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Luggage Transfer Correos

New Backpack

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
I’ve just spent a few days researching backpacks and come up with m/l Osprey Kestral 38, does any of the team have one of these and are there any downsides?
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018)
My whole tribe uses various Ospreys. I have used one of the Kestrel series for years now - can’t look up now which one it is. For me it needs to allow opening it from the bottom as well as from the top!
 

Calisteve

Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 16 CF
July 17 CF with my son (aged 14)
July 18 CP with my wife
I've an Osprey Exos 48 litre. I originally bought the smaller size and exchanged it for the 48l the next day. Personally I value having the spare space for food etc and not having to squeeze my stuff in to fit. Top quality bag.
 

walkingstu

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino SJPP to SDC 2007 Frances
Camino Aragon Pau Fr. to Pamplona 2010
Camino Burgos to SDC 2012
Camino Porto to SDC 2015
Camino VDLP Seville to SDC March 2016
Excellent bag. The size is ideal, as it forces us to carry less and pack more aware of the weigh factor. Ounces are pounds, and pounds are pain. I used it on the VDLP, plenty of room. The tendency is to fill whatever bag you have.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
I've got enough Osprey packs in the cupboard to open my own shop. The Kestrel is a very comfortable pack line, but about one pound per pack heavier than the Osprey Exos of similar size. Try the Exos 48.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
I’ve used the exos48 on my Camino’s—using it again this fall. It doesn’t open at the bottom but a solid, lightweight bag without lots of weight inducing bells and whistles. Call it my Camino amigo. I don’t like bits hanging off the back so it holds everything I need and is a comfortable carry. I’ve used the hydration pack previously. Thinking about small bottles this go around. Feedback?
 

Calisteve

Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 16 CF
July 17 CF with my son (aged 14)
July 18 CP with my wife
Portia

Agree 100% about the Exos 48. I didn't use a hydration pack - opted for water bottles (1 litre in a side pocket and a 1/2 litre plastic bottle in my pocket). Worked for me. Only down side - on my first camino, needing to stop and take the bag off to get at the litre bottle as I was walking solo. Not an issue on my last two camino's as I walked with my son and then my wife. That said, when I walk solo next time I will probably still use the bottles rather than a hydration pack. The Exos is a great bag either way.
 

Gail Dickson

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April 2016
Portugese from Lisbon 2018
Via Francigena (2020)
I’ve just spent a few days researching backpacks and come up with m/l Osprey Kestral 38, does any of the team have one of these and are there any downsides?
Used that exact bag for 2 caminos. Love it.
 

Phil71

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2014,2016),Primitivo (2015), San Salvador (2017), Norte (2018), Ingles (2018)
Or the talon 44. Also osprey. Got one last year and found it perfect. Just big enough for all I need. And if it was a bit short inside there's a big stuff pocket on the back that holds more than you expect. Used a bladder though as the side pockets are a bit awkward for bottles.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018)
I agree about the bladder! Even with convenient side pockets for bottles, the bladder with its tube is so much easier to handle. I cannot drink from a bottle without stopping to walk. With the bladder tube I can just have a sip once in a while as I am walking...
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Thanks for all the encouraging thought on the Osprey, I’ll be ordering one today.
Please feel free to PM me should you have any questions or concerns on getting a good fit with the new pack :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
September 2018
Take a look at theULA 2.0 ohm pack. It’s half the weight of any Osprey and has a massive hip belt which really transfers the weight to the hips. One cool option is the shoulder strap pouch which holds a 500cc water bottle which is very easy to grab on the go. I used this pack last year and it was a pleasure to carry.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
My husband uses the Kestrel 48 and I use the female version Kyte 46 for the Camino and for glacier hiking. Love them! The bladder is located in an easy to get to spot and detaches for easy removal (sold separately).
 
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gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
If you don't know too much about packs, make sure you get fitted for one by a professional.
There is a lot to learn.
Regards and good travelling.
Gerard
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
If you don't know too much about packs, make sure you get fitted for one by a professional.
There is a lot to learn.
Regards and good travelling.
Gerard
Thanks @gerardcarey for the reminder, I have been using packs for years but it never hurts to remind ones self of the correct fitting techniques. I’ve already been informed by Osprey that it’s on the way, so hopefully by the time I get home it will be on the doorstep.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
Blimey. Teaching my grandmother to suck eggs.
Should look to see whose talking before I open my big trap shouldn't I?
You have my permission to give me a good slap next time you see me.
Probly best if I do it myself.

Ow!
Regards
Gerard
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Blimey. Teaching my grandmother to suck eggs.
Should look to see whose talking before I open my big trap shouldn't I?
You have my permission to give me a good slap next time you see me.
Probly best if I do it myself.

Ow!
Regards
Gerard
Not at all, non of us are experts and its very easy to forget the easiest of things. I've not had a new backpack for a number of years and you're right it should be fitted by someone in store to make sure you have the right size for your torso, I note that Osprey now have an App that can do the sizing for you. I already knew my torso size so it was a test for the App, and blow mw down the App got it spot on, so it was just a matter of getting the pack with all the bits and boobs I wanted.
I guess the bottom line is that I'm always open to advice, because as you get older the old gray matter does forget things, so no offence taken.
 

Opa Theo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais to Santiago
I’ve just spent a few days researching backpacks and come up with m/l Osprey Kestral 38, does any of the team have one of these and are there any downsides?
I looked at that back pack and then stumbled on a 35 liter pack by GONEX on Amazon. $35. It arrived and was pleased that with discounts it cost $16. It has lots of features plus lots of separate compartments. I've tried the big single packs and prefer packs with separate compartments. Used the GONEX as carry on luggage.
 

E V Waight

It's the journey, not the destination.
Camino(s) past & future
September (2017)
Possible September (2018)
Holy Year (2021) (all three Gladys, John and I)
I’ve just spent a few days researching backpacks and come up with m/l Osprey Kestral 38, does any of the team have one of these and are there any downsides?
I guess not many of us are experts on packs, but, at risk of perhaps putting my foot in my mouth, I'd risk saying that Osprey make the better packs (my prejudice and preference). I have used the Stratos 35 and my wife has for years used the Sirrus 36. These are quite adequate sizes and keeps you in check with weight/volume to pack. The importance is to have a pack that fits comfortably. I'll close in daring to say: Go with Osprey!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I looked at that back pack and then stumbled on a 35 liter pack by GONEX on Amazon. $35. It arrived and was pleased that with discounts it cost $16. It has lots of features plus lots of separate compartments. I've tried the big single packs and prefer packs with separate compartments. Used the GONEX as carry on luggage.
Is this the pack you are talking about? https://smile.amazon.com/Gonex-Backpack-Trekking-Waterproof-Included/dp/B01MDTEQVE/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1546706420&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=gonex+35l+backpack&dpPl=1&dpID=51dS4vA00WL&ref=plSrch&th=1&psc=1 How comfortable is it when it's fully packed?
 

capun

Member
My 2 cents. You can't go wrong with an Osprey pack, my 2 preferred brands are Osprey and Gregory.

My wife took the Gregory Z-38 and she loved the pack.
 

Gaddong

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2018) CF SJPDP April 22, to May 27.
I have the exact model; I used it for the entire CF April to May 2018 I love the pack and I still carry it when I do my 3x weekly walk re-tracing my training route here in West Seattle. The most Important is for you to GET FITTED AND CORRECT SIZE. then pack them with their weighted sacks and walk around the store. I used a hydration pack mil spec camel back short 3L = 6 pounds but as you drink it gets lighter in time for when you get a little tired. Buy it now and pack your stuff like you are on the camino so you have a feel as to what is comfy and not. Buen Camino.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
I agree about the bladder! Even with convenient side pockets for bottles, the bladder with its tube is so much easier to handle. I cannot drink from a bottle without stopping to walk. With the bladder tube I can just have a sip once in a while as I am walking...
There are several drinking tubes you can use with a variety of water bottles, giving you the convenience of both, without having to dig around in your pack to remove your water bladder and then having to stuff it, refilled, back into your pack. Instead, just use about any regular water bottle, even a 1L Smart Water or similar bottle, and when refilled, just screw the top with the tube onto the bottle and slide it into the outside bottle pocket of your pack on the side you have the bite valve clipped onto your shoulder strap. Simple to remove and refill and replace, simple to drink from.

See, for example, here: https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Desert-SmarTube-Hydration-System/dp/B000GM6LWS
and here:
https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-040818070451-Drinking-Tube-Kit/dp/B000J2H8OA

The Blue Desert fits more bottles, including wide mouthed ones like a standard Nalgene (using the included large top) but you pay a slight bit for the versatility; the Platy top is fixed to the tube and only fits one size. My daughter and I each used the Blue Desert on our '17 CP, she on a wide-mouthed Nalgene, me on a collapsible Platy, and each found them a huge help and simple to use.
 
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JRO

Member
Camino(s) past & future
santiago to muxia
I’ve just spent a few days researching backpacks and come up with m/l Osprey Kestral 38, does any of the team have one of these and are there any downsides?
I used the Osprey Kestrel 44 (xs torso length-I'm5"2") on the Camino, and liked it very much. It opens at the top, covered by a small zippered pouch which I wished were removable to wear as a belt pack (but wasn't removable). It also zipped open on the size, and had a bottom compartment that had a "floating" top, meaning that one could reach into the larger compartment by pushing the top aside. There were also two small pockets with zips on the belt- not big enough to fit my Iphone 6S,however, but candy, chapstick, tissue, eyedrops. It sat on my hips well and I found it very comfortable.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
There are several drinking tubes you can use with a variety of water bottles, giving you the convenience of both, without having to dig around in your pack to remove your water bladder and then having to stuff it, refilled, back into your pack. Instead, just use about any regular water bottle, even a 1L Smart Water or similar bottle, and when refilled, just screw the top with the tube onto the bottle and slide it into the outside bottle pocket of your pack on the side you have the bite valve clipped onto your shoulder strap. Simple to remove and refill and replace, simple to drink from.

See, for example, here: https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Desert-SmarTube-Hydration-System/dp/B000GM6LWS
and here:
https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-040818070451-Drinking-Tube-Kit/dp/B000J2H8OA

The Blue Desert fits more bottles, including wide mouthed ones like a standard Nalgene (using the included large top) but you pay a slight bit for the versatility; the Platy top is fixed to the tube and only fits one size. My daughter and I each used the Blue Desert on our '17 CP, she on a wide-mouthed Nalgene, me on a collapsible Platy, and each found them a huge help and simple to use.
I used a Blue Desert tube with a collapsible bottle on my first Camino. However in August and September my water got quite hot in the side pocket, so I ended up putting it inside my backpack and threading the tube through the hydration port, thus "inventing" a water bladder. 😄
For my second and third Caminos I invested in a very good water bladder system, and I really don't have a problem refilling it. I do carry a partially filled bottle of water in a side pocket for emergencies, in case I run out of water in the bladder.
I haven't done this, but @davebugg posted about setting up a quick connect system to fill the bladder through the drinking tube here in post #52 https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/bottle-vs-hydropack.52823/#post-585800
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
There are several drinking tubes you can use with a variety of water bottles, giving you the convenience of both, without having to dig around in your pack to remove your water bladder and then having to stuff it, refilled, back into your pack. Instead, just use about any regular water bottle, even a 1L Smart Water or similar bottle, and when refilled, just screw the top with the tube onto the bottle and slide it into the outside bottle pocket of your pack on the side you have the bite valve clipped onto your shoulder strap. Simple to remove and refill and replace, simple to drink from.

See, for example, here: https://www.amazon.com/Blue-Desert-SmarTube-Hydration-System/dp/B000GM6LWS
and here:
https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-040818070451-Drinking-Tube-Kit/dp/B000J2H8OA

The Blue Desert fits more bottles, including wide mouthed ones like a standard Nalgene (using the included large top) but you pay a slight bit for the versatility; the Platy top is fixed to the tube and only fits one size. My daughter and I each used the Blue Desert on our '17 CP, she on a wide-mouthed Nalgene, me on a collapsible Platy, and each found them a huge help and simple to use.
That can be a good system.

However, if that choice is only because of a concern about ease of access for refilling a bladder, I would just like to add that it is not necessary to remove a water bladder/reservoir from a pack in order to refill it. In fact, one doesn't even need to remove one's pack. It is simple, inexpensive and quick to add a quick disconnect to the external water feeding tube above the mouth piece.

Accessibility is really no longer a valid point in the decision algorithm between bottles and bladders :)
 

Richard Smith

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016
Kumano Kodo 2014
I’ve used the exos48 on my Camino’s—using it again this fall. It doesn’t open at the bottom but a solid, lightweight bag without lots of weight inducing bells and whistles. Call it my Camino amigo. I don’t like bits hanging off the back so it holds everything I need and is a comfortable carry. I’ve used the hydration pack previously. Thinking about small bottles this go around. Feedback?
Bottles will fit nicely in the side mesh pockets of the EXOS, even 1 litre size is comfortable and never fell out. I used just one 1 litre but two smaller might be better.
Easy to fill the bottles are fountains too.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I left off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.

For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket. Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

https://www.amazon.com/Platypus-2-Liter-Ultralight-Collapsible-Bottle/dp/B000J2KEGY/ref=pd_bxgy_468_img_3?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000J2KEGY&pd_rd_r=14358bba-1150-11e9-bc47-bf7c597b90fd&pd_rd_w=3QhCc&pd_rd_wg=71n1W&pf_rd_p=6725dbd6-9917-451d-beba-16af7874e407&pf_rd_r=6MQBHQGHQQ4HY6ZKVQ2N&psc=1&refRID=6MQBHQGHQQ4HY6ZKVQ2N

Hopefully this will help those who favor using a water reservoir/bladder extend the ease of its usability. It takes me about 30 seconds or so to add a fresh 1 liter of water to my reservoir. Less for 1/2 liter.

 

willydp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Programmed C Inglés for "7-12 June 2019"
Hello,
Everybody is giving information about trying it on, features like H2O bladder and others, but one feature I don't read about is colour.
Has anyone experience about one colour is better than the other?
Black will be no good for water and food storage ...absorbing sunlight/heat🌞
But has anyone some real experience on the Camino or is it just you like out or you don't 😉
Buen Camino
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hello,
Everybody is giving information about trying it on, features like H2O bladder and others, but one feature I don't read about is colour.
Has anyone experience about one colour is better than the other?
Black will be no good for water and food storage ...absorbing sunlight/heat🌞
But has anyone some real experience on the Camino or is it just you like out or you don't 😉
Buen Camino
Color is really just a matter of personal aesthetics. From a practical standpoint there is no color that allows the packbag to perform better. Some might mention a brighter color as a counterpoint to gloomy days, or as a way for rescuers to better spot one who is stranded on a cliff. :)

The big color for backpacking and climbing in the late '60's and '70's was International Orange. :)
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I use the Exos 38. It meets my needs with plenty of room for every thing I need. It has been all over the world. At the end of February it accompanies me to West Africa for 2 weeks.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
I use the Exos 38. It meets my needs with plenty of room for every thing I need. It has been all over the world. At the end of February it accompanies me to West Africa for 2 weeks.
Hope you enjoy West Africa, I spent 4 years out there before I retired.
 

mwextine

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (September 2013)
I've an Osprey Exos 48 litre. I originally bought the smaller size and exchanged it for the 48l the next day. Personally I value having the spare space for food etc and not having to squeeze my stuff in to fit. Top quality bag.
I love my Exos 48 - but in a store recently and there are major changes to that model. No longer has zipper pockets on the waist belt and the design of the belt tightening has changed (to the worse). Another problem for me is that it's too long for current carry on bags - backpack is 60cm+ and limit nowadays is 55cm.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I use the Exos 38. It meets my needs with plenty of room for every thing I need. It has been all over the world. At the end of February it accompanies me to West Africa for 2 weeks.
I spent a few months in West Africa a fair while back... my choice of colors for clothing and gear was limited to Tiger Stripes and Olive Drab, though. :)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I looked at that back pack and then stumbled on a 35 liter pack by GONEX on Amazon. $35. It arrived and was pleased that with discounts it cost $16. It has lots of features plus lots of separate compartments. I've tried the big single packs and prefer packs with separate compartments. Used the GONEX as carry on luggage.
I have one of that brand's 40L packs. Great pack for the money. Well made, durable and with a rain cover included. Budget minded pilgrims who simply cannot afford packs costing more than 100 dollars should look at them.
For a warm month Camino where one does not carry more than around 5 kilos of things in their pack, it works great.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
My Kestrel 38 arrived today, after unpacking my In House Advisor and I proceeded to fit it to my torso size, that was great fun and a little time consuming but in the end we got it right.
So now down to loading, quite easy with the side loading zip and before I knew it I had all my kit in, it's not really a great deal of stuff.
After all this effort I thought I should take her for a walk, you know get her acclimatised to outside conditions, bit of a fight but in the end I won. Didn't go to far as myself and the pack needed breaking in (I've not walked since before Christmas), we only did 4 miles just so she could get the feel of my back and I think she really likes it, I didn't end up with any pains in my shoulders that I didn't start with so it was considered a successful little outing. Tomorrow I will introduce her to the fresh sea air and perhaps double the distance. Isn't life wonderful when all the bits come together. Haven't got a name for her yet but I'm sure it will come.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I see online that Backcountry has the Osprey Kestral 38L on sale at a good price, as well as the Gregory Zulu 40L. Both look like very good packs and are very similar, also sale priced about the same, 35%-40% off.
Any forum members have experiences with the Gregory brand packs?
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
Try on a number of packs-- and adjust them with weight in them. There will be one that will be an "Ah-ha!" moment of comfort. Ospreys and Deuters didn't work for me. I am slight across the shoulders, and they didn't fit well. Also, I want to be able to set my pack down and not have it fall over -- so I wanted a bigger bottom. -- After trying on at least 15 packs, I ended up with an LL Bean 35L pack. Not as in style as an osprey, but fits me--the weight in on the hips, my shoulders are comfortable. It has a trampoline suspension system Here's the current version (38L) website: https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/88840?page=women-s-at-38-day-pack&bc=&feat=back pack-SR0&csp=a&attrValue_0=Bright Plum&searchTerm=back pack&gnrefine=1*GENDER*Womens
 

Leigh Macklin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances {2016}, Portugese {2017}
I see online that Backcountry has the Osprey Kestral 38L on sale at a good price, as well as the Gregory Zulu 40L. Both look like very good packs and are very similar, also sale priced about the same, 35%-40% off.
Any forum members have experiences with the Gregory brand packs?
I walked the CF and CP with a Gregory z30. It was perfect for me. Good fit and good quality with convenient pockets. To bad the only color I could buy was black. 😐
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I walked the CF and CP with a Gregory z30. It was perfect for me. Good fit and good quality with convenient pockets. To bad the only color I could buy was black. 😐
I need to retire my old 48L pack and the 38-40L would be perfect. I know they are both quality with good reviews overall.
How's the back air circulation on the Gregory? My old pack is good, but it does lack good circulation between my back and the pack itself and in warmer weather it makes a difference.
 

Leigh Macklin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances {2016}, Portugese {2017}
My z30 has amazing ventilation, my model was bought about 3 years ago. I have tried hiking with a newer miwok18 but the ventilation is not near as good so it is far too hot in the summer. Too bad as it is half the weight.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
My z30 has amazing ventilation, my model was bought about 3 years ago. I have tried hiking with a newer miwok18 but the ventilation is not near as good so it is far too hot in the summer. Too bad as it is half the weight.
Looks like it is going to be the Gregory.
I like that it has a minimum of external straps hanging off it, which is the deal changer for me, and it comes in three color choices.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I have one of that brand's 40L packs. Great pack for the money. Well made, durable and with a rain cover included. Budget minded pilgrims who simply cannot afford packs costing more than 100 dollars should look at them.
For a warm month Camino where one does not carry more than around 5 kilos of things in their pack, it works great.
I bought the Gregory Z40 for my first camino in 2015 and put about 3,000 km on it with three caminos (Frances, Aragones + and VdlP) as well as a few hikes in the Canadian Rockies. This past summer, I fell over backwards in a mud hole and the frame died on me. I liked the pack for packing my gear, but it was not very comfortable and I have recently bought a woman specific Gregory Jade 38, which is a better fit for me.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I bought the Gregory Z40 for my first camino in 2015 and put about 3,000 km on it with three caminos (Frances, Aragones + and VdlP) as well as a few hikes in the Canadian Rockies. This past summer, I fell over backwards in a mud hole and the frame died on me. I liked the pack for packing my gear, but it was not very comfortable and I have recently bought a woman specific Gregory Jade 38, which is a better fit for me.
What do you mean the frame "died on you"? It snapped in two or something? and what did you find uncomfortable about it?
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
What do you mean the frame "died on you"? It snapped in two or something? and what did you find uncomfortable about it?
@RJM
By "the frame died on me" I mean that one lower corner of the frame, where the metal frame was covered with fabric which was wearing through, the fabric just split, so there was no further rigidity in the frame and it was not usable (I hope this is clear). I figured that I had got reasonable use out of the pack with 3,000 km wear. As for "uncomfortable" it is supposed to be a both gender pack but it never felt very comfortable on me. This is hard to describe, as I have never found backpacks very comfortable: mostly the pressure on my shoulders. If I adjusted the straps to bring the pack closer to my back, my shoulders complained. But if I loosened these straps, the pack swayed away from my back and was also quite uncomfortable. I am hoping the my new women's fit Gregory Jade 38 will be better for me, as it felt quite comfortable when fitted with weight in it. But I guess I won't really know until I have had some time walking a trail with it. Good luck in your own purchase.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
@RJM
By "the frame died on me" I mean that one lower corner of the frame, where the metal frame was covered with fabric which was wearing through, the fabric just split, so there was no further rigidity in the frame and it was not usable (I hope this is clear). I figured that I had got reasonable use out of the pack with 3,000 km wear. As for "uncomfortable" it is supposed to be a both gender pack but it never felt very comfortable on me. This is hard to describe, as I have never found backpacks very comfortable: mostly the pressure on my shoulders. If I adjusted the straps to bring the pack closer to my back, my shoulders complained. But if I loosened these straps, the pack swayed away from my back and was also quite uncomfortable. I am hoping the my new women's fit Gregory Jade 38 will be better for me, as it felt quite comfortable when fitted with weight in it. But I guess I won't really know until I have had some time walking a trail with it. Good luck in your own purchase.
I believe Gregory has a lifetime warranty on their packs. May be something worth checking out to see if that fabric tear is covered towards a replacement.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I believe Gregory has a lifetime warranty on their packs. May be something worth checking out to see if that fabric tear is covered towards a replacement.
Thanks, but I bought the pack on sale at Mountain Equipment Co-Op and got reasonable wear from it. Now I have a new Gregory pack which I think fits me better at an even cheaper price. I know that MEC has its own guarantee, but I am happy with what I got for what I paid and do not wish for a refund. I don't think that falling over backwards on a pack which has given good service ought to bring me money back towards a new pack.
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Via Serrana
Portia

Agree 100% about the Exos 48. I didn't use a hydration pack - opted for water bottles (1 litre in a side pocket and a 1/2 litre plastic bottle in my pocket). Worked for me. Only down side - on my first camino, needing to stop and take the bag off to get at the litre bottle as I was walking solo. Not an issue on my last two camino's as I walked with my son and then my wife. That said, when I walk solo next time I will probably still use the bottles rather than a hydration pack. The Exos is a great bag either way.
hey ,,you can get a tube to fit onto a bottle !!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Thanks, but I bought the pack on sale at Mountain Equipment Co-Op and got reasonable wear from it. Now I have a new Gregory pack which I think fits me better at an even cheaper price. I know that MEC has its own guarantee, but I am happy with what I got for what I paid and do not wish for a refund. I don't think that falling over backwards on a pack which has given good service ought to bring me money back towards a new pack.
Not money from Gregory, but a replacement I would assume. Normal when a product has a lifetime warranty. I have had some tools replaced in such a way. Wrenches. Lifetime warranty, wrench breaks when I was using it, bring it back to a dealer of that brand and walk out with new wrench. Quite nice.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Not money from Gregory, but a replacement I would assume. Normal when a product has a lifetime warranty. I have had some tools replaced in such a way. Wrenches. Lifetime warranty, wrench breaks when I was using it, bring it back to a dealer of that brand and walk out with new wrench. Quite nice.
@RJM
I see your point, but then the pack was never really very comfortable, so I was content to let it go and get a new pack which I believe fits me better.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@RJM
I see your point, but then the pack was never really very comfortable, so I was content to let it go and get a new pack which I believe fits me better.
If you still have your broken pack, you could still think about getting Gregory to replace it, and then sell it to help fund the cost of your new one :). Although you won't be keeping it, I would not feel even a tiny bit sheepish about using the warranty which came with the Gregory; after all, the warranty is part of your purchase. :cool:
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
If you still have your broken pack, you could still think about getting Gregory to replace it, and then sell it to help fund the cost of your new one :). Although you won't be keeping it, I would not feel even a tiny bit sheepish about using the warranty which came with the Gregory; after all, the warranty is part of your purchase. :cool:
@davebugg
This is what I found out about the Gregory warranty on their website:

LIMITED WARRANTY
The manufacturer shall not be held responsible for incidental or consequential damage nor the natural breakdown of materials which occurs with extended use.


In addition, their "lifetime guarantee" only covers repairs:
THE GREGORY LIFETIME GUARANTEE
We build Gregory gear to last a lifetime and that's how long we stand behind it. We guarantee to you, the original purchaser, that this product will be free from defects in materials or workmanship, for as long as you own it.
If your Gregory pack or accessory needs service or repair due to normal wear and tear, animal attack, accident, or some other reason that's not covered under the warranty, we will provide the necessary service for a reasonable charge.

I don't feel that they owe me anything. But even if they did, I want the new pack, not to pay for repairs on the old one.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@davebugg
This is what I found out about the Gregory warranty on their website:

LIMITED WARRANTY
The manufacturer shall not be held responsible for incidental or consequential damage nor the natural breakdown of materials which occurs with extended use.


In addition, their "lifetime guarantee" only covers repairs:
THE GREGORY LIFETIME GUARANTEE
We build Gregory gear to last a lifetime and that's how long we stand behind it. We guarantee to you, the original purchaser, that this product will be free from defects in materials or workmanship, for as long as you own it.
If your Gregory pack or accessory needs service or repair due to normal wear and tear, animal attack, accident, or some other reason that's not covered under the warranty, we will provide the necessary service for a reasonable charge.

I don't feel that they owe me anything. But even if they did, I want the new pack, not to pay for repairs on the old one.
I definitely see your point :)
 

Mark B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF & Finesterre (4-5/2011); Roncesvalles to Santo Domingo de la Calzada, CdN-Primitivo (2-4/2014).
I used a 2011 Gregory Z-40 on my two caminos and was very happy with it. Its empty weight seemed a little heavy for a pack of that volume, but it had excellent padding and a very comfortable fit. I appreciated the rigidity of the frame, the light "footprint," and the back ventilation, which at the time I didn't see in ultralight packs. I have a Z-35 now, a no-hassle warranty replacement after the coating on the metal stays in my Z-40 cracked, causing the metal to rust and roughen after a very rainy second camino.

After I bought my Z-40 in 2011, Gregory modified the Z series a couple of times before the line became the Zulu series, which successfully fixed some things that seemed to be works-in-progress in Gregory's effort to lighten the Z series packs. (I think they improved the coating on the metal stays, too.) I think the Zulu is a great pack. I have a Zulu 65, and although I still like my Z-35 for three season day hiking in the mountains and it would be fine for the camino, I think the Zulu version would be a better choice for the latter, because of it's improved lumbar and shoulder-strap padding and it's anti-barreling panel.

For those considering a Zulu, though, note that Gregory has just given that series an entirely new suspension and sizing system (adjustable), so look for new reviews, or look for sales on the outgoing model. I don't see them yet on the Gregory website, but the REI website has them both.

For what it's worth, in trying out Gregory packs, I found a surprising degree of variation in the dimensions of packs of the same model and size, for instance, the minimum waist-belt size and the spacing between the shoulder straps where they attach at the top of the pack, both of which are critical issues for me. Kinda like blue jeans, you just have to try a number of them in a given size to find the best fit.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
For those considering a Zulu, though, note that Gregory has just given that series an entirely new suspension and sizing system (adjustable), so look for new reviews, or look for sales on the outgoing model. I don't see them yet on the Gregory website, but the REI website has them both.
I noticed today that REI has the old, non-adjustable models on sale now. Their site shows, for example, the Jade 53 at $100 (off from $200) and the Jade 38 at $90 (off from $180).
 

howardd5

New Member
I agree about the bladder! Even with convenient side pockets for bottles, the bladder with its tube is so much easier to handle. I cannot drink from a bottle without stopping to walk. With the bladder tube I can just have a sip once in a while as I am walking...
Let me say a word in favor of water bottles and against a bladder. About half of the water on the Camino is untreated and with the warnth of your back can cause some bacteria growth in the bladder. Not real serious but tastes funny. Also can't tell the amount left so sometimes i ran low without being aware . I enjoy stopping for a "wet " with a bottle ,kinda social & friendly ,and I'm not so in a hurray ,sometimes even sit (or fall) down while a drink. Im back to water bottle
 

Rick H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018 from Leon
(Frances Sep 2019)
I'm an Osprey Exos 48 and water bottle guy. Both worked great and will use them again in Sep when I take on the entire CF. Also fell in love with a can of Aquarius sports drink on the hotter days.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Let me say a word in favor of water bottles and against a bladder. About half of the water on the Camino is untreated and with the warnth of your back can cause some bacteria growth in the bladder. Not real serious but tastes funny. Also can't tell the amount left so sometimes i ran low without being aware . I enjoy stopping for a "wet " with a bottle ,kinda social & friendly ,and I'm not so in a hurray ,sometimes even sit (or fall) down while a drink. Im back to water bottle
I have to say that I have always been in favour of water bottles until a month ago, I thought with my new Ospray pack would try the 2 lira bladder, I'm now sold on the bladder system. Now I know it needs cleaning, takes longer to take it out and fill, don't know how much you have l;eft. Well I'm not in a hurry so a couple of these issues don't really matter, but not knowing how much you have left will always be a concern, in this instance I carry a small water bottle as a back up, so far on all my train walks I've not had to use it.
I guess the choice is up to the individual and I would never try to influence anyone. With my trial I was prepared to suck up the cost of the bladder is it wasn't satisfactory.
You never know I might ditch it on my next camino (vdll) starting next Monday and revert to water bottles.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
It's my understanding that while you are continuously using a hydration bladder it doesn't require cleaning, because you are continually replacing the fresh water.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Let me say a word in favor of water bottles and against a bladder. About half of the water on the Camino is untreated and with the warnth of your back can cause some bacteria growth in the bladder. Not real serious but tastes funny. Also can't tell the amount left so sometimes i ran low without being aware . I enjoy stopping for a "wet " with a bottle ,kinda social & friendly ,and I'm not so in a hurray ,sometimes even sit (or fall) down while a drink. Im back to water bottle
Hi howard. . .

I think I can help with this issue; and it does come up periodically. :)

Hydration bladders/reservoirs are inherently safe. They are no more prone to growing bacteria than a water bottle or the water lines in your home. It is not the chemical purification of a utility system's water that keeps a municipal water supply safe in the homes water lines, it is the frequent flow of the water itself. Water that sits stagnant in a home's plumbing can eventually develop pathogen contamination.

Whether water bottles or hydration reservoirs, that same principal applies. Neither of these containers will contain sterile water, nor are these containers absolutely sterile when water is placed into them, then capped in a sterile fashion so that they can store water without bacterial growth sooner or later.

Water containers -- bottles or reservoirs -- rely on a dynamic process of frequent water turnover so that fresh resupply never allows bacteria growing conditions of stagnation to occur.

The other issue mentioned was contamination via an untreated water source. If untreated water is the concern, then neither water bottles or hydration reservoirs are at a higher risk -- one vs the other -- at harboring waterborne pathogens as they might have originated from that water source itself. If that is a concern, then there are extremely compact and lightweight and effective filters which are capable of filtering out bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses. They do not work for chemicals, though.

As far as where a water reservoir is carried, which is usually in a big pocket against the inside back of the pack, this does not usually cause body heat to warm up the water very efficiently. Not only is the bladder sitting inside the pack, but almost all packs will have a pad on the outside of the pack which insulates the bladder from the person's body, and in some packs also incorporates an air gap of some type. So in effect, with the stuff in the pack also providing insulation, the water in a reservoir can stay quite cool for prolonged periods.

External pockets are generally not insulated which allows heat from the sun and warm temperatures to heat up a bottles water much quicker than that of a bladder.

As with water bottles, cleaning a reservoir is simple. It involves rinsing with a clean water source, and keeping the container open to air dry. If there are special concerns with a bottle or bladder or the water tube from the bladder, adding a few drops of regular bleach or denture cleaner when filling the container will do the trick. For the bladder, drain the water through the hose and then open the bladder to air dry.

More specific instructions are available online for any one wanting them, but the above is the method in a nutshell.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I have to say that I have always been in favour of water bottles until a month ago, I thought with my new Ospray pack would try the 2 lira bladder, I'm now sold on the bladder system. Now I know it needs cleaning, takes longer to take it out and fill, don't know how much you have l;eft. Well I'm not in a hurry so a couple of these issues don't really matter, but not knowing how much you have left will always be a concern, in this instance I carry a small water bottle as a back up, so far on all my train walks I've not had to use it.
I guess the choice is up to the individual and I would never try to influence anyone. With my trial I was prepared to suck up the cost of the bladder is it wasn't satisfactory.
You never know I might ditch it on my next camino (vdll) starting next Monday and revert to water bottles.
There is a quick and inexpensive way which allows a reservoir user to quickly complete a refill without removing it from the pack... or even needing to take off the pack. It takes me about 30 seconds to do a 2 liter refill, less for 1 liter.

Let me know if you would like more information. The adapters are available online, do not decrease the ease of use and usability of the bladder, and are quick to retrofit as a simple DIY.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
There is a quick and inexpensive way which allows a reservoir user to quickly complete a refill without removing it from the pack... or even needing to take off the pack. It takes me about 30 seconds to do a 2 liter refill, less for 1 liter.

Let me know if you would like more information. The adapters are available online, do not decrease the ease of use and usability of the bladder, and are quick to retrofit as a simple DIY.
Thanks Dave I think I’ve got it covered by just using a bottle, with the Osprey I can access the the bladder without removing it.
 

Gaddong

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2018) CF SJPDP April 22, to May 27.
Hi howard. . .

I think I can help with this issue; and it does come up periodically. :)

Hydration bladders/reservoirs are inherently safe. They are no more prone to growing bacteria than a water bottle or the water lines in your home. It is not the chemical purification of a utility system's water that keeps a municipal water supply safe in the homes water lines, it is the frequent flow of the water itself. Water that sits stagnant in a home's plumbing can eventually develop pathogen contamination.

Whether water bottles or hydration reservoirs, that same principal applies. Neither of these containers will contain sterile water, nor are these containers absolutely sterile when water is placed into them, then capped in a sterile fashion so that they can store water without bacterial growth sooner or later.

Water containers -- bottles or reservoirs -- rely on a dynamic process of frequent water turnover so that fresh resupply never allows bacteria growing conditions of stagnation to occur.

The other issue mentioned was contamination via an untreated water source. If untreated water is the concern, then neither water bottles or hydration reservoirs are at a higher risk -- one vs the other -- at harboring waterborne pathogens as they might have originated from that water source itself. If that is a concern, then there are extremely compact and lightweight and effective filters which are capable of filtering out bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses. They do not work for chemicals, though.

As far as where a water reservoir is carried, which is usually in a big pocket against the inside back of the pack, this does not usually cause body heat to warm up the water very efficiently. Not only is the bladder sitting inside the pack, but almost all packs will have a pad on the outside of the pack which insulates the bladder from the person's body, and in some packs also incorporates an air gap of some type. So in effect, with the stuff in the pack also providing insulation, the water in a reservoir can stay quite cool for prolonged periods.

External pockets are generally not insulated which allows heat from the sun and warm temperatures to heat up a bottles water much quicker than that of a bladder.

As with water bottles, cleaning a reservoir is simple. It involves rinsing with a clean water source, and keeping the container open to air dry. If there are special concerns with a bottle or bladder or the water tube from the bladder, adding a few drops of regular bleach or denture cleaner when filling the container will do the trick. For the bladder, drain the water through the hose and then open the bladder to air dry.

More specific instructions are available online for any one wanting them, but the above is the method in a nutshell.
Amen... I cleaned my water bladder every other day just by rinsing it with no chemicals. From SJPDP to Santiago. I use the tube to empty the second rinse by squeezing the bladder to get some water force out.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021"
OK... I guess because this thread is about 'New Backpacks' what I am about to post should apply.
Doing my research I came across Ozark Trail Eagle 40L and saw the following:

Warnings:
proposition 65 reasons:WARNING: This product can expose you to DEHP, Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, diethylhexyl phthalate, a Phthalate chemical which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information, go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

This product can expose you to DEHP, Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, diethylhexyl phthalate, a Phthalate chemical which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information, go to www.p65warnings.ca.gov

I shall presume that anyone of us can suffer from afore-mentioned maladies even if we don't live in the Great State of CA to which it is known.... :oops:...and therefore should be concerned....perhaps something to keep an eye for with different backpack brands\manufacturers?
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
What is DEHP?
  • DEHP belongs to a family of chemicals called phthalates, which are added to some plastics to make them flexible. In the past, DEHP was one of the phthalates most frequently used in plastic products, but its use has decreased in recent years for a variety of reasons.
  • DEHP is still used in various types of plastic consumer products:
    • Some shower curtains, furniture and automobile upholstery, garden hoses, floor tiles, and coverings on wires and cables.
    • Some rainwear and shoes.
    • Some lunchboxes, binders, and backpacks.
    • Some plastic food packaging materials.
    • Some medical devices and equipment, including some types of blood and intravenous solution bags, tubing for dialysis, feeding tubes, oxygen masks, and surgical gloves.
  • California law prohibits the manufacture, sale, or distribution of children’s toys and child care articles containing DEHP at levels greater than 0.1%. US law has a similar prohibition.
How does exposure to DEHP occur?
  • DEHP can be gradually released from consumer products into indoor environments such as homes, schools, daycare centers, offices, and cars. It settles on floors and other surfaces, and can accumulate in dust and air.
  • Exposure can result from contact with medical devices or during medical procedures where devices or equipment containing DEHP are used.
  • Low levels of DEHP have been detected in some foods that have been in contact with plastics during processing and packaging.
  • During pregnancy, DEHP can pass from mother to baby.
dehp.svg
1. Breathing in DEHP present in air and dust 2. Transferring DEHP from hands to the mouth and then swallowing 3. Consuming food containing DEHP as a result of processing or packaging 4. Undergoing medical procedures that use devices or equipment containin

How can I reduce my exposure to DEHP?
  • Avoid plastics known as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or vinyl (with recycle code 3).
  • Prior to undergoing medical procedures (especially recurring ones like dialysis) plan ahead by requesting medical devices or equipment that do not contain DEHP. This is especially important for protecting boys from the reproductive effects of DEHP (during pregnancy, in infancy, and around the time of puberty).
  • Minimize exposure to dust, which can contain DEHP:
    • Wash your hands and your child’s hands frequently, especially before preparing food and eating.
    • Clean floors regularly, using a wet mop if possible, or a vacuum with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter.
    • Wipe up dust regularly, using a damp cloth.
  • Eat more fresh food, and less processed and packaged food.
For more information:
General DEHP Fact Sheets and Resources
Scientific Information on DEHP
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021"
OK so nothing that is different from any other 'something' in a course of a 'given day'.
All the mays and coulds and cans and somes….
(Just MHO - and if someone is worried, they can do their diligence by conducting a more thorough research and taking it from there)
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021"
Amen... I cleaned my water bladder every other day just by rinsing it with no chemicals. From SJPDP to Santiago. I use the tube to empty the second rinse by squeezing the bladder to get some water force out.
After my initial warm water clean I fill it with cold tap water and add couple of drops of lemon juice. Shake, rattle, roll, dump, refill, rinse... dry out.
So far no green stuff (or any other color for that matter) that I saw :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
OK so nothing that is different from any other 'something' in a course of a 'given day'.
All the mays and coulds and cans and somes….
(Just MHO - and if someone is worried, they can do their diligence by conducting a more thorough research and taking it from there)
The first clue of how to treat this kind of warning: it is based on a politics, and not on hard science.

California Proposition 65 was passed a popular vote. It was put on the ballot as a preemptive attempt to keep as yet unknown risks of contamination to water and food from occurring. It wasn't the result of hard science arriving at any specific conclusions that a substance does or is likely to have a direct correlation of causing either cancer or birth defects. Any substance is put on an official list in California if it might have at least a 1 in 100,000 chance of causing cancer or birth defects over a 70-year period.

There are legitimate and known hazardous materials on the Prop 65 list. These are substances which have scientific agreement of actual potential harm. But what makes this 'list' a tediously useless resource, is that it is composed of a long list of substances which have no peer-reviewed studies documenting actual harm or potential harm at likely levels of human exposure.

I give as much due consideration to Proposition 65 Warning Labels as I do to the warnings about Dihydrogen Monoxide:

Dihydrogen monoxide:
  • is also known as hydroxic acid, and is the major component of acid rain.
  • contributes to the "greenhouse effect".
  • may cause severe burns.
  • contributes to the erosion of our natural landscape.
  • accelerates corrosion and rusting of many metals.
  • may cause electrical failures and decreased effectiveness of automobile brakes.
  • has been found in excised tumors of terminal cancer patients.
Despite the danger, dihydrogen monoxide is often used:
  • as an industrial solvent and coolant.
  • in nuclear power plants.
  • in the production of Styrofoam.
  • as a fire retardant.
  • in many forms of cruel animal research.
  • in the distribution of pesticides. Even after washing, produce remains contaminated by this chemical.
  • as an additive in certain "junk-foods" and other food products.
Yup, H2O is bad for you according to the warning labels.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
Speaking of backpacks, and small auxiliary bags (chest packs, bum bags, fanny packs, shoulder harness pockets, hip-belt pockets, etc.), I just found this company, Thrupack, who makes "fanny packs" of various sizes and materials and styles, as well as very light packs of the main sizes of 35, 45 and 55 L. Probably not for everyone, but for the long distance and through hiker crowd, looks like some interesting gear.
See here: https://www.thrupack.com/
 

JusWalkin

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - Sept 2015
Francés - Sept 2016
VDLP - April 2019
There is a quick and inexpensive way which allows a reservoir user to quickly complete a refill without removing it from the pack... or even needing to take off the pack. It takes me about 30 seconds to do a 2 liter refill, less for 1 liter.

Let me know if you would like more information. The adapters are available online, do not decrease the ease of use and usability of the bladder, and are quick to retrofit as a simple DIY.
I'm interested in one of these quick-fill adapters, but can't find them. Maybe I'm searching using wrong terminology? I'm going to buy a 2L camelbak for my upcoming VDLP
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018

JusWalkin

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - Sept 2015
Francés - Sept 2016
VDLP - April 2019

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
thank you Trecile - does this enable filling straight from a tap?
No, you fill a collapsible bottle the water source. Once filled, just screw the lid on the bottle and quick connect it to your reservoir's feed tube. The water is squeezed gently into the bladder.

This is one of the soft collapsible bottles that I use. I use a 900 ml size, but you can get them up to 2 L in capacity. I keep it a side pocket where I can reach it as needed.

Below is a video of the whole deal. Please note that a small, dark colored water filter is attached in line with the bottle because the water is from an open and standing water source which can contain pathogens. For Camino use you do not need a filter attached. The quick connect cap is screwed directly to the bottle.

 
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JusWalkin

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - Sept 2015
Francés - Sept 2016
VDLP - April 2019
No, you fill a collapsible bottle the water source. Once filled, just screw the lid on the bottle and quick connect it to your reservoir's feed tube. The water is squeezed gently into the bladder.

This is one of the soft collapsible bottles that I use. I use a 900 ml size, but you can get them up to 2 L in capacity. I keep it a side pocket where I can reach it as needed.

Below is a video of the whole deal. Please note that a small, dark colored water filter is attached in line with the bottle because the water is from an open and standing water source which can contain pathogens. For Camino use you do not need a filter attached. The quick connect cap is screwed directly to the bottle.

thank you davebugg. You are most helpful 😘
 

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