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Irish President walks the Camino

ivar

Administrator
Staff member

El Correo Gallego

The Irish President started her walk from Sarria on Monday. She passed Melide yesterday. Read more here in today's El Corrego Gallego.

Note: if you read Spanish, have a look at the comments in the article in El Correo. I see comments like "...Spanish politicians have a lot to learn...". Maybe walking the camino should be a requirement to be elected in any country?

Saludos,
Ivar
[edit: Yes, you are right she is the President, not Prime Minster :oops: ]
 

ajp

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-October (2009), Sept-Oct (2013)
Maybe President McAleese will join us over 60's in our thread....assuming she has attained that milestone.

I wish her godspeed and a good camino!

AJP
Victoria
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
I am ashamed of seeing how the press is treating her, the article in the paper says she is very unfriendly because she does not want to talk to the press, she is on her holiday, and I think she should be respected as another piligrim.

this said, she is not JUST another pilgrim, she is not keeping a particularly low profile with her big entourage, a hideous fuchsia rain jacket, bodyguards, accomodation in the same hotel every night with bus transport back and forth...

I understand her security is important, but for this type of trips, maybe things should be done in a different way, I am pretty sure nobody would recognize her along the way, if she wants to do the Camino, she can choose between waiting to finish her term in office and doing it in a nice relaxed way, or else do the final 100 km in the way she is doing them. I would say if she were discreetly guarded, she would be safe enough, nobody knows her face here in Spain!

Anyway, mixed feelings about this, on the one hand, ashamed of the journalists not leaving her alone, on the other hand, not happy with all the entourage and circumstances around her 4 or 5 day trek (calling that a pilgrimage is hard)

Buen camino, Mary, at least thanks for coming around in low season!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
I have always wanted to exclude the fuschia-clad from true pilgrim status.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Lucky she (and most of those behind her) has 2 skiing poles on that rough looking road otherwise she'd probably fall over-presumably she also uses them when walking the streets in Ireland
 

JaneB

Member
I don't normally jump into these threads but

what happened to 'everyone walks their own camino'?

Who is to say that, like so many of us, she wasn't drawn to walk for a reason that she didn't fully understand? When that need hits resistance is futile and if this was an available opportunity then good for her for taking it. And if 5 days is what she had, then 5 days has to be enough. We don't all have the luxury of being able to take several weeks leave in order to walk. Are pilgrims who walk from Sarria less worthy of the accolade?
She may not be easily recognised in Spain but that doesn't mean the need for security is greatly reduced, her position makes her vulnerable. Are we to deny someone the right to walk simply because of their job?

Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox!
 
JaneB,
Glad you jumped on the soap box,I feel the same as you,we are all different and good luck to her I am sure that Mary will have gained something from the experience.
Buen Camino,
stpatricksbhoy. :) :) :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:
 

NaKwendaSafari

Active Member
JaneB,

stpatrickboy has my support, you are voicing what most of the silent majority should voice.

You are sorely needed on this soapbox, too often this forum is unfortunately dominated by those intent on bragging about the way a "proper pilgrim" should do a pilgrimage. Good on Mary, she is doing it her own way, wearing what she likes irregardless of its colour, raincoat colour does not make a pilgrimage.

Kwaheri
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
Being sarcastic and hypercritical about a fellow pilgrim´s Camino is NOT a very Christian attitude. I am surprised and disappointed at some of the comments on this thread. It is easy to poke fun at someone who can´t reply, but also childish.

If Mary´s Camino didn´t mean something to her she wouldn´t be doing it. In her position she is probably doing the best she can. Good luck and "buen Camino" to her.

Sandra :x
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
A wonderful feeling of peace on the Camino
Irish Times

PRESIDENT MARY McAleese will resume her official duties as President today when she hosts a reception in the Áras for Ireland’s Grand Slam rugby team. I expect it will be a pleasant occasion for all concerned – due recognition by our first citizen for a marvellous achievement in the name of Ireland. For much of the past week, however, the President has been doing something in private which, no offence to the team, I think will live with her long after that unforgettable drop goal kicked them all into the history books.

Early last week, McAleese got herself to Sarria, a provincial city in Galicia, northwest Spain. From there, she and her husband Martin and some friends walked 112 kilometres west to Santiago de Compostela, following the Camino, a path trod by tens of millions of people over millennia.

The reasons for doing the Camino are varied and usually quite personal. The President is known to be a very religious and spiritual person. She’s also a great walker. So the Camino was a win-win for her.
In boom times or recession, the Camino imposes a healthier perspective than the advertising agencies. I hope Mary McAleese talks a little of her Camino because I strongly suspect she could say things that would ring true for many people right now.

I got an e-mail the other day from a friend, a 74-year-old man walking the Camino for the sixth time. He tried to explain its appeal, how it led to “a meditative or contemplative experience . . . What meaning one gives this could be called a grace,” he wrote. The elements of this were a substantial period (six to eight hours) of strenuous physical effort each day; silence; a simple life with few outside responsibilities and simple material requirements; and the physical rhythm of walking.

“More and more, as the Camino goes on,” he wrote, “I find myself nodding and swaying to the regular beat of my feet and my walking sticks . . . when the whole of my walking ensemble is hanging just right, working just right, bag hangs so that I am barley aware of it, my feet are supported so comfortably in my boots, my sticks are extended to the appropriate length so that they work in tandem with the opposite foot. When all of these elements are present I easily slip into a – what to call it? – a trance, a meditative state at times leading to a wonderful feeling of peace . . . At times when I come out of one of these states I do not remember what I had been thinking about, if anything.”
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
NaKwendaSafari said:
JaneB,

this forum is unfortunately dominated by those intent on bragging about the way a "proper pilgrim" should do a pilgrimage.

Kwaheri

I honestly think my remarks have been misunderstood, I have every right to have my own opinion, I am disappointed on the way the press did not leave her alone, that was not fair on her.

Obviously the remarks about the colour of her jacket was just a touch of humour, no offence meant in that.

This said, I insist I do not think it is the best of ideas to bring an entourage to the camino and to arrange all that safety measures, buses, etc, this lady may have done a beautiful walk, but I doubt that can really be considered pilgrimage, everybody being free to do whatever they may choose to do, but in my view, not sleeping in the hostels takes a lot of the nicest parts of walking the camino, and bringing such a crowd (police, security, etc) is not the best contribution to tranquility in the Camino.

I am glad she finished well, sure she enjoyed it, and hope the press guys gave her a break and left her alone.
 
The dictionary defines Pilgrimage as,

A journey to a sacred place or shrine.
A long journey or search, especially one of exalted purpose or moral significance.

We all aspire to the above in our own way and should never question a fellow pilgrims motivation,length or type of pilgrimage.I have been to Iona several times,car,hotel,boat and bus in that order to get there,never walked a yard more than required,however spiritually I had some wonderful experiences,met many pilgrims and nobody asked how I got there.

Buen Camino,
stpatricksbhoy. :) :) :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:
 

JaneB

Member
I'm glad she walked.

I'm glad that so many people walk, it may make the CF crowded during the summer months but there are other routes, and months, for those wanting a quieter walk.

ETA : Iona is another one of those places that 'calls'. My memories of an all too brief visit there linger 11 years on
 

Timo

Member
Terve,
Thank you Sil. It´s very wise to put neutral quote to this discussion. I think we are too eager to critize others...
-T-
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
It should also be noted that, in Irish constitutional practice, the President requires governmental permission to leave the country and the inclusion of a security detail was almost certainly a requirement. I have known a few people who have been required to live with security and they would have very happily (even joyfully) dispensed with it. This likely had an effect on the accommodations available. I have known moderately prominent people, including at least three bishops and a former Minister of the Crown, who have stayed in the albergues, but bishops are not really targets of anybody these days.

The walking or cycling aspect of pilgrimage is, I would think, the essential one. Where one sleeps is neither here nor there, and is entirely a matter of personal preference. Feeling superior on one account or the other isn't likely a good idea and will probably earn one spiritual blisters.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
The camino has seen it all! Besides the mendicant pilgrim, throughout history, famous and important people have also journeyed to Santiago. Kings and Queens traveled on horseback with large retinues of servants and knights to protect them. Knights traveled with their ladies, ecclesiastical pilgrims with their clerks and servants.
Pope John Paul made two 'pilgrimages' to Santiago with security and staff. (Who would dare to suggest that he wasn't a 'real' pilgrim because he didn't walk 'the whole' camino carrying a backpack and sleeping in albergues?)
Why have we modern pilgrims chosen a caricature of a one-dimensional, poor pilgrim - usually from the early middle-ages - who has to walk hundreds of kilometers and sleep in the most basic accommodation as our benchmark for 'pilgrim'?
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I Did It My Way - and so should you

Things you must do to walk a proper Camino:

Walk exactly 30 km per day, the perfect distance for you, and, therefore, for everyone. Walk it every day. Avoid the bed race, but be irritated at those who arrive ahead of you. After all, they used up the hot water leaving you to a cold shower. If they had kept walking until you arrived, you could have had a hot shower and they would be avoiding the bed race, a win-win for everyone.

Your pack must be a minimum weight. Take nothing that might provide an element of comfort. Brag about how little you brought, but borrow the hair dryer if it is offered. As a matter of fact, borrow anything that you left behind to save weight even if it is as small as a BandAid. It will help lighten others’ packs, and show them a little bit about packing smart, too.

You must walk at your own pace. Avoid interesting fellow pilgrims if they will put you off your pace.

Don’t set a schedule, or take maps. Guidebooks that might tell you about interesting historical spots just add weight. Leave them behind. Take no watch. If you need to know the time, you can always ask another pilgrim. They will be delighted to break stride to check their watches. Borrow their guidebooks, too.

Take no photographs. Your memories will be enough. Take no cell phone or iPod, either. Mozart is no brown thrush, after all, and the sounds of nature are the purest of sounds, not including trucks. If you do not use holistic relaxation techniques, then you are not permitted to relax.

Never leave early for fear of disturbing fellow pilgrims (me). Make no clicking noises with your poles, even if no one is around. Don’t let plastic rustle. No zipper, snap, or Velcro noises, either.

Stay only in albergues of a primitive nature. They are the true Camino. If they operate on donations, leave as small a donation as your conscience permits. If they foolishly ask for nothing, then nothing is what they deserve. Accept any offer of dubious sanitation. They did not have refrigerators or running water in the Middle Ages, so it is a luxury today. No one eating from the communal pot will have a communicable disease, so dig in, and be sure to help with the cold water clean up afterward. It may be your only chance to wash your hands, given the lack of facilities.

Eat vegetarian. It is kinder to animals and lower on the food chain. Buy raw foods that are not wrapped in wasteful plastic or paper. Assume a smug air of superiority that you have ecological enlightenment and others don’t.

Use a sleeping bag that allows you to be cold and uncomfortable at night. It is more important that your pack “meet weight” than you sleep well. Tolerate bed bugs because insecticides may have side effects.

Be zen and meditative. You cannot get anything out of a pilgrimage if you focus on the physical. Avoid other pilgrims that are not as spiritual as you. Learn and use the vocabulary of self-discovery. Remind everyone regularly that you are on a voyage of self-discovery, “walking my Camino.” They will admire you for the example you set.

Insist that other pilgrims act just as you do, wake when you do, sleep when you do, and eat when you do. Experience, enlightenment, and superiority are your firm foundations for leading others along the same path as yourself. They will eventually “get it,” if they will just do it your way.

Remember, it is your pilgrimage, so let other pilgrims know when they are irritating you. Avoid the local people because their peasant lives do not permit them to understand the suffering and exaltation of the pilgrim. If they wanted to use their five weeks of paid vacation, they could join in; they just don’t want to, and that is a personal choice they are entitled to make.

Complain incessantly about the weather, the hospitalero, and blisters. Assume everyone around you wants to hear all about it because they are not experiencing them too. Even blog about them. No one’s pain is as real as yours.

And that is the ideal. If yours is not just like it, then you have missed out on the real Camino and will have to do it again until you get it right. Rules are rules after all.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
.... and wear only boots (sandals and socks are for sissies!)
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
I was not expecting everybody to agree with my view, but I really think I not have explained myself properly.

Alas, everybody does the camino as they like. Next time I will make sure to bring along a band of marching majorettes with drums and flying battons announcing my arrival in every town with loudspeakers as I triumphantly march in.

:wink:

I am not saying everybody has to do the camino the way I may like, but I find that we can all contribute to keep a low profile, that is the basis of my view, that it would be ideal to keep these displays off the Camino.

Anyway, buen camino everyone
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
amancio said:
it would be ideal to keep these displays off the Camino.

I'm just grateful not to have been a pilgrim in the company of Dame Margery Kempe - she had visions and was so taken with the love of God that she shook and wailed and sobbed and fell about - it often happened that her pilgrim companions made very early starts (no plastic bags to give the game away) to get away from her!!!


I wonder what it was like sharing the Way with Shirley Maclaine??
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
seeing I am called "not a good Christian" and "I need to go out more often" as per other fellow pilgrims who consider me to be intolerant, I shall follow your advice and stop coming to this forum. I do not think you need Spaniards here, anyway.

Buen camino a todos
 
Amancio, So you are now as we say in Scotland " in the huff ",your challenge is to figure that out.Your Christianity is not in question and personally I would never question it.You probably do come across as somewhat intolerant,so what the heck I have been called many things in life and lived to tell the tale.Stay on the forum,say what you feel.At sixty two years of age I started my six week course of tourist spanish lessons last night and I hope that we can meet on the Camino and I can say, " mucho gusto".

Buen Camino,
stpatricksbhoy. :) :) :arrow: :arrow: :arrow:
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Well somemuch for toleration for others viewpoints. If you look back to Amancio's original post there are some valid points. Given that Mary is the Irish president she is obvioulsy not the usual pilgrim-compound that with the fact that she is travelling with bodyguards and an entourage. Can Janeb,Stpatricksbhoy,Nakwendasafari,Sansthing etc illuminate us as to naming other recent pilgrims who have travelled thus? The original comment seems blindingly obvious. Sansthing-if someones comment does not show,in your opinion, a christian attitude-so what? are you saying only christians are allowed on the camino?
Janeb-I don't quite understand your reasoning-if someone is virtually unknown in spain would'nt it be counter productive to surround that person with security-are'nt you drawing attention to someone by doing that?
Stpatricksbhoy-never question someones motivation?-how touchy feely of you. There have been those on the camino who have preyed on pilgrims for financial or sexual gain-of course those people's motivation should be questioned and challenged-don't be so ridiculous. And you state that you have been called many things in your life-I'm not surprised.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Well, now that we have that all sorted out now let's get back to light weight packs, bed bugs and pure water.

I am a bit disappointed that there hasn't been any discussion at to whether the President prefers vinotinto or vinoblanco. Could it be that one in the group has a frosty, cool Guinness at the ready.

Buen Camino,

Arn
 
Well I am sorry but it's not sorted,Omar you know nothing about me,you obviously see the worst in people,where I hope I see the good things,maybe you need a good look at yourself and maybe you are the one with some "ridiculous" opinions,all are entitled to walk the Camino,life is full of dangers,the Camino will be no different.
stpatricksbhoy.
:arrow: :arrow: :arrow:
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Just as a general principle as has been said before on other posts if a person has something personal to say please use the PM facility.

While a lively discussion on the pros and cons of the Irish President are a discussion topic worth writing about there is little to be gained, especially in a community of pilgrims, by attacking others personally. By all means disagree vehemently with what they say but try to produce a reasoned arguement.

If anyone continues personal attacks via the PM and the moderators are told about it action will be taken as necessary.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
William said:there is little to be gained, especially in a community of pilgrims, by attacking others personally.

Arn said, Well, now that we have that all sorted out now let's get back to light weight packs, bed bugs and pure water.

Well, there you have two moderator responses to a thread dust up. One a slight nudge and the other a not so subtle push.

We are a community of pilgrims with ostensibly a common goal…to make our journey to Santiago enjoyable, meaningful and above all safe. The Forum is sort of a “safe house”. It’s a place that before, during and after your Camino you can return to and share your insights and discoveries, new hopes and desires. If it harbors divisive actors voicing rancor at ever increasing levels of volume, the casual visitor will depart.

Buen Camino,
Arn
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
President MacAleese comes from a Belfast academic background. Such circles have always had a good appreciation for tinto and, if memory serves me well, I first had Spanish wine at the table of one of the chaplains at Queen's University, Belfast, many many moons ago.
 

ajp

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-October (2009), Sept-Oct (2013)
I think a lot of us are missing an important point here......anyone who has had any involvement in public life, at any level, will know how demanding and time consuming a job it is. Quite frankly I think it is amazing that the President of an important and dynamic country such as Ireland, with all the pressures she must have on her, would make the time to do a pilgrimage. It says a great deal about her and her character, Ireland is lucky to have her!

I wish our current Prime Minister would go on a pilgrimage, ( but a much longer one).

AJP
Victoria
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I have got to go with the Private Message recommendation. Having poured oil on this fire, I know that humor hits different people different ways, supporting the use of a PM!

Congratulations are also an excellent use of PM's. The entire Forum does not need to know that someone is congratulating someone. Quite frankly, a public compliment is more about the complimenter than the complimented (though I DO understand the importance of complimenting in public and reprimanding in private).

I know that in the future, when in doubt, I will use a PM.
 

crackmrmac

Veteran Member
My post was an informative type one, which included general things all pilgrims experience.
Here's another one http://www.independent.ie/opinion/colum ... 19694.html

Arn, J Walker etc might smile at final paragraph.

"I hope she didn't suffer the same jolt as I did when I entered the city. I was walking with my brother-in-law on this last stage. My eyes were raised to the spire of the cathedral, my mind filled with images of medieval devotion.

The tap-tap of my stick was ringing out like a prayer.

"Jesus," says my companion, "there are some cracking bars in this joint."
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
Re: I Did It My Way - and so should you

falcon269 said:
Things you must do to walk a proper Camino:

Walk exactly 30 km per day, the perfect distance for you, and, therefore, for everyone. Walk it every day. Avoid the bed race, but be irritated at those who arrive ahead of you. If yours is not just like it, then you have missed out on the real Camino and will have to do it again until you get it right. Rules are rules after all.

I'm SO glad I read this before I ate my lunch...I'd be laughing so hard, I'd probably be ill! Thank you for your delightful set of rules. I'll be sure to print them before I go again!!

And in further note, while I personally don't do Pink/Fuschia or other seriously girly colors....I think
El Presidente looks fab and cheerful on what was obviously a rainy and dreary day!

All I can say is good for her, and probably when all is said and done, good for those who had to follow her. Perhaps they too came away the better from the exposure!

To one and all, Buen Camino :D :arrow:
 

TippMan

New Member
ajp said:
I think a lot of us are missing an important point here......anyone who has had any involvement in public life, at any level, will know how demanding and time consuming a job it is. Quite frankly I think it is amazing that the President of an important and dynamic country such as Ireland, with all the pressures she must have on her, would make the time to do a pilgrimage. It says a great deal about her and her character, Ireland is lucky to have her!

I wish our current Prime Minister would go on a pilgrimage, ( but a much longer one).

AJP
Victoria
firstly i'm not so sure our country is quite so dynamic since the recession, we are now 90billion, yes 90 billion euro in debt.
On a second point people outside Ireland confuse the role of our president with that of a president of another country, say USA. In Ireland the president is more of a figure head role. She visits countries smiles and tries to be pretty.

Our Taoiseach or Prime Minister is the one who leads the country. Mary McAleese is something similar to the queen of england in her role.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
crackmrmac said:
Arn, J Walker etc might smile at final paragraph.

"I hope she didn't suffer the same jolt as I did when I entered the city. I was walking with my brother-in-law on this last stage. My eyes were raised to the spire of the cathedral, my mind filled with images of medieval devotion.

The tap-tap of my stick was ringing out like a prayer.

"Jesus," says my companion, "there are some cracking bars in this joint."

And I have it on the best authority that whilst her attendance at the Pilgrims' Mass was strictly incognito (at her request, with no botafumeiro) the organ did sound with the tune of Danny Boy after Communion :)
 

NaKwendaSafari

Active Member
PILGRIMAGE

Postby sillydoll on 18 Aug 2007, 11:31
In the general sense - A journey to a sacred place or shrine.
A long journey or search, especially one of exalted purpose or moral significance. This could be to the tomb of a saint, or to Graceland, or a Buddhist shrine!

Pilgrimage (i) a journey undertaken to a distant shrine or holy place.
(ii) striving to obtain salvation of your soul through a physical journey in which you are driven by caritas, love for God; and not cupiditas, love for material things.

Dante said in La Vita Nuova, “romeros” described those headed for Rome, “palmers” for Jerusalem, and “pilgrims” for Santiago.
"Non s'intende peregrino se non chi va verso la casa di Sa'Jacopo … chiamansi peregrini in quanto vanno a la casa di Galicia" one is not a pilgrim who does not visit the House of St. James — they who set foot in the Galician homeland alone earn the name of pilgrim.

So, you can take your pick on what makes a pilgrimage a pilgrimage!
Sil

Sil, I consider your passage written in August 2007 an enduring classic piece. Quoting Dante adds the icing on the cake as Dante states simply that any person, President or not, visiting the House of St. James is a pilgrim.

I am in contact with an elderly couple who are now in wheelchairs. They survived a horrific traffic accident, breaking their legs and ribs, but are aiming to walk unaided by November this year to attend his nephew's wedding. They are also planning to walk the St James Walk next summer. I will show them your passage and assure them that as long as they set foot on the Galician homeland and visit the House of St. James they would have achieved as much as they can. Particularly when the examination of the broken ribs discovered incurable cancer of the lung which now entails chemotherapy to gain remission. The story of the accident and discovery of the cancer was broadcast on "Closeup" on TV New Zealand in March 2009.

Kwaheri
 

Theo

Active Member
Re: Irish President walked ... in Britanny in 2010 ?

Hi,

... She 'd have walked also in Britanny last april 2010 (Easter week) between Le-Mont-Saint-Michel and Rennes on a Breton St James Way starting at Mont-Saint-Michel ...

Why not to follow in her footsteps ... ?

More about the Breton St-James Ways in Brittany from Ireland HERE.

Théo
 

Arn

Veteran Member
What a great time to be walking the Camino...few numbers of peregrinos, plenty of space at the albergues, probably no Italian bikers forcing one off the path and just in time for St. Paddy's Day.

Rath Dé ort!

Arn
 

Mountainman

El Croco loco
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances
(StJ-Santiago) 2007, 2009
(StJ-Fisterra) 2011, 2012
Future:
Camino del Salvador 8/2014
Camino Primitivo 8/2014?
Camino del Norte 9/2014,
and hopefully many more yet unplanned
I say: good for her she walks the Camino!, whatever length or form and however many bodyguards accompany her.

The world would be an infinitely better place if every politician would walk the Camino (preferably from home :mrgreen: and back). So let all other politicians take this example!
 

AntAthOBuaidhe

New Member
I wish the whole Dáil Éireann would walk the Camino, carry on to Finisterre and then go ten miles further. Ireland would be a happier place. :lol:
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
AntAthOBuaidhe said:
I wish the whole Dáil Éireann would walk the Camino, carry on to Finisterre and then go ten miles further. Ireland would be a happier place. :lol:

Now I think that's the best pre election suggestion for putting the country back on track that I've heard so far :lol:
N
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
:D :D I daresay many of us would suggest the same "camino" for our respective elected officials!

lynne
 

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