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Winter Gear Shakedown

peregrino_bobby

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
January/February (2020)
Hey everyone!

I have somewhat lazily cobbled together my packing list for the Camino Frances this January (2020) using this website: https://lighterpack.com/r/cu1qgo

The information is obviously not complete––I don't know what my spork weighs and I'm not about to buy a scale to find out––but I think I've hit pretty much everything I'm planning on taking with some ballpark figures on weight. Factoring in all the unknown weights, I'm going to guess that this pack comes out to ~8.5 kilos.

Now, my questions:

1. Patagonia Nano-Air vs Patagonia Down Sweater. I have both of these jackets. The Down Sweater is relatively non-breathable down jacket; the Nano-Air is a breathable synthetic layer that I'll probably be paring with my Houdini when the wind really gets kicking. I'm leaning towards the Nano-Air because of how wet the camino could get and because I can't imagine doing anything active in the Down Sweater. However, I'm concerned if I have enough warmth for when I'm standing still. Does anyone here have expereince with either of these jackets in winter temps?

2. Beanie vs Hoods. Simple question: all my jackets have hoods; do I really need a beanie?

3. Rain Jacket + Rain Pants vs Poncho. I know, I know, this question again. Frankly, I never even considered a poncho until some friends with camino experience insisted that I needed one. However, they've done the camino in the summer; digging around on the interwebs gave me pause whether or not the poncho is the clear-cut winner for the winter. Does anyone here have experience with ponchos in wintertime that care to opine on this interminable topic?

4. Finally, tear my list apart. Anything I'm omitting? Anything that I shouldn't take? Keep in mind that I'm walking in the wintertime.

Thanks for the help everyone!
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
1. Synthetic beats down in the wet hands down.

2. Yes. Head insulation very important.

3. Personal preference. I’ve never used a poncho and I’m not even poncho-curious.

4. Too much clothing. Drop a pair of long johns for a start.,
 

peregrino_bobby

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
January/February (2020)
4. Too much clothing. Drop a pair of long johns for a start.,
I was wondering about this actually. My plan was to use the longjohns for sleeping and hiking. However, I run a little warm; would it be too warm in the winterime on the camino to hike in longjohns?
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
I was wondering about this actually. My plan was to use the longjohns for sleeping and hiking. However, I run a little warm; would it be too warm in the winterime on the camino to hike in longjohns?
In my opinion, you will be too warm. I ‘run warm’ also - in my case that’s a euphemism for ‘I’m a fat lad.’

If it gets exceptionally cold wear your over-trousers for a short while.

You’ll be very lucky to have the chance to walk in shorts, but I’d also take a lightweight pair. If it’s not too cold I walk in shorts in all weathers. Skin dries quicker than cloth.
 

lettinggo

Active Member
Hola

1. Nano - in winter the primary objective is to stay DRY. - In my opinion down may be very wet and slow to dry up. remember that in winter plenty of the albergues will not have central heating going on and there may be smaller electric radiators which many pilgrims share to dry their cloth.
Many times you will wake up and put on damp cloth, which doesnt really matter as you soon after starting walking will be sweating again.

2. Beanie. You will probably also need wearing it during sleeping at some of the places.

3. Rain jacket and troussers. It is just my preferences. I like diversity and it serves well as an extra windbreaker if needed,

4. I wrote this some years ago in respons to a message:

The one major thing that I am concerned about is the 30 L backpack.
I take it that you are a somewhat petit person?
A winter camino requires heavier and more clothing than in the other three seasons.
To fit all that into a rather small space can be a challenge.
But I am also in the group of pilgrims that rather want a little to big backpack and extra space, than the smalles possible.
Anyhow, there are no rights or wrong with this. It all depends on the individual and if it suits you then it is fine.

I'd take the head lamp for sure. You will have limited daylight and when I did a winter camino years ago, we often got up predawn if we had a long day ahead of us.

• 3-4 meters of cord for hanging washing cloth.

• Safety pins x 20 (10 to give away as gifts)

• Some kind of whaist belt or arond the neck pouch for passport, money, etc etc.

• If you bring Ibuprofen then also bring Paracetamol and take 1 or 2 pills of each medicin to have an increesed synergetic effect.

• Small rock for the Cruz de Ferro - that is if you have any burden in you life that you would like to unburden yourself of...

• Handkerchief x 2

• Small smiple knife - like the swiss ones - the simple ones..

• Small purse/bag for coins.

• Reflective vest - reflective bands to wear around ankles.

• High quality / low weight shopping bag - like Sea to Summit Ultra Sil - for..shopping, sitting on outside when it is wet, use for your belongings whan going to the bathroom/shower, ...

• Extra toilet paper.

• Small bicycle flashing light thing - the red one, to put on your backpack while walking on the roads.

• You may want to add some sunglasses depending on how the weather prognosis turns out -
The sun can be very fierce even in january and you will under all ciurcumstances arrive in Santiago with a sunburned left hand side face... (alternativly you can just buy som cheaper ones in Spain - eyewear is inexpensive in Sapin compared with many other countries).

• Anything wool is good as it has an insulating quality even when wet. Therefor I would suggest wool gloves and waterproof mitten over them. Waterproof mitten can be expensive, but it all comes down to the most imprtant on a winter camino: stay DRY.
Therefor it is also good to have jackets with zippers/openings under the armpits for ventilation.
Your body will generate a lot of heat and has to be either deposited in wool or ventilated out.


Finally. Some advice about sleepingbags I wrote in another thread some years ago:


• Use an inner silk or fleece liner/bag.
A silk liner adds about 5° degree celsius to the bag and a fleece 8°.
On winter camping/trekking two liners are often used as the effect adds up and the liners are light weight.

• The sleeping bag does not make you warm.
It function as a thermo and isolate you.
This mean that it contains the warmth/heat you put in, so make some gymnastic before you enter and you will sleep warmer.
Think of the difference of poring cold or hot water into a thermo.

• Wear a beanie, scarf, long johns, gloves, cloth while sleeping.

• Unpack your sleeping bag early before going to sleep as the down/synthetic needs to unfold to provide maximum insulation.

• Ventilate you sleeping bag in the morning to get rid of sweat before packing it up.

• Do use a sleeping bag that matches your size. A to large result in to much air that needs to be heated and a to small result in to little air to provide best insulation.

• Put some hot water in your 0.5 L water bottle and bring it into the sleeping bag.

• Never go hungry to bed. Energy equals heat.

• Remember to go to bathroom and pee off before going to bed.
The body uses a huge amount of energy if you are in a state that needs to go to the bathroom.


Buen Camino :)
Lettinggo

Link to the thread with other winter related discussion:
 

peregrino_bobby

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
January/February (2020)
@lettinggo, thanks for the feedback, particularly with the smaller things I wouldn't have thought of. (I totally blanked on the stone!)

Your post made me think of something though, particularly the knife. I was going to pick one up in France to pair with my spork for kitchen-related activities. Is there anything else I might want? I'm pretty mystified as to how food works on the Camino in general, actually.
 

lettinggo

Active Member
@lettinggo, thanks for the feedback, particularly with the smaller things I wouldn't have thought of. (I totally blanked on the stone!)

Your post made me think of something though, particularly the knife. I was going to pick one up in France to pair with my spork for kitchen-related activities. Is there anything else I might want? I'm pretty mystified as to how food works on the Camino in general, actually.
Start practising now.
If you master a good, simple pasta - you will be the center of attention at the albergues.
Some days you will go out and eat at some restaurants - menu del dia which is pretty cheap.
Other nights you will cook together with your fellow pilgrims.
Food preparation is a joyous social event and everyone will be starving at the end of the day.

As for breakfast and lunch, everyone has different approaches.
Either buy bread, cheese, chorizo and make yourself a sandwhich - or buy at the Bar's you come across.
You will need to get shelter anyways during the cold, so its a good combination with a cafe con leche.

When I walk, summer or winter, I always carry some food. Always!
You cannot be sure that there are something at your end destiantion - especially in winter.
I carry 1x powder soup - some bread and cheese - and a tin of sardines. Yes- it is weight.
And yes - I have shared one portion of soup 3 ways when I arrived at albergues where unprepared pilgrims were hungry. 1/3 of a portion of soup with a little 2 days old and stale baguette can taste like the best meal ever when one is tired and hungry. Save some for the morning as well. You might have to walk for several hours before some shop is open.
Anyhow, it is all good as it is part of the Camino :)
Lettinggo

.
One more thing.
You can buy an airplane transfer nylon bag for the backpack.
They are very sturdy and waterproof.
I use this in transit and when I arrive in Spain I empty the backpack and put the bag inside as a liner.
Your gear will be 100% dry inside that bag.

.
And another thing...
Everything you bring goes into different zip-lock bags.
To organise and keep dry.
 
Last edited:

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I'm a fan of a light wool scarf. It works as a neck warmer, a hood, can be spread across front and back as an extra layer under a jacket, can be used as an extra layer in bed.

Get it in a bright colour and it can help make you visible.
 

Penbaysail

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Some kind of trail shoes. I know they’re heavy & bulky, but I replaced my sandals for Crocs about 5 days into my walk. They were used daily while my trail shoes dried, doing multiple duties as shower shoes, doing laundry shoes, evening shoes, etc.
 
D

Deleted member 29041

Guest
Crocs are NOT to be trusted in the winter - unless you want to emulate Bambi on the ice. No traction. I've _really_ hurt my knee on that account.

Actually, if you are wearing one of the cheap knock-offs, even walking on a wet floor can be hazardous.
 

Leigh Macklin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances {2016}, Portugese {2017}
I 2nd most of what has already been said.

I do quite a bit of winter hiking and I find the raincoat, rain skirt & gaiters combo to work the best for me. More versitility with matching clothing items and keeps me from being cold AND sweaty. Only problem = wet straps on backpack. Also means a lighter back as I wear this with winter weight wool leggings, which take up much less mass and room in my bag. The poncho only comes along if it is part of my sleep system for the trip.
 

CdnDreamer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (12, 15 & 18) San Salvador (18), Portuguese (19)
I haven't walked in winter, but on my spring and fall caminos I carried a $1.00 poncho and used it a lot. I could wear my raincoat, but then I would throw the poncho over top to keep my backpack straps dry. If it wasn't raining hard, I just used the poncho. Last year it rained daily for 2 weeks, and I was putting on and taking off that poor $1.00 poncho several times a day, and it survived. I would just tuck it into the pocket on my hip belt when it stopped raining. I thought it was well worth carrying as it weighed nothing, took up little space and cost nothing.
 

roving_rufus

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013-2015) Portugues (2017-2019) Via Francigena (2018-??) Camino from Ireland (2020-??)
Having walked in all different seasons I just couldn't adjust to a poncho, so its rain trousers and coat for me - but I often carry an umbrella with me. Maybe I'm just Irish and used to having one to hand at all times - but I find it useful as it keeps rain off me, it also helps stop my glasses fogging up as much and when it is just a quick passing rain shower I don't have to get raincoat out. Its just a basic cheap umbrella which is small and light

Someone mentionned a fluorescent vest - I have taken one and it is useful on darker mornings and wet days especially in winter months. You often have to cross roads, walk along roads etc

Also I note you have a 2L bladder and 1L Nalgene bottle - that seems to be alot of water to carry?

And to your follow up questions about food - In winter I more often cooked - but facilties do vary greatly - some albergues are really set up for it, others have no kitchen at all, some have little (or no) equipment in their kitchens. It is useful to bring a few things with you - I had little satchets of spices and herbs (paprika, chilli, dried mixed herbs etc) & a few stock-cubes as well as some food - dried packet soup, cous-cous, instant mashed potato, sardines, cheese etc. It was interesting to see what meals that got pulled together - from simple to great feasts (we made a six-course meal one night!)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hey everyone!

I have somewhat lazily cobbled together my packing list for the Camino Frances this January (2020) using this website: https://lighterpack.com/r/cu1qgo

The information is obviously not complete––I don't know what my spork weighs and I'm not about to buy a scale to find out––but I think I've hit pretty much everything I'm planning on taking with some ballpark figures on weight. Factoring in all the unknown weights, I'm going to guess that this pack comes out to ~8.5 kilos.

Now, my questions:

1. Patagonia Nano-Air vs Patagonia Down Sweater. I have both of these jackets. The Down Sweater is relatively non-breathable down jacket; the Nano-Air is a breathable synthetic layer that I'll probably be paring with my Houdini when the wind really gets kicking. I'm leaning towards the Nano-Air because of how wet the camino could get and because I can't imagine doing anything active in the Down Sweater. However, I'm concerned if I have enough warmth for when I'm standing still. Does anyone here have expereince with either of these jackets in winter temps?

2. Beanie vs Hoods. Simple question: all my jackets have hoods; do I really need a beanie?

3. Rain Jacket + Rain Pants vs Poncho. I know, I know, this question again. Frankly, I never even considered a poncho until some friends with camino experience insisted that I needed one. However, they've done the camino in the summer; digging around on the interwebs gave me pause whether or not the poncho is the clear-cut winner for the winter. Does anyone here have experience with ponchos in wintertime that care to opine on this interminable topic?

4. Finally, tear my list apart. Anything I'm omitting? Anything that I shouldn't take? Keep in mind that I'm walking in the wintertime.

Thanks for the help everyone!
This is what I would choose:

For the Smartwool 250 longsleeved, I would replace with 2 Smartwool 150 longsleeved for better temperature control and layering. I would drop the short sleeved 150 Smartwool shirt.

I use running shorts, even during lowland winter snows. I wear the base layer (long john) bottoms underneath. At altitude with very low temps, it is base layer with a weather shell pant that is NOT waterproof.

THREE pair of socks. . . one to wear and two to carry.

IF you prefer a rain jacket (I much prefer a poncho), then drop the Houdini wind shell, it is a redundant choice as the rain jacket can be used as a windshell. But then, I also use a poncho as a windshell. At any rate, drop the Houdini. I have the Houdini and it is a great windshell, you just do not need two.

Far too many pants. Pick one. The lightest one. Then use base layers to add warmth if needed.

Rain kilt or skirt can be used rather than rain pants. It can save 7 ounces, and allow better breathability to keep you dry under load.

Prana shorts are a good short to wear. I prefer running shorts to walk/backpack in. It saves about 6 ounces.

The Mont Blanc gloves are a good choice. I've used both the Mountain Laurel Design mitts and zPacks mitts, and the Zpacks seem to fit and function slightly better. But unless the temps are going into the sub 20 F range, I find them too warm even in rain.

The Gossamer Gear Mariposa is a terrific backpack. I've used it during part of my thru hike on the PCT and the Colorado Trail, and on two Caminos. If not already purchased, look at the Gossamer Gear Silverback. It is still a capacious, though slightly smaller capacity bag, weighs a bit less, and I find the fit and feel even better than with my Mariposa.

Also, if you haven't already, replace the backpad panel with the new version of the pad. It is significantly better at maintaining airflow and reducing back sweat build up.

As to the question of Nano Air vs down sweater, the two are designed to serve different functions. If worn when walking under load, either will get wet from condensation from sweat. Nowadays, down is treated with a hydrophobic coating so even wet, down will maintain loft and insulation. . . . but it is far more fragile and losses insulation when compressed by the backpack you will wear. Compression of the down's loft means loss of insulative capacity.

So unless I am attempting to summit a high altitude peak where heavy, duty down-filled parkas are the best choice, I do not wear down for warmth while under load.

For flexibility of temperature regulation and use and weight, this is my solution. . . .

I take a vest. You like Patagonia products, and the Nano Air vest is great choice, and lighter in weight than the Air Nano jacket. Paired with your long sleeved base layers, you will have all the warmth you need.

Below is a guide I wrote which may help inform your choice of clothing for your 'closet' :) k in cooler weather.

-------------------------------------------

Layering clothing for temperature regulation and comfort is a biggie. You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving at in exerting energy, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only those needed when full exertion is going to be achieved. For those who can't suck it up ;) for a few minutes, then wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes. Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.

Feel free to send me a private message if you have other questions that you think I can help with. :)
 

Penbaysail

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Crocs are NOT to be trusted in the winter - unless you want to emulate Bambi on the ice. No traction. I've _really_ hurt my knee on that account.

Actually, if you are wearing one of the cheap knock-offs, even walking on a wet floor can be hazardous.
There are differences in Crocs traction, and the Bistro model work better than the regular ones. I wear mine frequently during a Maine winter in snow & ice. I also attach a traction device (Stabilicers or Microspikes).
 
Camino(s) past & future
I am walking in March and April of 2019.
Hey everyone!

I have somewhat lazily cobbled together my packing list for the Camino Frances this January (2020) using this website: https://lighterpack.com/r/cu1qgo

The information is obviously not complete––I don't know what my spork weighs and I'm not about to buy a scale to find out––but I think I've hit pretty much everything I'm planning on taking with some ballpark figures on weight. Factoring in all the unknown weights, I'm going to guess that this pack comes out to ~8.5 kilos.

Now, my questions:

1. Patagonia Nano-Air vs Patagonia Down Sweater. I have both of these jackets. The Down Sweater is relatively non-breathable down jacket; the Nano-Air is a breathable synthetic layer that I'll probably be paring with my Houdini when the wind really gets kicking. I'm leaning towards the Nano-Air because of how wet the camino could get and because I can't imagine doing anything active in the Down Sweater. However, I'm concerned if I have enough warmth for when I'm standing still. Does anyone here have expereince with either of these jackets in winter temps?

2. Beanie vs Hoods. Simple question: all my jackets have hoods; do I really need a beanie?

3. Rain Jacket + Rain Pants vs Poncho. I know, I know, this question again. Frankly, I never even considered a poncho until some friends with camino experience insisted that I needed one. However, they've done the camino in the summer; digging around on the interwebs gave me pause whether or not the poncho is the clear-cut winner for the winter. Does anyone here have experience with ponchos in wintertime that care to opine on this interminable topic?

4. Finally, tear my list apart. Anything I'm omitting? Anything that I shouldn't take? Keep in mind that I'm walking in the wintertime.

Thanks for the help everyone!
I say a beanie is a must, and in winter a poncho is not very effective.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Hey everyone!

I have somewhat lazily cobbled together my packing list for the Camino Frances this January (2020) using this website: https://lighterpack.com/r/cu1qgo

The information is obviously not complete––I don't know what my spork weighs and I'm not about to buy a scale to find out––but I think I've hit pretty much everything I'm planning on taking with some ballpark figures on weight. Factoring in all the unknown weights, I'm going to guess that this pack comes out to ~8.5 kilos.

Now, my questions:

1. Patagonia Nano-Air vs Patagonia Down Sweater. I have both of these jackets. The Down Sweater is relatively non-breathable down jacket; the Nano-Air is a breathable synthetic layer that I'll probably be paring with my Houdini when the wind really gets kicking. I'm leaning towards the Nano-Air because of how wet the camino could get and because I can't imagine doing anything active in the Down Sweater. However, I'm concerned if I have enough warmth for when I'm standing still. Does anyone here have expereince with either of these jackets in winter temps?

2. Beanie vs Hoods. Simple question: all my jackets have hoods; do I really need a beanie?

3. Rain Jacket + Rain Pants vs Poncho. I know, I know, this question again. Frankly, I never even considered a poncho until some friends with camino experience insisted that I needed one. However, they've done the camino in the summer; digging around on the interwebs gave me pause whether or not the poncho is the clear-cut winner for the winter. Does anyone here have experience with ponchos in wintertime that care to opine on this interminable topic?

4. Finally, tear my list apart. Anything I'm omitting? Anything that I shouldn't take? Keep in mind that I'm walking in the wintertime.

Thanks for the help everyone!
Hi,

I use Patagonia Micro Puff Hoodie ...it's a windbreaker as well so you can use it as outer layer. And it's also water repellant so it works for light rain for a short while and really good for snowstorms if it's now wet. It works to keep the cold out but you need a layer under to keep you warm as well. I use a light wool sweater and a merino baselayer under the puffy in winter.

Also the Patagonia Micro Puff Hoodie is synthetic, made from recycled plastic bottles, and it can get wet without getting destroyed. Only use non-detergent soap according to instructions for washing to keep the water repellancy.

Use a rainponcho with with sleeves. And use rain gaiters with rainpants on top, if you want to stay dry.

I use both a wool beanie, have hoodie on my merino baselayer and a hoodie on my puffy jacket too. If weather is nice just the beanie. If the weather is epic I use all.

You can theck my list here (it includes winter too):
https://camino.ninja/packlist

I didn't look through your list yet ...will later :)

Andy
 

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