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How long (time km and time) and how much is total cost for whole camino walk?

Time of past OR future Camino
Going for Camino walk this Nov.
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.

A lot of questions here. When you say "the full camino of all routes" it is a bit difficult to know exactly what you mean. This website has many of the routes on it, but not all. To work our how much time it would take to walk all those routes you would need to add up the total kilometres and do some maths, and allow days for travel from one route to another and for rest days. I don't think anyone on this forum can do that for you.

The cost will depend on how you propose to live. If you think you would be camping with a tent then it will be a lot less than if you are staying in luxury accommodation. Members of the forum can probably give you a daily amount of their own expenses.

As to your questions about training, preparing, and elevation, I think you would need to work that out yourself.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.
Hi Shinta, when you say full Camino, which did you have in mind? The lengths, level of difficulty and cost will vary according to the route/s selected? Or did you have in mind to walk multiple different routes?
Did you plan to walk in Spain, or to start further out and link routes together, eg, Le Puy - Frances - Finisterre?
Edited to add - are you able to stay in Spain longer than the allowed Schengen days?
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Going for Camino walk this Nov.
Hi Shinta, when you say full Camino, which did you have in mind? The lengths, level of difficulty and cost will vary according to the route selected? Or did you have in mind to walk multiple different routes?
Did you plan to walk in Spain, or to start further out and link routes together, eg, Le Puy - Frances - Finisterre?
Hello, thank you for the reply. I refer to all walks available in camino regardless of the country. I wonder if anyone has already have all this information on hand. If not is ok, don't bother. :) I will try to Google it and add all and maybe once done I can share it here and the experts here can make correction if my research is not showing correct result. Thanks.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Going for Camino walk this Nov.
Hi Shinta, when you say full Camino, which did you have in mind? The lengths, level of difficulty and cost will vary according to the route/s selected? Or did you have in mind to walk multiple different routes?
Did you plan to walk in Spain, or to start further out and link routes together, eg, Le Puy - Frances - Finisterre?
Edited to add - are you able to stay in Spain longer than the allowed Schengen days?
Hello, it is my dream to walk to all caminos available regardless of routes and countries for at least once. I wonder if there are people of same interest, maybe we can make a group and do it together? I will of course first need to save money for that. Maybe if there are people interested, we can form a group and we start this journey together like 2 years from now. :) I am really serious and hopefully to find people that could do that with me. Because I don't think I can do it alone. Given my poor navigation and direction skills, language barriers. Thanks.
 
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trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Yes on Camino. Just wondering if eur200,000 be enough or need eur1,000, 000?
This is a "how long is a piece of string?" question. No one can accurately answer it.

You would no doubt have to stop working in order to devote all of your time to walking Caminos. So you would need enough money to live on for many, many years.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Going for Camino walk this Nov.
Hi Shinta, when you say full Camino, which did you have in mind? The lengths, level of difficulty and cost will vary according to the route/s selected? Or did you have in mind to walk multiple different routes?
Did you plan to walk in Spain, or to start further out and link routes together, eg, Le Puy - Frances - Finisterre?
Edited to add - are you able to stay in Spain longer than the allowed Schengen days?
I am only allowed to stay in Spain for 90 days for now. I will find out more about visa for Singaporean. I don't mean to do it now. I mean this is a dream. It may not come true too, it is ok. I am just wondering if anyone here has the same thoughts with me or have done that. :)
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Unless you can get permanent residence status or long term Schengen visa you would be limited to spending half the year in Schengen, split into two trips.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
I refer to all walks available in camino regardless of the country.
No such inventory exists. There is no organization that manages all of the routes that we call "the Camino."

I don't know what your motivation is, to do this. Is it just to claim that you have done "all the routes"? I have never heard of anyone looking for that particular challenge. It seems to be a very artificial construct - something for which you could make up whatever arbitrary rules you want.

The cathedral in Santiago gives compostelas to people who have walked the last 100 km on any of the recognized routes. The list of "recognized routes" would be available from the Pilgrim Office, or someone here on the forum probably would know it. Routes are added to that list each year, I believe.

Maybe you can find the list of recognized route - maybe there are 10-15 - walk the last 100 km of each. That would be a manageable challenge. You could then calculate the cost and time from the number of routes multiplied by 100 km.
 
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woody66

This is my boy !
Time of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Coastal 2021 Frances 2023
HI!
Searched Google came up with this!
H
How many Camino de Santiago routes are there?


Although the Camino begins at each pilgrim's own door, over the centuries, a number of main routes have been pinpointed. There are currently 281 Caminos listed, encompassing more than 51,500 miles of routes through 29 different countries.
Buen Camino
and good luck

Woody
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
I am only allowed to stay in Spain for 90 days for now. I will find out more about visa for Singaporean. I don't mean to do it now. I mean this is a dream. It may not come true too, it is ok. I am just wondering if anyone here has the same thoughts with me or have done that. :)
Nobody has had such thoughts or done that.

What a number of people have done or dream of doing is walking from their own home to Santiago. When you have finished walking from Sarria to Santiago and then to Finisterre why not start planning your Camino from Singapore to Santiago. Are you in Sarria now and about to do your first Camino steps? If so, then Buen Camino!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Here is something you can consider while you are walking from Sarria. You will find many places where there are alternative routes. Some might be 500 m and some 50 km. Will you plan to walk all of those alternative routes? On a larger scale you will have the same quandary as you walk from any distant point in Europe. The paths to Santiago are virtually infinite in number.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
HI!
Searched Google came up with this!
H
How many Camino de Santiago routes are there?


Although the Camino begins at each pilgrim's own door, over the centuries, a number of main routes have been pinpointed. There are currently 281 Caminos listed, encompassing more than 51,500 miles of routes through 29 different countries.
Buen Camino
and good luck

Woody
And is that just the routes to Santiago? If so, there are many other pilgrimage routes in Spain, leave aside the rest of Europe, and the rest of the world, that do not proceed to Santiago.
 

LavanyaLea

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (May/June 2022)
I think the Cathedral of Santiago adds more routes to their approved/official list of Camino faster than one can complete it 😅 (there was a post about the routes that they added in 2022 and there were a few dozens?).

Most pilgrims start off with the Frances as that was “the” Camino they knew of before embarking on this journey (of a lifetime?) and then ideas start forming in the off season to do others… usually the Portugues, del Norte, Primitivo, Ingles, or Via de la Plata… then if you look here, there are many many other routes with more and more obscure names…

When you get to Santiago, there is a very cute and a big unique souvenir shop that specialises on magnets/pins for various Camino routes, including the more obscure ones! So you can take your inspiration there. I certainly found some I’ve never heard of!

A Rúa Recordos
+34 981 58 25 37

(It’s on one of the main/popular streets with bars/shops off the cathedral)

Stingy Nomads have done a few caminos and they provide approximate costs for different budgets…


A few forum members here also keep very active blogs and social media accounts which hopefully can inspire you on your next Camino! @jungleboy @NadineK @Elle Bieling or go to the “live on the Camino” section and follow someone’s day to day journey.

With 90-day Schengen rule, you’ll have enough time to do one long Camino which can take 30-40 days and maybe give yourself a relaxing holiday to process afterwards. The via Francigena may be just pushing it at the limit of the 90 days… then take a breather, and if you are still hooked on the Camino, plan for the next one the following year!

But first, Buen Camino! Don’t think too far ahead, enjoy the present moment 🐶
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Time of past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
There is a Camino saying in Spain, which is that the Way of Saint James is along every road and passes through every village.

As such, walking ALL Caminos over their entire length is a complete material impossibility.

But even just walking the entirety of the officially recognised routes in the Iberian peninsula, including not just Spain and Portugal, but also Gibraltar and Andorra and the basic starting points in France, including but not limited to not just Paris, Tours, Arles, Vézelay, Le Puy but also the Mont-Saint-Michel, Lourdes, Perpignan, and so on, and perhaps even also Canterbury, Aachen, Rome, etc etc etc, I think would also be impossible in a single lifetime.

But maybe if it were limited to just the Major Routes, and you went from Canterbury via Paris, from Rome via Arles, included Lourdes in another Camino, on a second arrival in SJPP switched up via Hendaye to the Norte, and so on, it might just be feasible.

But it would take a massive chunk of your life to achieve, and you'd basically need to become a permanent pilgrim and do nothing else for many years.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
The via Francigena may be just pushing it at the limit of the 90 days
Oh yes, the pilgrimage routes to Rome! Now there is an area that is still in its infancy. So many Caminos to rediscover and develop!

And it is not only the Cathedral of Santiago who adds routes to Saint James in Galicia to their portfolio of recognised Caminos. Towns and regions not only all over Spain but all over Europe are currently busy doing so!
 

dick bird

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I did a rough count of the longer caminos in the Iberian peninsula. From memory these are all over 600 km each and there were about twelve of them. In addition to this there are innumerable shorter camino routes and variations. This would amount to at least 10000 km of walking, just in Spain and Portugal and at 25 km a day would take you 400 days, not including rest days and travelling between start points. Schengen would be a major problem as at 90 days at six month intervals you would need three or four years. At 50 euros a day the cost would be 20000 euros, which is quite cheap but again does not include rest days and expenses when travelling between start points. I do not think anyone has actually done this (although some people I know may be close), but it looks doable. But I would strongly advise you to do a lot of research (don't rely on Google and Wikipedia, serious research) and acquire some basic Spanish first. Other than that, all I can say is good luck and buen camino.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
@shinta_narulita, in post #10, @trecile has helpfully posted a map with an overview of major Caminos to Santiago. There are many more, I can see that immediately ☺️.

So what is your current thinking when you start in say Görlitz? Do you plan to walk via say Erfurt, Würzburg, Trier, Paris, Tours? Or Erfurt, Bamberg, Ulm, Bern, Le Puy? Or are you planning to cover each Camino segment only once, meaning that you rarely arrive in Santiago at all? You need to be clear about this before one can work out days, kilometres and euros ...
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Although the Camino begins at each pilgrim's own door, over the centuries, a number of main routes have been pinpointed. There are currently 281 Caminos listed, encompassing more than 51,500 miles of routes through 29 different countries.
51500 miles = 82881 kilometers
82881 km / 25 km per day = 3,316 days

Or about 9 years and a month but you have to double that because Schengen rules only allows you in for about 6 months per year.

Throw in some rest days and call it twenty years.
 
Last edited:

krosemc

Camino Primitivo 2020, Camino Frances 2019
Time of past OR future Camino
2021
Gronze.com is a great source of information for the great majority (and maybe the most traversed camino paths) in Spain, with a few originating in France. Distances, elevations, and accommodations are included. You could start there. The Via De La Plata could take up to 40 days to walk or less, and that's reported to be the longest route in Spain at 600-1,200km depending on variants. If you walked the Plata, the Frances, The Northern Route, the Portuguese Route.. you could include the Invierno and that undertaking in itself could be 5-6 months I think. But, there's a reasonable list at that site with plenty of information. Cost anywhere from 30Euro-100euro a day would be my estimate depending on accommodation. It's an ambitious undertaking! :) Buen Camino! Kathleen
 

Bob P

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
First timer, leaving April 3rd from SJPDP
Way to put the numbers together Rick. I was working on it and thinking I was getting crazy numbers, but similar! 10+ years.

About the cost, I was happy on 25 Euros per day expenses, then my wife joined me and it went to >100 euros a day for the two of us. So, the cost will range entirely based on your comfort level desires. I could imagine 15 euros at the lowest, but I didn't test it 😉
 

RRat

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Planning 2017
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.
About three days and €12.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
About the cost, I was happy on 25 Euros per day expenses, then my wife joined me and it went to >100 euros a day for the two of us. So, the cost will range entirely based on your comfort level desires. I could imagine 15 euros at the lowest, but I didn't test it 😉
About five years ago there was a thread about the cost of doing the Francés. I remember the cost for retirees averaging about 35€ per person per day because that is what we averaged for about eight weeks. Mostly for albergues and pilgrim meals but including some fancier things too.
 
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Sharonih

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.
The answer is yes and no. Does it help to train the answe is of course but can you do it without training the answer is again of course. Take it easier in the beginning so you don’t do damage to yourself initially as your body gets use to the rhythm. The cost has so many variables but figure either side of 30 Euros a day
 

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
Hello, I am interested to walk the full camino of all routes with average 20-25km per day. Do you know how much time do I need to invest? Like 1-2 years? How many km is the total camino? How much money do I need to prepare? This is the most important part. I need to save money to make this happens. :) Thanks. I am really interested to make this dream comes true. Is the Camino walk hard? Do I need to train and prepare for it? Can I just do the on site training? I am in the midst of doing the last 100km of Camino Frances and Finisterre route starting today from Sarria. What is the highest elevation of Camino walk? Is that anything above 5000 meters above sea level? Thanks.
Wow... this is a question that is hard to quantify in order to answer correctly. What do you constitute a full Camono? And What "all routes" are you considering?

For the main Camino routes in Spain - I suggest looking at an app or a website like gronze.com . It is in Spanish, but you can have a Chrome browser translate it for you if needed. It lists a lot of the Camino routes in Spain. Frances, Porgugues, Norte, Primitivo, Via de la Plata, Fisterra y Muxia, Ingles, Invierno, Salvador, Madrid. It also has a link to Caminos in France (Le Puy, Arls, Tours y Paris, Vezelay, and Piamonte_. There is also a link with a map of OTHER Caminos - but not specific information for those.

Anyhow - looking through gronze.com or a similar app should give you a general idea of each Camino route distances and how many days the prescribed stages would take you to walk the Camino. For example - it shows the Frances as having 33 stages, so the average person takes about 33 days to walk that Camino.

How much does it cost? Well - depends on which Camino you are on. I believe the Frances is the cheapest and takes 30-50 Euros/day for most pilgrims, but the variance is due to spending habits and where you want to sleep and what foods you want to eat. Other routes can cost a little more. Spain is cheaper than France. And outside of Spain/France I am guessing the cost varies.

Cheapest Caminos would be those with lots of albergues, especially municipal as opposed to private.

How much did it cost for me to do the Frances/Muxia/Finisterre (39 days I think) and the Norte/Primitivo (30 days)? I spent less than 2000 Euros on each. Plus airfare.

How long will it take you to do ALL of them? Again - define what you mean by ALL of them. Seems like you could do all of Spain in well under a year back to back. The nice thing is - you don't have to do all of them at once.

Do you need to train? Well - training is helpful. But not mandatory. Start out slow and listen to your body. By "slow", I simply mean to pace yourself. I do recommend you walk often at home, and walk as long of distances as possible as preparation. I slowly built up my distances before my first Camino. Before my second Camino I walked 8 miles most days and on Sundays I walked 17 miles. Unfortunately my terrain was mostly flat - but it still got me in pretty decent shape.

Don't know about highest elevations of all the Caminos - you would probably need to look up elevations for each Camino route and compare.
 

Pathfinder075

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (Villada to SdC) (2016)
Primitivo (Ribadesella to SdC) (2017)
Don't know for total length of time to do them all, maybe 10 years, as a figure? Assuming you walk 25km everyday and you were following Woody66's 281 caminos, that gives roughly 6 years of walking, maybe 10 years if you throw in breaks and not actually walking 25km every day. TBH it sounds like you are going to prison for 10 years. How someone could do that and find it enjoyable I don't know.

As for cost, 15-20 euros a day is easy to do. Buy your food from supermarkets, eat a lot of salad, maybe carry a small stove and pan, buy pasta, chorizo and something green like rocket, some tomato puree and you have tomato pasta dinner wkith chorizo everyday. A couple of cans of cheap strong beer (Dia supermarkets do an 8% beer that was 40 cents a can a few years back and is probably still quite cheap) and you can stay on Camino forever if you wanted. Not sure I would want to. You might want to try the Francigena first and then decide on whether you want to go full blown crazy. Still you definitely have a big set for even contemplating such a nuts level idea like this. :p

Training for it, I wouldn't bother. The fact you are able to efficiently contemplate walking 52000 miles, means you probably don't need to train.

Buen Camino.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1989
Don't know for total length of time to do them all, maybe 10 years, as a figure? Assuming you walk 25km everyday and you were following Woody66's 281 caminos, that gives roughly 6 years of walking, maybe 10 years if you throw in breaks and not actually walking 25km every day. TBH it sounds like you are going to prison for 10 years. How someone could do that and find it enjoyable I don't know.

As for cost, 15-20 euros a day is easy to do. Buy your food from supermarkets, eat a lot of salad, maybe carry a small stove and pan, buy pasta, chorizo and something green like rocket, some tomato puree and you have tomato pasta dinner wkith chorizo everyday. A couple of cans of cheap strong beer (Dia supermarkets do an 8% beer that was 40 cents a can a few years back and is probably still quite cheap) and you can stay on Camino forever if you wanted. Not sure I would want to. You might want to try the Francigena first and then decide on whether you want to go full blown crazy. Still you definitely have a big set for even contemplating such a nuts level idea like this. :p

Training for it, I wouldn't bother. The fact you are able to efficiently contemplate walking 52000 miles, means you probably don't need to train.

Buen Camino.
Building on Woody66's and Pathfinder075's responses, probably a bit more than ten years. Trusting on the six years of walking that Pathfinder075 came up with and remembering that most of the routes are probably in the Schengen which means, as was pointed out above, you can only walk half the time, and figuring that you will probably wants some breaks on the time that you are walking, and may need to walk some bits multiple times on your different treks, I'm guessing 12-15 years is probably minimum. I notice Rick above did different math than Pathfinder075 and came up with 20 years.
I'm going to disagree with Pathfinder075's 15-20 euros a day suggested budget. Not everywhere will permit wild camping. The budget you will need will depend, of course, on the style you want to live in, the accommodations and food you will want. But remember most accounts have France being more expensive than Spain, and I expect Germany and Switzerland and other countries on the list are more expensive still.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
I have been pondering this question, and what sort of answer might be useful.

I can only assume you are interested in this as a great challenge that you will commit to, and persevere at, over many years if necessary. You will aim to have, at the end, a sense of completion and accomplishment. I understand that, and certainly view my own Caminos in a similar but more modest way.

The problem I see is that your goal would be arbitrary and artificial. It would take many years and what would be the point? And at the end, the goal posts will have moved - there will be new marked routes to Santiago and some of the old ones will be changed.
 
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Pathfinder075

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (Villada to SdC) (2016)
Primitivo (Ribadesella to SdC) (2017)
I'm going to disagree with Pathfinder075's 15-20 euros a day suggested budget. Not everywhere will permit wild camping.
Yeah, sorry i should have clarified, that is 15-20 euros in Spain. France is indeed much more expensive, other countries further North even more so.

That was based on staying in Municipal Albergues at roughly 10-14 euros per night and eating frugally. if your game is blowing 20 euros a day on food alone and partying like the world is about to end every night, then you would need to readjust the calculation substantially. The number I give is what I need. It may not suit your own case.

Wild camping or camping in general probably isn't required, unless you have complex medical needs in the same way as I do. Very few have the same level of problem as I do with only the guys that need daily meds and CPAP coming close. But saying that you can get away with wild camping in many countries. Spain not so much if you go by the official word, but then many albergues would probably let you camp if you had to for whatever reason.

My original response was kind of assuming you are a superhero that never tires and can walk back to back days for years on end. The reality is very few can do that.

Also as C Clearly mentions. What would be the point?

If you (the OP) set a goal like I will walk to Santiago from Jerusalem, then that would be an epic adventure/pilgrimage across multiple countries and would set you at a level beyond the vast majority of touristy pilgrims that do the last 100 for their piece of paper. Also it would be far more achievable since you wouldn't be so limited by Schengen annoyances. Is it achievable to walk that far, I don't know, it's beyond my level of adventure. I know (from reading) a couple of people on here have done it, but the other way, ask them. :)

Or you could do the mainstream caminos. Frances, Norte, VdlP, Primitivo, Finisterre, Madrid, maybe Francigena. They are achievable, walkable and you don't need to do them back to back. Just one at a time over a few years. 90 days of walking, 90 days of resting, rinse , repeat. Maybe 4 years of adventure assuming you walk twice a year. The rest of the year could be spent on other things. I don't know. it just makes more sense to do something like that. It's not a race, it's about you and the journey. Enjoy it.
 

Tiger 48

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2014 Frances. 2017 to be Norte
A lot of questions here. When you say "the full camino of all routes" it is a bit difficult to know exactly what you mean. This website has many of the routes on it, but not all. To work our how much time it would take to walk all those routes you would need to add up the total kilometres and do some maths, and allow days for travel from one route to another and for rest days. I don't think anyone on this forum can do that for you.

The cost will depend on how you propose to live. If you think you would be camping with a tent then it will be a lot less than if you are staying in luxury accommodation. Members of the forum can probably give you a daily amount of their own expenses.

As to your questions about training, preparing, and elevation, I think you would need to work that out yourself.
I was going to reply but I totally concur with your comments.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
.
Hello @shinta_narulita
Throughout the ages there have been pilgrims in Europe and other places who have chosen to live in a state of permanent transition, moving year after year from holy site to holy site. They leave their former lives for a very long time. Some never return. Is this how you see yourself?

Regards
Lovingkindness
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Interesting thought. So I had to run some very rough numbers........

Total distance from post above.

View attachment 137243

I think you'd need to move to Europe and give up working!
And if you add the inflation you will encounter by year 10, the costs will be even higher. And if you dont move to Europe - the flights into and out of the EU every alternate 90 days
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1989
And if you add the inflation you will encounter by year 10, the costs will be even higher. And if you dont move to Europe - the flights into and out of the EU every alternate 90 days
Definitely moving to Europe seems the way to pursue this dream (on a visa that doesn't impose the Schengen limits). Besides avoiding the costs of the frequent flights, it removes the "only 90 days out of every 180" limit allowing you to focus on your goal and complete it twice as fast.
 
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CWBuff

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Time of past OR future Camino
Frances May-June/2022
Finisterre June-July/2022
Throughout the ages there have been pilgrims in Europe and other places who have chosen to live in a state of permanent transition, moving year after year from holy site to holy site. They leave their former lives for a very long time.
Yup
Happened to meet a couple of folks when I walked. Quite an interesting concept and makes one helluva-conversation
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
So if it’s going to take you 20 years - or even just 10 - that’s one mighty commitment for someone to make to do with you. You might have more success learning to navigate yourself. Especially as no one has yet managed to identify the goal and I suspect most people would need a reason to commit a decade or two to something.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Going for Camino walk this Nov.
HI!
Searched Google came up with this!
H
How many Camino de Santiago routes are there?


Although the Camino begins at each pilgrim's own door, over the centuries, a number of main routes have been pinpointed. There are currently 281 Caminos listed, encompassing more than 51,500 miles of routes through 29 different countries.
Buen Camino
and good luck

Woody

Nobody has had such thoughts or done that.

What a number of people have done or dream of doing is walking from their own home to Santiago. When you have finished walking from Sarria to Santiago and then to Finisterre why not start planning your Camino from Singapore to Santiago. Are you in Sarria now and about to do your first Camino steps? If so, then Buen Camino!
From Singapore to walk to Santiago is impossible. :) yes finishing my camino frances tomorrow. 1 day earlier. I have 7 full days spare to do Finister. At first, I don't plan to go to Muxia. So I may have 3 nights at Finister. I may have to change plan. 3 nights at Finister maybe too long.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
At first, I don't plan to go to Muxia. So I may have 3 nights at Finister. I may have to change plan. 3 nights at Finister maybe too long.
You could spend one night at Finisterre, then walk to Muxía over two days, spending the night in between in Lires.
It looks like there's a morning bus and two afternoon buses from Muxía to Santiago.

 
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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Or go back to Santiago from Finisterre - there are wonderful things to do there for a few days.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
From Singapore to walk to Santiago is impossible. :)
Difficult, yes, dangerous, yes, but once you get over the strait to Malaysia, it would technically be possible! However, if you have difficulty navigating, that would be a serious constraint.

By the way, how did you find your camino taster? Are you still interested in pursuing years of walking? I'm wondering if you might try a longer route next.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023: Via Francigena, Lucca to Rome
I'm wondering ... do you perhaps mean one single long walk to Santiago, combining multiple camino routes, as opposed to walking dozens of different routes to Santiago? The first is do-able in one person's lifetime.

If so, check out:
  • Via Gebennensis (Geneva to Le Puy, France; 16 stages) (Stages are based on Gronze.com)
  • Via Podiensis (Le Puy to Saint Jean Pied de Port; 29 stages)
  • Camino Francés (Saint Jean to Santiago; 33 stages)
That would take at least two seasons on a Schengen Visa.

Going back to Switzerland, you can start walking to Rome:
  • Via Francigena (Lausanne to Rome; 50 stages)
You'd want to cross the Alps in summer, but I've read you also want to avoid parts of Italy in the summer (mosquitos and heat), so figure two seasons for this also.

I have no idea on the cost ... check back with me in ten years when I've done them all!

There are other options ... there are less-travelled routes starting in Germany and Central Europe, and the Via Francigena del Sud that goes from Rome to Bari, from which you get a boat to Albania & continue walking to Jerusalem. That would be the adventure of a lifetime.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Planned
A lot of questions here. When you say "the full camino of all routes" it is a bit difficult to know exactly what you mean. This website has many of the routes on it, but not all. To work our how much time it would take to walk all those routes you would need to add up the total kilometres and do some maths, and allow days for travel from one route to another and for rest days. I don't think anyone on this forum can do that for you.

The cost will depend on how you propose to live. If you think you would be camping with a tent then it will be a lot less than if you are staying in luxury accommodation. Members of the forum can probably give you a daily amount of their own expenses.

As to your questions about training, preparing, and elevation, I think you would need to work that out yourself.
I didn’t know you could camp with a tent. Is that true?
 
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Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
From Singapore to walk to Santiago is impossible. :) yes finishing my camino frances tomorrow. 1 day earlier. I have 7 full days spare to do Finister. At first, I don't plan to go to Muxia. So I may have 3 nights at Finister. I may have to change plan. 3 nights at Finister maybe too long.
No, it isn't. Very difficult but not impossible. It's all overland. Try to be in Siberia in the summer. You will need a lot of visas and would probably be crossing a war zone. The route is via Thailand, Vietnam, China, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, France.
That's the main countries, there are some short bits in other countries and an alternative route not going through Vietnam. You could go round Ukraine but it adds a substantial amount of walking. Another option would be the silk route. Get a big map.
 

Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
It's all a bit of a pipe dream, I think. Some prior reading would be a good thing before jumping in to this project. I certainly don't see saving up first then only spending on the way, rather than alternating work and walking as an option. The 90 day limit does not need to be a problem, long term Schengen visas are available. There are other fora used by long distance travelers that could be helpful. Take a look on Facebook. I would strongly recommend a bit more walking on the French or Spanish routes to decide if this is really a good idea.
 

Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Perhaps a more authentic pilgrimage, well travelled and lots of places to stay although some neglected over the last 1,000 or so years. A few camels recommended rather than a donkey, although less useful as you approach Europe.
Someone did walk the Le Puy route with a camel. I never saw it myself but it had a big impact on the hospis.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
This thread has a kind of weird fascination for me - occasionally I do think about taking permanently to the road and becoming a hobo. It lasts about 30 minutes before I realise that "freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose!"

Besides, think of the many discomforts. Our friend @shinta_narulita completed the last 100km into Santiago but is now unable to walk because of blisters.
 
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henrythedog

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Rather a lot, and hopefully more to come
This thread has a kind of weird fascination for me - occasionally I do think about taking permanently to the road and becoming a hobo. It lasts about 30 minutes before I realise that "freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose!"

Besides, think of the many discomforts. Our friend @shinta_narulita completed the last 100km into Santiago but is now unable to walk because of blisters.
I think many of us, when settled into the routine, get that ‘wouldn’t it be great if this just carried on forever’ feeling.

Much as I like Santiago; the ‘first morning’ feeling after arrival when I realise I don’t have to pack up and set off is bitter-sweet.
 

Sirage

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago 2005 and a few more since
There are people who leave home for long while, for example, 3 specific examples:
1. I spoke to an unusually dressed man in Madrid - he had just arrived having walked from Jerusalem, and was on his way somewhere I forget, possibly Santiago. Reported also in the Spanish press.
2. I heard of an English school teacher who retired, was given a bicycle, and without much riding experience, headed off around the world. Fairly well known.
3. In Melbourne (Aus) a few years ago I stopped to chat with an Italian man riding a very heavily loaded bike - he had just cycled from Darwin. Although that year's ride had begun a long way before Darwin. Apparently he was over 100,000 km of riding in 10 or so years, on the road for 8 o 9 months and home with family for a few months before heading off again. An endless ride.

So this question, of "all the Caminos" whilst vague, has been a reality in some form for some people, and no doubt there are many many more some of you will have heard of.

Whilst we all here enjoy a long walk somewhere (except for those who don't walk and are just curious or lurking), long walks have been an essential aspect of the progress of civilisation, including those that appear to be endless. Many books will have been written about this I suppose.

Doing a Camino on foot is now allowing many people to participate in a profoundly important and rewarding ancestral activity which had been almost forgotten for a few hundred years until the last few decades. The number of those now walking is testament to that yearning.

So I guess @shinta_narulita is wondering how to fulfil his/her yearning. An easy answer would be to start at the front door. Think about finishing another time.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
long walks have been an essential aspect of the progress of civilisation
I find that a bit of an unusual view. While we can discuss endlessly that a pilgrimage is not a hike, I see the ever increasing popularity of Camino walking evolve in parallel with the ever increasing popularity of outdoor walking during leisure time, at least around here where I live in the middle of the European continent. I wanted to read up a bit on data for my own pleasure but came instead across an article about the History of Walking (also known as wandern, wandelen, randonner, and I don't know the Spanish, is it caminar?) and thought I'd share a bit of it (translated, see below).

Walking when you don't have to do so for your living became popular about 150 years ago, at the end of the 19th century. And isn't the last sentence in the quoted extract true? Ask yourselves: Would YOU be walking in Spain if there were no transcontinental airplanes to take you there?

The history of walking
People have always been on the move on foot - to open up new hunting grounds, to transport goods, to look for work, to find pastures for their cattle or to wage war against neighbouring peoples with entire armies.
For a long time, however, no one wandered just for fun. Walking was not a pleasure or a leisure activity, but a means to an end. And walking was part of the hard daily routine for those who could afford neither horse nor carriage.
That only changed about 150 years ago. In the middle of the 19th century, a means of transport was gaining ground that made it possible for broad sections of the population to get from one place to another faster than ever before: the railway.
People were no longer forced to do everything on foot - the way was paved for hiking as a conscious experience of nature.
People became more mobile. Sundays no longer had to be spent in one's own village or town. From now on, people could travel to places that would have been almost inaccessible without the railway.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1989
The 90 day limit does not need to be a problem, long term Schengen visas are available.
I've done a bit of research and I've never come across long term Schengen visas for travel or tourism. Only longer term visas for work, study, or residency. Can you help me out with where I can find more information about them? I'm thinking if I ever want to do the Via Francigena in one go, I might want to give myself a bit more than 90 days. (I know it is doable in 90 for may, but it would be pushing it for me and I like to have a bit of leeway.) Or maybe for the Camino from Geneva.
 

Tincatinker

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2012
I've done a bit of research and I've never come across long term Schengen visas for travel or tourism. Only longer term visas for work, study, or residency. Can you help me out with where I can find more information about them? I'm thinking if I ever want to do the Via Francigena in one go, I might want to give myself a bit more than 90 days. (I know it is doable in 90 for may, but it would be pushing it for me and I like to have a bit of leeway.) Or maybe for the Camino from Geneva.
There might be those, 'Paddy' Leigh Fermor would've been one, who would suggest that the entire purpose of a long walk was study and work - and/or avoiding both ;)
 
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Tincatinker

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2012
I think the OP's question was asked in all innocence. It fits in with the "string" (length thereof) question; Angel density on a standard pin-head; did God create Darwin and, will it rain on Tuesday. All topics that merit discussion but all unanswerable.

Let us be grateful for such questions, otherwise all discussion will be lost to the definitive: eg. Yes, you should pre-book Orisson if you really want to stay there
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I find that a bit of an unusual view. While we can discuss endlessly that a pilgrimage is not a hike, I see the ever increasing popularity of Camino walking evolve in parallel with the ever increasing popularity of outdoor walking during leisure time, at least around here where I live in the middle of the European continent. I wanted to read up a bit on data for my own pleasure but came instead across an article about the History of Walking (also known as wandern, wandelen, randonner, and I don't know the Spanish, is it caminar?) and thought I'd share a bit of it (translated, see below).

Walking when you don't have to do so for your living became popular about 150 years ago, at the end of the 19th century. And isn't the last sentence in the quoted extract true? Ask yourselves: Would YOU be walking in Spain if there were no transcontinental airplanes to take you there?

The history of walking
People have always been on the move on foot - to open up new hunting grounds, to transport goods, to look for work, to find pastures for their cattle or to wage war against neighbouring peoples with entire armies.
For a long time, however, no one wandered just for fun. Walking was not a pleasure or a leisure activity, but a means to an end. And walking was part of the hard daily routine for those who could afford neither horse nor carriage.
That only changed about 150 years ago. In the middle of the 19th century, a means of transport was gaining ground that made it possible for broad sections of the population to get from one place to another faster than ever before: the railway.
People were no longer forced to do everything on foot - the way was paved for hiking as a conscious experience of nature.
People became more mobile. Sundays no longer had to be spent in one's own village or town. From now on, people could travel to places that would have been almost inaccessible without the railway.
Even now I know many people who wouldnt walk unless there was a purpose.
Ive been with people who will drive around and around the block waiting for a parking spot to materialise right by the door, when we could have parked 200 metres away and walked in half the time.

Because I live in a small rural village, we have a lot of farmers and forestry people here. They're on their feet all day, so unless they're heading out hunting, or a place can only be reached by foot, they often dont walk for fun.
I live 1km from the middle of the village, and I think I'm the only person in our road to walk there instead of driving.
But I do see change happening.
A track has just been completed around a local park, and I see all sorts of people there, the usual suspects like myself with a dog, but now I notice couples, and families.
And we are about to hold our second Camino evening, where I cook Spanish food, we see a movie, and chat about the elements of a Camino, and at least 2 people are planning one.
 

Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I've done a bit of research and I've never come across long term Schengen visas for travel or tourism. Only longer term visas for work, study, or residency. Can you help me out with where I can find more information about them? I'm thinking if I ever want to do the Via Francigena in one go, I might want to give myself a bit more than 90 days. (I know it is doable in 90 for may, but it would be pushing it for me and I like to have a bit of leeway.) Or maybe for the Camino from Geneva.
Residency would fit. Or Study. Camino history, anyone? If you have the money to support yourself you can go pretty much anywhere.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
I've never come across long term Schengen visas for travel or tourism
There are several forum members who obtained long-term visa for Camino walking and for travelling in Europe. If memory does not fail me all them had a nationality that does not require a visa for stays shorter than 3 months. Here is one such thread:

I happened to recall the name of the poster and so it was easy to find the thread. I don’t recall the other names but there was at least one other forum member with a similar situation - perhaps they even got a visa for 12 months instead of just 6 months, also for travelling … but I can’t remember the details.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
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No, it isn't. Very difficult but not impossible. It's all overland. Try to be in Siberia in the summer. You will need a lot of visas and would probably be crossing a war zone. The route is via Thailand, Vietnam, China, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, France.
The "proper" route would be through Jerusalem, Byzantium (which is still the name of the part of Istanbul around the Hagia Sophia), Greece, Rome and Italy, and so on. Either walk around the Adriatic or cross by ferry, the latter being the more traditional option.
 
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Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
The "proper" route would be through Jerusalem, Byzantium (which is still the name of the part of Istanbul around the Hagia Sophia), Greece, Rome and Italy, and so on. Either walk around the Adriatic or cross by ferry, the latter being the more traditional option.
Yes, I hadn't thought of that one, I just surged to my keypad with the first one that came to mind as I was a little cross at being flat out contradicted. The "proper" route would probably be a little easier than the Siberian route, both for terrain and bureaucracy. How would the distances compare?
I do maintain that a map is a much under- rated tool, the proper use of which can answer many questions. Having said which, I may now have to use one to answer my own question. 🤔
I suppose one would route via Myanmar and Nepal, which might pose the first major visa problems, not to mention how few authorised border crossings exist. Plus if your feet aren't happy doing Sarria to Santiago I dread to think what they would be like by Jerusalem. I wonder if it could be done by train? I like trains. It only takes three weeks from my home in France to Bangkok by train. No blisters involved.
I hope the OP will come back and tell us what they plan on doing and that we haven't frightened them off.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1989
I suppose one would route via Myanmar and Nepal, which might pose the first major visa problems, not to mention how few authorised border crossings exist.
For what it's worth, when I put Singapore to Jerusalem into Google maps, asking for walking directions, it routes me through Myanmar and India, with a tiny bit of Nepal (just the extreme southeast bit). It's 10,614 km for 2.150 hours of walking (at the speed Google expects you to walk).
1669753645218.png
 
Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
For what it's worth, when I put Singapore to Jerusalem into Google maps, asking for walking directions, it routes me through Myanmar and India, with a tiny bit of Nepal
Not sure whether to start this comment with "Seriously" or not ... 😅.

But, seriously, walking through Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and Syria for a single female pilgrim from Singapore? That is not realistic, guys. @Barbara had the right idea: Bangkok, China and then simply follow the railway tracks until Paris and then the scallop shells from there. That might be just about doable.

As to the question about taking the train: not right now. As the man on seat 61 knows: All international trains to/from Moscow & Russia remain suspended until further notice. No trains at all now cross the Poland/Belarus or Finland/Russia border.
 
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Barbara

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Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Not sure whether to start this comment with "Seriously" or not ... 😅.

But, seriously, walking through Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and Syria for a single female pilgrim from Singapore? That is not realistic, guys. @Barbara had the right idea: Bangkok, China and then simply follow the railway tracks until Paris and then the scallop shells from there. That might be just about doable.

As to the question about taking the train: not right now. As the man on seat 61 knows: All international trains to/from Moscow & Russia remain suspended until further notice. No trains at all now cross the Poland/Belarus or Finland/Russia border.
Not that it makes much difference, but do we know if the OP is female/male/other/prefers not to say? It's all hypothetical anyway, and this thread has taken on a weird kind of self sustaining pseudolife, with the OP probably still treating their blisters in Santiago.
There is some kind of marked route through Poland, so no need to follow the train tracks there, and there are roads through Siberia though usually not right next to the railway. On another note, as for the trans sib, yes, currently it's local trains only Though you could go to Vladivostok from Moscow, which is an interesting definition of local, and in any case Russia is a bit problematic right now. I did use the trans Mongolian in happier days and had planned Tibet by train. Who knows when that will be possible again? So my current plan is cross Canada, which is a decent ride. I don't pretend it's a pilgrimage, and yes, it will involve a flight at each end. So the greenies can shoot me down, I really don't care.
Ok, having sown the seeds for yet another thread drift, I'm off to walk the dogs. Which has to happen come hell, come high water. According to them, at least. Not that they look very active right now.
 

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Time of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
I agree with Barbara: it does not work quite like that.

Our fictive female heroine (or male hero) train traveller can of course just leave a train station, walk to the next border, then to the next train station and hop on another train. However: I had, for a long time, toyed with the idea of travelling on the Transib, ie from Paris to either Vladivostok or Beijing and that seemed eminently feasible as plenty of other travellers were doing it. With train connections missing between countries it is a totally different story (even when, obviously, ignoring the political circumstances that are the reason for the lack of continuous train connections).
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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Not that it makes much difference, but do we know if the OP is female/male/other/prefers not to say? It's all hypothetical anyway
We do. Unless the OP asked the question about walking the Primitivo not for their own person but for another “solo female”; however, the context indicates that she asked for herself. I sometimes look at previous posts to get a bit of an idea of the background for a question so that my answers are not completely off the mark. Perhaps not everybody does that … 😶

Of course this thread is hypothetical 😇. We could just answer by saying “Given enough time, and health, anybody can walk around the world or walk all the Caminos to Santiago imaginable”.
 
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Not that it makes much difference, but do we know if the OP is female/male/other/prefers not to say? It's all hypothetical anyway, and this thread has taken on a weird kind of self sustaining pseudolife, with the OP probably still treating their blisters in Santiago.
I wondered, too, how old the person was, mainly because the notion of such a grandiose idea to walk every camino there is; it seemed rather naive to me. I was surprised how it has evolved into 80 replies, although I have not read the majority of them.
Taking trains to accomplish such a feat is definitely less daughting than walking.
I do get the impression the OP was sincere in starting the thread.
 

Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I think from context quite young. Though she may not have had much idea at that point of the history of this particular pilgrimage. I expect she does now have rather more knowledge and experience. It would be a shame if we have poured too much cold water on her ideas. Anyone for Our Lady of Walsingham to Jerusalem? I could quite fancy cycling that one. 🙂
 

Tincatinker

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2023 Camino Guides
The 2023 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Time of past OR future Camino
Planned
No, it isn't. Very difficult but not impossible. It's all overland. Try to be in Siberia in the summer. You will need a lot of visas and would probably be crossing a war zone. The route is via Thailand, Vietnam, China, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, France.
That's the main countries, there are some short bits in other countries and an alternative route not going through Vietnam. You could go round Ukraine but it adds a substantial amount of walking. Another option would be the silk route. Get a big map.
Very Interesting.
 

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