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Memorable Climbs

Juspassinthru

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés 2017, Inglés 2019, Aragónes 2024
As I've been reflecting on my Camino's, I've been creating a list of memorable climbs on the routes that I've walked. Some were long, steep, long and steep. Sometimes it's the conditions or the condition I was in when I had to make that ascent. There are lot's of factors that make a climb memorable. These are the ones that stick in my mind and why.

  1. Urdos to Somport Pass at the end of the Chemin d'Arles. For me, this was the most difficult climb on the routes that I've walked. It's a difficult climb, gaining almost 1000m over about 15k. The length and elevation gain is a constant. We had a compounding factor of the terrain. In early April, the trails (no roads) were also the path of least resistance for the snow melt run off. The idyllic meadows were actually green bogs where at times you sunk midway up your calf. It was a long, difficult climb and our weather was good, a week later it apparently turned into a full blizzard. Definitely #1 on my list.
  2. SJPP to Roncesvalles. I did this in 2017, it too is a long, steep climb and it can be even more difficult in bad weather, fortunately it's closed in very bad weather, the climb to Somport is not. Three things make this #2, for me. First, the steepest climb is from outside of SJPP to just above Orrison so it's early and then it becomes a bit less steep. Second, if you want, you can break it into 2 days, many do. Third, you're on a path of some sort the whole time. Another reason it's so high on my list, it's Day One...welcome to the Camino!
  3. Ruesta to Sangüesa on the Aragónes. You leave the ruined town of Ruesta on a gentle downhill in a beautiful forest for about a kilometer, great start to the day. Then, the climb begins and it's a steep climb, 400m over about 6k. It's just kind of relentless, when you think you've reached the top, around the bend is another climb. It reminds me of the first part of the Francés up to Orisson. Some may disagree but this is #3 on my list.
  4. Villafranca del Bierzo to Trabadelo via Pradela alto on the Frances. It's a fairly long climb which starts steep and stays steep for an hour before it begins to become less steep until you reach the top. One plus is that if you start early, you're shaded most of the way. If you choose to make the climb investment, you're rewarded with great views and solitude. Definitely #4.
  5. Las Herrerías to O'C on the Francés. I'd forgotten about this one, it kind of snuck up on me last month even though I've climbed it 3 times now. The first 2/3 is the worst, steep and the trail in areas is very rough. We did the Pradela route but stopped in Las Herrerías. Before I'd done the river route out of Villafranca to O'C. IF I were younger, I MAY have done the Pradela alto route to O'C. I'd like to think that with age comes wisdom. Glad I broke it into 2 days. Yep, #5.
  6. Puente la Reina to Cirauqui on the Francés. This may surprise some, it's not horrendous, it's steep but relatively short but I just find it to be a grinder and I found more people stopping along the way here than on other similar climbs. I think because it's still early on the CF and usually early in the morning it just seems tougher than it should be. #6.
  7. Puente la Reina de Jaca to Arrés on the Aragónes. For me, what made this tough was that it comes at the end of another long day on the Aragónes and you can see Arrés and the albergue on the hill top...it's right there! And then you start the climb up the road (I know there's another option normally but construction blocked it) and it was just a soul crushing climb that seemed to never stop, I'd also run out of water. The last 100m it gets even more steep proving again that old Santiago has a sense of humor. The saving grace was that we were met by Jacquilena, the Hospitalera who had a great smile, an infectious laugh and water. Definitely memorable and #7 on the list.
  8. Castrojerez to Fromista on the Francés. Once again, maybe a surprise to some. It's not particularly long or overly steep but it stares you in the face as you leave Castrojerez and sort of taunts you as you approach it and then, you climb. Maybe I'm a bit masochistic, I enjoyed this climb on a beautiful morning with friends Nigel and I had met along the way. On a nice day, you're rewarded with a stunning view.
I'm sure there will be lot's of others and some disagreement. There are many routes I've not walked. Please feel free to chime in and add to the list, please add the why's and rewards or pitfalls. I look forward to reading about climbs I've missed.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The entire route of the Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria. Short but very impressive. Starts at sea level, rises up through steep rocky mountains to 1800m, then back down through forest and open hillsides to sea level again in less than 80km. Astonishing range of landscapes and climate types for such a short distance.

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Ruesta to Sangüesa on the Aragónes.
I started developing a cold during the night at Arrés, so I was on day two of feeling miserable for this stage. The small steep hill to Undués de Lerda almost did me in, so I asked about a taxi when I got to the bar there. The barman pointed me to a taxi business card. I was conflicted about taking a taxi, so I sent the driver a WhatsApp message asking the price. I decided that if I didn't hear back from him I would walk the 10km to Sangüesa where I had booked a hotel a hotel room to keep from spreading my germs in albergues. I didn't hear from the taxi driver, so I trudged on to Sangüesa, and asked to stay two nights, which was just what I needed.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I started developing a cold during the night at Arrés, so I was on day two of feeling miserable for this stage. The small steep hill to Undués de Lerda almost did me in, so I asked about a taxi when I got to the bar there. The barman pointed me to a taxi business card. I was conflicted about taking a taxi, so I sent the driver a WhatsApp message asking the price. I decided that if I didn't hear back from him I would walk the 10km to Sangüesa where I had booked a hotel a hotel room to keep from spreading my germs in albergues. I didn't hear from the taxi driver, so I trudged on to Sangüesa, and asked to stay two nights, which was just what I needed.
That stage with any kind of congestion sounds horrible. Glad you lived to tell about it😎
 
My most memorable climb is probably the Puerta de la Fuenfria Mountain Pass on the Camino de Madrid. From my Camino de Madrid Highlights post:

The Puerto de la Fuenfria Mountain Pass

For the first three stages after leaving Madrid, the Sierra de Guadarrama mountain range looms in the distance as the early focal point of the camino. On the fourth day, it’s a 600m ascent from Cercedilla, partly on a Roman road, to the Puerto de la Fuenfria mountain pass. When we walked in early April, it was below freezing when we left Cercedilla, there was still some snow on the pass, and it snowed heavily the following day.

Snow and fog on the camino at the mountain pass. The following day, a snowstorm hit the region and pilgrims following us were unable to take this route.

Snow and fog on the camino at the mountain pass the day before an April snowstorm hit the region.

Despite the cold and early morning fog, we crossed the pass under blue skies and had the trail completely to ourselves. After the pass, the next seven or eight kilometres is in beautiful forest, and the ruins of Casa Eraso, a 16th-century royal way station, are atmospherically situated in the woodlands just off the path. Later, on the open plains, the ruins of a 17th-century albergue of sorts for travellers and shepherds are also well worth exploring.

The beautifully situated woodland ruins of Casa Eraso, a 16th-century royal way station after the mountain pass at Puerto de la Fuenfría.

The woodland ruins of Casa Eraso, a 16th-century royal way station after the mountain pass at Puerto de la Fuenfría.

And after a 30km stage that is one of the most memorable – if exhausting – days you could imagine on any camino, the reward is the fabulous city of Segovia.
 
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I very much enjoyed going up the 2038m Puerto del Reventón, on the Complutense variant of the Camino de Madrid. Quite deep snow on the November day I walked it. Fabulous views back towards Madrid, and down to the "petit Versailles” palace at La Granja de San Ildefonso.

 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
There were a lot of beautiful climbs on the San Salvador and Primitivo last year. And the climb to Fuenfria was also memorable, although I got rain rather than snow. But most memorable for me was the climb to A Fonsagrada on the Primitivo. I think that was the only one where I felt forced to stop and catch my breath.
 
Love this post.
So very interesting that it seems a great deal depends on one’s physical condition + state of mind, weather, time of year…All these variables come into play. A particular difficult climb one year may not seem that way another time.
My personal nemesis after walking Primitivo, Salvador, Invierno, Portuguese (after the Combarro=nothing hill), remains the Ingles ascent after Pontedeume, been there, done that, hated it, a lot.
The descents, are always way worse than going up, any day, to me. Perhaps someone will start that thread.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Yes, the descents are far worse for me and my left knee. And, only rarely is there an ascent without a descent soon to come. Somehow though, Memorable Descents doesn’t seem as daunting when in fact, for some of us they are.
 
The entire route of the Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria. Short but very impressive. Starts at sea level, rises up through steep rocky mountains to 1800m, then back down through forest and open hillsides to sea level again in less than 80km. Astonishing range of landscapes and climate types for such a short distance.

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Hi Bradybus

My girlfriend and I have hiked that Camino Gran Canaria,now called Camino Gran Canaria Entre Volcanes, three times, twice from south to north, from Maspalomas to Galdar (2018 and 2022) and once from the north to south, from Galdar to Maspalomas (2023).

Here are some pictures from that 2018 hike then we stayed at Cruz de Tejeda, at the Hotel Rural El Refugio, which was later hosted by Juanma Sanchez Castro, who we met again 2022 in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, he is very actively involved in the development of that Camino Gran Canaria.

There is also an app for the Gran Canaria hike, here is the link to the app.

https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https://bit.ly/3NeZ0nS&data=05|02||52c48638032742cf45c808dc863c96cc|84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa|1|0|638532841979824243|Unknown|TWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0=|0|||&sdata=0ymmqJA7kIyqQg2YR76MY6MRrOuOjL3jEjNX3A9Exy0=&reserved=0

Regards, PenaV
 

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Probably one of the easier climbs to make, but I've always enjoyed the climb and subsequent views of Alto del Perdón
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
As I've been reflecting on my Camino's, I've been creating a list of memorable climbs on the routes that I've walked. Some were long, steep, long and steep. Sometimes it's the conditions or the condition I was in when I had to make that ascent. There are lot's of factors that make a climb memorable. These are the ones that stick in my mind and why.

  1. Urdos to Somport Pass at the end of the Chemin d'Arles. For me, this was the most difficult climb on the routes that I've walked. It's a difficult climb, gaining almost 1000m over about 15k. The length and elevation gain is a constant. We had a compounding factor of the terrain. In early April, the trails (no roads) were also the path of least resistance for the snow melt run off. The idyllic meadows were actually green bogs where at times you sunk midway up your calf. It was a long, difficult climb and our weather was good, a week later it apparently turned into a full blizzard. Definitely #1 on my list.
  2. SJPP to Roncesvalles. I did this in 2017, it too is a long, steep climb and it can be even more difficult in bad weather, fortunately it's closed in very bad weather, the climb to Somport is not. Three things make this #2, for me. First, the steepest climb is from outside of SJPP to just above Orrison so it's early and then it becomes a bit less steep. Second, if you want, you can break it into 2 days, many do. Third, you're on a path of some sort the whole time. Another reason it's so high on my list, it's Day One...welcome to the Camino!
  3. Ruesta to Sangüesa on the Aragónes. You leave the ruined town of Ruesta on a gentle downhill in a beautiful forest for about a kilometer, great start to the day. Then, the climb begins and it's a steep climb, 400m over about 6k. It's just kind of relentless, when you think you've reached the top, around the bend is another climb. It reminds me of the first part of the Francés up to Orisson. Some may disagree but this is #3 on my list.
  4. Villafranca del Bierzo to Trabadelo via Pradela alto on the Frances. It's a fairly long climb which starts steep and stays steep for an hour before it begins to become less steep until you reach the top. One plus is that if you start early, you're shaded most of the way. If you choose to make the climb investment, you're rewarded with great views and solitude. Definitely #4.
  5. Las Herrerías to O'C on the Francés. I'd forgotten about this one, it kind of snuck up on me last month even though I've climbed it 3 times now. The first 2/3 is the worst, steep and the trail in areas is very rough. We did the Pradela route but stopped in Las Herrerías. Before I'd done the river route out of Villafranca to O'C. IF I were younger, I MAY have done the Pradela alto route to O'C. I'd like to think that with age comes wisdom. Glad I broke it into 2 days. Yep, #5.
  6. Puente la Reina to Cirauqui on the Francés. This may surprise some, it's not horrendous, it's steep but relatively short but I just find it to be a grinder and I found more people stopping along the way here than on other similar climbs. I think because it's still early on the CF and usually early in the morning it just seems tougher than it should be. #6.
  7. Puente la Reina de Jaca to Arrés on the Aragónes. For me, what made this tough was that it comes at the end of another long day on the Aragónes and you can see Arrés and the albergue on the hill top...it's right there! And then you start the climb up the road (I know there's another option normally but construction blocked it) and it was just a soul crushing climb that seemed to never stop, I'd also run out of water. The last 100m it gets even more steep proving again that old Santiago has a sense of humor. The saving grace was that we were met by Jacquilena, the Hospitalera who had a great smile, an infectious laugh and water. Definitely memorable and #7 on the list.
  8. Castrojerez to Fromista on the Francés. Once again, maybe a surprise to some. It's not particularly long or overly steep but it stares you in the face as you leave Castrojerez and sort of taunts you as you approach it and then, you climb. Maybe I'm a bit masochistic, I enjoyed this climb on a beautiful morning with friends Nigel and I had met along the way. On a nice day, you're rewarded with a stunning view.
I'm sure there will be lot's of others and some disagreement. There are many routes I've not walked. Please feel free to chime in and add to the list, please add the why's and rewards or pitfalls. I look forward to reading about climbs I've missed.
A very good and clear explanation-
 
I ate a menu del dia
As I've been reflecting on my Camino's, I've been creating a list of memorable climbs on the routes that I've walked. Some were long, steep, long and steep. Sometimes it's the conditions or the condition I was in when I had to make that ascent. There are lot's of factors that make a climb memorable. These are the ones that stick in my mind and why.

  1. Urdos to Somport Pass at the end of the Chemin d'Arles. For me, this was the most difficult climb on the routes that I've walked. It's a difficult climb, gaining almost 1000m over about 15k. The length and elevation gain is a constant. We had a compounding factor of the terrain. In early April, the trails (no roads) were also the path of least resistance for the snow melt run off. The idyllic meadows were actually green bogs where at times you sunk midway up your calf. It was a long, difficult climb and our weather was good, a week later it apparently turned into a full blizzard. Definitely #1 on my list.
  2. SJPP to Roncesvalles. I did this in 2017, it too is a long, steep climb and it can be even more difficult in bad weather, fortunately it's closed in very bad weather, the climb to Somport is not. Three things make this #2, for me. First, the steepest climb is from outside of SJPP to just above Orrison so it's early and then it becomes a bit less steep. Second, if you want, you can break it into 2 days, many do. Third, you're on a path of some sort the whole time. Another reason it's so high on my list, it's Day One...welcome to the Camino!
  3. Ruesta to Sangüesa on the Aragónes. You leave the ruined town of Ruesta on a gentle downhill in a beautiful forest for about a kilometer, great start to the day. Then, the climb begins and it's a steep climb, 400m over about 6k. It's just kind of relentless, when you think you've reached the top, around the bend is another climb. It reminds me of the first part of the Francés up to Orisson. Some may disagree but this is #3 on my list.
  4. Villafranca del Bierzo to Trabadelo via Pradela alto on the Frances. It's a fairly long climb which starts steep and stays steep for an hour before it begins to become less steep until you reach the top. One plus is that if you start early, you're shaded most of the way. If you choose to make the climb investment, you're rewarded with great views and solitude. Definitely #4.
  5. Las Herrerías to O'C on the Francés. I'd forgotten about this one, it kind of snuck up on me last month even though I've climbed it 3 times now. The first 2/3 is the worst, steep and the trail in areas is very rough. We did the Pradela route but stopped in Las Herrerías. Before I'd done the river route out of Villafranca to O'C. IF I were younger, I MAY have done the Pradela alto route to O'C. I'd like to think that with age comes wisdom. Glad I broke it into 2 days. Yep, #5.
  6. Puente la Reina to Cirauqui on the Francés. This may surprise some, it's not horrendous, it's steep but relatively short but I just find it to be a grinder and I found more people stopping along the way here than on other similar climbs. I think because it's still early on the CF and usually early in the morning it just seems tougher than it should be. #6.
  7. Puente la Reina de Jaca to Arrés on the Aragónes. For me, what made this tough was that it comes at the end of another long day on the Aragónes and you can see Arrés and the albergue on the hill top...it's right there! And then you start the climb up the road (I know there's another option normally but construction blocked it) and it was just a soul crushing climb that seemed to never stop, I'd also run out of water. The last 100m it gets even more steep proving again that old Santiago has a sense of humor. The saving grace was that we were met by Jacquilena, the Hospitalera who had a great smile, an infectious laugh and water. Definitely memorable and #7 on the list.
  8. Castrojerez to Fromista on the Francés. Once again, maybe a surprise to some. It's not particularly long or overly steep but it stares you in the face as you leave Castrojerez and sort of taunts you as you approach it and then, you climb. Maybe I'm a bit masochistic, I enjoyed this climb on a beautiful morning with friends Nigel and I had met along the way. On a nice day, you're rewarded with a stunning view.
I'm sure there will be lot's of others and some disagreement. There are many routes I've not walked. Please feel free to chime in and add to the list, please add the why's and rewards or pitfalls. I look forward to reading about climbs I've misse
I ate a menu del dia in Finisterre one afternoon, drank the whole bottle of wine, went to the lighthouse, descended the rocks to the ocean, got my pant legs wet in the surf to prove it and climbed back up. I don’t remember it taking long or being particularly difficult, but maybe I just don’t remember. 😀🍻
 
A particular difficult climb one year may not seem that way another time.
I did the Camino del Norte in 2018 and again last year. The days that I remember being difficult weren't as hard as I remembered, and days that I remember being fairly easy almost killed me. I think part of it had to do with whether I was walking alone or with someone else .
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
The walk up to the Tunel San Adrian on the Vasco. Gorgeous, and a good 3 hour climb - about 700m up.
 

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As I've been reflecting on my Camino's, I've been creating a list of memorable climbs on the routes that I've walked. Some were long, steep, long and steep. Sometimes it's the conditions or the condition I was in when I had to make that ascent. There are lot's of factors that make a climb memorable. These are the ones that stick in my mind and why.

  1. Urdos to Somport Pass at the end of the Chemin d'Arles. For me, this was the most difficult climb on the routes that I've walked. It's a difficult climb, gaining almost 1000m over about 15k. The length and elevation gain is a constant. We had a compounding factor of the terrain. In early April, the trails (no roads) were also the path of least resistance for the snow melt run off. The idyllic meadows were actually green bogs where at times you sunk midway up your calf. It was a long, difficult climb and our weather was good, a week later it apparently turned into a full blizzard. Definitely #1 on my list.
  2. SJPP to Roncesvalles. I did this in 2017, it too is a long, steep climb and it can be even more difficult in bad weather, fortunately it's closed in very bad weather, the climb to Somport is not. Three things make this #2, for me. First, the steepest climb is from outside of SJPP to just above Orrison so it's early and then it becomes a bit less steep. Second, if you want, you can break it into 2 days, many do. Third, you're on a path of some sort the whole time. Another reason it's so high on my list, it's Day One...welcome to the Camino!
  3. Ruesta to Sangüesa on the Aragónes. You leave the ruined town of Ruesta on a gentle downhill in a beautiful forest for about a kilometer, great start to the day. Then, the climb begins and it's a steep climb, 400m over about 6k. It's just kind of relentless, when you think you've reached the top, around the bend is another climb. It reminds me of the first part of the Francés up to Orisson. Some may disagree but this is #3 on my list.
  4. Villafranca del Bierzo to Trabadelo via Pradela alto on the Frances. It's a fairly long climb which starts steep and stays steep for an hour before it begins to become less steep until you reach the top. One plus is that if you start early, you're shaded most of the way. If you choose to make the climb investment, you're rewarded with great views and solitude. Definitely #4.
  5. Las Herrerías to O'C on the Francés. I'd forgotten about this one, it kind of snuck up on me last month even though I've climbed it 3 times now. The first 2/3 is the worst, steep and the trail in areas is very rough. We did the Pradela route but stopped in Las Herrerías. Before I'd done the river route out of Villafranca to O'C. IF I were younger, I MAY have done the Pradela alto route to O'C. I'd like to think that with age comes wisdom. Glad I broke it into 2 days. Yep, #5.
  6. Puente la Reina to Cirauqui on the Francés. This may surprise some, it's not horrendous, it's steep but relatively short but I just find it to be a grinder and I found more people stopping along the way here than on other similar climbs. I think because it's still early on the CF and usually early in the morning it just seems tougher than it should be. #6.
  7. Puente la Reina de Jaca to Arrés on the Aragónes. For me, what made this tough was that it comes at the end of another long day on the Aragónes and you can see Arrés and the albergue on the hill top...it's right there! And then you start the climb up the road (I know there's another option normally but construction blocked it) and it was just a soul crushing climb that seemed to never stop, I'd also run out of water. The last 100m it gets even more steep proving again that old Santiago has a sense of humor. The saving grace was that we were met by Jacquilena, the Hospitalera who had a great smile, an infectious laugh and water. Definitely memorable and #7 on the list.
  8. Castrojerez to Fromista on the Francés. Once again, maybe a surprise to some. It's not particularly long or overly steep but it stares you in the face as you leave Castrojerez and sort of taunts you as you approach it and then, you climb. Maybe I'm a bit masochistic, I enjoyed this climb on a beautiful morning with friends Nigel and I had met along the way. On a nice day, you're rewarded with a stunning view.
I'm sure there will be lot's of others and some disagreement. There are many routes I've not walked. Please feel free to chime in and add to the list, please add the why's and rewards or pitfalls. I look forward to reading about climbs I've missed.
I remember the walk from ruesta. I also hated all of the false summits on the road! Luckily there was a horse trough at the top to drink out of.
 
Fonfría on the Madrid is definitely up there but also 2 stages on the Levante before Ávila, if I recall around Cebreros and San Martín de Valdeiglesias. There are two mountain pass crossings which I did in the pouring rain. I remember thinking, how amazing this would be in good weather. Despite the fog, wind and rain the stages were beautiful!
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
My most memorable climb is probably the Puerta de la Fuenfria Mountain Pass on the Camino de Madrid. From my Camino de Madrid Highlights post:
Nick, your memory and link to your Camino de Madrid has me wistful that I did not walk that big climb. I chose to avoid it having broken my shoulder several months prior and I wanted an easier Camino, so starting in Segovia was perfect for me at the time. However, it was disappointing to miss that climb early on and your write-up confirms I missed out on something special.
 
I did the Camino del Norte in 2018 and again last year. The days that I remember being difficult weren't as hard as I remembered, and days that I remember being fairly easy almost killed me. I think part of it had to do with whether I was walking alone or with someone else .
That is so true and have noticed and experienced the same when walking alongside new Camino friends. I think it is why some people end up with blisters or other problems the next day; keeping up and not realizing it at the time when engrossed in conversation, but paid the price the following day. Even at home, when we are biking out of town with friends, I don't notice the grueling uphills nearly as much while chatting alongside a friend.
 
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The unexpected sharp and short climb to Villavieja and its wonderful albergue on the Invierno caught us by surprise, as well as the climb out of the Belesar valley after staying at Diomondi. In fact the Invierno has way more impressive "ups" than any of the other Caminos we have done. But nothing we have walked compares in difficulty to the Lycian Way in Turkiye.
 
I agree with @VNwalking in post #16. What a spectacular surprise to reach the top of the hill approaching the Tunel de Adrian (Camino Vasco) and see the vista open out, including the Tunel itself.

I also nominate the Cerro del Calvario on the VDLP in the Finca El Berrocal just before Almaden de la Plata. It is just a little blip on the profile map, but very steep and so satisfying to reach the view in both directions at the top.
 
I remember a hot tired afternoon on CF struggling up what I believe translates as "Donkey-killer Hill. I felt so good as I reached the top, proving that I am not a donkey.
On my 2nd CF journey, it was a very cold morning, I was walking & chatting with another pilgrim, and was surprised as I passed my "achievement" photo spot at the top that it was the steep "Donkey- killer Hill" that we had just walked up.
Time of day, weather and company can make such a difference.
Ascending to OCebriero on horseback on my 2nd Camino still remains an exciting highlight for this non-horsey person.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Between the Val reservoir and Ágreda on the Camino Castellano-Aragonés.

DSC_0638-1.jpg

Does the road wind up-hill all the way?
Yes, to the very end.
Will the day’s journey take the whole long day?
From morn to night, my friend.
 
That is so true and have noticed and experienced the same when walking alongside new Camino friends. I think it is why some people end up with blisters or other problems the next day; keeping up and not realizing it at the time when engrossed in conversation, but paid the price the following day. Even at home, when we are biking out of town with friends, I don't notice the grueling uphills nearly as much while chatting alongside a friend.
Yes, walking with someone can make all the difference. A lesson there if anyone ever feels that the challenge may be too difficult. My friend Nigel and I slogged up many hills, often not talking but we were there together. Not really a shared burden, a shared experience maybe.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Here is a vivid memory of an extremely steep and difficult climb walking the Via Podiensis out of Cahors in France with two friends. It crossed the river and shot straight up the other side. I was nervous to turn around and look when I took that second picture. The last picture we'd made it to the top and and were once again on level ground.
Screenshot_20240607-121342~2.pngScreenshot_20240607-121354~2.pngScreenshot_20240607-121404~2.png

And this in another spot somewhere on the route...
Screenshot_20240607-121211~2.png
 
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I also nominate the Cerro del Calvario on the VDLP in the Finca El Berrocal just before Almaden de la Plata. It is just a little blip on the profile map, but very steep and so satisfying to reach the view in both directions at the top.
You beat me to it! On day 2 of my very first camino it made me wonder what I was in for.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
The worst climb for me is that last .5K UPHILL that always seems to be right before your stop for the night. My speed goes from 3 or 4 K an hour to mere feet per minute. Legs get heavier. Mind tends to fog. And all you can think about is a nice shower, bed, or beer (perhaps in reverse order).
@John Sikora, I only walk 2km per hour on Caminos. If you walk 3-4km per hour, that is an amazing speed.
Yes, I too, lamented those final uphill climbs to finish the day. I thought the Via Francigena consistently had the most uphill endings.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
My personal most memorable hill ever was this year on the Camino Serrana. The stage from El Colmenar to Jimera del Libar is about 25 km, including a spectacular but first half through a canyon. On arriving at the train station by Jimera del Libar, I was tired, but I've been tired before and survived.

Well, my partner in crime had booked a casa at the top of the picturesque white pueblo, 2 km up from the station. She was already there, having explored a cave and a castle or two after her day's walk. Well, that 2 km uphill was the worst piece of camino I have ever walked. Every step was a major challenge; stopping and resting every 5 steps did not even help. I seriously wondered if I would need help. Eventually I made it, but I still don't understand why I was so utterly exhausted! :( Unfortunately I had no interest in taking any photos to record the experience.

The next day, I was fine. However I took a train for 10 km in order to shorten my day, as I thought my body might be trying to tell me something!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

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The worst climb for me is that last .5K UPHILL that always seems to be right before your stop for the night. My speed goes from 3 or 4 K an hour to mere feet per minute. Legs get heavier. Mind tends to fog. And all you can think about is a nice shower, bed, or beer (perhaps in reverse order).
Bingo!
 
My favourite was turning left off the Camino (Somport variant) between Borse and Urdos, and going up the Chemin de la mature. It's a truly amazing path, literally hacked out of a 200m+ sheer cliff face (la ravine d'enfer). Depending on whose history you believe, It was created by the British (using Spanish miners from the Basque country), or by the French in 1772. Either way, the purpose was to allow the extraction by ox teams of the very long straight tree trunks found higher up the mountain, for use in naval shipbuilding.
I understand the path is now closed due to safety concerns. What a pity...
There is an unmanned mountain hut at the top (1500
m climb in about 5km...challenging) so you could overnight there and return the same way or if in summer you can carry on to Somport, but this is high mountain hiking so only for the experienced.
There might be alternative routes to the hut, which is close to the HRP.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Camino del Norte - set off from Mondenado on a bleak and rainy day for a short day to Abadin via Cesuras and the 680m Alto climb up onto a plateau. As we made our way up the track, a woman in gum boots walking two cows came into sight. We gradually gained on this small group - her cadence was perfect - exchanged greetings and reflected as we walked on that she had probably been taking animals up to pasture since childhood, and would probably have been shaking her head wondering why people would choose to climb 680m from choice! By the 500m mark we were wondering the same thing! She and a cyclist were the only people we saw until the outskirts of Abadin.
BTW, two things: 1. we found the Mondenado Cathedral and museum well worth a visit and 2. the route out of Mondenado township itself was tricky to follow.
So good to read of happy experiences.
Buen Camino.
 
The walk up to the Tunel San Adrian on the Vasco. Gorgeous, and a good 3 hour climb - about 700m up.
Ooh! Great pictures. It is my intention to do the Vasco Del Interior beginning in Late July. Any tips would be welcomed.
 
In addition to many mentioned previously, the Mozarabe has a few good climbs on the way to Granada, often with views to the snow capped Sierra Nevada so making the 1,800 metre (?) seem enjoyable in comparison to the 2,700 m peaks nearby.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
the Chemin de la Mâture. It's a truly amazing path, literally hacked out of a 200m+ sheer cliff face
Agreed, very depressed to learn it is closed. Last walked that way in 2019.

031019-094846.jpg

There is an unmanned mountain hut at the top (1500m climb in about 5km..
I spent a very happy night in that hut, "lull'd in these flowers" by cow bells and a mountain stream, my two favourite noises.

DSC_0296.jpg

I carried on up the next day, crossing into Spain by the Col des Moines (c2138m), where for centuries monks from the nearby monastery used to welcome pilgrims over the watershed by the source of the río Aragón, just past the lovely Lac Bersau.

DSC_0386-1.jpg
 

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