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Celebrating my old age

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2022: CFx6, CP, VdlPx2, Mozarabe, more later.
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
 
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I celebrated my 50th birthday by buying myself an Interrail pass and using it to travel from the UK to the far east of Turkey and back. I was far too skint and scared to do that as a student in the 1980s like so many of my contemporaries. With deeper pockets and some more life experience the time felt right for the trip. Some milestones deserve a little extra acknowledgement! :) Ultreia!
 
Buen Camino Alex, I’m 11 months ahead of you. Hit 70 this April past. Too many broken bits to take on the road just now but I never stop hoping and planning. I’m a cantankerous bugger. Coruna, Ferrol, Santiago ought to be doable. I’ll only need a toothbrush and a change of knickers (oh, and a corkscrew just in case).

Again, buen camino amigo. If we were but 20 years younger. Just think of the mess we could have made 😉
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I didn't realize that orujo was sealed with a cork.😉
It wont be sealed with me!
Buen Camino Alex, I’m 11 months ahead of you. Hit 70 this April past. Too many broken bits to take on the road just now but I never stop hoping and planning. I’m a cantankerous bugger. Coruna, Ferrol, Santiago ought to be doable. I’ll only need a toothbrush and a change of knickers (oh, and a corkscrew just in case).

Again, buen camino amigo. If we were but 20 years younger. Just think of the mess we could have made 😉
Orujo it will be
 
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Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, buy a Tarjeta Dorada, and hop on a train to Pamplona the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.
Alex, what a hell of a way to celebrate - I envy you. I will turn 60, 10 days before you, and would love to do the same - however I'm going to have to wait a couple of years. I will most definitely be with you in spirit and hopefully virtually as you write about your adventures here on the forum. Buen Camino.
 
I celebrated/acknowledged/tested myself by starting on my 75th birthday last year at SJPdP and finished at Santiago de Compostela some 31 days later. A great way to spend time by yourself (well obviously not) but the freedom of just getting up and walking with nothing to test your brain apart from following the way ahead. One of those experiences that will remain in your memory when perhaps "old age" catches up with you - difficult to know as I have never been old before!
 
One of those experiences that will remain in your memory when perhaps "old age" catches up with you - difficult to know as I have never been old before!
I love this ! When I was a teen 30 was unimaginably old. Then it was 'life begins at 40'. The next thing I knew I was celebrating my 50th. Next year I turn 60.

I've always been old and I've always been young, I'm just never sure which is what.

My body and my mind are certainly at odds over this issue... .
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Nice post Alex. I will be 70 in Sept and, like you, have been walking Caminos for some time now. It's the only place I know where time slows down. I am currently nursing a hernia and in the process of a repair, and hope to be recovered for a spring 2024 Camino, somewhere. This is why we walk, you never know when you hit a bump that keeps you home. Our window is, I feel, closing in, we have to make the best of it and get out there to do the things we love to do. Happy Birthday! Buen Camino!
 
70 is quite young! IMHO!!!
I'm a good few years past that and same age friends and I are still tramping along various caminos

Just keep on going at your own pace. Great for body and mind.
 
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I am 70 on March 30th, 2024.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, buy a Tarjeta Dorada, and hop on a train to Pamplona the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.
I reached this age with similar fears, was the upcoming walk going to be my last. As I aged different parts of my body sent signals to me giving me hints...
and finally caught came. It was hard to accept.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
I turned 80 this year and, apart from facing shoulder replacement surgery this winter, am still planning to walk the Mozarabe as soon as I am recovered, maybe fall '24. There has always been "just one more route" that we'd like to walk. For me, it is the Mozarabe. My partner Wes is now 87 and he says the long walks are behind him now. We all stop when our bodies say "enough." I guess I just haven't heard my body say that yet.
 
Another septuagenarian here, still working but not walking this year. My absence from the Camino is due neither to ill health nor to declining fitness but to the need to earn the money to pay for the next one. Best wishes to all senior walkers not going gently into a leisurely retirement.
 
You are still young - as many of us who have long passed 70 can attest. However, you are correct in deciding to do your pilgrimage while you can because you never know. I found this out when my Camino Portuguese ended abruptly in Porto- the night before I was to begin walking. I celebrated my 75th birthday not on the camino, but in the ICU - lucky to have lived to that day. Buen camino!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, buy a Tarjeta Dorada, and hop on a train to Pamplona the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.
Good for you! I celebrated my 70th by walking the Camino in 2017. If the good Lord spares me I will do a section of it to celebrate my 80th. Buen Camino.
 
We never know when we may pass this way again. I undertook the CF as my 75th birthday present to myself. Although I was in reasonably good shape from hiking in the Cascade Mountains and elsewhere, I purposely set out to take my time as this may be the only occasion I will have to experience the camino. Over the course of 45 days, I was never in a hurry. My only rest day was in Leon, and I couldn't wait to get 'back on the trail'. I stopped often; there were so many 'roses' to smell. I touched the stones and building blocks of ancient bridges, castles, and cathedrals. The clouds were beautiful whether they were gorged with rain or just passing through to once again reveal the sunshine. Oh, how fortunate I am, I marveled to myself each hour spent alone with Mother Nature. At 81, I romance the idea of a reprise of the CF.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
At 71, I walked the Via Francigena from Turin to Rome in February when many alberghi were closed - longest stage 46 km. This past March at 72, I walked the Mozarabe, San Salvador, and Primitivo. Several stages over 40km and many 30-35. This coming February at 73, my plan is to walk the Levante to Zamora, then continue to Ponferrada and the Invierno - roughly 1300km. I don't see myself as elderly just yet. As long as I avoid mirrors, I still feel young enough and look forward to more caminos in the coming years. While I acknowledge that we are all subject to the aging process, I don't feel that any particular age should hold us back.
 
A Treasure Trove Of Interesting Pilgrim Hacks! Learn & Share Your Own Too!
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, buy a Tarjeta Dorada, and hop on a train to Pamplona the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.
C’mon you blokes what’s going on? It’s not an age, it’s just a number. I did the Frances in my 70th year in late winter from St J p de P. The weather was vile most of the way Took me 26 days and I then toddled off to Muxia. And I’d knocked my body around quite a lot in the years before then. I’d love to do my tenth anniversary early next year but my wife’s health won’t allow it.

De Colores

Bogong
 
I celebrated my 70th birthday walking from home along the coast of France, first round the coast of Britanny, then down the Atlantic coast to Irun and the Camino del Norte to Santiago and on to the Cap de Finisterre - five months on the road. That was my first camino and I regretted having discovered caminos so late in life. Have walked caminos ever since and am planning the Invierno for next year at 84. Se Deus quiser! As several of you said, very much conscious of my luck and of having to make the most of it as long as I can!

As to the importance of corkscrews - I always carry one since many years ago there was no corkscrew to be found in the albergue and none of us pilgrims carried one. Finally one of us took a screw out of the spare folding bed and managed to unscrew the bottle. Lesson: since you cannnot be certain of finding a folding bed in your albergue, better carry your own corkscrew!
 
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I was 70 last May, the oldest male in my family in 3 generations by 20 years... every year part 50 was a bonus year.
To celebrate being 70 I hit on a play on the gaelic for 70. Secht dó and adapted it to phonetically "Shock Joe!"
Plans were made and dreams of a fun year were my horizons. Unfortunately my planned Camino had to be shelved in September but took comfort that that I will still be 70 until mid May 24, Camino here I come again... a little slower but hopefully as profound and special as my previous ones.
I've had a terrific age of 70 so far and as long as I don't have to act my age that number has been a milestone in itself.
Still enjoying cycling, sea swimming, walking up to 3 hours a day weather depending, (I don't need to practice getting wet,) going for a blast on my 800 cc sports motor bike, navigating in car rallies.
To recall a phrase of my late father " if God lives to spare me" I'll be tramping in my 80's.
Get up the road, there's life in the old dog yet!
 
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71 next week, recovering (swiftly) from surgery for a torn cartilage which appeared, miraculously, AFTER I finished the CF and Invierno this year. Hoping to tackle the Aragones next year - and some of the remoter parts of Scotland.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
I turned 80 this year and, apart from facing shoulder replacement surgery this winter, am still planning to walk the Mozarabe as soon as I am recovered, maybe fall '24. There has always been "just one more route" that we'd like to walk. For me, it is the Mozarabe. My partner Wes is now 87 and he says the long walks are behind him now. We all stop when our bodies say "enough." I guess I just haven't heard my body say that yet.

Wow. Inspiring. I am 72 and am hankering after the Mozarabe but wondering if the body is up for it. I have been focusing on health (food) and fitness (walking and strength training) for the past few months and things are looking up. I may see you there. 🤪
 
When I was a teen 30 was unimaginably old.
If someone had told me, 40 years back in time, that at some time in space I would go to bed with a great-grandmother, I would have shivered. Well, I will do that tonight, with pleasure. Time changes everything.... :cool:

Inspiring to read posts from all you old-timers: Keep on walking!
 
All replies are so inspiring! I walked into Santiago on my 65th birthday, Nov 4th, having done ~3 weeks on the Frances. God willing, I hope to walk into Santiago again on my 75th birthday, Nov 4, 2024! 😃 I’ve walked various routes every year in between (except Covid!) so just trying to decide which route to do this time for ~3 weeks, with shorter distances available & weather allowing that time of year??? Buen Camino to all!
 
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70 is quite young! IMHO!!!
I'm a good few years past that and same age friends and I are still tramping along various caminos

Just keep on going at your own pace. Great for body and mind.
I'm 85 and because of deteriorating balance problem am cheerfully looking at wheelchairs, walkers etc. We Octogenarians are the REAL oldies, but not in spirit. I thinks you would find more than a few quietly slipping along the Plata! Buen Camino and

Vaya

con Dios.

Samarkand.
 
Seventy isn't old. I am visiting my father this weekend and he turns 98 this coming Tuesday.
He still drives, mentally very clear and still lives in his own home with my 93 year old mom.
Just trying to keep him off his roof and trying to convince him that maybe he should give up shoveling the snow on his heavily sloped driveway...no success.
So look forward to many more good years!
 
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A Treasure Trove Of Interesting Pilgrim Hacks! Learn & Share Your Own Too!
Yes, However it is a number closer to the closing chapter of the Book than the Opening. :)

Well aren't you the little ray of sunshine. :) All six of my caminos have been post my 70th birthday and at 80, I am contemplating a 7th. I guess that I am past the back cover of the book. ;)
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I love your post - it is full of grace. ❤️
I'll be walking from SJPP starting mid April so it looks like our paths won't cross, which is a shame...but then who knows! I hope you have a truly wonderful journey.
Buen Camino!
 
Buen Camino Alex, I’m 11 months ahead of you. Hit 70 this April past. Too many broken bits to take on the road just now but I never stop hoping and planning. I’m a cantankerous bugger. Coruna, Ferrol, Santiago ought to be doable. I’ll only need a toothbrush and a change of knickers (oh, and a corkscrew just in case).

Again, buen camino amigo. If we were but 20 years younger. Just think of the mess we could have made 😉
I bet you could still make a pretty good mess 😏😄
 
Be part of the Camino Cleanup team! Help us pick up litter from Ponferrada to Sarria.
I turned seventy-five two days after Easter this year, and celebrated the occasion by volunteering as a hospitalera in the albergue at Calzadilla de los Hermanillos. I enjoyed each day of my two weeks there, particularly the times when I was priviledged to cross the street in front of the albergue and sit with the senior female members of the town to comment on the state of the community. I considered this a special honour offered to me as a woman whose mature age gave me a position of authority in the community, if only the temporary one of a two-week resident.
 
Just catching up on this thread...last year walked my 3rd Camino at the age of 70, and planning for another next year. As always, listen to your body, as when we were younger, walk when we feel strong, rest when we feel tired, enjoy each moment, and celebrate each person you meet. The world is a bit crazy now, as it has always been, so spread some kindness and joy and pray for better days ahead.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Seventy isn't old. I am visiting my father this weekend and he turns 98 this coming Tuesday.
He still drives, mentally very clear and still lives in his own home with my 93 year old mom.
Just trying to keep him off his roof and trying to convince that maybe he should give up shoveling the snow...no success.
So look forward to many more good years!
You have a miracle dad. Carpe diem, as you know who always advises...
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
We are the pilgrims master, & we shall go always a little further....
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better

Yes, God willing...
A favourite refrain of my father's.
Not that it makes any difference to you, but I wish you health and strength to walk the legs off yourself until you no longer can. Buen camino.
Here is a wee birthday gift in advance.
ps this predates Zoom by many years. My original version showed a slideshow. I risked a subscription to find this for you, but cancelled immediately after sending it to you! Walk well, pilgrim!
 

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A selection of Camino Jewellery
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.
Continue to celebrate, Alex. I totally identified with your post. Your point about dementia is not to be taken lightly. Presently looking after an aged relative striken with that, and I can tell you that it fosusses the mind and soul. At 78, I reckon I have a few caminos left in me.
 
Well aren't you the little ray of sunshine. :) All six of my caminos have been post my 70th birthday and at 80, I am contemplating a 7th. I guess that I am past the back cover of the book. ;)
Oops. . .yeah, I didn't want the post to be a downer as much as an encouragement and a little reminder that, as another mentioned, things put off may never be realized. Age may be a state of mind or just a number, but it also comes with the increasing odds of discovering potential issues of serious illness related to aging as well.

Until late 2020, I felt as if I had all the time in the world to delay those things that were important to me or required at least reasonable fitness and health to do. Now, after several battles with degenerative disease and illness, I regret those delays. In my younger years when I looked at the future where I would be the age I am now, I had thought I would still have a couple of decades of adventure ahead. Now - and I am still somewhat flabbergasted by the turn of events - I am wondering if the unknown amount of days, weeks, months, or years ahead will be generous enough for the recovery time needed to complete another Camino. Hopefully more, but I'd be happy with just doing it one more time.

So my encouragement is for others to not put things off that are important. If you are able to do what you dream about or that your spirit of adventure is calling you to do, then sooner is a safer bet than later. And I would be shocked if there are not more than just a few other Forum members that feel this same way with advice to those folks who are pondering if they should wait, or make the effort to walk a Camino sooner than later.

P.S - Lest anyone was given the impression of my giving up, that is not the case at all. Recognizing the enemy gives one the ability to redevelop their tactical plans and to keep going. I may have stumbled and fallen hard, but I am not staying on the ground and will be working hard to get back up.
 
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A selection of Camino Jewellery
When I was 13 years old, my grandparents retired after a lifetime of working 7 days a week at a small sporting goods shop that they owned. Their plan was to "finally" travel. My grandfather died of a heart attack 2 weeks later. There was a lesson to be had there and I took it.

As soon as I could, I started traveling all over the world, doing things like hiking the Inca Trail, rafting in eastern Turkey and sipping tea on the back of a wooden houseboat in Kashmir (highly highly recommended destination when safe, btw), and at 62 (yes, far younger than many on this thread), I'm still going and also finally finding myself returning to many places, such as Spain, that I've loved for decades. The hit my retirement account has taken for my travels is nothing compared to what I've gained in return.
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a semirar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I loved your post. :)

I'll be arriving in Logroño around the 12th of April, so who knows? Maybe I'll run into you.
I'm going to walk a section of the Meseta before picking up my group on the 28th in Pamplona.

I'm a bit ahead of you. I hit 71 this year and am SHOCKED at how fast it's all gone!
As far as how I feel about being 71,
I tell my kids, "I hope to reach 100, but it sure can be a BUGGER (not the word I used) getting there!"
 
I loved your post. :)

I'll be arriving in Logroño around the 12th of April, so who knows? Maybe I'll run into you.
I'm going to walk a section of the Meseta before picking up my group on the 28th in Pamplona.

I'm a bit ahead of you. I hit 71 this year and am SHOCKED at how fast it's all gone!
As far as how I feel about being 71,
I tell my kids, "I hope to reach 100, but it sure can be a BUGGER (not the word I used) getting there!"
Thank you, Annie, I will PM you my phone no., so who knows: We may share a tinto or 5 together.

As for reaching old age: Someone said: "One day you shall die. All other days you shall live". So let's focus on living good days, and keep on trucking as best as we can.

We shall all die as long as we stay alive and have good health. :cool: But before that, we shall live and walk our way.
 
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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
We'll see you when you come through Moratinos, Alex. We don't keep orujo around, but we have some mighty fine C tucked away!
I fondly remember my visits in your friendly home in Moratinos, Thank you. Especially when you needed a vet, and I was bringing you one at your doorstep. :cool: It was such nice and pleasant encounters.

I don't have a clue what "aguardiente" is, but it sounds strong. I'll accept it.:cool: Let it be on me.
 
Good for you! Buen camino!
I’m loving this conversation. I’m planning to do my Camino mid to late april. Then I turn 70 - which seems crazy - in august. My first Camino. How is the weather in mid april. Lots to plan. I’m very excited. I’ll go skiing w my son in Canada in February and will be more sensible so I don’t risk my Camino!! Getting all the info I can.
 
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Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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Celebration
I celebrated my 63rd while in Cee, one day away from Finisterre. Somewhat low key but jubilantely enough in the company of my wife (who flew into SdC to greet me on Plaza Oibradorio at the completion of my Francés and then joined me onto Finisterre) and another Peregrina whom I met in Orisson, walked with on and off for perhaps 4-5 days then ceparated.... and ran into each other in Ponte Olveira
Good Lord Willing, I'll turn 65 next June and joyfully will start TMB about a week later (also with my wife... who herself will celebrate her upper-50th while at it)...
...And then... looking forward to return to Frances and step on del Norte in the subsequent years to come...
La Dolce Vita 😁
 
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Oops. . .yeah, I didn't want the post to be a downer as much as an encouragement and a little reminder that, as another mentioned, things put off may never be realized. Age may be a state of mind or just a number, but it also comes with the increasing odds of discovering potential issues of serious illness related to aging as well.

Until late 2020, I felt as if I had all the time in the world to delay those things that were important to me or required at least reasonable fitness and health to do. Now, after several battles with degenerative disease and illness, I regret those delays. In my younger years when I looked at the future where I would be the age I am now, I had thought I would still have a couple of decades of adventure ahead. Now - and I am still somewhat flabbergasted by the turn of events - I am wondering if the unknown amount of days, weeks, months, or years ahead will be generous enough for the recovery time needed to complete another Camino. Hopefully more, but I'd be happy with just doing it one more time.

So my encouragement is for others to not put things off that are important. If you are able to do what you dream about or that your spirit of adventure is calling you to do, then sooner is a safer bet than later. And I would be shocked if there are not more than just a few other Forum members that feel this same way with advice to those folks who are pondering if they should wait, or make the effort to walk a Camino sooner than later.

P.S - Lest anyone was given the impression of my giving up, that is not the case at all. Recognizing the enemy gives one the ability to redevelop their tactical plans and to keep going. I may have stumbled and fallen hard, but I am not staying on the ground and will be working hard to get back up.

Point taken. A few lines, presented in isolation, often fail to reveal the thoughts and intent behind them.
Buen Camino Dave on whatever path life has set before you. Getting up can sometimes be difficult, but is necessary for the next step forward. Best wishes for many more steps. Your post has presented us with another image to hold as we each step forward.
 
Oops. . .yeah, I didn't want the post to be a downer as much as an encouragement and a little reminder that, as another mentioned, things put off may never be realized. Age may be a state of mind or just a number, but it also comes with the increasing odds of discovering potential issues of serious illness related to aging as well.

Until late 2020, I felt as if I had all the time in the world to delay those things that were important to me or required at least reasonable fitness and health to do. Now, after several battles with degenerative disease and illness, I regret those delays. In my younger years when I looked at the future where I would be the age I am now, I had thought I would still have a couple of decades of adventure ahead. Now - and I am still somewhat flabbergasted by the turn of events - I am wondering if the unknown amount of days, weeks, months, or years ahead will be generous enough for the recovery time needed to complete another Camino. Hopefully more, but I'd be happy with just doing it one more time.

So my encouragement is for others to not put things off that are important. If you are able to do what you dream about or that your spirit of adventure is calling you to do, then sooner is a safer bet than later. And I would be shocked if there are not more than just a few other Forum members that feel this same way with advice to those folks who are pondering if they should wait, or make the effort to walk a Camino sooner than later.

P.S - Lest anyone was given the impression of my giving up, that is not the case at all. Recognizing the enemy gives one the ability to redevelop their tactical plans and to keep going. I may have stumbled and fallen hard, but I am not staying on the ground and will be working hard to get back up.

A Danish poet once said, over a new grave:

"So, this was where you were going, you hasty one".

Carpe diem...
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Loving this thread! I am excitedly planning my 1st Camino next September when I will be 74!
I have a feeling I'm going to get the bug and want to do many more, God willing. As it is I think about it every day and love reading facebook posts and watching You tube videos! Which Camino to do is my problem: the Portugese Coastal or the Ingles? I can only do the last 100km or so as my much younger friend, who is coming with me (54 - a mere babe!) still works and can only get 10 days off work. We had decided on the Portugese until we read about the possible tree felling and road changes for the last 15Km.:(
Any advice would be gratefully received. Many thanks.
 
Loving this thread! I am excitedly planning my 1st Camino next September when I will be 74!
I have a feeling I'm going to get the bug and want to do many more, God willing. As it is I think about it every day and love reading facebook posts and watching You tube videos! Which Camino to do is my problem: the Portugese Coastal or the Ingles? I can only do the last 100km or so as my much younger friend, who is coming with me (54 - a mere babe!) still works and can only get 10 days off work. We had decided on the Portugese until we read about the possible tree felling and road changes for the last 15Km.:(
Any advice would be gratefully received. Many thanks.
I love the Portuguese coastal, standard and literal, but it’s more solitary than the French Way or standard Portuguese camimo.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I'll turn 70 in April next year. I have a plan to travel (from Helsinki) to Lübeck and start walking from there, via Eisenach and Beaune to Le Puy-en-Velay, and then Via Podiensis. Planned it for this year already, but had to get my left hip replaced:)
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I'm 77 and can envision another Camino too. It will be fairly slow, probably a few weeks long and accomodations will be in small albergues and pensions, a room with a private bathroom and breakfast included. This will make for a pleasant journey. Be in tune with what is sensible for you.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
It wont be sealed with me!

Orujo it will be
Hi fellow pilgrims have done the Frances twice first in 2010 age 65 a few years after a double by pass opp, again in 2015 ending up with a damaged knee Cartilage.and being an obstinate S and S , hope to return next year at the young age of 79, to those that have been thinking about doing the Camino, all i can say is go for it, its a life changing trip you will never forget.
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking

A heartfelt buen camino to you Pilgrim!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

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I love this ! When I was a teen 30 was unimaginably old. Then it was 'life begins at 40'. The next thing I knew I was celebrating my 50th. Next year I turn 60.

I've always been old and I've always been young, I'm just never sure which is what.

My body and my mind are certainly at odds over this issue... .
A young man (20) once said:

"When I was 16, my father and mother were unbelievably stupid, and I was always embarrased on their behalf. It is impressive how much they have improved in the last 4 years"...
 
“ been walking Caminos for some time now. It's the only place I know where time slows down”. I love this thought, and find it to be true-
All of this banter is very inspiring and joyful to read……I hope to finish the second half of my 2023 Camino Norte either when I turn 70 or the year before (either in 2025 or 2026 see www.livealagom.life)
—this conversation is wonderful keep it up and Buen Camino to all; “ age is a matter of mind. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter “ (even if your body does.)
!
 
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I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
A wonderful way to celebrate your birthday.
My husband has enjoyed several camino birthdays ( his 69th in Salamanca ) and I was thinking we might aim to be in Santiago for his 70th next May .
We are now hoping to complete the VdlP/ Sanabrés in April next year and then have a family celebration.
May there be many more caminos !
Buen Camino to all those planning to walk.
 
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I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I am 71 next month and hope to be on the Frances in April. No point in waiting 🐘🐘🐘
My wife turned 70 this year and was very down about it. So she decided to do a Camino.
We walked from Viana do Castelo and about half way there she put all her concerns in a stone I gave her and she cast them away. It really worked for her.
She is still 70 but doesn’t care about it.
 
The older I get, the more I identify with the sentiment of this song. 'How old would you be if you didn't know the day you were born?'
37ish. But my knees have a different 70ish opinion, unfortunately. It will be pain over endurance, and endurance shall win the day(s) for this old bugger,
 
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Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Yes, However it is a number closer to the closing chapter of the Book than the Opening. :)
Agreed, and agreeing with your later post. As a recently passed troubadour once said,

"I'm all done explaining or passin' some test
So pour me another, it's good for my health
I'm not ready to put the book on the shelf"
 
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
Your message and outlook struck a chord with me....very similar to mine.
I was 74 when I walked the VLDP again for the third time in 2022. Lead a reasonably healthy lifestyle, without being too radical, and you should have many more Caminos in your future. I am tentatively planning another VLDP walk in Sept 2024. All the best and Buen Camino!
Alan
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
For all of us who are keeping on keeping on now more than ever these words from Ulysses, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson are relevant .

"...and tho'
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."


In the truest sense Carpe diem!
 
Last edited:
In my "community", 65 - 75 is junior senior, 75 - 85 is senior, 85 and beyond is senior senior. :cool:
I was 85 in July and am now " off the legs " due to yet another serious fall due to balance disorder. As a senior senior ( I love this description ):rolleyes: and classified as " high risk " by the medical profession ( I think they mean the man is barking " ) I intend to light many candales and torment my guardian angel, ancestors et al , win many pennies and buy the very latest big engined mobility scooter? / bloody great trike with 2000 cc motor and assail the Pyrenees. There will also be a team of bearers,, pushers, mechanics in the convoy. Now, I ask you, in all sincerity, is that too much to ask?😇

Vaya con Dios
y
Buen Camino

Samarkand.
 
Buen Camino Alex, I’m 11 months ahead of you. Hit 70 this April past. Too many broken bits to take on the road just now but I never stop hoping and planning. I’m a cantankerous bugger. Coruna, Ferrol, Santiago ought to be doable. I’ll only need a toothbrush and a change of knickers (oh, and a corkscrew just in case).

Again, buen camino amigo. If we were but 20 years younger. Just think of the mess we could have made 😉
I also turned 70 in April this year (2023) and am considering the Madrid Camino. My last (and only) Camino was the Portuguese in 2019 from Lisbon and as I had a couple of days over I added Finisterre. Thoroughly enjoyed myself except when a largish and exceedingly determined farm dog decided I didn't need all my bits and pieces however we sorted that out :)
Often see comments that age is only a number well yes, it is and it isn't. As your car gets older with more miles things simply wear out. My body is like that, things are wearing out.
Not too worry I think one more Camino from Madrid and will see how life is treating me after that.
Cheers
Moonbeamzz
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I am 70 on March 30th, 2024, God willing.

The last 15-16 years, I have walked many Caminos. It has changed me, for the better, At least my woman says so, and she is of course a better judge than I am :cool: I believe and hope. I think walking the Camino will change others too, and I hope so.

I plan to take a plane to Barcelona the morning after my 70th birthday, take a taxi to the Saints railway station there and buy a Tarjeta Dorada , and hop on a train to Pamplona (frequent departures) the same afternoon, and start out the day after.

I have understood that my knees are not the same as before; neither is my breath. So I realise that I need shorter days in terms of kms/day, but use more days.

Fortunately, my pension allows me to walk endlessly, but I need to stay (mostly) in albergues, which suits me fine: I like the albergue life: It brings me close to other pilgrims, and makes it easy to socialise. (I try to write in English, not American).

I would love to walk slowly (a necessity these days, anyway), and just suck it in. For newbies: it is easier than you think.

As I have reached my age of 70 (surprisingly, considering that I have not always been kind to my body), I am happy to be able to take on my (final?) walk. It will be the Camino Frances, that for some reason resonates with my heart.

I am looking forward to to seeing again the wide open landscape from the top of the Alto del Perdon, the real start of the Meseta from the top of the Alto del Mostalares, walking the river route into Burgos, and much more. I will stop in places that I earlier years passed by. I will very much smell the roses this time and live in the now.

I was attending a a seminar this afternoon about dementia/Alzheimer, and at my age, I realise I can be hit
by the sh*t from a fan anytime, so it's time to go.

Hope to see ya and share stories and food togehter.. I have many Camino stories after so many years.

Edit: And yes, sitting down and enjoying a cold beer, tortilla, and coffee with orujo (got you, @Tinkatinker ) and watching life walking by.
I will be ahead of you by a day or two, I will be 71 when I start my ninth Camino on the first day of April when hopefully the Route de Napoleon will be open, I will be trying to do four Caminos covering all the entries into Santiago, Frances Inglés, Invierno and Portuguese so we will be in Santiago at similar time. If you want to share some stories especially doing multiple Caminos and what it feels to do it in your seventies then contact me
 
I also turned 70 in April this year (2023) and am considering the Madrid Camino. My last (and only) Camino was the Portuguese in 2019 from Lisbon and as I had a couple of days over I added Finisterre. Thoroughly enjoyed myself except when a largish and exceedingly determined farm dog decided I didn't need all my bits and pieces however we sorted that out :)
Often see comments that age is only a number well yes, it is and it isn't. As your car gets older with more miles things simply wear out. My body is like that, things are wearing out.
Not too worry I think one more Camino from Madrid and will see how life is treating me after that.
Cheers
Moonbeamzz
I walked the Camino de Madrid this past June. It is indeed, a fine Camino and a favourite for many. Just be ready for a Camino that is somewhat solitary (more than half the time I was the only pilgrim in the albergue and there were only two pilgrims I saw more than once) and where you will be communicating in Spanish rather than finding English speakers.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I was 85 in July and am now " off the legs " due to yet another serious fall due to balance disorder. As a senior senior ( I love this description ):rolleyes: and classified as " high risk " by the medical profession ( I think they mean the man is barking " ) I intend to light many candales and torment my guardian angel, ancestors et al , win many pennies and buy the very latest big engined mobility scooter? / bloody great trike with 2000 cc motor and assail the Pyrenees. There will also be a team of bearers,, pushers, mechanics in the convoy. Now, I ask you, in all sincerity, is that too much to ask?😇

Vaya con Dios
y
Buen Camino

Samarkand.
So very sorry to read what you wrote at the start, re your balance disorder. However, I will not be at all surprised to hear of people coming across a barking mad pilgrim with mongrel ancestry, beetling along at the rate of knots and bestowing kindnesses on those who help when it is needed!
 

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A beautiful story , https://www.lavozdegalicia.es/noticia/ferrol/pontedeume/2024/02/15/llevo-53-caminos-santiago-adicto/0003_202402SL15F4991.htm

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