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Considering this modified route. Compostela qualifier?

Year of past OR future Camino
2018
So originally I was thinking Coastal (Porto to Pontedevra) plus the Variante Espiritual. But now I am considering this option if anyone is familiar:
  • Start in Valenca/Tui - normal Camino Portugues until Pontevedra.
  • Then switch to the Variante Espirutual until Combarro
  • Then switch to the Ruta de Padre Martín Sarmiento until eventually meeting up with the Variante at Vilanova de Arousa.
  • Then take the boat up to Padron, resyncing with the Camino Portugues.
  • Onwards to SdC as normal
Thoughts on this? I cannot see any reason why this would not be a recognized route.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2018
You can follow any combo that you wish. If you want to obtain a Compostela in Santiago you must walk at least the last 100km to SdC.
Well sorta....

I know that regardless of the fact that Ruta de Padre Martín Sarmiento is more than 100km, its not recognized and therefore on its own does not qualify. That's why my thought was start in Tui and rejoin in Padron and that should qualify. But I wasn't 100% sure.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2012
The "recognized route" thing only applies to the last 100km into Santiago but is also rather dependent on the Pilgrim's Office interpretations. If you start in Tui you're 114km from Santiago. Get your two stamps a day in somewhere the PO might find on their lists and you should be fine. In previous, friendly, discussion with the PO it was suggested that Pilgrims are supposed to walk to Santiago. The implication that spending time wandering about Iberia did not count as a pilgrimage to Santiago.

It'll probably come down to the voluntaria/o on the jump the morning you arrive and your ability to persevere. While I've never seen any sin in "taking the long way round" some do seem to.

Buen Camino

ps. which is more important - the journey or the award?
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
ps. which is more important - the journey or the award?
The Way is the goal, IMHO...It's many years since I stopped collecting Compostelas, although I worked as a volunteer in the PO in May/June 2019. I call it payback time for what the Caminos have given me in the last 11 years.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There has been a lot of discussion on the forum about whether the Variante Espiritual qualifies for a compostela. The pilgrims office recognizes it. Do a search with “variante espiritual compostela.” My memory is that the main issue is whether the boat ride reduces your total to a number below 100 kms. If it does, you don’t get the compostela. So it depends on where you start, at least that’s what I remember. What you describe seems to keep you well over the 100 mark, so it doesn’t seem like it should be a problem. But I also remember that there were people who thought they were entitled to a compostela who didn’t get one, so I think you should be willing to accept that possibility — if you can’t, then I wouldn’t walk the Variante Espiritual.
 

Flog

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
The "recognized route" thing only applies to the last 100km into Santiago but is also rather dependent on the Pilgrim's Office interpretations. If you start in Tui you're 114km from Santiago. Get your two stamps a day in somewhere the PO might find on their lists and you should be fine. In previous, friendly, discussion with the PO it was suggested that Pilgrims are supposed to walk to Santiago. The implication that spending time wandering about Iberia did not count as a pilgrimage to Santiago.

It'll probably come down to the voluntaria/o on the jump the morning you arrive and your ability to persevere. While I've never seen any sin in "taking the long way round" some do seem to.

Buen Camino

ps. which is more important - the journey or the award?
I agree, a starting stamp in Tui, a couple a day in between and a couple in Padron should satisfy the office. But I would suggest as it's not strictly official: please just accept and be prepared to let it go if they do make an issue of it.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
The "recognized route" thing only applies to the last 100km into Santiago but is also rather dependent on the Pilgrim's Office interpretations. If you start in Tui you're 114km from Santiago. Get your two stamps a day in somewhere the PO might find on their lists and you should be fine. In previous, friendly, discussion with the PO it was suggested that Pilgrims are supposed to walk to Santiago. The implication that spending time wandering about Iberia did not count as a pilgrimage to Santiago.

It'll probably come down to the voluntaria/o on the jump the morning you arrive and your ability to persevere. While I've never seen any sin in "taking the long way round" some do seem to.

Buen Camino

ps. which is more important - the journey or the award?
Thank you.

Certainly the journey is the adventure and the point. But, still, the Compostela would be nice :)
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
The Way is the goal, IMHO...It's many years since I stopped collecting Compostelas, although I worked as a volunteer in the PO in May/June 2019. I call it payback time for what the Caminos have given me in the last 11 years.
I always get a Compostela but only have one framed (my first) and it still sits in a closet. I do like getting them and they are scattered in tubes around my house. But when I stumble across one I still like to look at it and remember.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
So originally I was thinking Coastal (Porto to Pontedevra) plus the Variante Espiritual. But now I am considering this option if anyone is familiar:
  • Start in Valenca/Tui - normal Camino Portugues until Pontevedra.
  • Then switch to the Variante Espirutual until Combarro
  • Then switch to the Ruta de Padre Martín Sarmiento until eventually meeting up with the Variante at Vilanova de Arousa.
  • Then take the boat up to Padron, resyncing with the Camino Portugues.
  • Onwards to SdC as normal
Thoughts on this? I cannot see any reason why this would not be a recognized route.
Me and my wife did a similar route in May 2019, but we started in Valença do Minho. We didn't do the Ruta de Padre Martín, but we did take variant option after Pontevedra to go to Vilanova de Arousa. From there we took the boat to Pontecesures. On arrival at SdC there were no issues regarding it's validity, even with the boat trip it's over the 100km minimum. Mind you, a very keen checker-upper in the Pilgrims' Office gave all my stamps a good eye-balling to make sure I still had 2 stamps per day. 🙃
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Thank you.

Certainly the journey is the adventure and the point. But, still, the Compostela would be nice :)
Please listen to Tinker if it is important to youth get one. He does know his Camino stuff. If you walk from Tui and then do the Spiritual Variant you will be fine and will be able to get your Compostela. If not it is a crapshoot. But you can always come back another time. It seems you would have more time to walk as you mentioned starting in Porto. You could always walk to Muxia and Finisterre. It is a beautiful loop to take. Then you could get your Santiago Compostela and the certificates from both Muxia and Finisterre.
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2000, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
So originally I was thinking Coastal (Porto to Pontedevra) plus the Variante Espiritual. But now I am considering this option if anyone is familiar:
  • Start in Valenca/Tui - normal Camino Portugues until Pontevedra.
  • Then switch to the Variante Espirutual until Combarro
  • Then switch to the Ruta de Padre Martín Sarmiento until eventually meeting up with the Variante at Vilanova de Arousa.
  • Then take the boat up to Padron, resyncing with the Camino Portugues.
  • Onwards to SdC as normal
Thoughts on this? I cannot see any reason why this would not be a recognized route.

Camino Portuguese / Variant Espiritual and the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento.

If you are starting from Tui, you should receive the compostela.

The Ruta de Padre Sarmiento is NOT a recognised route, though the walking distance from Tui places you you in theory well within the 100km requirement.

However, if you wish to walk the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento and also to obtain the Compostela, do read this !

As the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento is not, at least at the moment, an officially recognised route, and despite being over 190kms in distance, should you commence walking at Tui, your walk will NOT necessarily qualify to receive a Compestela.

And so to the walk.

On departing, and once at Pontevedra, follow the usual route taken by all peregrino heading north on the Camino Portuguese, which is well indicated. At the point where the Camino divides and the possibility for taking the Variant Espiritual, turn left as indicated. The sign indicating the turn is very prominent and would be hard to not see.

In turning left and stepping on to the Variant Espiritual, the majority of the peregrinos walking on the Camino Portuguese will be left behind, as the majority will continue to walk on the ‘regular’ Camino.

From this divide where the walk turns left it is both the Variant Espiritual and the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento.

The Camino will pass Poio, where there is the Monasterio de Poio (Hospedería Monasterio de Poio).

This is a convenient stop should you wish it to not have too arduous a first day, as well as being in a beautiful place with a wonderful ‘energy’. In the grounds there is also to be found the longest ‘hórreo’ that I have seen in Galicia, and at over 33 metres long is almost certainly the longest that you will ever see.

There are also plenty of opportunities to eat within a reasonable distance from the Monastery, including in Comborro, a very picturesque fishing village which is now moderately touristic.

It is in Combarro that the turn away from the Variant Espiritual to the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento is to be found - see the attached. For those walking on the Variant Espiritual, the Camino continues upwards with the turn that veers to the right, while for those choosing the Ruta de Padre Sarmiento, the turn is to the left and past the former fisherman’s houses and small ‘hórreo’ along the route, the majority of which are now given over to restaurants and shops providing the usual tourist offerings.

Nonetheless, the area is extraordinarily picturesque.

The stages from this point will be a personal choice connected with how much time is available as well as your budget. There is a need to take into account that between Pontevedra and Vilanova de Arousa, all overnight accommodation will be at hotels / private hostel / Airbnb or camping. There are no Albergue !

While there are no Albergue, should the route be walked outside of the peak tourist season, it is almost certainly the case that overnight accommodation will not be ridiculously expensive. There are also excellent eating opportunities for almost the entire route.

The final overnight along the road before we rejoined the Variant Espiritual was on the island of Arousa, waking early so as to arrive at Vilanova de Arousa in time to take the Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) [Tours Rias Baixas contact phone 00 34 680 733 990 or www.toursriasbaixas.com/es/contact] that would take us, along with eight other Peregrinos, to Pontecesures, which is just outside Padron. This journey up the Rio Ulla qualifies as being part of the Camino, and certainly would be of interest to those who like to have a distinct stamp in the Credencial, as well as quite an exhilarating ride on the river.

From Padrón, the Camino is the last stretch for most of the various strands of the different routes coming up from Portugal. It is consequently a quite busy stretch of Camino, though if you are seeking something of a refuge from the masses, strongly suggest diverting from Padrón to Herbón, about 6kms away, where there is the stunning Monasterio de Herbón, which provides the warmest of welcomes to peregrinos, and a great Camino experience for the body, mind and soul.

Hope that the above helps, and also refer to the following for more information

https://www.rutapadresarmiento.com/

http://www.osalnes.com/en/discover/activities/the-route-of-father-sarmiento

https://www.caminodesantiago.gal/en/make-plans/the-ways/the-mar-de-arousa-and-rio-ulla-route
along the river from Vilanova de Arousa
https://www.labarcadelperegrino.com/home.html
naviera@bahiasub.com
 
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