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Brierley Guide ????

Walkingboy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
 

CdnDreamer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2015 & 2018) San Salvador (2018)
I would continue to use the Brierley guide but not walk every day exactly as he laid out the guide. You can stop at any of the towns along the way, and the Brierley guide gives you the names and phone numbers of all the albergues in the different towns. I have used the guide and stopped at a town in the middle of the page, and the next day walk to the town in the middle of the next page. But I would expect that in March you won't have to be concerned about the albergues being crowded. You may need a list of which albergues are open before Easter. I don't have that link.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
The Brierley guides have a great deal of practical and historical information. On that score they are probably as good as most though I personally dislike his style and approach and do not use them. So I cannot comment on the accuracy of his quoted distances and elevations which are often criticised. Many people suggest that a useful way of using Brierley's stages is that you disregard his division of the route entirely and stop in towns and villages which are not the end point Brierley advocates. Probably not necessary to do that all the time but a reasonable principle all the same. I think the significance of Brierley's stages may sometimes be exaggerated though. Brierley's may be the de facto standard guide for speakers of English but Anglophones are definitely in the minority on the Caminos and speakers of Spanish, Italian, French and other languages all have their own preferred guides.
 

Walkingboy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France
I would continue to use the Brierley guide but not walk every day exactly as he laid out the guide. You can stop at any of the towns along the way, and the Brierley guide gives you the names and phone numbers of all the albergues in the different towns. I have used the guide and stopped at a town in the middle of the page, and the next day walk to the town in the middle of the next page. But I would expect that in March you won't have to be concerned about the albergues being crowded. You may need a list of which albergues are open before Easter. I don't have that link.
Hi that seems a sensible solution and will save me spending out on another guide. Cheers. Dave
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I would continue to use the Brierley guide but not walk every day exactly as he laid out the guide. You can stop at any of the towns along the way, and the Brierley guide gives you the names and phone numbers of all the albergues in the different towns. I have used the guide and stopped at a town in the middle of the page, and the next day walk to the town in the middle of the next page. But I would expect that in March you won't have to be concerned about the albergues being crowded. You may need a list of which albergues are open before Easter. I don't have that link.
Try this link for albergues open in winter.
http://www.aprinca.com/alberguesinvierno/
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC (train) 1977; CF 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones 18; Meseta again 2019
Brierley's "New Age" comments are regularly offputting -- but his maps are simply mesmerizing. Love 'em!!! Wouldn't use anything else!!!

And the biggest problem with not using his stages (IMHO) is that his stages end - usually, but not always! - in the most interesting places to stay.
 
Last edited:

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
None of the guides are perfect. My strategy was to take a bunch and cross-check them against each other, hoping that they wouldn't all make the same mistakes so where one was an outlier I could trust the rest. They way I did this was to take them on my phone. So, while my son had the physical Brierley book that I had bought (which he wanted to bring and carried, until it was left behind in one of the albergues partway along the way), I had:
  • the Brierley maps e-book
  • the Village to Village e-book, which I liked as much as the Brierley
  • the Wise Pilgrim app, which I liked but had trouble with the dynamic mapping - I hear that is fixed now
  • the Camino Pilgrim app, which I also used a lot
  • the Buen Camino app, which I also liked
  • a bunch of other apps I didn't use as much (the apps were only a few dollars each. In the context of what the whole Camino was costing me, I figured they were worth the investment "just in case they were useful", especially as they added no weight)
  • the Eroski and Gronze websites
The Village to Village guide often had different stage end/beginning points than Brierley. Some of the apps had stages; some didn't; some let you set your own; some generated recommended stages and let you customize them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-Santiago (Sep/Oct 2018)
The Brierley Guide is probably the most efficient way to get from SJPdP to Santiago in 33 days of walking. There are a lot of good comments here, especially about stopping early, or walking further. The question you need to ask yourself is "Which towns am I willing to bypass?" You might want to think about stopping before a "big" town. The next day, walk a few hours, do some sightseeing, then continue out of town to your destination. If you're planning to go "off-script" I would suggest you allow more time for your trip, rather than try to make it up with longer days. Buen Camino!
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
The first time I had no book and followed the arrows, I preferred to let the Camino unfurl as I went. I purchased the small Michelin guide a few days in, which was all I used for planning both Caminos. On the second I bought a book (not Brierly), and then forgot to take it, my sister bought a Brierly - we often didnt walk together so it didnt really help me.
The Brierly gives good information as do the others, just walk as your body tells you, and make your own stages.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
There is one distinct advantage to following St John's guide with precision. Every night, without fail, you will find a cabal of fellow pilgrims clutching their Brierley's; and you will be part of that Brethren. Whether you are cursing his "elevations" or praising his "short-cuts and by-ways" - well that will depend on the company you keep ;)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
The Brierley guide is more than adequate and no need for you to purchase another one. It will do the job well and is more than accurate enough. Nowhere in the Brierley guide does he state you have to walk the stages he breaks it down into. Quite obvious as he lists albergues etc in the other towns.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
There is one distinct advantage to following St John's guide with precision. Every night, without fail, you will find a cabal of fellow pilgrims clutching their Brierley's; and you will be part of that Brethren. Whether you are cursing his "elevations" or praising his "short-cuts and by-ways" - well that will depend on the company you keep ;)
As good a reason as I've seen yet for stopping elsewhere! ;)
 

simeon

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP LosArcos 09\14 Tricastella SDDC 0515 Porto SDDC 1015 LosArcos Burgos 1016 Burgos Leon 0917
I prefer the Wise Pilgrim app. The albergue reviews were incredibly helpful in planning our next stop. I wouldn’t get too wedded to your plan. The Camino has a way of messing up any plans or preconceived ideas you might have started with.
I like the wise pulgrim app. The elevation guide is great, it weighs nothing, it would be great if the elevation would open to your current location..... I think it is all you need. N
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
It may also be worth pointing out the Camino Places app, which wasn't available on my previous Caminos. It is a free app with offline maps that works with your location. It is offered by the same fellow that offers the Wise Pilgrim apps in conjunction with this Forum. At no cost and no weight, if you are taking a smart phone you can hardly go wrong in bringing this app. If you like it, you can consider springing for his Wise Pilgrim app(s).
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
There is one distinct advantage to following St John's guide with precision. Every night, without fail, you will find a cabal of fellow pilgrims clutching their Brierley's; and you will be part of that Brethren. Whether you are cursing his "elevations" or praising his "short-cuts and by-ways" - well that will depend on the company you keep ;)
lol "a brethren I am not" but used his maps only guide on my 1st.Camino in 2012 and remember how beefed I was in certain sections.
Ironically on March 6th in Toronto I am part of the hosting team for an evening symposium of JB.
 

c0484

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
Remember that it is a guide. I prefer Brierley, but plan my own pace. Availability of beds depends on the time of year that you are walking the Camino and the time of day you stop. I walk the Camino in the Spring and stop between 1 and 2 in the afternoon. I have never encountered a problem finding a bed. I also average walking the entire Camino in 30 days and am 73 years old.
 

jblaskovits

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
In 2015 my husband and I used both Brierly and the Rother guide by Cordula Rabe on the CF. They worked well together, didn't add a lot of weight to our packs and gave the guidance we needed.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
Just like you probably wouldn't take only one person's advice in this forum, it's useful to have more than one guide. I usually have two or three (one paper and the rest digital). There is so much information out there now and under constant revision that's it is hard for any one author to keep it up to date.
 

jblaskovits

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
lol "a brethren I am not" but used his maps only guide on my 1st.Camino in 2012 and remember how beefed I was in certain sections.
Ironically on March 6th in Toronto I am part of the hosting team for an evening symposium of JB.
I am a fellow Canadian, and live in northern British Columbia. I attend the Edmonton CCoP meetings in Edmonton and Vancouver whenever I can. I would love to attend one of the Brierly seminars but other plans will not make it possible to be in Toronto, Vancouver or Victoria at the right time! We had some complaints about Brierly on the CF in 2015 but I wished for his level of detail this fall when we did the Chemin d'Arles and Aragones! Have a splendid evening at the symposium!
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
I use the yellow Raimond Joos guide which is available in English on Kindle and as a paperback, as well as the Wise Pilgrim app.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
If you are walking in March there will be plenty of beds available:)
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
I am a fellow Canadian, and live in northern British Columbia. I attend the Edmonton CCoP meetings in Edmonton and Vancouver whenever I can. I would love to attend one of the Brierly seminars but other plans will not make it possible to be in Toronto, Vancouver or Victoria at the right time! We had some complaints about Brierly on the CF in 2015 but I wished for his level of detail this fall when we did the Chemin d'Arles and Aragones! Have a splendid evening at the symposium!
Thanks, we are looking forward to it.
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2020)
If you do want to bring the Brierley guide, here is what I did in 2015. I went into a copy store (Kinkos) and had them cut the spine off my copy. Then I took it home and scanned the entire book using the automatic document feeder on my multifunction printer. This way I had the entire book with me without any of the weight.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
Remember Guides are just that. Brierley Guide is good but sometimes we ignored the situation recommended albergues and stopped earlier or later depending on tiredness or energy. The visitor office have all kinds of local info on Albergues, Hostels and hotels.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
Simple solution is to plan your stages as you want to do. So take your starting and ending points from the half way mark in the stages. Most guides I have seen more or less stick to the same stage concept you find in Brierley. I stick to the Brierley guide just to read about whats ahead rather than follow his advice. Generally his layout is in my opinion better than say, the Wise Pilgrim, where you have to flick back and forth between stage discription and the maps which are all at the start of the book. You can be fairly certain about albergue descriptions, locations and phone numbers in all of them. If you fancy, the Wise Pilgrim app for your phone is excellent. No book to carry with you. I like browsing it while at home just to revive memories
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
Remember Guides are just that. Brierley Guide is good but sometimes we ignored the situation recommended albergues and stopped earlier or later depending on tiredness or energy. The visitor office have all kinds of local info on Albergues, Hostels and hotels.
Exactly what I was intending to write ......John Brierl'ys guide, IS only a guide, not a user Bible which must be followed to the letter. Yes, a lot of his elevations and his distances are oft times, way out, but, the Spanish kilometre distances which are marked on poles and other signs, are often, also way out of line with the actual distance one has to walk......they too are only a Guide...
 

Walkerooni

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
I walked C.F. May-June this year. For the most part I walked off-stage and found amazing places the entire way. Typically walked til about 1pm so never had any issues getting a bed at what was by all reports a busy time. Sometimes walked hours without seeing a soul. Saw many others with different books who were envious of the info in my Brierley book.
 

Eric G

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
1st timer
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
Brierley guide is fine..heavy but fine. To avoid the crowds(which I'm pretty sure wont be an issue in March) just plan to spend your night before or after Brierley's recommended stop. Problem solved.
That worked great for me.
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
Decide roughly how far you want to walk and stop there.
Here is a link to Gronze. In Spanish but very easy use. It also has stages, with distances between towns etc. And links to some accommodation.
I would use it to decide where to stop. If I wanted to walk about 20km I’d see what was around that distance.
Some of the best places I stayed weren’t the obvious.
There were places I wanted to stop at. The rest I fitted in as I felt.
https://www.gronze.com/camino-frances
 

Thundrla

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014)
Muxia (2014)
Frances (2017)
Finisterre (2017 - 2x)
Portuguese (2018)
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
No need to buy another guide - I used the Brierly but simply ignored his "ridiculous for the average walker" stage suggestions. I simply decided each day how far I wanted to walk, chose an option as close to that as possible, and voila - created my own "stages" (48 the first time, 42 the second)
 

johnmeyerbooks

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2014)
The word "guide" is very appropriate. Brierley's distances are a little off sometimes. And his recommends should be taken with a grain of salt. It's just one man's opinion.

Eg. He loves remote locations and hates city life. I loved most of the big towns. Finally, you have some choices on where to eat and drink... and you didn't have to worry about the siesta time when things close down...
 

Mike Wells

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (1995), Via de la Plata (1996), Camino Frances (2017 x2), Camino Frances (2018 plan)
Brierley's "New Age" comments are regularly offputting -- but his maps are simply mesmerizing. Love 'em!!! Wouldn't use anything else!!!

And the biggest problem with not using his stages (IMHO) is that his stages end - usually, but not always! - in the most interesting places to stay.
I agree about the new age and spiritual comments. Not only are they off-putting but they break the flow of the narrative and make it hard to follow. However I disagree on the maps. The Brierley maps are awful!!!! Scales differ from map to map, and even more disconcertingly they differ across different parts of the same map. They are hand drawn and inaccurate, many side tracks and even some roads are missing. Moreover I prefer a 'proper' orientation, ie N at the top, not an orientation that changes from map to map. The only good thing about Brierley is his accommodation listings.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
I have no objections with Brierley. I walked during a busy time, sometimes I would stop in between Brierley stages, sometimes not.

I can still here the voice of the British man whom I would see many days as I walked along: "Are you going to the top of the page today?"

Makes me smile.
 

Dodger

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2018 intended
Hi, I start the camino on the 20th March and have been using the Brierley guide to plan my stages. However I have seen some posts that suggest there are other guides available and as good. Also suggesting that using the Brierley guide means you and all the others using it end at the same overnight stops and leading to overcrowding. Can any of you who have done the walk suggest the best guide to use to overcome this? Cheers. Dave
A guide to take or not, Brierley guide is easy to use, even if a little out on distance and elevation. As I checked with GPS. I walked with the book in Apr&May 2018, this guide does give you some history, and options for side tracks of interest. If you have already paid for it I would keep it and take it, if just for the history. I used TrekRight app, which I used every day, the map function is great, connects to GPS and tracks your progress along the route.
The app also has accomodation options. Like many have said the Camino can have ways that will change the best laid plans.
 

GRR

Member
Camino(s) past & future
August - September 2015
You don’t need a book. Just follow the yellow arrows, use your senses, pay attention to your mind, body, and soul and walk.
 

GaryAus

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF December 2017
I had a ceremonial burning of the Brierley Guide upon my return home. I carried it all the way across Spain and didn't use it, not even once. Yellow signs, Gronze.com, Booking.com and Buen Camino App served me well. Would never carry a book again. Too much weight for too little value.
 

Lindsay53

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk April /May 19
How do people feel about the Cicerone guidebooks?
I bought the Cicerone "Way of Saint James" by Alison Raju in preparation for my upcoming walk in April, and I am not a fan. The maps are small scale and few and far between as the book relies mainly on written descriptions of the route. In fact that is about all the book consists of. No useful information on accommodation and meals and limited information on places of interest. A pity as I have used other Cicerone guides and found them excellent.

I then bought the Wise Pilgrim guide instead. Much more user friendly and informative.
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel to CF and part Norte (all 2017) Budapest to Vezelay (2018).
Walk: Le Puy (2018)
Endorse everything said above. Brierley is well researched and thorough, but also contains a lot of New Age philosophy and spirituality which won't appeal to everyone.
If you would prefer something lighter, with essential information on accommodation, interesting heritage/must-sees and maps with just the right level of detail, try the latest guide from the English Confraternity of Saint James - https://www.csj.org.uk/product/camino-pilgrim-guides-camino-frances-saint-jean-pied-de-port-to-santiago-de-compostela-2018-19/
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Brierley is well researched and thorough, but also contains a lot of New Age philosophy and spirituality which won't appeal to everyone.
I've said it before, maybe even on this thread, but except for maybe two pages early on Brierley's spiritual thoughts and places for notes are just fill and only add the weight of ink, not paper.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances (Sept-Nov 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2019)
I prefer the Wise Pilgrim app. The albergue reviews were incredibly helpful in planning our next stop. I wouldn’t get too wedded to your plan. The Camino has a way of messing up any plans or preconceived ideas you might have started with.
Isn't that the truth!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I had a ceremonial burning of the Brierley Guide upon my return home. I carried it all the way across Spain and didn't use it, not even once. Yellow signs, Gronze.com, Booking.com and Buen Camino App served me well. Would never carry a book again. Too much weight for too little value.
Why burn it like something out of Fahrenheit 451? I am sure you quickly realized on the Camino you had no need for it. You could have left it on a donativo table at an albergue for someone who needed it. In 2017 I met a pilgrim near Pamplona who mentioned they didn't bring a guidebook and regretted it. That day when in the albergue I saw a slightly used Wise pilgrim guidebook on the donativo stack. I secured it, and the next day saw the pilgrim on the path and gave it to them. They were quite happy and appreciative for the gift from an unknown pilgrim somewhere who left it on that table.
 

habanerocat

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances
2014 Camino Frances again
2015 The Rheinsteig
The only criticism of the Brierley guide is that he finishes the second stage (Roscesvalles to Larrasoana) in Larrasoana. The single hostel in Larrasoana was packed. The owner was critical of the guide. Lots of people had to sleep on the floor of the church.

A better option would have been Zubiri. Bigger town more hostels.

I have to note that was six years ago. The guide may be different now. I don't know. I understand that this is only relevant as there will always be a bit of a bottleneck at the start of a major route, as pilgrims try their best to keep pace with their plan. It also put two long stages together at the start.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
The only criticism of the Brierley guide is that he finishes the second stage (Roscesvalles to Larrasoana) in Larrasoana. The single hostel in Larrasoana was packed. The owner was critical of the guide. Lots of people had to sleep on the floor of the church.

A better option would have been Zubiri. Bigger town more hostels.

I have to note that was six years ago. The guide may be different now. I don't know. I understand that this is only relevant as there will always be a bit of a bottleneck at the start of a major route, as pilgrims try their best to keep pace with their plan. It also put two long stages together at the start.
but why feel the need to have to stop in Larrasoana? Why not Zubiri?
I don't understand.
 

pjacobi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
In September, I had no problems with overcrowding at Brierley stage.

I felt that the average of 20-30Km stages in Brierley are just about right for a person in good health and already in good hiking shape. Those with less training and experience fall quickly behind the Brierley pace as foot problems occur.


-Paul
 

c0484

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
but why feel the need to have to stop in Larrasoana? Why not Zubiri?
I don't understand.
I do not like the municipal albergue in Larrasoana. We had one bathroom and one roll of TP for 47 people, the woman at the desk move all Spanish speaking people to the head of the line. I now stop at Zuribi each time I walk the Camino.
 

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