A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Roncevalles - end of September - how cold it is?

Nezabudka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Burgos (Oct 2018)
#1
Hi all,
I am starting my first Camino end of September and naturally quite excited and worried already. The biggest fear - either I've got proper closing and equipment for this time of the year - swinging from - "omg, I will be too hot" to "omg, I will be freezing" :D
I guess, Pyrenees might be the coldest part for me. With Roncevalles albergue not supplying blankets, will it be enough with the fleece liner (SeaToSummit Thermolite Reactor), or should I take more warm clothing, just in case? At the moment for warmer layers I'm planning to take only long-sleeve thin merino top, long-sleeve thermal top (not super warm), fleece jacket and wind-cheater...
Thanks a lot :)
 

Advertisment

Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#2
Actually, O Cebreiro might be the coldest part for you. Last August as I was walking from there in the morning mist I wished that I had brought gloves with me!
 

Nezabudka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Burgos (Oct 2018)
#3
Actually, O Cebreiro might be the coldest part for you. Last August as I was walking from there in the morning mist I wished that I had brought gloves with me!
Thanks, I will not get that far this time. I have only 12-13 days for this stage, so hope to finish somewhere between Logrono and Burgos ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#4
should I take more warm clothing, just in case? At the moment for warmer layers I'm planning to take only long-sleeve thin merino top, long-sleeve thermal top (not super warm), fleece jacket and wind-cheater...
You would probably be be OK on a chilly night if you put them all on. Do you have a second layer of pants? Scarf or buff?
 

Nezabudka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Burgos (Oct 2018)
#5
Hm.. normal tights and compression shorts...
Theoretically I also have spare light pants and t-shirt to change into at nights... the issue might be if all the main clothing gets wet, then I have only one set to change into and sleep in....
Thinking to take an extra layer of cotton- like leggings and tank-top just to sleep in, but not sure yet....
 

Advertisment

AlexanderAZ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Fisterra-Muxia (Sept/Oct 2017)
#6
I walked mid-Sept last year. The day I went over the Pyrenees it was raining sideways, cold, with tremendous winds. I saw nothing but my shoelaces. The day before me pilgrims had quite a warm, if not hot, trip up and over. They had beautiful photos as proof. Mother Nature will let you know when you arrive what you are in for. Prepare for both circumstances.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#7
the issue might be if all the main clothing gets wet, then I have only one set to change into and sleep in....
That is an important consideration! Fortunately, the hospitaleros at the albergue in Roncesvalles will do laundry for you.
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
#8
it could well be extremely hot every day.
 

Nezabudka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Burgos (Oct 2018)
#9
Thank you, guys :)
Still the biggest worry - how chilly it might get inside the albergue? Its not that old church anymore, but big three story building must be quite cool inside, too, right? Did you feel warm enough if you had liners only?
 

Cam1952

www.camcamino.com
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct (2013)
Frances Santiago Sept-Oct (2017)
Portuguese Sept (2018)
#11
I have walked th CF twice starting around Sept. 21st each time. I was freezing in Roncesvalles on the first trip as someone wanted the window open. I subsequently bought an ultralight sleeping bag in Pamplona and have used it ever since. The best part is it weighs nothing and on the coldest nights I put the Albergue blankets on top of th3 sleeping bag. Since traveling with this bag I haven’t felt cold at all.
You can see both of my Caminos at www.camcamino.com if you are interested....
 

Nezabudka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Burgos (Oct 2018)
#13
Thank you, Viva, it's exactly what I came to... I will not book an albergue in Roncevalles in advance and see what the weather prepared for me closer to the date. Depending on it, either check my luck for free beds on the day or walk further to Espinal for other accommodation options.
Not worth bringing something extra just because of one night for sure. :)
 

Adelihna

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016

plan to walk Camino del Norte - 2019
#14
I walked Camino Frances in the beginning of October, 2016. The first day - the one that takes you to Roncevalles - was perfect, warm, almost hot, clear sky and everything. I couldn`t tell how cold does it get in the monastery itself; I had my fat sleeping bag with me.
The weather was really ranging - from steaming hot to chilly with drizzle. The worst part was, of course, O`Cebreiro. I walked it just when it started snowing.
I had no winter gear. I put tights under my yoga pants and a light jacket over a light jacket, but I was totally unprepared for the blizzard party on the top. That said, it IS better to take things "just in case". Camino has its ways of surprising you, even if you are just walking to Burgos.
Keep an open mind and a warmer set of clothes. A blanket/sleeping bag is not that heavy and you might be grateful for it in some albergues.
 

Paul J W

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2002/3 and 2004/5)
Camino Ingles. (2008)
Camino Portuguese. (2009)
Camino del Norte (2008 and 2014)
Ruta de la Plata (2004)
Camino Primitivo. (2015)
Camino Mozarabe (2007)
"Tunnel" route (2016)
Camino del Salvador (projected: 2017)
#15
Always be prepared for ANY conditions AND take note of forecasts - regardless of how the weather may appear to you. Personally, I always carry a survival bag (bright orange) and a “space” blanket, and include a whistle and a torch. Basic survival gear!
 
Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2018
#16
I have similar 'concerns'. I intend to start on my 1st CF in mid September. None of us can predict what nature will have in store weatherwise. I'm sure all of us doing the Camino for the first time will have exactly the same concerns too. Though there is an enormous variety of equipment and gear available to us, getting that final choice of kit - that delicate balance between functionality and weight seems to be critical to success. I did finally decide to purchase a sleeping bag - the Highland Trekkie. At about 600g it is quite light as sleeping bags go and is quite cavernous in length. I'll use it in conjunction with a Rab silk liner. Whether or not it was a good decision I'm about to find out in 13 weeks time. It'll be in my pack. A factor that influenced the decision is that I'm told the same sleeping bag is stored in one of the outdoor shops in Pamplona. Should the weather be bad and the albergos be cold and the Highland Trekkie not up to it I can buy a second one early on during the Camino, though it'd cost over twice the price that it did to purchase it in the UK!!!

I'm trying to be optimistic with regard to the weather and this influences my choice of clothing. For baselayer tops I've gone for 1 long sleeve Icebreaker (Bodyfit Basics 200) merino , 1 Icebreaker Cool Lite short sleeve, and 1 Rab Merino 120+ long sleeve top. I hope to wear the Cool Lite and the Rab most of the time as both are merino blends, more suited for warmer weather and quicker drying than the long sleeve pure merino top. The more substantial Icebreaker 200 long sleeve top will be my baselayer for 'bad weather' days. I'm still not decided on what to wear to sleep in so I could be persuaded to throw in a pair of light weight tracksters! For cold/cool/windy dry weather I have the excellent Montane featherlite top that weighs all of 60g as a windbreak. As a general walking 'jacket' to take on this 5 to 6 week venture I decided on the Outdoor Research Ferrosi smock. I love it. I have also packed an old but cosy Jack Wolfskin Gecko fleece to wear at the end of each day. For walking trousers I've got Craghoppers Kiwi Plus and a pair of fairly old but very good Columbia convertibles. For wet windy days I'd wear Berghaus Paklite overtrousers. Here in the UK my go to choice of waterproof jacket would be the Paramo Adventure Light smock. It's superbly effective and has a beautiful soft feel, but at 560g and not being particularly packable I have reluctantly decided to leave it at home. Instead I've bought the Altus poncho!The clothing choices have been based on walking in the weather conditions that we have faced in the UK so far this year. Months of wet and cold weather turned the countryside into a quagmire up until mid May. There were two particularly wintry spells where the sub-zero winds came at us directly from the depths of a bitterly cold Eurasian continent. Since then temperatures have rocketed on several occasions to 27 Celsius and the weather has been dry and sunny in the main. So I know that my kit will cope with these extremes. I have not yet tried the poncho as it is bright red - not my colour choice I'm afraid. I just hope it does the job if needed whilst on the Camino.

At the end of the day you have to make some compromises. My main priority has been to keep the weight of the pack down to as low as practicably achievable. This is so so so important over a 5 to 6 week period. Adaptability has been the key to human survival on this planet. I just hope that given the final choice of clothing that I have made I am able to find some combination of it that allows me to adapt reasonably comfortably to whatever I have to face on that day. Inevitably there'll be periods of discomfort. But although you should never take comfort from someone else's misfortunes it's often the case that no matter how much you suffered on the day someone else somewhere will have had an even worse time of it than you had.
 

Paul J W

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2002/3 and 2004/5)
Camino Ingles. (2008)
Camino Portuguese. (2009)
Camino del Norte (2008 and 2014)
Ruta de la Plata (2004)
Camino Primitivo. (2015)
Camino Mozarabe (2007)
"Tunnel" route (2016)
Camino del Salvador (projected: 2017)
#17
I have similar 'concerns'. I intend to start on my 1st CF in mid September. None of us can predict what nature will have in store weatherwise. I'm sure all of us doing the Camino for the first time will have exactly the same concerns too. Though there is an enormous variety of equipment and gear available to us, getting that final choice of kit - that delicate balance between functionality and weight seems to be critical to success. I did finally decide to purchase a sleeping bag - the Highland Trekkie. At about 600g it is quite light as sleeping bags go and is quite cavernous in length. I'll use it in conjunction with a Rab silk liner. Whether or not it was a good decision I'm about to find out in 13 weeks time. It'll be in my pack. A factor that influenced the decision is that I'm told the same sleeping bag is stored in one of the outdoor shops in Pamplona. Should the weather be bad and the albergos be cold and the Highland Trekkie not up to it I can buy a second one early on during the Camino, though it'd cost over twice the price that it did to purchase it in the UK!!!

I'm trying to be optimistic with regard to the weather and this influences my choice of clothing. For baselayer tops I've gone for 1 long sleeve Icebreaker (Bodyfit Basics 200) merino , 1 Icebreaker Cool Lite short sleeve, and 1 Rab Merino 120+ long sleeve top. I hope to wear the Cool Lite and the Rab most of the time as both are merino blends, more suited for warmer weather and quicker drying than the long sleeve pure merino top. The more substantial Icebreaker 200 long sleeve top will be my baselayer for 'bad weather' days. I'm still not decided on what to wear to sleep in so I could be persuaded to throw in a pair of light weight tracksters! For cold/cool/windy dry weather I have the excellent Montane featherlite top that weighs all of 60g as a windbreak. As a general walking 'jacket' to take on this 5 to 6 week venture I decided on the Outdoor Research Ferrosi smock. I love it. I have also packed an old but cosy Jack Wolfskin Gecko fleece to wear at the end of each day. For walking trousers I've got Craghoppers Kiwi Plus and a pair of fairly old but very good Columbia convertibles. For wet windy days I'd wear Berghaus Paklite overtrousers. Here in the UK my go to choice of waterproof jacket would be the Paramo Adventure Light smock. It's superbly effective and has a beautiful soft feel, but at 560g and not being particularly packable I have reluctantly decided to leave it at home. Instead I've bought the Altus poncho!The clothing choices have been based on walking in the weather conditions that we have faced in the UK so far this year. Months of wet and cold weather turned the countryside into a quagmire up until mid May. There were two particularly wintry spells where the sub-zero winds came at us directly from the depths of a bitterly cold Eurasian continent. Since then temperatures have rocketed on several occasions to 27 Celsius and the weather has been dry and sunny in the main. So I know that my kit will cope with these extremes. I have not yet tried the poncho as it is bright red - not my colour choice I'm afraid. I just hope it does the job if needed whilst on the Camino.

At the end of the day you have to make some compromises. My main priority has been to keep the weight of the pack down to as low as practicably achievable. This is so so so important over a 5 to 6 week period. Adaptability has been the key to human survival on this planet. I just hope that given the final choice of clothing that I have made I am able to find some combination of it that allows me to adapt reasonably comfortably to whatever I have to face on that day. Inevitably there'll be periods of discomfort. But although you should never take comfort from someone else's misfortunes it's often the case that no matter how much you suffered on the day someone else somewhere will have had an even worse time of it than you had.
A small but obvious suggestion: try out your gear before embarking on your pilgrimage. Preparation is more than being physically fit! Don’t “just hope”.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#18
  1. Shorts -- Pearl Izumi x 1
  2. Baselayer Top -- Smartwool, Lightweight, Long-Sleeve x 1
  3. Baselayer Bottom - Smartwool, Lightweight
  4. Hat - wool beanie
  5. Windshell Jacket - Patagonia, Houdini
  6. Insulating Layer -- Mountain Hardwear, Ghost Whisperer Vest
  7. Socks -- Smartwool Phd, Crew, Light Padding x 2
  8. Extra insoles x 1
  9. Poncho --- Zpacks, Cuben Fiber
  10. Rain Kilt -- ULA
  11. Gloves -- North Face, polartec

The above is what I carry during the Shoulder Seasons.... Fall and Spring. It is about the same as what I used to thru hike the Pacific Crest Trail and the Colorado Trail (most of which sits above 9,000 feet / 2743 meters in elevation. And for the thousands of other backpacking miles I have done. And the hundreds of miles I do each year. And on the Camino last year in late September.

The total weight is around 3.25 pounds. With the clothing that I wear, it provides a comfort range from 30F to very hot. This is just an example of how a layering system can be flexible and cover a wide temperature range which, on this specific thread's topic, is more than sufficient for the time of year you are going over the Pyrenees and Galicia.

The Camino is not wilderness backpacking and while it is good to have some basic emergency stuff, you really don't need to pack for "just in case" situations as you would when away from civilization for days and weeks at a time. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2018
#19
A small but obvious suggestion: try out your gear before embarking on your pilgrimage. Preparation is more than being physically fit! Don’t “just hope”.
I agree 100%. Rest assured sir that all my kit has been tried out, with the one exception of the poncho , due to the fact that we've had no significant rain in my part of the UK for the last 6 weeks. But I do know that it will cope with the hot sunny days where the temperature gets up to 27 centigrade. You're correct in saying that preparation is more than being physically fit. I'd say that developing the right mental attitude comes ahead of physical fitness. From this will come forth discipline and resilience. I have been preparing for this Camino for two years, scouring the info on the internet and on these forums, and trying out all manner of pieces of kit in order to put together the relatively few items that I consider will give me my best shot at coping with 6 weeks on the Camino. We're all different. We all have different physiologies and metabolisms. Some walk faster than others. Some sweat more than others. The items that I'm taking are based on the fact that I know they'll work for me in a range of conditions - with the one exception of the poncho. I helped my daughter train up for a 65-mile walk that she did in May and we both had to endure some shockingly daunting weather conditions during that time in the first five months of this year. Week after week of driving rain, mud and at times knee-deep water certainly sharpen up your determination not to give up. I do intend to test the poncho at some stage before I go.

As I now have most of the kit that I plan to take I'm now trying to replicate as best I can what it'll be like on the Camino by loading up my bag (Exos 38 old style) with most of these items and getting out walking. Though we don't have the Pyrennees here in the UK we have plenty of countryside that will sustain mile after mile of walking with plenty of rise and fall of height. I'm happy to say that so far things have gone very well. With 6.5 kg weight it has been no problem at all doing walks of about 15 miles length. The Exos 38 does an excellent job of distributing the weight that I'm carrying. I intend to carry a maximum of 7.5 kg ( I weigh 73 kg) and absolutely no more.

I'm 65 years of age now. For me keeping the weight down is much more important than throwing extra items into the bag to cope with 'one-offs'. Many years ago I learned the hard and very painful way what it's like to carry a heavy bag on a trek such as the Camino. I never want to experience it ever again.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
#20
  1. Shorts -- Pearl Izumi x 1
  2. Baselayer Top -- Smartwool, Lightweight, Long-Sleeve x 1
  3. Baselayer Bottom - Smartwool, Lightweight
  4. Hat - wool beanie
  5. Windshell Jacket - Patagonia, Houdini
  6. Insulating Layer -- Mountain Hardwear, Ghost Whisperer Vest
  7. Socks -- Smartwool Phd, Crew, Light Padding x 2
  8. Extra insoles x 1
  9. Poncho --- Zpacks, Cuben Fiber
  10. Rain Kilt -- ULA
  11. Gloves -- North Face, polartec

The above is what I carry during the Shoulder Seasons.... Fall and Spring. It is about the same as what I used to thru hike the Pacific Crest Trail and the Colorado Trail (most of which sits above 9,000 feet / 2743 meters in elevation. And for the thousands of other backpacking miles I have done. And the hundreds of miles I do each year. And on the Camino last year in late September.

The total weight is around 3.25 pounds. With the clothing that I wear, it provides a comfort range from 30F to very hot. This is just an example of how a layering system can be flexible and cover a wide temperature range which, on this specific thread's topic, is more than sufficient for the time of year you are going over the Pyrenees and Galicia.

The Camino is not wilderness backpacking and while it is good to have some basic emergency stuff, you really don't need to pack for "just in case" situations as you would when away from civilization for days and weeks at a time. :)
@davebugg I'm a bit confused. Is this what you carry or wear? The lightweight-ness of it looks like a dream for me but don't understand how it is enough clothing to keep warm?
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#21
@davebugg I'm a bit confused. Is this what you carry or wear? The lightweight-ness of it looks like a dream for me but don't understand how it is enough clothing to keep warm?
That is what I carry in my pack. I normally will wear a similar baselayer top, shorts or zip off pants, and, of course, a pair of socks, and my footwear and hat.

My closet is built on the efficiency of each piece to create effective layered insulation. Example: My longsleeve shirt that I wear keeps me comfortable in the 60's. My vest will add 30F of increased warmth if added. If it is really breezy when in the lower temperatures, I will add my second baselayer top and the windshell, which will offset the effects of that windchill. If I was in really dire straits, adding my poncho can add another 10 F boost. The poncho, though, is really only used as the outer weather layer for rain.

In the other direction, the long sleeves reduce the ability of the sun's radiant energy to directly heat my skin, which means I stay cooler in hot weather than if I use short sleeves. It also provides the sunburn protection from UV. The shirt's ability to wick sweat means that the shirt actually provides a cooling effect via evaporation, although the perception of actual coolness is not really appreciated in the heat. My hat is caped to cover my neck.

Also, my shorts have a liner, so no underwear. I don't need a bra. And there are, perhaps, a few other gender differences. :)

Hope this helps.
 

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Pilgrims here right now

Advertisement

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 32 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 106 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 172 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 51 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 14 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 201 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 85 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top