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A budget tent to take on Camino - Detailed Review after 2 years of test

2020 Camino Guides
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Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
Best Budget-Friendly QUECHUA QUICKHIKER ULTRALIGHT 2-PERSON TENT Detailed Review after 2 years test


Watch the full video here:


Today we are going to be doing another gear review and this will be our one and only beloved tent Quechua QuickHiker Ultralight 2-person tent. It has been with us from the very start. We have this tent for over two and a half years now and during these years we spent probably 6 full months staying in it doing lots of wild camping. So we've tested it quite a bit in a different weather conditions and on a different terrain and developed different techniques with it for the best use. So in this video we'll talk about the general specs of it, go though the installation process, comfort, durability, its benefits and drawbacks.


Let us know in the comments below what kind of tent you are using now and how you like it. As we said we would love to explore the different gear and maybe find other tent suitable for us. Now we are in the search for a good quality budget friendly self-standing tent. And if you know one we would be grateful for you to leave all the suggestions below.
 

Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
Glad you like your tent but, honestly I would not recommend to anyone to take a tent on the Camino, at least not in Spain or Portugal.
Sure, we perfectly understand that it is not for everybody but for someone like us who loves to stay outdoors and in the campgrounds it is very necessary.
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Glad you like your tent but, honestly I would not recommend to anyone to take a tent on the Camino, at least not in Spain or Portugal.
Why not recommend taking a tent

I done four different caminos.

On all four of them I either had my REI Quarter dome Tent, Hennessy hammock or MSR bivysac.

by the way,many alburgues welcome you to tent camp. Pay small fee, use facilities and go to bed in your tent. I have tent camped atthe alburgues on patios, balcony, yards, decks , etc.

and enjoyed it every time!

I am little puzzled why you do NOT recommend tent camping when walking

I also have, with permission, slept in my tent at private homes, yards, farms and more.
Also, dare I tell you, have stealth camp.

NO fire, smoking, trash left, no lights, music etc.
NEVER go over fence or through a gate.

ALWAYS leave the place BETTER than got it.

tent camping is frowned upon in Spain and Portugal mainly because of the recent fires.

Bet you don’t know how many of last years fires was caused by a tenter?

I strongly recommend people to take a light weight tent on their Camino.
Don’t have to listen to the snoring, farting, talking etc
And NO bed bugs!!
 
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martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Sure, we perfectly understand that it is not for everybody but for someone like us who loves to stay outdoors and in the campgrounds it is very necessary.
No need to stay in camp grounds. Which are hard to find on the Camino anyway.
When one can easily, and legally, tent camp at most alburgues.
These anti tent camping ones on here may have never tent camped on the Camino.

I have always been welcomed with open arms at the alburgues to sleep outside in my tent.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Glad you like your tent but, honestly I would not recommend to anyone to take a tent on the Camino, at least not in Spain or Portugal.
What is wrong with tent camping along the Camino where you can? I have observed many pilgrims do it, quite often staying in the grounds of an albergue.
Not everyone that walks the Camino can afford to stay in albergues every night. Staying in a tent when and where they can helps them keep it affordable.
I for one recommend taking a tent on the Camino if that's how you want to walk it and/or it allows you to do it in the first place.
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Glad you like your tent but, honestly I would not recommend to anyone to take a tent on the Camino, at least not in Spain or Portugal.
Why do you NOT recommend such?
i have done four CaminodeSantiago. Tent, hammock or bivysac used on ever one.
Never had a problem at any alburgues.

nevergot bed bugs.
Got good nights sleep. Without hearing snoring, talking, giggling, farting, etc.

in today’s world with so many rude all about me people, tent vs inside stuffy smelly alburgues is the way to go.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Sure, tent camping at albergues is fine, but @Island is still entitled to recommend against it even while you recommend for it. I didn't hear "tent hating" in his response. I personally wouldn't recommend it either, and I have backpacked (tent and hammock) for all my life in the Colorado Rockies, so I am not a hater and I don't speak from ignorance.

Wild tenting is a different thing, and it's a lot more than just about fires. So, carry your tent by all means if that is what you would like to do, but pitch it at the albergues rather than on public or private land.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
My recommendation of carrying a tent and camping of course includes the responsibility and courtesy that if you do, to do it
trace free. Fire free.
Like I said, not everyone can afford the gentrification of the Camino.
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Sure, tent camping at albergues is fine, but @Island is still entitled to recommend against it even while you recommend for it. I didn't hear "tent hating" in his response. I personally wouldn't recommend it either, and I have backpacked (tent and hammock) for all my life in the Colorado Rockies, so I am not a hater and I don't speak from ignorance.

Wild tenting is a different thing, and it's a lot more than just about fires. So, carry your tent by all means if that is what you would like to do, but pitch it at the albergues rather than on public or private land.
Good , fair, reply. Thanks
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
My recommendation of carrying a tent and camping of course includes the responsibility and courtesy that if you do, to do it
trace free. Fire free.
Like I said, not everyone can afford the gentrification of the Camino.
Well spoken!
 

ManShootsSnaps

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP (Spring2020)
No need to stay in camp grounds. Which are hard to find on the Camino anyway.
When one can easily, and legally, tent camp at most alburgues.
These anti tent camping ones on here seem to have no earthly idea about what is really going on on the Camino and the alburgues.

I have always been welcomed with open arms at the alburgues to sleep outside in my tent.
Hi Marty, Im starting VDLP in late April .. im carrying a lightweight tent .. Is there anywhere in Seville that i can get a small gas cylinder for my stove ? ( small screw-in type )
Thanks
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
I don’t take a small stove when walking Caminos.
You can find the canisters at the Decathlon stores in Seville.
There are a few of them here.
Also, in the sporting goods section at Corte Ingles in Seville. The sporting/hiking gear section is across the street from the main store located in central part of city. There are other CI stores in Seville.

do your home work to make sure your device is compatible with threading sold in Europe.

my understanding is the small stoves are universal now as far as being compatible. finding gaz canisters to work on your stove here is easy.

also can get at Costco warehouse here.

even sone smaller stores or gas stations

Easy to find. Just ask and will find place.

friend of mine from states brought his small MSR stove. He found gas canisters here. No problem

Ask about taking canisters on buses and trains. Just show it to ticket agent or driver. As if ok or not. I know for a fact cannot take on the AVE. But sure some know it all has done it. Well until they scan his bags and got caught.

by the way, any brand (company) will work on your stove. There is a report on line where the wisdom of telling people only their brand of gaz will work with their stoves. Wrong. Any company will work. Only thing to be aware is some of the very very old stoves had different size threads. All universal now. Like telling people can only use Shell gas in your car. Any gas brand will work.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
My recommendation of carrying a tent and camping of course includes the responsibility and courtesy that if you do, to do it
trace free. Fire free.
Like I said, not everyone can afford the gentrification of the Camino.
So long as it's legal (which would exclude trespassing on private land), I agree.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I am an experienced camper, but I would not choose to camp on a camino in Europe, in an albergue or elsewhere. There are multiple reasons for my preference. To summarize: the gear would be too heavy for me to carry on camino, when I wish to walk further than on a mountain excursion, and I would not really have the experience, social understanding, and linguistic skills to negotiate the possible challenges. For those who can and want to, fine. For those who want to and put the effort into learning what is needed: good luck to you.
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
tent camping on the Camino it is without stoves, lanterns, ice picks, dog chains, boat anchors, mother in laws clothes, kids, BBQ grills, full kitchen ware set, wash sink, 59 gal propane bottles, snake kits, spot lights, 12ga shotguns, dogs, etc
it is not the PCT / AT or some survival hike!etc

only LIGHT WEIGHT tent, hammock or bivysac.
With light weight sleeping bag and pad.
You have all you need in towns/cities.
I have never known a tenter to leave trash on the Camino.
But seen plenty of this done by those staying in alburgues ... leaving liter, cans, TP, poop piles etc.
 
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martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Hi Marty, Im starting VDLP in late April .. im carrying a lightweight tent .. Is there anywhere in Seville that i can get a small gas cylinder for my stove ? ( small screw-in type )
Thanks
Read my comments where to buy in Seville.
posted above.
You will find many locations in Seville to buy the canisters.
Great you are tenting some on the Via.

sure many will think you committed a cardinal sin.

you will enjoy the alburgues much more in your own tent
 

ManShootsSnaps

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP (Spring2020)
I think it would be a cardinal sin , NOT to spend an evening outside contemplating the sky 😀

I do intend to mix and match where i test my head/feet , but since my tent weights in at a mere 2lbs ... its a nice insurance policy

Also, i snore occasionally ( but loudly) I may be doing a greater thing by going under a tent

Appreciate your replies .. much appreciated

Read my comments where to buy in Seville.
posted above.
You will find many locations in Seville to buy the canisters.
Great you are tenting some on the Via.

sure many will think you committed a cardinal sin.

you will enjoy the alburgues much more in your own tent
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Previously I wrote a detailed explanation about the types of gas canisters available to ensure that someone walking the camino would have the right type of stove to match the available fuel and, if not, what converters would be needed.
The thread is at https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/buying-camper-stove-fuel-on-the-trail.42513/
My best reply is on the same thread here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/buying-camper-stove-fuel-on-the-trail.42513/#post-435047
 

Island

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués 2019
Pilgrims' Way 2020
Via Francigena 2020
Florida Trail
Appalachain Trail
My recommendation for the Camino is not tent camping as (a) it is a lot of weight for few opportunities and (b) I prefer to meet other pilgrims in the albergues, etc. to add depth to my Camino experience. I've done 30+ years of tent backing along the Appalachain Trail and Florida Trail.

Some may recall that the OP posted the Camino was not for them and didnt benefit from the experienc Another reason I would always recommend first-time pilgrims not consider tent camping in lieu of albergues. Fast forward 60 days and we have this video posted here as well as 10+ other boards and Reddit groups, which leads me to wonder how commercially motivated the poster is in gaining views / ad revenue from the video post.
 

Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
You say this is the best budget two person tent. What were the other tents you compared it too, and what did they cost?
It is just one of our first tents that we´ve been using for two years now since we started backpacking so we don´t really have much to compare with. We have been just comparing the information about different tents on the web and we do think that it is a quite budget tent and its quality is really nice for the time period we´ve been using it. So this is all can be subjective of course and based on own´s personal experience. That´s why we are interested in exploring other options too and would appreciate any advice and other tent suggestions.
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Previously I wrote a detailed explanation about the types of gas canisters available to ensure that someone walking the camino would have the right type of stove to match the available fuel and, if not, what converters would be needed.
The thread is at https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/buying-camper-stove-fuel-on-the-trail.42513/
My best reply is on the same thread here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/buying-camper-stove-fuel-on-the-trail.42513/#post-435047
Rick, as with all of your other comments/posts, thanks and good job.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (2020)
It is just one of our first tents that we´ve been using for two years now since we started backpacking so we don´t really have much to compare with. We have been just comparing the information about different tents on the web and we do think that it is a quite budget tent and its quality is really nice for the time period we´ve been using it. So this is all can be subjective of course and based on own´s personal experience. That´s why we are interested in exploring other options too and would appreciate any advice and other tent suggestions.
So you have no basis for claiming it is 'best'? Pity.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
The OP has, in other threads, multiple threads, posted their videos and expressed their opinions - including the one where they opined that the Camino was not for them.

However, they have posted again on a forum devoted to the Caminos and have no doubt scored a few more hits on Utube (other social media sites may be available).

Members are free to completely ignore this self-serving b8llocks if they wish ;)
 

martyseville

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
The OP has, in other threads, multiple threads, posted their videos and expressed their opinions - including the one where they opined that the Camino was not for them.

However, they have posted again on a forum devoted to the Caminos and have no doubt scored a few more hits on Utube (other social media sites may be available).

Members are free to completely ignore this self-serving b8llocks if they wish ;)
Mmmm thanks for this info.

interesting to learn
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Hopefully Via de Bayona/Burgos to Ponferrada/Camino de Invierno
I am an experienced camper, but I would not choose to camp on a camino in Europe, in an albergue or elsewhere.
I agree with you @Albertagirl , I see no benefit from carrying a tent on the Spanish Caminos or in Italy on the way to Rome. But.... walking through France in Summer , (on the way to the Holy Land), it was really useful as there was little accommodation available and what there was was already booked ahead by holidaymakers. Also useful in Germany and further - until the bad weather (no, horrid!) made me send it all back home! Fair weather camper, me! 😉
My tent was much lighter than the OP’s btw 😎😁😎
 

mmmmartin

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santander-SdC bici '14
Plata bici '17
1/2 Plata bici '18
Frances a pie '18
(Porto a pie '19)
The OP has, in other threads, multiple threads, posted their videos and expressed their opinions - including the one where they opined that the Camino was not for them.

However, they have posted again on a forum devoted to the Caminos and have no doubt scored a few more hits on Utube (other social media sites may be available).

Members are free to completely ignore this self-serving b8llocks if they wish ;)
👌👌👌
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I agree with you @Albertagirl , I see no benefit from carrying a tent on the Spanish Caminos or in Italy on the way to Rome. But.... walking through France in Summer , (on the way to the Holy Land), it was really useful as there was little accommodation available and what there was was already booked ahead by holidaymakers. Also useful in Germany and further - until the bad weather (no, horrid!) made me send it all back home! Fair weather camper, me! 😉
My tent was much lighter than the OP’s btw 😎😁😎
But then you are a genuine long-distance pilgrim. I am a mere amateur in comparison, having walked no route longer than the VdlP, and now being unlikely to do so. If I decided to try, I might try to carry some form of shelter, but I hope that it would be for emergency use only. I carried an ultra-light shelter when travelling in New Zealand and found that it kept out the rain but kept in the moisture of my breathing, so was not ideal. I am also, by preference, a fair weather camper.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Hopefully Via de Bayona/Burgos to Ponferrada/Camino de Invierno
But then you are a genuine long-distance pilgrim. I am a mere amateur in comparison, having walked no route longer than the VdlP, and now being unlikely to do so. If I decided to try, I might try to carry some form of shelter, but I hope that it would be for emergency use only. I carried an ultra-light shelter when travelling in New Zealand and found that it kept out the rain but kept in the moisture of my breathing, so was not ideal. I am also, by preference, a fair weather camper.
You walked in N-Z? 😎
Nooooo, I only ever did one long trek. Not easily forgotten, yes, but only one!
The VdlP on the other hand freaked me out, all these cows.... 😳 I was terrified! 😁
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
I took a tent on my 1st Camino when I walked from my home in Devon to Plymouth then caught a boat to Santander and on the Norte. It is the only Camino I can think of that I would do it on, apart from the Primitivo in August. The Norte lends itself to sleeping close to the Sea and under the stars, there is plenty of campsites and some albergues have no issue with you pitching within their grounds. However I don't advocate stealth/wild camping , it can become a plague for the areas the Caminos passes through, the Op sees it's as 1/2 person, but at certain times or periods you can see many tents pitched up without little thought for the locals.
.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF last 150 to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
It's got me thinking........ :rolleyes:

A few nights under the stars might be nice.

But Jeez. It would have to be Ultra Ultra Lite to warrant carrying a tent/shelter.

I would not bother with cooking gear or anything though! Shelter, Mat, sleeping bag.
So only the mat and shelter are extra weight.....

Goes off in search of Ultra Lite shelter..............back soon. ;)

Nemo Hornet 1 person Tent 723 g
Tarpent Aeon Li 500g.
Now we're getting there...........
 
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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@Robo check out zpacks. I don’t have one but would like to try one - to go in my Radical Designs trailer.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
@Robo check out zpacks. I don’t have one but would like to try one - to go in my Radical Designs trailer.
You'd love them. My personal tent is their Duplex, which is far more roomy than the tent the OP posted about. And my Duplex weighs in at 15 ounces (0.43 kg), compared to the OPs 'ultralight' 4.5 pound (2.05 kg) tent.
----------------------------------------------------

A separate note to self:

I see that the OP never claimed his tent was "ultralight". That label is the manufacturer's deceptive name for the product.

For Camino I would not carry a tent at all if I was camping along the way. I would use a tough plastic film like polycro, along with trekking poles, to make tarp shelters. Effective against rain, and for a roomy shelter, the material itself weighs 2 to 4 ounces.

Unlike a typical plastic tarp, polycro is not something I consider disposable, as it is a tough plastic that wears well and will last for years.
 

Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
The OP has, in other threads, multiple threads, posted their videos and expressed their opinions - including the one where they opined that the Camino was not for them.

However, they have posted again on a forum devoted to the Caminos and have no doubt scored a few more hits on Utube (other social media sites may be available).

Members are free to completely ignore this self-serving b8llocks if they wish ;)
That post was about expressing our honest opinion about our own personal experience with Camino and we didn´t say in the video itself that it wasn´t for us. We enjoyed it very much and would love to do another Caminos in the future just in our own way doing lots of alternatives as we did with the Norte. The name of the thread we agree may be a bit "outrageous" so to say. And we do support the idea of everybody's expressing their opinion that's why we share our posts in the first place.
 

Dromengro

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2020)
I carried a tent on the Frances in 84, but then there wasn't the Albergues like now and if there was I couldn't afford them. It originally weighed 1.6k/3.5lb but I only used the flysheet and made some other adaptions so it weighed less than half that, the only problem I found was getting pegs in the ground. I remember I had to share it for a night with a couple of tourist girls who couldn't find any accommodation. :)

I'm surprised that there is not a network of campsites along the way, I think the locals are missing an opportunity. It's easier and cheaper to set up a campsite, just a field or garden, water tap and composting toilet and might help prevent wild camping, and also the bed race in busy times, as many carry a poncho and trekking poles which make grand shelters without any extra weight. I'm sure there are many who would prefer a tent to hot, noisy, smelly albergues.
 
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Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
At close to 2kg this tent hardly qualifies as ultralight!
BC SY
You'd love them. My personal tent is their Duplex, which is far more roomy than the tent the OP posted about. And my Duplex weighs in at 15 ounces (0.43 kg), compared to the OPs 'ultralight' 4.5 pound (2.05 kg) tent.
----------------------------------------------------

A separate note to self:

I see that the OP never claimed his tent was "ultralight". That label is the manufacturer's deceptive name for the product.

For Camino I would not carry a tent at all if I was camping along the way. I would use a tough plastic film like polycro, along with trekking poles, to make tarp shelters. Effective against rain, and for a roomy shelter, the material itself weighs 2 to 4 ounces.

Unlike a typical plastic tarp, polycro is not something I consider disposable, as it is a tough plastic that wears well and will last for years.

Yes, it is not ultralight at all in comparison with the Zpacks or alike tents and it is just what stated the manufacturer. We think we would like to try Zpacks in the wild to see how we like it even though it is not self-standing tent of course. Apart from the price we are concerned about it being warm and isolated enough for the colder weather as we are used to have double walls with little mosquito nets and still we were cold sometimes so it is something we are worried about.
 

Walking Nature World

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2018)
I carried a tent on the Frances in 84, but then there wasn't the Albergues like now and if there was I couldn't afford them. It originally weighed 1.6k/2lb but I only used the flysheet and made some other adaptions so it weighed less than half that, the only problem I found was getting pegs in the ground. I remember I had to share it for a night with a couple of tourist girls who couldn't find any accommodation. :)

I'm surprised that there is not a network of campsites along the way, I think the locals are missing an opportunity. It's easier and cheaper to set up a campsite, just a field or garden, water tap and composting toilet and might help prevent wild camping, and also the bed race in busy times, as many carry a poncho and trekking poles which make grand shelters without any extra weight. I'm sure there are many who would prefer a tent to hot, noisy, smelly albergues.
That's what we felt lack of a lot while doing a Camino-not enough campgrounds or campsites on the way. They could make it a similar system as with albergues but it would be so much more comfortable. This is one of the main reasons we didn't stay in albergues because we just can't survive in such conditions for a month or so.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Yes, it is not ultralight at all in comparison with the Zpacks or alike tents and it is just what stated the manufacturer. We think we would like to try Zpacks in the wild to see how we like it even though it is not self-standing tent of course. Apart from the price we are concerned about it being warm and isolated enough for the colder weather as we are used to have double walls with little mosquito nets and still we were cold sometimes so it is something we are worried about.
There are both pros and cons to self standing tents, and if someone uses trekking poles, the tents by manufacturers like Gossamer Gear, zPacks, and TarpTent, are steller choices.

Backpacking tents are not meant to provide warmth, although they will provide increases to a sleeping bag's or sleeping quilt's efficiency and warmth factors. Backpacking tents are meant to be a weather shells. . to be weather tight shelters. I have used a zPacks and a TarpTent (a manufacturer of ultralight sil-nylon tents.) on winter backpacking trips in the Rockies above 9,000 ft.

So if you were cold, it is not a tent's fault. . . your sleeping gear was deficient. And/or your ground insulation was not good enough.

There are mountaineering tents and expedition tents that ARE designed to provide considerable heat retention. They do so by incorporating methods for small heaters and stoves to be used inside the tent. These types of tents are too heavy for regular backpacking use, however.

The rain fly is not a "double wall" in the traditional meaning of the word. It is simply the waterproof shell for the roof of the tent itself, because the body of your tent is not water proof. You can see that the rain fly maintains a sizeable gap between it and the body of the tent. That is to try and keep condensation from forming.

While the rain fly does shed wind so that air movement (and wind chill) is minimized, zPacks does the same without the weight of a rain fly.

zPacks and the other tents I mentioned all have netting and will keep mosquitoes and Noseeums out.

So, if you want to try out an ultralight tent and the cost of a zPacks is too much, I would look at the various models from TarpTent. :)
 
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davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
That post was about expressing our honest opinion about our own personal experience with Camino and we didn´t say in the video itself that it wasn´t for us. We enjoyed it very much and would love to do another Caminos in the future just in our own way doing lots of alternatives as we did with the Norte. The name of the thread we agree may be a bit "outrageous" so to say. And we do support the idea of everybody's expressing their opinion that's why we share our posts in the first place.
I agree with Tincatinker for a few reasons. I have seen copies of your threads appear on other forums and websites. Of course there is YouTube as well. It feels like you are working toward trying to monetize your media and social media projects. . . which is not a bad thing in and of itself.

The other thing that really catches my attention is the fact that, outside of your own sporadic threads that you start, once that thread cools off and participation dies, you are nowhere to be found. I may very well be wrong, but I have never read a post by you on someone else's thread. You don't offer advice on other threads, or offer commentary, or . . .

And it is the same on the other media sites: you post your subject topic, and ignore active participation elsewhere.

The beauty of this Forum is how people actively participate and interact with others. By doing Hit and Run thread postings, you are missing out on so much that the Forum provides.
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
I agree with Tincatinker for a few reasons. I have seen copies of your threads appear on other forums and websites. Of course there is YouTube as well. It feels like you are working toward trying to monetize your media and social media projects. . . which is not a bad thing in and of itself.

The other thing that really catches my attention is the fact that, outside of your own sporadic threads that you start, once that thread cools off and participation dies, you are nowhere to be found. I may very well be wrong, but I have never read a post by you on someone else's thread. You don't offer advice on other threads, or offer commentary, or . . .

And it is the same on the other media sites: you post your subject topic, and ignore active participation elsewhere.

The beauty of this Forum is how people actively participate and interact with others. By doing Hit and Run thread postings, you are missing out on so much that the Forum provides.
I respectfully tend to disagree. There are so many others, who advertise their books and publish podcasts and videos (and monetize?) on this forum and who don’t necessarily participate in much else, so why not these two young people? I guess the possibility that someone may find their videos useful cannot be entirely ruled out. While most (all?) of the contributions are positive towards walking Caminos, I believe there should be room for different views as well.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
What?

never bring a tent?

soft groundout back of most alburgues.
And use a pad

again wonder why people say no tents on Camino???
Maybe for you may friend but when you are pushing 66 you lay down on the floor and it may be days before you get up off the floor again!!!!!!!! I honestly think everyone should walk the way they want. If you want to bring a tent go for it and tent up lay down and have a good night's sleep under the stars! If you like it then do it!!!! That is what is perfect for you.
 

alhartman

346 joyful days in Spain and France since 2005
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
I have to agree with davebugg and tinkatinker.
While I love to see entrepreneurs building new businesses, I am personally offended by the stealth techniques of posting on forums to drive traffic to a site paying the poster for advertising hits (similarly offended by multi level marketing). It does seem to be the new model to become an 'influencer' to monetize self or some interesting topic. I have no issue with folks posting links to their books and guides as that is direct and honest. Frankly I put these 'fake' and hidden referals in the same moral category as the 'deaf' beggers on the Camino.
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I really do not understand some of the reactions in this thread and the treatment given to the OP.

If moderators think the threads started by the OP are violating Forum Rule 3 (and are to be considered as commercial posts) then thet moderators should adress and discuss this with the OP. Then again, there are so many others who use this forum to get attention for their books, websites and youtube channels.

Apparantely it is okay to accuse this OP of all kinds of things and be particularly rude to them, like comparing them to 'deaf' beggars on the Camino. A moderator even refers to the OP as "self-serving bull*cks", which is then 'liked' by other moderators. I just think this is plain rude, and not in line at all with the spirit of this forum. (or at least Forum Rule 1)
 
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C clearly

Veteran Member
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
While I have the same negative reaction to the lack of interaction and interest that the OP has in the forum, I think some of the criticisms have been excessive. Let's give credit to the OP for being unfailingly courteous in response.

I think the problem is that the OP has created content for another platform, and repeatedly posts it here without participating more fully in the forum. This is just "using" the forum and could be considered in violation of rule #3 for commercial posts. Posts for other books, etc., are supposed to be posted once only, and in the Resources section.

The name of the thread we agree may be a bit "outrageous"
Yes, and your names tend to be too long. That doesn't get you off to a good start here!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
As one of the moderators who liked the post you are referring to (but it has nothing to do with the word you mentioned—I have never heard that word and don’t even know what vowel replaces the asterisk), I will add my two cents here. There are a lot of slippery slopes involved in drawing the line between permitted and prohibited when it comes to commercial posts. As others have mentioned, for instance, members are allowed to post a notice about a book or other commercial venture — once.

Believe it or not, we spend a fair amount of time trying to keep an eye on what we would describe as “self promoting bumping” of those threads or stealth references to those products, websites, or services. Answering a question directed to you as the author of a thread that announces a service or product is OK, but repeated posts that just say “thanks for the good review” or something like that get deleted. And those are the more obvious forms of self promotion. It gets tough when, for example, an author repeatedly posts excerpts from his or her book in a thread related to a general camino topic. Or when a member posts a link to a Camino article of interest, but links it through his or her own website, which has ads, which has counters. Or when someone posts art work and then repeatedly alerts us to where we can buy it. This is all part of this new world of online fame and monetization. We may not always get it right but we try hard to keep things within the non-commercial guidelines Ivar has established.

This particular thread (and others, nearly all, in fact, by this same author) has been accurately described in earlier threads, and it could have been deleted. But the authors are so enthusiastic, tremendously positive, and courteous, so that may be why we have not taken any action.

My point here is not to call out @Walking Nature World, but rather to let people know that we are trying to keep things on the up and up while cutting some slack. Buen camino, everyone, Laurie
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I think the time has come to lock this thread, it has gone so far off topic and indeed nasty that its impossible to figure out how to try and clean it up other than deleting the whole thing.
 
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