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Going forward!

NanaEL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan on walking the Camino Frances May 2019, God willing
We had planned on walking our first time this Spring and family events (significant ones) kept us from going at that time and then I just started having misgivings — but have decided to go forward with my plan of walking the Camino Francés beginning mid-September. We are 67 and 72 , what am I waiting for???
Thanks to so many of you who provide so much wonderful information (but overwhelming myself with it at the moment). Where to begin???? Traveled a fair amount, but never anything physical like this.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hi, NanaEl. I am excited for you as you continue with your planning. As you already know, this Forum is full of good supportive folks who are happy to provide encouragement and insights.

Buen Camino :)
 

kclem

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago de Compostela 2019
We had planned on walking our first time this Spring and family events (significant ones) kept us from going at that time and then I just started having misgivings — but have decided to go forward with my plan of walking the Camino Francés beginning mid-September. We are 67 and 72 , what am I waiting for???
Thanks to so many of you who provide so much wonderful information (but overwhelming myself with it at the moment). Where to begin???? Traveled a fair amount, but never anything physical like this.
Hi
We are also planning our 1st Camino (Sarria to Santiago) in May 2019, my husband will be 75 & I'm 66. The planning is overwhelming & I have a mind to say lets just go for it and see what happens.
Good luck & Buen Camino
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
Buen Camino! Youngsters such as yourself should have no real problems! We Old Fogies can perhaps lend a hand. Get a good guidebook, know where you are going, and absolutely ignore any information concerning recommended daily distances. The best recommendations will come from your own body your own mind, your own cares. It will probably take a few days (maybe a week and a bit) to hit your own pace - that which is comfortable for you yourself! Give yourself some extra time and enjoy every minute! Take hundreds of photographs, pop into every interesting thing you see along the Camino churches, shops, museums, stop in for coffee, beer, lunch whenever or whatever y-o-u feel like it. You have a couple of days in hand go then stay and Santiago and enjoy the sight or on to Muxia or FisteraDo be prepared but here is no reason to go overboard, you and your body should decide distances, times, places, and why. I can still do 30k a day but the next day, I feel devastated and cannot walk half that much so what did I gain? Hostels are very welcoming places, after some time the ideas of daily communal bathing, daily communal sleeping, daily communal dining can become tiresome so check your guidebook for hostels with private rooms, look around for inexpensive hotel lodging, B&B's, casa rural, all of which will also allow you to take dinner in a restaurant - pilgrims menus are fun and filling but can become boring as well. The Camino is journey into yourself as you continually ask why am I doing this, allow your mind to wander though "Remembrance of Things Past" but also into the present and the future, enjoy the company and camaraderie of fellow pilgrims, you will enjoy daily achievements and confront the occasional difficulties, but know that as you triumphantly walk into Santiago this has been a marvelous experience.
 
Last edited:

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Last edited:

Helen1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
London to Santiago (2014)
Narbonne to Oloron (2015)
Camino Portugues (2016)
Sentier Cathar (2017)
Where to begin????
Welcome to the forum! I would begin by doing the following:
  1. working out how much time you can/want/can afford to be away from home
  2. whether you want to do only a camino or are going to tack on some tourist time at the beginning/end
  3. book your flights (if you can change the date of the flight home it will relieve a lot of potential stress)
  4. book your first night's accommodation
The rest pretty much takes care of itself when you get there. If you're worried about the physical side of things then you need to do a bit more planning for day 1 and 2 to make things easier but that really amounts to choosing between booking into Orisson or getting your bags transported to Roncesvalles. (You could also go to Valcarlos but that's less typical). After that you'll be in Roncesvalles and into the swing of things and can decide as you go.
 

kclem

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago de Compostela 2019
Buen Camino! Youngsters such as yourself should have no real problems! We Old Fogies can perhaps lend a hand. Get a good guidebook, know where you are going, and absolutely ignore any information concerning recommended daily distances. The best recommendations will come from your own body your own mind, your own cares. It will probably take a few days (maybe a week and a bit) to hit your own pace - that which is comfortable for you yourself! Give yourself some extra time and enjoy every minute! Take hundreds of photographs, pop into every interesting thing you see along the Camino churches, shops, museums, stop in for coffee, beer, lunch whenever or whatever y-o-u feel like it. You have a couple of days in hand go then stay and Santiago and enjoy the sight or on to Muxia or FisteraDo be prepared but here is no reason to go overboard, you and your body should decide distances, times, places, and why. I can still do 30k a day but the next day, I feel devastated and cannot walk half that much so what did I gain? Hostels are very welcoming places, after some time the ideas of daily communal bathing, daily communal sleeping, daily communal dining can become tiresome so check your guidebook for hostels with private rooms, look around for inexpensive hotel lodging, B&B's, casa rural, all of which will also allow you to take dinner in a restaurant - pilgrims menus are fun and filling but can become boring as well. The Camino is journey into yourself as you continually ask why am I doing this, allow your mind to wander though "Remembrance of Things Past" but also into the present and the future, enjoy the company and camaraderie of fellow pilgrims, you will enjoy daily achievements and confront the occasional difficulties, but know that as you triumphantly walk into Santiago this has been a marvelous experience.

Thanks for taking the time to respond with a very reassuring message.
 

kclem

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago de Compostela 2019

Unie

Irish in QLD Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May 2019
Buen Camino! Youngsters such as yourself should have no real problems! We Old Fogies can perhaps lend a hand. Get a good guidebook, know where you are going, and absolutely ignore any information concerning recommended daily distances. The best recommendations will come from your own body your own mind, your own cares. It will probably take a few days (maybe a week and a bit) to hit your own pace - that which is comfortable for you yourself! Give yourself some extra time and enjoy every minute! Take hundreds of photographs, pop into every interesting thing you see along the Camino churches, shops, museums, stop in for coffee, beer, lunch whenever or whatever y-o-u feel like it. You have a couple of days in hand go then stay and Santiago and enjoy the sight or on to Muxia or FisteraDo be prepared but here is no reason to go overboard, you and your body should decide distances, times, places, and why. I can still do 30k a day but the next day, I feel devastated and cannot walk half that much so what did I gain? Hostels are very welcoming places, after some time the ideas of daily communal bathing, daily communal sleeping, daily communal dining can become tiresome so check your guidebook for hostels with private rooms, look around for inexpensive hotel lodging, B&B's, casa rural, all of which will also allow you to take dinner in a restaurant - pilgrims menus are fun and filling but can become boring as well. The Camino is journey into yourself as you continually ask why am I doing this, allow your mind to wander though "Remembrance of Things Past" but also into the present and the future, enjoy the company and camaraderie of fellow pilgrims, you will enjoy daily achievements and confront the occasional difficulties, but know that as you triumphantly walk into Santiago this has been a marvelous experience.
Loved this post.
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April (2019)
Thanks for asking the question.
As a 68 year od planning my first Camino in just 7 weeks, it was comforting to read the responses! Yes it is daunting, but I'm hoping the old adage of eating an elephant one bite at a time still holds good.
I's be interested to know how much pre-training experienced pilgrims recommend. I have been walking locally, in the Welsh hills, for the past few months, but what are the thoughts on this?
 

marylynn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-12-14-15-16-17-18-(19) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
The thing that helped the very most when a friend and I planned to walk the Camino in 2011 was to meet together with a woman in our city who had walked the Camino before. We planned to walk from Leon to Santiago and she shared lots of practical information and patiently answered our many silly questions and we left feeling confident that we could really do this walk, which we did with no problems...and I haven’t stopped since.
It was the ‘face-to-face, what-worked-for-you’ interaction that finally gave us the confidence to feel that we could really do it. And it was great to ‘de-brief’ with her when we returned.
 

Rhun Leeding

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
Hi NanaEL,

I'm sure there are plenty of other people who will be along with the practical advice for you. However, I'll be starting from SJPP on the 18th (I think!) so hope we can share a cafe con leche along the way.

I guess the difficulty is in planning times, especially if you have to fly to and from the Camino. Give yourself plenty of time, do your training to get your footwear worn in, and keep your pack as light as possible. The rest the Camino will provide.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
I's be interested to know how much pre-training experienced pilgrims recommend. I have been walking locally, in the Welsh hills, for the past few months, but what are the thoughts on this?
If you already walk regularly in the Welsh hills, I’d say you’re good to go :) My advice would be to do a few walks with a fully loaded rucksack if you haven’t already done so. It does make a difference and you also can quickly tell if you are carrying too much.
(Imo) Don’t over-train, don’t carry too heavy a load and take it easy the first few days on the Camino. :)
 

NanaEL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan on walking the Camino Frances May 2019, God willing
Buen Camino! Youngsters such as yourself should have no real problems! We Old Fogies can perhaps lend a hand. Get a good guidebook, know where you are going, and absolutely ignore any information concerning recommended daily distances. The best recommendations will come from your own body your own mind, your own cares. It will probably take a few days (maybe a week and a bit) to hit your own pace - that which is comfortable for you yourself! Give yourself some extra time and enjoy every minute! Take hundreds of photographs, pop into every interesting thing you see along the Camino churches, shops, museums, stop in for coffee, beer, lunch whenever or whatever y-o-u feel like it. You have a couple of days in hand go then stay and Santiago and enjoy the sight or on to Muxia or FisteraDo be prepared but here is no reason to go overboard, you and your body should decide distances, times, places, and why. I can still do 30k a day but the next day, I feel devastated and cannot walk half that much so what did I gain? Hostels are very welcoming places, after some time the ideas of daily communal bathing, daily communal sleeping, daily communal dining can become tiresome so check your guidebook for hostels with private rooms, look around for inexpensive hotel lodging, B&B's, casa rural, all of which will also allow you to take dinner in a restaurant - pilgrims menus are fun and filling but can become boring as well. The Camino is journey into yourself as you continually ask why am I doing this, allow your mind to wander though "Remembrance of Things Past" but also into the present and the future, enjoy the company and camaraderie of fellow pilgrims, you will enjoy daily achievements and confront the occasional difficulties, but know that as you triumphantly walk into Santiago this has been a marvelous experience.
Thank you so much for this encouraging reply! I feel lighter already!
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
Buen Camino! Youngsters such as yourself should have no real problems! We Old Fogies can perhaps lend a hand. Get a good guidebook, know where you are going, and absolutely ignore any information concerning recommended daily distances. The best recommendations will come from your own body your own mind, your own cares. It will probably take a few days (maybe a week and a bit) to hit your own pace - that which is comfortable for you yourself! Give yourself some extra time and enjoy every minute! Take hundreds of photographs, pop into every interesting thing you see along the Camino churches, shops, museums, stop in for coffee, beer, lunch whenever or whatever y-o-u feel like it. You have a couple of days in hand go then stay and Santiago and enjoy the sight or on to Muxia or FisteraDo be prepared but here is no reason to go overboard, you and your body should decide distances, times, places, and why. I can still do 30k a day but the next day, I feel devastated and cannot walk half that much so what did I gain? Hostels are very welcoming places, after some time the ideas of daily communal bathing, daily communal sleeping, daily communal dining can become tiresome so check your guidebook for hostels with private rooms, look around for inexpensive hotel lodging, B&B's, casa rural, all of which will also allow you to take dinner in a restaurant - pilgrims menus are fun and filling but can become boring as well. The Camino is journey into yourself as you continually ask why am I doing this, allow your mind to wander though "Remembrance of Things Past" but also into the present and the future, enjoy the company and camaraderie of fellow pilgrims, you will enjoy daily achievements and confront the occasional difficulties, but know that as you triumphantly walk into Santiago this has been a marvelous experience.
Scruffy, this is one of the best pieces of Encouraging writing I have seen. Cheers🌻
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Hey Nana EL, I’m so glad you were able to overcome all obstacles and commit to the pilgramage. Even at your ripe young ages it will give you a new perspective on your life that will ROCK your world. I walked my first Camino in 2013 at 69 and I am doing my 4th
This April . You will be perfectly fine if you rememberers what Helen1 and all the other forum folks have shared.
I only add and suggest if you are starting from SJPdP and taking the Napoleon route that you book and stay at Orrison the first night. You must book ahead ASAP. I think they are closed till February 1???? Someone will chim in and give you that detail. Orrison is an incredible way to start your Camino. A big family meal and then everyone introduces themselves and tells where they are from and why they are walking the Camino. It’s a true Camino experience. At least I enjoyed it emensly !
Anyway I wish you a Buen Camino
 

Tom Anglim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port in September 2015
We had planned on walking our first time this Spring and family events (significant ones) kept us from going at that time and then I just started having misgivings — but have decided to go forward with my plan of walking the Camino Francés beginning mid-September. We are 67 and 72 , what am I waiting for???
Thanks to so many of you who provide so much wonderful information (but overwhelming myself with it at the moment). Where to begin???? Traveled a fair amount, but never anything physical like this.
Waiting to depart in Setptmber 2015 I felt the same way. “What am I waiting for?” I found September is a beautiful time of the year. I

Ultreïa E Sus eia, Deus adjuva nos!


We go further and higher, God help us!
 

Richmond Gardner

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Hey Nana EL, I’m so glad you were able to overcome all obstacles and commit to the pilgramage. Even at your ripe young ages it will give you a new perspective on your life that will ROCK your world. I walked my first Camino in 2013 at 69 and I am doing my 4th
This April . You will be perfectly fine if you rememberers what Helen1 and all the other forum folks have shared.
I only add and suggest if you are starting from SJPdP and taking the Napoleon route that you book and stay at Orrison the first night. You must book ahead ASAP. I think they are closed till February 1???? Someone will chim in and give you that detail. Orrison is an incredible way to start your Camino. A big family meal and then everyone introduces themselves and tells where they are from and why they are walking the Camino. It’s a true Camino experience. At least I enjoyed it emensly !
Anyway I wish you a Buen Camino
I have heard so many nice remarks about the albergue in Orisson, where I only stopped for a beer. It did seem like a congenial place, that I think is closed until at least April 1, the earliest date the Napolean route opens.
 

NanaEL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan on walking the Camino Frances May 2019, God willing
Hi
We are also planning our 1st Camino (Sarria to Santiago) in May 2019, my husband will be 75 & I'm 66. The planning is overwhelming & I have a mind to say lets just go for it and see what happens.
Good luck & Buen Camino
I am overwhelmed with the planning too! So many choices to pick from - packs, bedding, shoes, socks ... I wonder when this idea of pilgrimage got so complicated?? And we changed our start date to Sept 12 (49th wedding anniversary!) so created more work as I have to change reservations. Trying to practice growth in Faith, Patience and Surrender with it all.
 

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