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Can I pack my small multi tool in carry on luggage (backpack)?

MinervasCamino

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
23rd of April 2024
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
 
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You asked about checked luggage on Air France out of CDG. I've done that twice without any problems and I'm comfortable doing that, but I'm not sure two flights is a great measure of their reliability.

Just a thought, but the Victorinox SD is a tiny and inexpensive pen knife. I like the little scissors for trimming the mustache (probably not an issue for you ;) ). I know it's $20 and you would wind up with a duplicate, but you might just consider picking one up or something similar in St. Jean.
 
From what I read on the TSA website, your multi-tool, although small, would be prohibited.

“In general, you are prohibited from traveling with sharp objects in your carry-on bags. Multi-tools (multipurpose tools) with knives of any length are prohibited. Please pack these items in your checked bags. Multi-tools (multipurpose tools) with scissors less than 4 inches may be placed in carry-on bags.”

I’m with @Jarrad. Just purchase a similar multitool in SJPP or maybe opt for a nice French made Opinel No. 8 which would also make a nice Camino souvenir. Buen Camino!
 
The French civil aviation list and examples of prohibited items is on this website. Blades of 6 cm or less are permitted but you may run afoul of the “tools” section also depending on what’s on your multi tool. But if you clear security in your origin country you may or may not have to clear any French security screening. Sometimes terminal changes require it. Hard to say for sure.


Edit - I just looked up this SD model. I own one and flew from CDG with it last December. It was no problem. Also had it on 2 other European flights in Portugal, Switzerland and Germany last month also no problem. It’s a 6cm or less knife.
 

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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
From what I read on the TSA website, your multi-tool, although small, would be prohibited.

“In general, you are prohibited from traveling with sharp objects in your carry-on bags. Multi-tools (multipurpose tools) with knives of any length are prohibited. Please pack these items in your checked bags. Multi-tools (multipurpose tools) with scissors less than 4 inches may be placed in carry-on bags.”

I’m with @Jarrad. Just purchase a similar multitool in SJPP or maybe opt for a nice French made Opinel No. 8 which would also make a nice Camino souvenir. Buen Camino!
This is Sweden to France; I don’t think the TSA have any part to play at either end.
 
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
The EU rules permit a 60mm blade. We’ve had repeated protracted discussions on this over the years.

Interestingly the UK rules (which haven’t changed since we were in the EU) use almost precisely the same words as the EU, but with slightly different punctuation, leading to such knives not being permitted.
 
You asked about checked luggage on Air France out of CDG. I've done that twice without any problems and I'm comfortable doing that, but I'm not sure two flights is a great measure of their reliability.

Just a thought, but the Victorinox SD is a tiny and inexpensive pen knife. I like the little scissors for trimming the mustache (probably not an issue for you ;) ). I know it's $20 and you would wind up with a duplicate, but you might just consider picking one up or something similar in St. Jean.
Thank you for sharing your experince, both reagrding luggage and muliti tool. And as you write $20 is no biggy moneywise. 😊
But, I do want this specific multi tool since it's only 21g and I've spent some time on searching for lightweight alternatives. So I am ridiculously happy with this specific model (and I have 3 other multi tools at home, so I don't really need to add another one to my collection..🙄) Maybe this will be my camino ascetic lesson.. 🤫Maybe this model is easy to find in SJPdP due to it's weight?
 
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Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
Don't take it on carry-on, it's prohibited. Put it in your backpack and check the pack in, that's what I always do.
 
It’s not prohibited
You work at airport security do you?

It's a sharp object. I wouldn't take the risk, because I've had them taken away in the past, that's why I put them in check-in luggage now.
 
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You work at airport security do you? It's a shape object. I wouldn't take the risk, because I've had them taken away in the past, that's why I put them in check-in luggage now.
It may be surprising to some of you but as far as the typical Swiss Army pocket knives are concerned there is an important difference between airports in EU countries and airports in the USA: Official policy in US airports says that pocket knives are not allowed in cabin luggage. Official policy in many if not all EU airports says that pocket knives with blades less than 6 cm are not prohibited in cabin luggage.

The OP flies from a Swedish airport to a French airport and then (presumably) to another French airport.

This has nothing to do with being lucky or sneaking a pocket knife through security. I have a Victorinox knife with a 6 cm blade and another one with a smaller blade. For flights within the EU, I am occasionally asked to take my pocket knife out of my backpack and security staff measures the blade and hands it back to me.
 
And since not everybody clicks on links: This is an official French government website (hint: it ends in gouv.fr). It is available in EN and FR. For knives (Bladed weapons and items that could injure/cause damage) it describes what is not allowed in cabin luggage and then it says:
  • This cabin ban does not include knives and cutlery in general [and] scissors or other items whose “blade” is shorter than 6 cm, and plastic knives and cutlery in general.

  • Ne sont pas concernés par cette interdiction en cabine : les couteaux et plus généralement les couverts, paires de ciseaux ou autres articles dont la "lame" est inférieure à 6 cm, ainsi que les couteaux et plus généralement les couverts en plastique.
 
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And since not everybody clicks on links: This is an official French government website (hint: it ends in gouv.fr). It is available in EN and FR. For knives (Bladed weapons and items that could injure/cause damage) it describes what is not allowed in cabin luggage and then it says:
  • This cabin ban does not include knives and cutlery in general, scissors or other items whose “blade” is shorter than 6 cm, and plastic knives and cutlery in general.

  • Ne sont pas concernés par cette interdiction en cabine : les couteaux et plus généralement les couverts, paires de ciseaux ou autres articles dont la "lame" est inférieure à 6 cm, ainsi que les couteaux et plus généralement les couverts en plastique.
Thanks Merci
 
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This has brought back great memories of being in the debating society when I was around 15 years old. .
 
Why do you need a multitool or pocket knife? I used to always travel with a Swiss Army knife, and even thought about purchasing one when I arrived in Spain for my first Camino. The Camino is pretty darn civilized. If you want meat or cheese, they will slice it in the place you purchase it. Bread can be pulled apart. Not all places have refrigeration for the use of pilgrims, so anything that you buy and cannot finish that day might not be safe for the next. If you need a tool like scissors, you can usually find one to use at an albergue. After two Caminos. I just don't see the need. I don't expect to need one when I do the Francigena next year.
 
I brought a very small pocketknife attached to my keychain. It did not attract attention at Newark airport or Porto airport. It came in handy for cutting up fruit, thin rope, etc. I also have a sturdy set of plastic "silverware". Very lightweight. A couple of times i bought yogurt, etc. in the supermarket and my set came in handy when they didn't have any plastic spoons.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
Always a chance they'll snaffle it off you for some reason or another. I had a screwdriver confiscated in Porto once, one of those DIY tools with interchangeable bits (but no blades), I didn't even remember that it was in my carry-on luggage. It was a sad day when I had to say goodbye to my trusty screwdriver that day...

Rules are changing frequently. Last year, when leaving the UK at Stanstead, the jobsworth nearly took my small jar (125kg) of Marmite! It was all because the machine couldn't identify it. It was obvious what it was and it was still sealed. I had to insist he get the supervisor to check it. After about 15 minutes of deliberations and recalibration of the new machine, they finally let me take it with me.

So my advice, for what it's worth, would be not to take your Swissy with you if you don't want to have it confiscated. Or take the chance and be prepared to say adios amigo if it comes to it. It will be a bitter pill to swallow if that happens, a man's knife is sometimes like a best friend, always ready when you need them.
 
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
NO! In some European countries, and in particular at Madrid, security personnel will confiscate any multi-tool, no matter how small. Over the past five or six years, I have lost THREE tiny Gerber pocket multi-tools with NO CUTTING BLADE.

The reason given was "it's a tool. No tools are allowed." Even when I asked to see the supervisor and produced a printed copy of the EU regulations regarding what was and was not permissible, the inspector replied, "but, Senor, this is Spain."

I have learned the hard way - I rather liked those very convenient little tools - to always pack anything of questionable admissibility in my checked luggage. I always check my rucksack anyway.

The ironic thing is that I have no problem getting through security anywhere with a small, child's scissor - the sort with rounded tips. I use these to open packets of powdered protein that I need to supplement my diet. Those scissors are permitted, but a two-inch multi-tool with no knife is now. Go figure!

Hope this helps.

Tom
 
I think this thread could benefit from a better focus on: Paris airport. France. The item shown in post #6 (unless I am mistaken) which has a small knife with a blade of 3.5 cm and a tiny pair of scissors. NOT a flight from a European country to the USA - they have different rules and separate lines for security checks in a separate section of the airport!

:cool:
 
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It may be surprising to some of you but as far as the typical Swiss Army pocket knives are concerned there is an important difference between airports in EU countries and airports in the USA: Official policy in US airports says that pocket knives are not allowed in cabin luggage. Official policy in many if not all EU airports says that pocket knives with blades less than 6 cm are not prohibited in cabin luggage.

The OP flies from a Swedish airport to a French airport and then (presumably) to another French airport.

This has nothing to do with being lucky or sneaking a pocket knife through security. I have a Victorinox knife with a 6 cm blade and another one with a smaller blade. For flights within the EU, I am occasionally asked to take my pocket knife out of my backpack and security staff measures the blade and hands it back to me.
Thank you for being this specific, this is how I've interpreted this as well, but I was not that sure if I got it right.
 
Why do you need a multitool or pocket knife? I used to always travel with a Swiss Army knife, and even thought about purchasing one when I arrived in Spain for my first Camino. The Camino is pretty darn civilized. If you want meat or cheese, they will slice it in the place you purchase it. Bread can be pulled apart. Not all places have refrigeration for the use of pilgrims, so anything that you buy and cannot finish that day might not be safe for the next. If you need a tool like scissors, you can usually find one to use at an albergue. After two Caminos. I just don't see the need. I don't expect to need one when I do the Francigena next year.
Well, the "multi tool" (I didn't find a better description) replaces my small scissors, tweezers, and includes this tiny knife and a few other tools, for less weight than what I planned to pack if I would have packed these items separately.
And yes, as a first time pilgrim, I certainly am packing some of my fears.. I will most probably learn something from this as well 😊 But, the main reason is still, that this tiny "multi tool" saves a few grams 😊
 
I wouldn’t risk it, it is likely to be confiscated.
One Christmas, I bought some of these multi-tools for my sons and grandsons as stocking fillers (without thinking) and in the airport, they sighed and looked at me : ‘Are you for real?’ . Oops 😕
 
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Here’s a slightly different perspective. I have the smallest Gerber multi tool. I have carried it on my last two or three Caminos. I brought it on the plane in my checked bag. (I never check my backpack with essential gear. ). I also carry a small scissors to trim my unruly beard and a small Opinal Inox (stainless ) folding knife—- in checked bag. But I have yet to need or use the multitool on a Camino so I am not taking it again. At 1.5 ounces it’s TOO HEAVY! Buen Camino
 
Thank you for being this specific, this is how I've interpreted this as well, but I was not that sure if I got it right.
Yes, it has been like this for more than than 10 years now.

In 2013, the TSA, which is the US administration responsible for this, wanted to allow foldable pocket knives with a blade of maximum 2.36 inches long (corresponds to 6 cm) in cabin luggage again but there was a huge wave of opposition from flight staff, politicians, passengers and the public in general, and the TSA abandoned the plan.

They had intended to follow a recommendation about the risk assessment of an international organisation for aviation security. Other countries adopted their recommendation after having come to the same conclusion. Since then there is this difference between US airports and EU airports and apparently also Canadian airports.

But the ban still applies for international flights from these non-US airports into the USA.
 
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@MinervasCamino, I guess that you will be flying from Paris CDG to Biarritz? Is this a connecting flight from Sweden? I don’t know whether you even have to go through security again at CDG in this case as this is a Schengen flight. It depends on how this airport is organised for dealing with this specific kind of passenger flow.

Please do let us know how it worked. It may be of interest for other future pilgrims. The majority of forum members arriving at Paris CDG are international passengers from outside Schengen/EU, their experience will be different.

The only thing that may be relevant for you may be the conditions for boarding your plane at your Swedish airport.
 
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The only thing that may be relevant for you may be the conditions for boarding your plane at your Swedish airport.

This is from EasyJet for those who change planes at CDG airport and it ought to be the same whether it is Berlin-CDG-Bordeaux or Stockholm-CDG-Biarritz - at least on EasyJet flights. For their passengers on Schengen flights, there is no passport control nor security check when they change planes in Paris.

No security control at CDG for Schengen flights.jpg
 
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Gerber pocket multi-tools with NO CUTTING BLADE. The reason given was "it's a tool. No tools are allowed." Even when I asked to see the supervisor and produced a printed copy of the EU regulations regarding what was and was not permissible [...]
Nice anecdote and punch line ☺️. However, as pointed out on earlier occasions: There are no EU regulations about what is permissible. The EU regulations in question determine what is not permissible: knives with a blade longer than 6 cm even when they are foldable. This is an EU-wide minimum basic standard. Each EU country, each EU airport and each EU airline can set stricter standards if they want to do so. Also, the list of these basic standards has changed and does change over the years when risk assessments change.

I had a look: A mini-tool that looks like pliers and has a wire cutter 🙄? Who can be surprised that it gets confiscated? These items are not classified as objects that are capable of being used to cause serious injury in the list commonly known as 4-C, they are classified as workmen's tools - tools capable of being used [...] to threaten the safety of aircraft. So it is best to forget about carrying your Leatherman with you in your personal belongings, even when it is a mini Leatherman clone.

Note the difference :cool::

Comparison.jpg
 
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Nice anecdote and punch line ☺️. However, as pointed out on earlier occasions: There are no EU regulations about what is permissible. The EU regulations in question determine what is not permissible: knives with a blade longer than 6 cm even when they are foldable. This is an EU-wide minimum basic standard. Each EU country, each EU airport and each EU airline can set stricter standards if they want to do so. Also, the list of these basic standards has changed and does change over the years when risk assessments change.

I had a look: A mini-tool that looks like pliers and has a wire cutter 🙄? Who can be surprised that it gets confiscated? These items are not classified as objects that are capable of being used to cause serious injury in the list commonly known as 4-C, they are classified as workmen's tools - tools capable of being used [...] to threaten the safety of aircraft. So it is best to forget about carrying your Leatherman with you in your personal belongings, even when it is a mini Leatherman clone.

Note the difference :cool::
View attachment 168135
For what is might be worth. The THREE mini tools that were confiscated - all in Madrid - were sized near exactly like the one on the left, but with NO knife blade, and with the addition of a tiny pliers. Clearly, the larger variety on the right ought to be prohibited. But the one on the left, sans a knife blade, is harmless - unless you are an inspector who may fancy it.

After three of these lost micro-mini-tools, I just throw it my rucksack and check it. It did not pay to argue, and was not worth the hassle of replacement in France or Spain. If in doubt pack and check it.

But this provides an excellent depiction of scale.

Thanks for the assist.

Tom
 
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
No.
 
Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
I think that you did not mention whether you have two separate tickets or one ticket for your flight from Sweden to France, i.e. two separate airlines or one airline/airlines who cooperate. If it is the second case, then you will not have to pick up checked luggage at CDG. You pick it up at the airport of your final destination.

As mentioned before, depending on how the flights are organised and how the Schengen transit area at CDG is organised, your only concern may be your departure airport in Sweden.

Have a good flight and please let us know what you did in the end and what happened (if anything). 😊
 
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Aside from whether it’s allowed or not, one point worth remembering when traveling is that if there’s an airport where you’re going, you can probably buy anything you need there. Maybe not everything you want, but …
 
depiction of scale.
I like to be precise and I like to know what is being talked about ☺️. Visuals help.

I've edited my earlier post #35 and I am confident that the scale is pretty accurate now: the Gerber Dime Travel versus the Victorinox SD with the 3,5 (4) cm blade - one is small pliers/wire cutter with a few other functions and one is a small pocket knife with a few other functions.

For future reference. :cool:
 
For what it is worth. Anyone deciding to route through UK on their way should know that it is illegal to have any pocket knife with a blade over 3 inches long. I did read that this is the same for Spain also. But here in the UK we go one better and outlaw any blade that is capable oft being locked. Overnight I went from trusty sandwich maker to criminal. My number 7 Opinal had become illegal (funny it still looked the same), I had to " modify" it by angle grinding the blade and removing the locking ring.Its a sad world we live in when the means to slice a tomato can be the means to a criminal record.
Welcome to the UK.
Don
 
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number 7 Opinal
And here I am at the ready with visuals for the Opinel 7 and the Viktorinox SD with the small blade so that we know what we are talking about. Scale is pretty much accurate.

No matter what the law in Spain actually says about carrying knives outside your home and about transporting knives and about having knives in your home, this much is certain: The Opinel 7 is explicitly prohibited in cabin luggage at Paris CDG airport for a flight within the Schengen area. The reasons are that it is a knife with a blade that is longer than 6 cm and it has a lock mechanism.

It's a clear no.

Opinel 7 vs Viktorinox SD.jpg
 
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And here I am at the ready with visuals for the Opinel 7 and the Viktorinox SD with the small blade so that we know what we are talking about. Scale is pretty much accurate.

No matter what the law in Spain actually says about carrying knives outside your home and about transporting knives and about having knives in your home, this much is certain: The Opinel 7 is explicitly prohibited in cabin luggage at Paris CDG airport for a flight within the Schengen area. The reasons are that it is a knife with a blade that is longer than 6 cm and it has a lock mechanism.

It's a clear no.

View attachment 168364
And that is why i took an angle grinder, reduced the length of the blade and removed the locking ring. My Opinal Number 7 now completely legal in UK, Spain and Schengen and when I fly it stays absolutely in the bag in the hold.
Plus of course I have a legal reason to carry.
Don
 
Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
Im pretty sure it will be confiscated. Either check ur bag or leave it at home. You can always buy one on the Camino.
 
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My personal experience, for what it’s worth, is that it really doesn’t matter WHAT the rules are, if the person on security AT ANY AIRPORT feels like asserting his or her authority, then they will do so.

Nail clippers?, no problem, NOPE!, mine were confiscated.

Tiny blunt nail scissors – NOPE!, confiscated.

Umbrellas – HA! – allowed, but RARELY allowed through by security.

And try demanding to see the "supervisor" with 20 irritated people behind you . . . you must be kidding.

Good luck.
 
Even the multi-tools without blades sometimes get confiscated, and airports can be very inconsistent. After losing a bunch of tools, I realized that I primarily use the scissors and so now carry a very small pair. Which bytheway are far sharper than my multi-tool had been 🤷🏼‍♀️. But so far, it has cleared security on four continents, including Madrid.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
What is the risk? Losing a tiny pocket knife worth about €20 at an airport in Sweden or Paris when the Swedish TSA and the French TSA state that it is not explicitly prohibited?

The alternative is leaving it behind out of an abundance of caution and buy a new one at the point of arrival, provided that you can even find one at the airport of arrival (try it in Biarritz!) or a shop is open for business in a town or village when you happen to pass by and they carry Victorinox products.

After ten flights, you will own 11 tiny pocket knives and have spent €200. And that goes without mentioning the waste of consumer products and raw material.

Remember, these are not flights of a life-time for us. We fly all over the place and go for long walks all over the place.

I checked to refresh my memory: From about 2004 until about 2010, the law about basic common standards on aviation security in Schengen/EU referred to "knives with blades of any length". Since then it has been replaced by "knives with blades of no more than 6 cm".

Before boarding for a Schengen flight, I once had a ball of string confiscated. Also a pocket knife - it turned out that they measure the whole blade and not the just the sharp part and it was several mm over the limit. I bought a new one and made sure that it complied with the 6 cm limit.

I would not buy the tiniest of the tiny Opinels. I bought one once in France. It is rubbish as a useful item on the Way to Santiago. It is only good as a souvenir or as a decoration for your keyring.
 
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My personal experience, for what it’s worth, is that it really doesn’t matter WHAT the rules are, if the person on security AT ANY AIRPORT feels like asserting his or her authority, then they will do so.

Nail clippers?, no problem, NOPE!, mine were confiscated.

100%. I've had this on a couple of occasions. Had researched the regulations and still had items confiscated. One flight nail clippers, with a 4cm file 'dangerous weapon, confiscated." I was tempted to stab him with my Solid metal Parker pen - which of course was allowed. ( Ok, not really but you get the point) .

Last year, when leaving the UK at Stanstead, the jobsworth nearly took my small jar (125kg) of Marmite! It was all because the machine couldn't identify it. It was obvious what it was and it was still sealed. I had to insist he get the supervisor to check it. After about 15 minutes of deliberations and recalibration of the new machine, they finally let me take it with me.
Huh, you were lucky the regulations are actually quite clear. It's actually classed as a 'gel, cream or liquid', and as it's over 100 ml it is not allowed. I had this explained to be in very clear detail in Norway. And my Marmite had come from a hell of a lot further away ( New Zealand). Sigh....

Re @MinervasCamino ( who's now probably already on the way so it's a moot point) original question:

As somebody else quite clearly pointed out a multi-tool is exactly that - it is not classed as a knife it is classed as a tool, the regulations are different.

However as it's a Swiss Army knife variant (not a Gerber or Leatherman) it's more likely that this will be classed as a pocket knife. Which means that you shouldn't have any issues exiting Sweden, and as you are only connecting through France ( Schengen Zone) it won't be checked again anyway.

I carry the mini tweezers from a Swiss army knife ( easily obtainable as a spare part), a small pair of scissors (there's some excellent foldable super light travel scissors out there), and buy a knife when I get to Spain at the first supermarket. (Typically €5). Donate the latter to the cleaner at my last stop in Santiago.

Never needed a cork screw let alone a can or bottle opener.
 
you were lucky the regulations are actually quite clear.
Oh, ours is a bewildering world of seemingly random confiscations and changing rules!

I am not following the applicable rules about liquids and gels (within EU+ and Schengen but not for the UK and not for the USA) as carefully as the rules about walking poles and pocket knives but I do know that there has been change about gels recently in some parts of our global world. Widely known British travel journalist Simon Calder has this recent article in the Independent :


@MarkyD talks about his leaving from Stansted (not Heathrow) last year - for international readers: both airports are in the UK. His account may be accurate and dare I say so "useful information". But I simply don't know.

This reminds me of the time, many years ago, when I was kindly interrogated by security staff at Frankfurt airport in Germany. And I mean kindly - they were very friendly. Maybe it was even the Bundespolizei themselves and not some lowly contract staff. I had two big jars of my mum's home-made jam in my carry-on suitcase. It simply had not occurred to me that it was an issue although I had put my toothpaste etc into the obligatory plastic bag to have it viewed and screened. Surprisingly, they let me pass and did not keep the jam. I think it was strawberry jam. It's long gone now.

And so we all have our stories to share.

🙃
 
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Oh, ours is a bewildering world of seemingly random confiscations and changing rules!

This reminds me of the time, many years ago, when I was kindly interrogated by security staff at Frankfurt airport in Germany. And I mean kindly - they were very friendly. Maybe it was even the Bundespolizei themselves and not some lowly contract staff. I had two big jars of my mum's home-made jam in my carry-on suitcase. It simply had not occurred to me that it was an issue although I had put my toothpaste etc into the obligatory plastic bag to have it viewed and screened. Surprisingly, they let me pass and did not keep the jam. I think it was strawberry jam. It's long gone now.

And so we all have our stories to share.

🙃
Yup...like when my family was leaving the Good Ole USSR and the Bundespol....er... KG...er... TS....er...border control very friendly confiscated some cans of black caviar without even attempting to interrogate us (kindly or otherwise) :oops:😁
 
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Hi
I have a question regarding regulations in French airports on what is allowed to bring as carry on luggage.
I have a small lightweight Victorinox SD multitool including a small knife that is 35mm long that I would like to bring to the camino, but I can't find any information about this on Air France page? Most of the information is about lithium batteries..
According to Swedish National Transportation Authorities it allowed to bring a blade no larger than 70mm, but again, that are national rules.

Leaving next week from Sweden to France (SJPdP). And since I only have a 40min stop in CDG airport to fly on to BIQ, I am hesitant to check in my backpack in case it would be delayed due to the short stop..

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge of what is allowed by Air France and hand luggage?

Also, does anyone have experience of a short flight stop in CDG with checked in luggage, and the luggage successfully reached the end destination?
 
Don't even try.
Not only do you, most likely, loose your Multi tool but the one that you will then buy locally should either be gifted ,which happened for me, or checked in baggage when you fly out after your Camino. As to which. Buen Camino
 
I propose that we put this thread on hold until we hear from the OP.

If she took her small Victorinox SD with her on her flight from Sweden and had it confiscated at Paris CDG in France, I vow to forever hold my tongue. 😶

And I am still curious to know whether she even went through security at Paris CDG, seen that she travels within Schengen.
 
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Just a side comment. I've always packed my Swiss Army Knife in my checked luggage after having some problems in Australia, so that would be my vote. But my comment is that I've had more problems (almost every time that I take the fast trains where they check your luggage through a scanner) with the rail service stopping me and pointing out that I had a "knife" in the pack. Oddly, once I had explained that I was going on a Camino they said "ok".
 
Hi again,
just an update on my multi tool and security control.

I decided to not risk having my backpack delayed, so I didn't check-in anything. The Swedish security control didn't have an opinion or didn't notice my multi tool.

When I arrived to Charles de Gaulle in Paris, my connecting flight was in the same terminal as my arrival flight. Therefore, no more security control and I'm happy to have my multi tool with me on the camino now 😊
 
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