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Kitchens not in use

Ali@59

Alison
Time of past OR future Camino
2022
Just passed through A Gudiña and Ourense and both municipal albergues have beautiful new kitchens and also the whole albergues have been modified but only a fridge and microwave for cooking with and no utensils whatsoever , the biggest problem is there are no light switches in both these kitchens, they are controlled by the hospitalero/a, so no lights at night or morning. There are quite a few people complaining about this to the hospitalero/a because not everyone can afford to eat in bars and restaurants especially with the prices nowadays. So just to let anyone needing to cook on the route from Zamora through to Ourense at least
 
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To the complainers: "A pilgrim is grateful."

By the way, though this MAY be a result of COVID, in the past, some albergues stopped providing utensils simply because originally they DID provide them, and the pilgrims STOLE them!

Just sayin'

For the very low price pilgrims pay for a bed and shelter, I'm pretty deaf to their complaints.
Try getting that price at home...
 
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Hi Alison
thanks for the intel. How about Laza, inbetween, was that OK?
I'll be interested to hear what you find if you stay at A Laxe. I've spent many an hour there contemplating the Galician state and its state-of-mind concerning its approach to supporting, on a daily basis, the massive capital investments involved in creating its modern albergues. A Laxe won architecture prizes, I believe. A fantastic statement of brutalist concrete, open plan spaces and floor to ceiling glass looking out on the garden. A huge basement kitchen with rows of cookers and cupboards and benches and tables where happy pilgrims can eat and socialise... in theory.
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
From reports elsewhere on the forum over the last couple of years, I reckon most municipalities see the microwave route as the way to go - less mess to tidy up, easier risk assessment for kitchen dangers, lower energy bills, maintenance costs etc. I think it's fair enough for us to express disappointment about this, particularly, as you say, when we are surrounded by all these wonderful new facilities lying dormant. For me, it means I show double the gratitude and appreciation in those places that continue to maintain a working kitchen for pilgrims - to the extent that others probably think I'm a bit weird...
Hang on in there
 
I ran into the same situation at the beautiful albergue in Ribadiso, way back in 2015. Beautiful kitchen and dining area; but no dishes or pots and pans. Nada. I have wondered if it has changed. We ate at the restaurant next door, spending money we didn't plan on spending.

Oh well, after Sarria- I don't remember any communal meals or much connection with others, individuals or groups.

But in a way, that's a Galicia thing, isn't it? My understanding (which may be outdated) is the the Gov. Galacian Tourist Office was in charge of the camino in Galicia, while the government culture offices were in charge elsewhere in Spain. Does anyone know if this is correct?

Kate
 
But in a way, that's a Galicia thing, isn't it? My understanding (which may be outdated) is the the Gov. Galacian Tourist Office was in charge of the camino in Galicia, while the government culture offices were in charge elsewhere in Spain. Does anyone know if this is correct?
I think that you are right.
The Xunta albergues don't have hospitaleros per se. Rather Xunta employees are there to receive and register pilgrims, and clean up in the morning. I think that maybe they don't want to pay for the extra time that would be involved in cleaning the kitchen facilities. And I imagine that some pots and pans and other kitchenware have been abused over the years and not replaced when it became unusable.
 
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Hi Alison
thanks for the intel. How about Laza, inbetween, was that OK?
I'll be interested to hear what you find if you stay at A Laxe. I've spent many an hour there contemplating the Galician state and its state-of-mind concerning its approach to supporting, on a daily basis, the massive capital investments involved in creating its modern albergues. A Laxe won architecture prizes, I believe. A fantastic statement of brutalist concrete, open plan spaces and floor to ceiling glass looking out on the garden. A huge basement kitchen with rows of cookers and cupboards and benches and tables where happy pilgrims can eat and socialise... in theory.
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
From reports elsewhere on the forum over the last couple of years, I reckon most municipalities see the microwave route as the way to go - less mess to tidy up, easier risk assessment for kitchen dangers, lower energy bills, maintenance costs etc. I think it's fair enough for us to express disappointment about this, particularly, as you say, when we are surrounded by all these wonderful new facilities lying dormant. For me, it means I show double the gratitude and appreciation in those places that continue to maintain a working kitchen for pilgrims - to the extent that others probably think I'm a bit weird...
Hang on in there
I didn't manage to Laza, I didn't have time to finish in Santiago, so i had to cut short in A Gudiña and take the train to Ourense because i think it was my only way of getting public transport to get flight home. I can message a peregrina who is probably in Laza today. I'll let you know
 
My understanding (which may be outdated) is the the Gov. Galacian Tourist Office was in charge of the camino in Galicia,
https://www.turismo.gal/inicio like to think that they own the Camino. They've paved it, re-routed it, packaged it up and sold it as a Tourist destination dos mellores

I'm a kindly soul, I don't like upsetting people unnecessarily, so I haven't bothered to tell them that Camino belongs to the Pilgrim and to Santiago and to Santo Domingo and, for me, to my old Gods...
 
Hi Alison
thanks for the intel. How about Laza, inbetween, was that OK?
I'll be interested to hear what you find if you stay at A Laxe. I've spent many an hour there contemplating the Galician state and its state-of-mind concerning its approach to supporting, on a daily basis, the massive capital investments involved in creating its modern albergues. A Laxe won architecture prizes, I believe. A fantastic statement of brutalist concrete, open plan spaces and floor to ceiling glass looking out on the garden. A huge basement kitchen with rows of cookers and cupboards and benches and tables where happy pilgrims can eat and socialise... in theory.
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
From reports elsewhere on the forum over the last couple of years, I reckon most municipalities see the microwave route as the way to go - less mess to tidy up, easier risk assessment for kitchen dangers, lower energy bills, maintenance costs etc. I think it's fair enough for us to express disappointment about this, particularly, as you say, when we are surrounded by all these wonderful new facilities lying dormant. For me, it means I show double the gratitude and appreciation in those places that continue to maintain a working kitchen for pilgrims - to the extent that others probably think I'm a bit weird...
Hang on in there
Laza has cooking facilities and is a very beautiful albergue, I'm sorry I missed it
 
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Hi Alison
thanks for the intel. How about Laza, inbetween, was that OK?
I'll be interested to hear what you find if you stay at A Laxe. I've spent many an hour there contemplating the Galician state and its state-of-mind concerning its approach to supporting, on a daily basis, the massive capital investments involved in creating its modern albergues. A Laxe won architecture prizes, I believe. A fantastic statement of brutalist concrete, open plan spaces and floor to ceiling glass looking out on the garden. A huge basement kitchen with rows of cookers and cupboards and benches and tables where happy pilgrims can eat and socialise... in theory.
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
From reports elsewhere on the forum over the last couple of years, I reckon most municipalities see the microwave route as the way to go - less mess to tidy up, easier risk assessment for kitchen dangers, lower energy bills, maintenance costs etc. I think it's fair enough for us to express disappointment about this, particularly, as you say, when we are surrounded by all these wonderful new facilities lying dormant. For me, it means I show double the gratitude and appreciation in those places that continue to maintain a working kitchen for pilgrims - to the extent that others probably think I'm a bit weird...
Hang on in there
Facilities lying dormant------On my recent Primitivo, I stayed in many beautiful Municipal Albergues that had very few pilgrims staying there. Seemed like the majority of walkers feel they MUST pre-book and therefore are NOT patronizing the Public albergues. Afraid we are going to lose them if people don't stay in them. Still wondering how the albergue with the glass chimney for the open fire in the common room really works out when they light a fire. and how do you clean a glass chimney?
 
I know what you're saying and completely agree as i eat out myself mostly but I can't understand why they have large kitchens with new cooking hobs and tables and chairs but not really useful🤔
To the complainers: "A pilgrim is grateful."

By the way, though this MAY be a result of COVID, in the past, some albergues stopped providing utensils simply because originally they DID provide them, and the pilgrims STOLE them!

Just sayin'

For the very low price pilgrims pay for a bed and shelter, I'm pretty deaf to their complaints.
Try getting that price at home...
I partially agree.
Grateful I always was. Did I grumble at certain things? Certainly did. In sum, both my Caminos were truly great and I am thankful for every volunteer working.
You lost me with your low price argument tho.
BTW, one shall not shoot the messenger (OP in that case)
 
Just passed through A Gudiña and Ourense and both municipal albergues have beautiful new kitchens and also the whole albergues have been modified but only a fridge and microwave for cooking with and no utensils whatsoever , the biggest problem is there are no light switches in both these kitchens, they are controlled by the hospitalero/a, so no lights at night or morning. There are quite a few people complaining about this to the hospitalero/a because not everyone can afford to eat in bars and restaurants especially with the prices nowadays. So just to let anyone needing to cook on the route from Zamora through to Ourense at least
"A pilgrim is grateful."
I understand your frustration but as Anniesantiago says a pilgrim is grateful. I am in every manner a "budget" pilgrim and I saw how much more money I spent on the VDLP because kitchens were completely closed. Now that they are open if there is no utensils or stoves I make due. Just like when I stay in a municipal albergue in Galicia. I do a little planning. I buy food along the way an dinner in the town if I know the town has a market. I will eat sandwiches, or cheese and crackers with pate, or get those premixed salads that are pretty good in the market. Just go with the flow and do the best you can. It is also so true that, unfortunately, there are pilgrims who do not clean up after themselves and do steal things from kitchens.
 
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Just passed through A Gudiña and Ourense and both municipal albergues have beautiful new kitchens and also the whole albergues have been modified but only a fridge and microwave for cooking with and no utensils whatsoever , the biggest problem is there are no light switches in both these kitchens, they are controlled by the hospitalero/a, so no lights at night or morning. There are quite a few people complaining about this to the hospitalero/a because not everyone can afford to eat in bars and restaurants especially with the prices nowadays. So just to let anyone needing to cook on the route from Zamora through to Ourense at least
I agree- I'm doing the hospitalero bit now and its sad: great kitchens no real way to use them- all about economics
 
This thread made me think of the military-style mess kit that I had when I was really young, not long after the end of World War II, and my father's service in the US Army. And, low-and-behold, Coleman makes them now and Amazon sells them. There are also new and improved variations on mess kits and accessories, if you scroll down on this link. It seems as if carrying a lightweight version (not metal so safe for microwaves) might make albergue cooking possible again. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUR4A/?tag=casaivar02-20
 
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The only thing I do not understand is why the Xunta albergues in Galicia, Spain are allocated money for lovely stainless steel kitchens (which I have seen) bother to spend money on these beautiful kitchens if they do not encourage them to be used by the pilgrims they house overnight...why bother and what a waste. No pilgrims (or very few) carry pots, pans, dishes and silverware in their backpack as a means to cook along the "Way". I never use albergue kitchens, but many do and I have enjoyed seeing them collaberating to share an evening meal together. These particular kitchens are beautiful, but void of humans.
 
The only thing I do not understand is why the Xunta albergues in Galicia, Spain are allocated money for lovely stainless steel kitchens (which I have seen) bother to spend money on these beautiful kitchens if they do not encourage them to be used by the pilgrims they house overnight...why bother and what a waste.
I think that @peregrino_tom got it - the funds were available to build the albergue kitchens, but the budget for the day to day maintenance of the facilities is lacking.
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
 
I think that @peregrino_tom got it - the funds were available to build the albergue kitchens, but the budget for the day to day maintenance of the facilities is lacking.
Hmmm, possibly, but I'm not so sure. The cost of those shiny, expensive kitchens vs an hour to clean them each day by a volunteer does not add up imo. I saw no microwaves in the ones I stayed at in 2015, let alone dishes to heat up food up in them even if they had been available...it seemed strange.
 
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Hmmm, possibly, but I'm not so sure. The cost of those shiny, expensive kitchens vs an hour to clean them each day by a volunteer does not add up imo.
But the Xunta albergues do no rely on volunteers to staff the albergues. They will just have a Xunta employee check people in, or sometimes you have to go to a Xunta office to check in. In general there are no on site hospitaleros in Xunta albergues, which means that the kitchens could be quite abused without anyone there to monitor them.
 
But the Xunta albergues do no rely on volunteers to staff the albergues. They will just have a Xunta employee check people in, or sometimes you have to go to a Xunta office to check in. In general there are no on site hospitaleros in Xunta albergues, which means that the kitchens could be quite abused without anyone there to monitor them.
Then why spend the money to build those awesome kitchens in the first place...a total waste.🤷
 
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Who knows. Probably two different government beauracracies that didn't consult with one another.
Definitely two separate budgets--capital (building the physical facility) and operations (maintenance, etc.). And likely operations is assigned as an "if time permits" responsibility to the town's public works (or similar) department.
 
The only thing I do not understand is why the Xunta albergues in Galicia, Spain are allocated money for lovely stainless steel kitchens (which I have seen) bother to spend money on these beautiful kitchens if they do not encourage them to be used by the pilgrims they house overnight...why bother and what a waste. No pilgrims (or very few) carry pots, pans, dishes and silverware in their backpack as a means to cook along the "Way". I never use albergue kitchens, but many do and I have enjoyed seeing them collaberating to share an evening meal together. These particular kitchens are beautiful, but void of humans.
Honestly, when I first walked, some of them DID have cookware, cutlery, etc. But pilgrims took the stuff with them and they just didn't replace it. OR, Pilgrims didn't wash up after themselves and didn't realize their mothers weren't walking behind them, I guess. I can't blame them.
 
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Facilities lying dormant------On my recent Primitivo, I stayed in many beautiful Municipal Albergues that had very few pilgrims staying there. Seemed like the majority of walkers feel they MUST pre-book and therefore are NOT patronizing the Public albergues. Afraid we are going to lose them if people don't stay in them. Still wondering how the albergue with the glass chimney for the open fire in the common room really works out when they light a fire. and how do you clean a glass chimney?
Then you were lucky having open municipals on the Primitivo! The last time I walked it June 2021 they were all closed and you had to stay in private albergues and pensiones if you wanted to walk this Camino.

They were closed for two years and only started opening up over the last few months and not all at once so maybe that's why pilgrims have been reserving in private accommodations. This year there has also been a huge increase in traffic and many albergue owners have suggested reserving (I have friends who walked, also friends with a few albergue owners on the Primitivo).

During a "normal" year the municipals are definitely used.
 
Definitely two separate budgets--capital (building the physical facility) and operations (maintenance, etc.). And likely operations is assigned as an "if time permits" responsibility to the town's public works (or similar) department.
Actually, in Galicia who have a network of some 90 public albergues the day to day management is subcontracted since 2006 or so. A few years ago, there was some excitement in the news because the gestor had ended their contract with the regional government prematurely because of insufficient rentability, and the administration had to find another service provider in a hurry.
 
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Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
That must be very true. Galicia is still one of the poorer regions of the European Union and as such they can count on a larger share of the money from their regional development funds than other regions. Random quote from ec.europa.eu who administer these programs: Total investment for the project “Renovation and promotion of the Primitive Way” is EUR 2 868 713, with the EU’s European Regional Development Fund contributing EUR 2 244 319 through the “Galicia” Operational Programme for the 2014-2020 programming period. This includes projects like transforming older buildings into public pilgrim albergues.
 
Just passed through A Gudiña and Ourense and both municipal albergues have beautiful new kitchens and also the whole albergues have been modified but only a fridge and microwave for cooking with and no utensils whatsoever , the biggest problem is there are no light switches in both these kitchens, they are controlled by the hospitalero/a, so no lights at night or morning. There are quite a few people complaining about this to the hospitalero/a because not everyone can afford to eat in bars and restaurants especially with the prices nowadays. So just to let anyone needing to cook on the route from Zamora through to Ourense at least
Unfortunately, that’s the way the local community View the pilgrims as a cash cow !

Galicia notably has the worse reputation for this. They also removed the doors to the showers, which is bizarre !
 
Unfortunately, that’s the way the local community View the pilgrims as a cash cow !
That’s one hell of a cow. €7 for a bed and another €12 for a three course meal and wine. It’s no wonder Galicians are all driving around in their posh cars and spending weeks on subsidized walking holidays in foreign countries
 
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Just passed through A Gudiña and Ourense and both municipal albergues have beautiful new kitchens and also the whole albergues have been modified but only a fridge and microwave for cooking with and no utensils whatsoever , the biggest problem is there are no light switches in both these kitchens, they are controlled by the hospitalero/a, so no lights at night or morning. There are quite a few people complaining about this to the hospitalero/a because not everyone can afford to eat in bars and restaurants especially with the prices nowadays. So just to let anyone needing to cook on the route from Zamora through to Ourense at least
I have been fortunate to volunteer at many albergues. Unfortunately there are pilgrims that think part of their Donativo goes to them deserving a roll of toilet paper. Others believe their mother will follow them and clean the kitchen. Over the years I have seen the removal of all kitchen ware, dishes, silverware and now cooking facilities. Also please understand that the public albergues do not want to compete with small town restaurants that in fact help sponsor your stay. Please be grateful.
 
I have been fortunate to volunteer at many albergues. Unfortunately there are pilgrims that think part of their Donativo goes to them deserving a roll of toilet paper. Others believe their mother will follow them and clean the kitchen. Over the years I have seen the removal of all kitchen ware, dishes, silverware and now cooking facilities. Also please understand that the public albergues do not want to compete with small town restaurants that in fact help sponsor your stay. Please be grateful.
I am grateful to all these albergues and volunteers etc but i was only telling what others felt, not everyone likes to eat out constantly while on the Camino. And I really don't think any albergue keeps silverware in the kitchen drawers!
 
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On another thread I posted a link for these salads. Perfect for those days when no kitchen / pots and pans are available.

I love prepared salads, occasionally at home and in a pinch on the Camino. They are always very good and I often prefer them to making a bocadilla sandwich.
 
Possibly the capital funding is accessible, but not the revenue funding necessary for day-to-day upkeep.
I, too, have speculated that this might be so. I have seen this pattern elsewhere, where the capital budget includes the initial outfitting of facilities like a kitchen, but the operating budget is controlled by a separate entity that hasn't made provision for equipment repair and replacement.
Actually the no utensils thing in the kitchen in Galicia is not a new thing. I think it has been that way since we walked in 2016. The Xunta albergues all had nice kitchens, but no way to use them unless you brought your own gear.
I remember staying in a Xunta albergue that year, the one at Dumbria. All that was left in the kitchen were the very large pots and pans. This year, there was no cooking equipment in the only Xunta albergue I stayed at in Galicia. I used my trusty neoprene cup to prepare a package cup of soup in the microwave, and prepared a cold meal from other food I had bought that day. Certainly nothing like the albergue meals I have been able to prepare in better equipped kitchens elsewhere on the Camino in earlier times.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I know what you're saying and completely agree as i eat out myself mostly but I can't understand why they have large kitchens with new cooking hobs and tables and chairs but not really useful🤔
Yes this is a thing and can be frustrating. At one such place I was able to talk to a local involved with the albergue who explained that the kitchen wasn't set up for solo pilgrims, rather the community had fund raised for the building and designed the kitchen for their needs. It was a community kitchen that they used for feast days and when large groups coordinated their pilgrim efforts. I was lucky once to arrive at an albergue on a local feast day where pilgrims where greeting with fresh melon, wine and giant paella. So the kitchens do get used, and most have a kettle or microwave for solo travelers to use without making a mess.

On another note, I remember coming across a group of French pilgrims where the wives were carrying pots, pans and implements as they cooked all their meals, they even had French wine sent on to the local post office as they didn't rate the local fare. I'll never forget the husbands playing cards while the wives cooked and cleaned. Scott rolled his eyes and shouted me a meal at the local taverna, just lovely, and I didn't need to carry a cast iron frying pan anywhere.
 
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Unfortunately, that’s the way the local community View the pilgrims as a cash cow !

Galicia notably has the worse reputation for this. They also removed the doors to the showers, which is bizarre !
Cash cow?
Tell me, where in your own country can you get a bed and food for this price?
It is a privilege - and sadly, many abuse it.
 
I partially agree.
Grateful I always was. Did I grumble at certain things? Certainly did. In sum, both my Caminos were truly great and I am thankful for every volunteer working.
You lost me with your low price argument tho.
BTW, one shall not shoot the messenger (OP in that case)
So, you can find a lodging and food easily in your country for what you pay to an albergue?
You certainly cannot in the USA. Not even if you're willing to share it with needles, cockroaches, bedbugs, and more...
 
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At one such place I was able to talk to a local involved with the albergue who explained that the kitchen wasn't set up for solo pilgrims, rather the community had fund raised for the building and designed the kitchen for their needs. It was a community kitchen that they used for feast days and when large groups coordinated their pilgrim efforts. I was lucky once to arrive at an albergue on a local feast day where pilgrims where greeting with fresh melon, wine and giant paella. So the kitchens do get used, and most have a kettle or microwave for solo travelers to use without making a mess.
That's very interesting!
 
I know. I know. Pack light. But at the same time (Boy Scout motto): Be prepared. When asked, "Be prepared for what?" the founder of the Boy Scouts replied: "Anything."

I carry a large stainless steel cup that can be used on a stove, a plastic bowl that can be used in a microwave, (and lids for both), a small knife, and a large spork. I also carry a small cork screw because while I know about other ways to open a corked bottle, the corkscrew is still the best tool. All under 10 oz. Priceless.
 
In March 2019 on a very rainy evening I was with a small group from Portland and they organised for one of the local restaurants suggested by the hospitaleros to provide for a ‘pilgrim’s menu’(incl.wine )for the evening meal. I think the average cost for the meal was around 12euros per head and we still had heaps of leftovers for a small breakfast the next morning!

I was surprised we had been unknowingly locked in for the night and we had to wait until the hospitaleros at around 7am to arrive and unlock the doors !
 
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