. Within two minutes this video shows you what the cables look like inside. Then it explains why it needs everything. Then it shows progressively cheaper cables. Nerds may want to watch the whole thing (I did a few months ago). Non-nerds don't have to go beyond the two minutes I mentioned (or maybe even them saying the cord has more electronics than the Apollo moon landing navigational computers).

Oh, remember, these cables transmit data in addition to power.

YouTube video id: AD5aAd8Oy84
 
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Do you have auditable objective evidence demonstrating that that is fact, or is it speculation?

I was for 35 years a fully trained and qualified professionally-Certified Engineering Technologist (now retired), employed as a procurement quality assurance auditor, performing technical quality audits on a wide variety of equipment, and formal ISO 9000 Quality Management System audits. I have encountered many horrifying problems. Rule number one was "never assume anything".

Those who are considering the use of aftermarket chargers for their device(s) might find the series of Youtube videos by Clive Mitchel to be quite informative. I understand him to be a qualified British journeyman electrician with many years of industrial experience. He performs on-screen technical tear-downs of electrical devices (including retail USB chargers), shows how they are built, and discusses the safety significance of his findings. Many of the aftermarket devices that he has taken apart on-screen were of shockingly-dangerous construction.

Clive Mitchell's channel:

Naw. . . I just pulled it out of thin air. I guess installing solar systems on homes and RVs and dealing with charge controllers from 12 to 48v and inverter/charger installs on multi Kw/Hr battery banks made me forget my place. Sorry.
 
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The basic early chargers were rated 5 watt, 10w or even more. They all used standard 5 volt charging voltage and had various component weights.

The Quick chargers are different. They communicate with compatible devices and vary the charging voltage to charge faster if compatible. If your devices aren't compatible with Quick chargers, there is no reason to carry the extra weight.
Since both devices are from Apple, I’m pretty sure both are “smart” chargers and will charge at the rate the device asks for.
 
There is a lot of great responses here (former 'industry expert' as they called me).
I've a few additional notes.
Try to only use your charger for security reasons, especially when traveling as on trip you are more likely to access details that you don't want shared. If you plug in with another device you could be comprising all your data.
I would consider a new reputable charger regardless of Apple branding or not a good choice.
I also found that a charger with multiple USB ports VERY useful in older Albergues with fewer plugs. I would just ask someone already plugged in if we could share.
And yes I know this is contrary to my first security point for them, but I also know that I am not hacking them 😝
 
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Not on topic Laurie but are you brining your Electric Coil and an EU adapter for it?
I've a multi USB charger (universal pins adaptable) as I use it abroad for Charging a camera battery pack, power bank and phone and kindle. This time I went and bought a Single USB Eu plug in Boots (pharmacy/chemist) the weight difference is negligible but the multi usb is a bit bulkier. I have an Apple phone an Apple lead for charging but the Plug/Eu is called GO.
 
I have two chargers with a Spanish plug, both have USB connections. I only need one, and for fun I weighed them. The Apple charger weighs 26 g. The Qualcomm Quick Charger 3.0 weighs 56 g and is bigger. I have no idea what explains the difference in weight, and it’s not a big deal, but I am curious. I’ve used both chargers before, and no obvious differences in performance pop into mind. Any ideas?
Probably the difference is in the maximum wattage output. I'm guessing the Apple charger peaks out at 20W and the Qualcomm charger peaks out at around 65W. Since the phone is probably only capable of accepting 20W, it will throttle the 65W charge down to a rate that it can handle. The 65W chargers are intended mostly for tablets and laptops that need that extra wattage.
 
This post will only interest a few technically inclined readers. Today on my morning YouTube viewing the following video was presented to me (I swear that I didn't seek it out). The channel DiodesGoneWild tears apart chargers to examine them. Most are found to be dangerous but this one passes (some wires are even triple insulated). Viewing this video will give you an idea of why there are weight differences in chargers.

YouTube video id: qRzuhWZoHXU
 
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