• Remove ads on the forum by becoming a donating member. More here.

Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Mug or not? (and other kitchen ware)

The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers
Hi JWST,

It really depends on your plans for food. If you picnic a lot and have a water bladder, it is useful to have a drinking device that is not in your pack. I use a small plastic water bottle usually picked up on my flight to the departure location. A cup is good at a fountain.

Rather than a plate, I recommend a food storage container with a snaplock lid for leftovers from last nights feast at the albergue.

Buen Camino
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I have abandoned 2 nice mugs on different Caminos, but I have a new one for my next trip. I doubt that this helps much with your decision! 🤣

My new one has folding handles, fits into the side pouch of my backpack, and my water bottle fits nicely in it. The bulk of a mug, and how/when you will use it, needs to be considered.
 
I don’t think you need any utensils. I brought a spork and only used it once to eat yogurt. That being said I’m doing another Camino soon and not packing my spork.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Thank you all, a bulky item but useful to protect crushables and for its regular use, and where to store it is a good point C clearly; have a swiss army knife (with scissors/corkscrew) and an Opinel with larger blade and corscrew, which to take is my next quandry :)
 
I’ve carried a plastic mug for boiling water in microwaves and keeping fruit from squishing. I would cope if I didn’t have it. You can bring one and be prepared to leave it behind in some albergue if you decide it’s surplus to your needs.
 
For my next camino I was thinking about bringing a little collapsible cup or mug. And every time I see a water faucet I will take a drink from it. Then I won't have to resupply my water bladder as much.
 
Last edited:
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
I use a lightweight 500ml cup that doubles as a pot. I use it daily when hiking/on the camino.

In albergues that have kitchens but no pots/plates ect. it was extremely helpful for cooking my pasta ect. (combined with spork and opinel it's all you need to prepare a simple meal). It also doubles as a wine glass when sharing a bottle with others during a picnic ect. It's part of my standard kit since 2015.

Other pilgrims with different needs might see it as unnecessary extra weight. So it depends.
 
this thread makes me think about adding my titanium hiking mug to my kit 🤔
FWIW - I've carried the single wall 600ml Snow Peak Titanium mug for years, with a tupperware lidded cup that fits snugly inside, giving the option of cooking on hobs or microwave. But last year the titanium mug saw no action at all, and it won't be packed again. Basically, if an albergue has any cooking facilities it will have a microwave. And unless you just have to have fried onions every night, the microwave can boil anything better than the hob cooker. Outside of Galicia the albergues with kitchens almost always have some useable pots/pans.
A big plastic cup, ideally with a lid, is IMHO the best compromise for: supplementing rudimentary meals with something hot, early morning coffee/late night tea, early start breakfast of yoghurt mixed with chopped (kiwi) fruit and biscuit, and (with a lid) carrying spillable/damageable foods.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I did part of the Via Bayona in January and took a soup cup which has a lid, and I made good use of it in microwaves in albergues from porridge, to soup to tea. But on earlier caminos I didn't bother, but I kind of like having some sort of mug.
 
FWIW - I've carried the single wall 600ml Snow Peak Titanium mug for years, with a tupperware lidded cup that fits snugly inside, giving the option of cooking on hobs or microwave. But last year the titanium mug saw no action at all, and it won't be packed again. Basically, if an albergue has any cooking facilities it will have a microwave. And unless you just have to have fried onions every night, the microwave can boil anything better than the hob cooker. Outside of Galicia the albergues with kitchens almost always have some useable pots/pans.
A big plastic cup, ideally with a lid, is IMHO the best compromise for: supplementing rudimentary meals with something hot, early morning coffee/late night tea, early start breakfast of yoghurt mixed with chopped (kiwi) fruit and biscuit, and (with a lid) carrying spillable/damageable foods.
Ahh interesting! Makes sense. This thread has made me think something like this will be good on the Camino Catalan where there are a couple potential stopping spots where there are no shops or dining options.
 
I have all sorts of ultralight dishes/cookware for wilderness backcountry hiking and usually leave all of it at home for the Camino and will for the VIa Francigena even.

At most - I have brought a spork. Barely used it. I also don't bother with a knife - I just rip my bread/cheese etc. On the VIa Francigena - since there are less supermarkets and restaurants along the way - I will bring my spork and 1 very light container for leftovers (I can't eat a restaurant meal in 1 sitting). That is all I will bring.

A mug? I wouldn't bother myself - but if you have to have your early morning cup of coffee and will be making your own - well then - maybe you should bring it. Otherwise it is unnecessary weight.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I have never brought a mug as I prefer waiting in the morning for a cafe con leche at an open bar/pastry shop, and the few times I have stayed at an Air B&B, cups were povided.
I do always bring a very lightwight, small approx. 8" dinner plate for picnic lunches on the way. It makes it easier to cut baguettes in half, slice quality cheese, holds olives and whatever else you have, especially when sometimes sitting awkwardly on the trail.
 
I do always bring a very lightwight, small approx. 8" dinner plate for picnic lunches on the way. It makes it easier to cut baguettes in half, slice quality cheese, holds olives and whatever else you have, especially when sometimes sitting awkwardly on the trail.
I just use a multi-purpose bandana for a place to set down my food if needed. Rarely use it for that - but since it is multi-purpose I do use it for other things as well. I have also used my food bag as a plate.
 
I just use a multi-purpose bandana for a place to set down my food if needed. Rarely use it for that - but since it is multi-purpose I do use it for other things as well. I have also used my food bag as a plate.
Nice for you, but I make quite a few of my lunches, so a stiff plate to cut and sit it on my lap is great and far more convenient for me.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
My take:

Mug or cup - yes. I carry a collapsible neoprene 'cup' that sits in the top pocket of my pack.

Plate - no. If I need to cut bread, cheese or sausage, I will use the hard base of my cup, any clean-ish flat surface, or carve off a slice holding whatever it is in my other hand.
Utensils. Pocket knife, spork.
 
I never needed a cup or plate but I did find myself wishing I had utensils. Many times I purchased items at a store that having utensils on hand would have been much more convenient and easy. My next camino in May I am bringing a pocket knife and a small camping spork type of utensil.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I have abandoned 2 nice mugs on different Caminos, but I have a new one for my next trip. I doubt that this helps much with your decision! 🤣

My new one has folding handles, fits into the side pouch of my backpack, and my water bottle fits nicely in it. The bulk of a mug, and how/when you will use it, needs to be considered.
Details! (Please) Brand, where found? Thx!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
We always bring titanium cups and coils to make hot tea, bouillon and oatmeal. and use it almost everyday. We leave early in the morning and we eat our first
breakfast at 4:30 to 5am (private room😀). We usually stop around 9am for a croissant & coffee. Then we eat our main meal right after we check in…usually by 2pm. We eat very light at night, usually food we purchased from the supermercado, then finish off with hot tea and a sweet before bed.
Now we buy small knife when we arrive to cut veggies. I bring a small piece of plastic which I got at a dollar store for a cutting board.
 
Last edited:
Never carried a plate, mug, fork or spoon. Never missed it. Used my little pocket knife and it's corkscrew a few times, but likely, i would not miss it much either. At least on the frances the infrastructure is extremely good and food and drink is very reasonably priced.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
...swiss army knife (with scissors/corkscrew) and an Opinel with larger blade and corscrew, which to take is my next quandry :)

I found scissors VERY useful for so many tasks. I used them to cut and taper a duct tape equivalent to reinforce my disintegrating shoes (!), and daily for cutting dressing retention tape to wrap my toes or to use over top of another bandage, gauze, or lambs wool. (The tape comes under a few names, Omnifix being the most common in Spain. Here in N America I have also bought Hypafix and Cover-roll stretch.) So, scissors are a 'must have' for me.

Re the mug: if you have room in your pack AND it is very lightweight and microwavable, it can come in handy, as others have said. Though I never took one, it is still on my 'maybe' list for next time.
 
Last edited:
Jeanine and Doug, I must be quite the diva then, using a plastic plate with its slight curve to hold my 3-course lunch .😂
LOL… didn’t say you shouldn’t. Just simply stated what I do instead of carrying a plate. I don’t care if someone carries a full service set of porcelain dishes as long as it doesn’t go in my pack on my back and I don’t have to listen to them complain about their heavy pack!

Carry what you feel you need :) And someone would consider me a diva when they realize I carry 2-3 sets of clothes… we all have our item(s) that someone else considers unnecessary- and that is fine. I wouldn’t judge you for that.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
We did have an entire set of boy scout group cookware left at Estella in 2019 when the owner decided he no longer wanted to carry service for 4 plus pans carefully packaged in the vintage green canvas bag.
LMAO - that certainly would be "MY" idea of excess for a Camino! Even on a wilderness through hike - I am all about the ultralight/minimalist packing. I weigh EVERYTHING (and for me that is part of the fun - but I do realize others find that excessive too haha).
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers

Hi JWST,

....A cup is good at a fountain.....
Especially at the Irache Fountain 🤣.... so ... YES do take one!
Good luck and Buen Camino 👍
 
For my next camino I was thinking about bringing a little collapsible cup or mug. And every time I see a water faucet I will take a drink from it. Then I won't have to resupply my water bladder as much.
I took a collapsable cup (capable of holding hot or cold beverages) and was glad I did, if even to use when brushing my teeth or taking vitamins in the morning. Only used my spork once, to cut up some cake for sharing with others…
 
Ahh, I am one of those morning coffee and breakfast before I can walk person... So I carried a cafetiere mug (the "press" slots into a crevice at the side of the mug so you can drink from it) with a lid, and when packed in my bag it contained my coffee. Also carried coil immersion heater. And 3 packs of Korean pot noodles - all drank and eaten by the time I reached Santiago!

If I weren't carrying the coil heater, I would've used my silicone collapsable cup.

IMG_0329.jpg
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
My kitchen:
aluminum cup - cup, protecting fruit, boiling water (meals, tea)
plastic butter container - protecting food, lid = plate
metal spork
aluminum swiss army card (one side is a knife, OK to fly with in CAN & EU)
tea, instant coffee, hot sauce in dropper bottle

- this kit cost me about $10 CAN
 
There’s no right or wrong about what to take on the camino just individual opinion, which I find fascinating. It’s all good learning.
I plan to take
A hip flask
A mini stack of titanium beakers to share my hip flask contents😄
And
A tea flask


Buen camino🫡
 
have a swiss army knife (with scissors/corkscrew) and an Opinel with larger blade and corscrew, which to take is my next quandry :)
One vote for the SAK - I used scissors almost everyday, knife blade sometimes and bottle opener more than the corkscrew (but if you drink wine instead of beer for your picnic that would be reversed).
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I used my titanium mug to pour a glass of wine at the Irachi wine fountain, rather than get wine in my water bladder.
 
For my next camino I was thinking about bringing a little collapsible cup or mug. And every time I see a water faucet I will take a drink from it. Then I won't have to resupply my water bladder as much.
Collapsible synthetic mug is the way to go. Takes up no room at all and very lightweight. I use a hydration pack (bladder) but use a mug to supplement when passing a water fountain. Also can be useful in some albergues when the majority of pilgrims tend to start their day at similar time and the demand for albergue mugs outstrips the number available (My name is Frank Worthington, and I'm a caffeine addict . . Etc🙃)
 
Jeanine and Doug, I must be quite the diva then, using a plastic plate with its slight curve to hold my 3-course lunch .😂]
In a former life, I learnt to carve off a slice from a salami or hunk of cheese without the benefit of any smooth, flat or clean surface. Best done with just one's hands and a sharp knife used carefully. Of course, if one wasn't contemplating sharing, not something I had contemplated then or now, one could just chew at the salami or cheese, and tear apart the bread. I suspect our forebears wouldn't have necessarily found that unusual 😇
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
One vote for the SAK - I used scissors almost everyday, knife blade sometimes and bottle opener more than the corkscrew (but if you drink wine instead of beer for your picnic that would be reversed).
Agree! Blade to slice cheese, corkscrew and bottle opener, and even the screw driver had come in handy one day
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Thank you all, a bulky item but useful to protect crushables and for its regular use, and where to store it is a good point C clearly; have a swiss army knife (with scissors/corkscrew) and an Opinel with larger blade and corscrew, which to take is my next quandry :)
Take the Opinel. You can cut anything with the knife and it has a better corkscrew
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Take the Opinel. You can cut anything with the knife and it has a better corkscrew
I agree, provided @JWST isn't planning to go through the UK at any point. The last time I carried an Opinel there, I found it was classified as a lock knife, and illegal to carry under the recently changed UK laws. I was nearly arrested and detained for having it on me, which I was able to avoid, but did have the knife confiscated. Carrying knives is highly regulated here in Australia, with some exceptions for emergency workers and when engaged in outdoors activities, as it is in the UK and some other places I visit. While it might not be a problem when walking the Camino, it might be a problem getting it into some countries on the way there and back.
 
knife, fork , spoon yes. Mug.. not really needed

Falls into the luxury item that may get damaged category imho
 
I agree, provided @JWST isn't planning to go through the UK at any point. The last time I carried an Opinel there, I found it was classified as a lock knife, and illegal to carry under the recently changed UK laws. I was nearly arrested and detained for having it on me, which I was able to avoid, but did have the knife confiscated. Carrying knives is highly regulated here in Australia, with some exceptions for emergency workers and when engaged in outdoors activities, as it is in the UK and some other places I visit. While it might not be a problem when walking the Camino, it might be a problem getting it into some countries on the way there and back.
That's a nuisance. Mind you, I was once asked at UK port on the way to France if I had any knives. Which won them a blank look and "This is a camper van. It has a kitchen. Do you have a kitchen without knives in your home?". Honestly, you couldn't make it up if you tried, could you?
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
We always bring titanium cups and coils to make hot tea, bouillon and oatmeal. and use it almost everyday. We leave early in the morning and we eat our first
breakfast at 4:30 to 5am (private room😀). We usually stop around 9am for a croissant & coffee. Then we eat our main meal right after we check in…usually by 2pm. We eat very light at night, usually food we purchased from the supermercado, then finish off with hot tea and a sweet before bed.
Now we buy small knife when we arrive to cut veggies. I bring a small piece of plastic which I got at a dollar store for a cutting board.
Do tell where to buy the coils to heat water please !!! I have been looking for those.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers
I will be in SJPDP on April 22 or 23. I will bring my UCO collapsible up & spork + collapsible plate.
 
Thanks all, great responses, all have our Way 😉, Ill be in SJPdP on 21st but only going to Orisson on Day 1, may see you chaujenly at Roncevalles
 
I take : v lightweight tupperware (often one that had a former life as an ice cream tub!) for leftovers/lunch
Plastic spork
Flask. I usually take a flask of coffee every day. I hike like that at home and I just miss it when I don't bring it
The flask lid is a small cup that can be used for other beverages eg WINE!
(A few Yorkshire tea bags wrapped up for when I just REALLY need a cup of tea)
Scissors (to cut bandages and plasters) and knife or pocketknife to cut oranges, tomatoes etc

It really depends how you do a Camino. I am on a budget and having these items really helps me to eat from supermarkets, cook for myself when I can, and carry leftovers

I think it depends largely on the time of year also. Outside of the Frances route in season, there's less amenities

Buen camino! Xx
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
All this discussion got me looking for mugs to take and I came across this which was really interesting. Plate/bowl/cutting board. I guess you could even drink from it.
It does it all.

61pACIGEXfL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
 
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers
Take one and leave it in Muxia when you finish
On the out side of the pack and great for the water you will need beside dinner.
And if you feel generous when arriving at your stop for the night , visit a wine shop , get a lovely Rioja and sit with the ham and tomato roll ...........and share the red or you'll be snoring all night.

Plate ..............no
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I always carry a plastic mug, you can microwave water, cup a soups and noodles in it. A plastic Spork. An Opinal no 7 knife...filed down and locking ring removed to comply with UK law. Always used, minimum weight. Plus a collapsible silicon bowl ( eBay), again light weight but worth carrying. I use it to put cereal,olives etc in.
Don.
 
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers
I have a collapsible silicon cup. It has a cover if I want to carry something in it. I'd rather microwave silicon than plastic. And I do have a spork that I use often.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Greetings all, I have had varying advice on carrying a lightweight cup/mug, any thoughts for a Camino novice? Or a plate?
Cheers
While I always carry a mug when on wilderness hikes, I did not on the Camino Francés. And I never missed it. But then again it depends if you often eat and drink in bars/restaurants where you never need having your own and if you are fine with drinking from a bottle.
 
All this discussion got me looking for mugs to take and I came across this which was really interesting. Plate/bowl/cutting board. I guess you could even drink from it.
It does it all.

These look great. I've seen someting similar, the brand is Fozzils. I already have my kitchen gear sorted otherwise I'd be tempted!

Fozzils.JPG
 
I drink wine. I don't drink it out of the bottle because that's just "nooo I don't do that" So I carry a little metal goblet shaped like a wine glass for my picnic. Can also use it for tea and coffee. Assuming I drink tea or coffee. Which I don't if there is wine. What do you mean, water? Dangerous stuff, that. You do realise that everyone who has ever drunk dihydrogen monoxide dies, don't you?
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-

Most read last week in this forum

I'd like to know about people who has flown drones on the Camino. I'm planning on doing the Camino, only in Spain. Thinking about taking with me a drone with camera that weights less than 250g...
Firstly, Hello and thank you for welcoming me to the group; I will be travelling to St Jean Pied De Port on July 2nd with view to starting my own journey to Santiago de Compostella throughout...
What are the best watches/devices to measure your distance walked each day?
Noticed for the first time today that Costco is carrying a Cloudveil short sleeve shirt. It’s loose fitting, sleeves quite short and is 52% merino and 48% tencel, several colours. For $17 I...
I had plans to get my walking stick to the Camino. I'm having problems getting a shipping tube or container for it. The walking stick is 60" tall. If I can get it there and ditch the long tube do...
Hello beautiful people! I am planning to walk my first Camino (French way) this September and have a question. After reading threads about walking in sandals, I decided to walk the Camino in my...

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top