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rough cost estimate

#1
Hi all, first time poster here,
I am looking to the camino frances this summer, not sure when exactly. i was just wondering what kind of cost am i looking at in general. how much would i be spending on accomodation and how much on food. is it possible to camp in places along the way?

thanks
 

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Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#2
$1000 US is enough if you are frugal. I spent 3 months walking from August to November and spent $3000 US.

We stayed in alburgues and refugios, slept out a few nights, stayed in a few privates.
We ate Pilgrim's plates a few times a week and cooked or picnicked the other days.
Took train trips, bus trips, and saw museums.

It's inexpensive if you know how to handle your cash.
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#3
Yes, the most frequently reported estimate is about 30 - 35 € per day per person. Don't count on less, although with really careful planning you could come out less.

Enter "Camping" in the search engine at the bottom of the page and you'll pick up the conversations about camping out along the camino.

Buen suerte!

lynne
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#4
Lynne is pretty on the spot with cost, I spent 35 Euros per day in 2006 sleeping in refugios and some private albergue and Hotel Suso in Santiago. This included pilgrims dinners most nights, bar breakfast, a sandwich or picnic lunch and a beer and aperitiv and the odd pharmacy item. I felt I lived well on that. Gitti
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#5
My friend John claims that he never spends more than 15 euro per day. He choose his shelters carefully (staying in 'donativo' albergues he says he gives a 5 euro donation and many places include a meal).
He buys all his food from the supermecado, even his beers which he takes off the shelf, puts them in a deep freeze with the meat or ice creams, walks around the shop for 1/2 an hour and then goes back for them when they are cold!
He makes his own breakfast and never eats the Menu del Peregrino, preferring to choose something from a menu for 3 euro or 5 euro. Its cheaper to buy a cold drink from a vending machine than from a bar.
There are some wild places to camp but camp sites are seasonal, usually out of town and charge the same as pilgrim albergues. I think there will be a lot more pilgrims taking tents this year than usual.
 

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#6
I paid just over 1000Euros for a months trek from SJPP to Santiago - staying in refugios for the most part, but not stinting on food or drink! 30-35E is a good estimate if you're not staying in private digs, taking too many taxis etc.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#8
30 euro a day includes accommodation - in pilgrim shelters - and food and drink.
 
#9
I don't really see how it is even possible to spend more than 15 euros for a normal day!

In my journal from the Camino Frances 3 years ago, I recorded how much I spent each day, and I think it ended up averaging 12-13 euros a day.

If you are frugal, make your own food a lot of the time, and stay in the refugios, there is no reason you should spend anything above this at any time.

Even if you eat out in the evening, you should stay under 15 euros. Sleeping for a night costs about 5 euros. you can get a coffee for about a euro. Lunch for 2 or 3 euros in a bar. you can eat off 'pilgrim menu' for dinner (including wine) for about 7 euros. Food from the grocery store costs next to nothing. I always carried a bit of bread, cheese, fruit, and nuts with me, so some days I didn't need to buy any food.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#10
I recorded similar costs in 2007 but things had gone up by last year.
There are very few albergues for 5 euro. Excepting for those in Galicia, most were closer to 10 euro
A cup of coffee in small cafe-bars was 1.50 euro. Breakfast of a coffee and tostados was 2.50 euro.
A bocadillo was anything between 4 and 6 euro
The Menu del Peregrionos were nearly all 10 euro (or more).
A glass of beer (small) or wine was 1.50 euro.

If the average pilgrim spends about 3 euro during the morning - for breakfast and later a cold drink or coffee, a chocolate or Madelena
5 euro for a bocadillo or other lunch and an afternoon coffee/cola cao or soft drink
12 euro for dinner and a drink - that equals 20 euro just for basic food and drink.

Add Between 5 euro and 10 euro for albergues and the occasional entrance fees to museums or cathedrals and the minimum comes to 30 euro.

Platos combinados are often cheaper than a full menu
Here is one from last year.
 

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#11
wow things have changed in 3 short years! The most expensive albergue I stayed in for the 5 weeks I walked was 7 euros (and that was only once), and I don't think I ever payed more than 3 euros for a bocadillo.

Good thing to know for the next time I'm over there!
 
#12
If you say 30 to 40 euro a day, enjoy your camino watch what you spend but dont be thrifty or too frugal, its a vacation for most people and the only foreign trip for a lot of people so you should enjoy yourself also--eat well as you need your strength for walking and have a couple of beers as you will have earned them
buen camino
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#13
benandsam said:
...and have a couple of beers as you will have earned them
Yes, that occational cold beer is a blessing: Peregrino gasolino!

But 30 Euro/day should be very much sufficient. Most albergues have a decent kitchen. I frequently made my own dinner, and found it very cheap and rewarding! But then again, I know how to make a meal. You can also go a long way on bread, cheese, ham, etc. in your backpack, as well as preparing your own meals.

So, my cost was something like 15-30 Euros/day, depending on how much I prepared/cooked for myself/bought/spent in restaurants.

If you prepare for yourself all the way, I think a budget of 15/day is ok. If you want to stay out, go for 30 as your day's budget. It is cheap anyhow...
 

elzi

Active Member
#14
Ok, I think it is technically possible to exist on 10-15 euro a day BUT I think you really need to budget more than that for things like trips to the pharmacy or occasional treats.

I managed on this much last summer with a mix of wild camping and albergues and only shopping in supermercardos. It involves not eating much, making up your own baguettes etc and not minding how much you smell - it's not for everyone!

Even if you take a lot of kit you can't plan for everything and you really need to budget for extras. After several weeks you start to need refills of things like suncream and blister plasters etc and they're not cheap. So even the most frugal trip needs a little extra put by...
 

elzi

Active Member
#15
Oh, another tip is to walk slightly off the camino, if you can be bothered, to get your breakfast coffee or lunch etc. Sometimes you can get a much cheaper coffee a street or two off route.
 
#16
My husband and I averaged 50 euros a day together. I wouldn't say we were super frugal, but we did try to keep our expenses down. We hiked from Burgos to Santiago and took a train once (Sahagun to Leon, i think, on the "local" cheap ticket) and took a taxi for approximately 20K to the next town when my shoes gave out and my feet couldn't take it any more. We stayed in a couple of private rooms costing about 35 euros, but mostly in alburgues averaging about 7 a night outside of galacia. We usually bought grocery store food for breakfast (pastries, fruit), and one menu for about 10 euros total (either at lunch or dinner, depending on our schedule), and then usually a bocadillo for about 5 euros for the other meal. We also carried nuts, cookies, etc. for snacks while walking. Usually included 1 cafe con leche a day and either a bottle or wine or a beer or two at the end of the day. I would think that 30 euros a day is a budget that one could be comfortable with. Allows for some luxuries and emergencies, but you could certainly get away with slightly less.
 
#17
SEPTEMBER I WILL WALK FROM LEON TO SANTIAGO..IS THERE ANYBODY OUT THERE WHO I COULD JOIN.. I'M LIVING IN FRANCE, 50K SOUTH OF TOULOUSE.. IF ANY FELLOW WALKER WOULD HELP ME WITH MY GARDENING I COULD OFFER FREE ACCOMADATION AT MY HOME HERE IN A VILLAGE CALLED MOLANDIER. EMAIL ME ON NARVIK15@HOTMAIL.CO.UK. ANDREW SPARSIS
 
#18
Dear Firstimer,
from my experience last summer, I believe that you can easily manage on a budget of €15-20 per day. While I did enjoy my time and was not penny-pinching, your money can go a long way on the Camino. Carefully choose your hostels (camionguide.net give costing & facilities) and cook your evening meals in as many hostels as possible. Buy food for breakfasts and lunches in the supermarkets and you will be fine. No doubt you will enjoy the siprit of the Camino - many evenings I bought dinner or a cool beer for a less financially secure pilgram.
May the road rise to meet you,
J
 

daesdaemar

Camino-holic
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles - twice
#19
I had lunch one day for 40 cents. It was two nice pears and a bottle of water bought at a small mercado.
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
#20
Not much protein there Daesdaemar, so I'd hope there would be some in the evening meal.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
#21
If you can get to the budget mecardos and you buy their house brands , A gaint tin fabada Asturiana , A 1 litre box of wine and a slab of chocolate all for just over 2 euros in August this year.
 
#22
I just returned last week from walking the Camino Frances from SJPP. I averaged 25 euros/day for the whole trip. Some days were cheaper w/ donativo albergues and supermercado meals, but I did eat the pilgrim menu dinner every night! This cost included all my souvenirs, Compeed, a longsleeve shirt and a fleece I had to buy because it got colder than I expected, all my meals, a ton of cafe con leches and several beers/claras, internet use along the way, all the small pastries I bought in order to use the servicios at cafes and bars, entrance to cathedrals, museums, and castles, a new SD card for my camera, ...everything! In the last 100km, the private albergues went up in price. If you didn't get a bed at the 5 euro xunta (municipal) albergue, the private ones ran 10-15 euros. Earlier in the Camino, the private ones ranged from 7-10 euros! Whatever you can afford, do it! What an amazing journey!! Buen Camino!
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
#23
Excellent Storkey , It sounds as if you enjoyed the Camino ; many pilgrims walk the whole way never to really discover The Way. - I'm sure you will understand this.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#24
If you stay in perroquial (donativo) or municipal auberges (E5-6) and don't eat out each night you can easily make it on E15.00 per day. That is what I averaged this past summer. But I never bought lunch and it wasn't until the last week that I splurged and had breakfast at a café. Instead I stopped at local supermercados and stocked up on (dried)fruit, nuts and tuna or beans.

My daily outlay went to a hot chocolate/café con leche in the a.m., the ocasional soft drink or bier/wine in the evening, lodging and shopping at markets. I never took trains, taxi's or buses.

The E15.00 does not include pharmacy supplies such as band-aides or the new pair of shoes I purchased along the way.

This was on the Camino Francés and am hoping that the Via de la Plata will be the same next year.
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
#25
I think a budget of 30 euro/day is good. I spent between 20 and 30 euros/day depending on if I ate out or not for dinner or lunch. I always had a cafe con leche or two in the morning. Usually breakfast #1 and then after a couple of hours of walking, breakfast #2 with a rest stop. This budget also included unexpected costs, like lots of Compeed, a neoprene knee brace and a new pair of shoes. I am sure with better planning, I could have gotten by on 20 euro/day. But it wouldn't have been as fun!

And always remember: The Camino Provides.
 

daesdaemar

Camino-holic
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles - twice
#26
CaroleH said:
Not much protein there Daesdaemar, so I'd hope there would be some in the evening meal.
On that particular day I had a jamon bocadillo (with an Estrella) in late afternoon and some fries with grilled shrimp late in the evening. The shrimp were ridiculously expensive - about 11 euros. It was my most expensive meal on the camino.
 
#27
A question that is slightly off track but along the same lines. I'll be going in May/June of next year, and I'm planning to stay in hotels as often as possible. Does anyone have any idea what those run per night? I'm perfectly willing to stay in refugios when necessary, but I know myself, and I think I'll like the quiet and privacy of a hotel room.

thanks so much in advance for any info you can give me.

Kari
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#28
Note that, in Spain, hotels are at the top of the range and are usually 40€-70€ for a single, but private rooms can be had in fondas or hostales (family-run pensions) and casas rurales (country inns). As well, many privately-run pilgrims’ hostels (albergues or refugios) have private rooms. Costs can run anywhere from 23€ (e.g. Hostal San Martín in León in 2009) up, but are usually in the 35€-50€ range. Burgos and Madrid *(!!!) are considerably more expensive than the smaller centres.

Spanish hotels, while pricey compared to albergues, are good value for Europe. I found that, in many places, even the swish ones offered a pilgrim’s rate.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2013/2014)
Via Podiensis, Camino Francés (2015)
Camino del Norte (2017)
#29
Anyone experience with walking in France? I am planning to walk (not at once) Amsterdam - Den Bosch - Rocroi - Vézelay - Le Puy - St Jean Pied de Port - Santiago. I heard that food and accomodation in France costs (a lot) more than in Spain. How many euros a day does one more or less spend there?
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#30
I walked Le Puy-SJPP-Santiago in 2008, and spent around double in France on what I spent in Spain. However, walker's gites, private and municipal, are usually available on the Le Puy route.

I met a Frenchwoman who walked from Brittany, and she spent a lot more on accommodation- much of it in hotels- before she reached the major route near Bordeaux. However, I also met a Frenchman who walked from north of Le Puy for several weeks, and he was bolder in his approach, knocking on convent and presbytery doors, and was nearly always provided with accommodation.

Margaret
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2013/2014)
Via Podiensis, Camino Francés (2015)
Camino del Norte (2017)
#31
Thanks Margaret! So I should count on at least 50 euros a day, I am afraid. Because I don't dare knocking on doors of church staff...
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#32
Luka said:
Thanks Margaret! So I should count on at least 50 euros a day, I am afraid. Because I don't dare knocking on doors of church staff...
Once you get to Le Puy it needn't be anywhere near that much Luka, but on the 'less-peopled' part of the route it might be like that. Others might be able to tell you of some cheaper options though.
Margaret
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#33
Luka, the refuges on the Vezelay path ranged from about 5 Euros - 10 Euros. I stayed in a couple of convents and they were around the 15 - 17 euros. I actually found the Vezelay path much cheaper than the le Puy path. Coming into Vezelay from Troyes there are also quite a few pilgrim refuges. Often they weren't listed in the guide I was using, but on visiting the Tourist office they would tell me where to go to find the refuge. These were often attached to the presbytery in some way (one place was at the end of the Scout Hall) . After the first few times I just got used to going straight to the Tourist office and asking them if there was any pilgrim accomodation in town. There were one or two occasions when I was told to wait in the building while someone came down to sign me in and give me a key. I would suggest that you do the same on the path you will be on - you never know what might be availlable. Cheers, Janet
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#34
Walking from Le Puy to Cahors in September 2010, I found I was often not able to stay in the least expensive accommodations because they were booked up (until I started booking out a week in advance), so there was a mix of accommodations I used. And I booked demi-pension wherever I could. My rough average was 50 euros a day. If you were able to book the gites municipal consistently, and perhaps did some of your own cooking, you'd be able to trim that by quite a bit.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2013/2014)
Via Podiensis, Camino Francés (2015)
Camino del Norte (2017)
#36
Margaret, Janet and Kitsambler, thanks again. This forum is a great place to get help from people who went down the path before.

I already heard from others that best way is to visit the tourist office to see what is possible. I will certainly do that when I am not able to book something in advance. For now it is just that I have to estimate how much money I need to safe for about a month walking in France next summer.
 
A

AJ

Guest
#37
Luka said:
Anyone experience with walking in France? ... How many euros a day does one more or less spend there?
On the Voie de Vezelay this year I averaged 42 euros per day, which included everything. I stayed in pilgrim refuges whenever possible. In some of these the hospitalier would prepare an evening meal for as little as 10 euros. I mostly ate in restaurants and did not stint on vin or biere.

France does not have to be very expensive.

My costs in Spain this year averaged about 35 euros per day.
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#38
Just a thought for your to consider. The tourist office had pilgrim refuges that were not necessarily on the information that I had about the place and so I reccomend to pilgrims leaving from here that they stop at the TO each time they stop in a town with the intention of staying as there may well be special accomodation for pilgrims there that you would otherwise not know about. Cheers, Janet
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#39
Hi all, I just got back walking the Via Gebenennsis from Geneva to Le Puy and averaged 38 /euros per day, staying at a mix of chambre d'hotes and municipal hostels. This included 3 or 4 course dinners with wine, breakfast and a picnic lunch and usually a beer or two. On the Le Puy route last year I averaged 38 Euros per day for the equivalent. I stayed mainly in gite d'etapes, lots of them privately run offering demi pension. Often I ended up sleeping alone in a room with several beds. Gitti
 

skilsaw

Veteran Member
#40
Cheap pilgrims bore me.
They are the ones who introduce themselves by saying, "I'm only spending 7.30 euros per day, and my pack is so large because I brought a peanut butter and Jam sandwich for each day from home."

If you ask them "Did you hear the birds singing in the forest?" They don't answer the question, but follow up by listing all the donativo albergues, highlighting the one they liberated the toilet paper from.

They distinguish themselves from genuinely hard up pilgrims by bragging, as if cheapness is something to be admired.

Genuine pilgrims on a lean budget out of necessity are usually hard to pick out. They tend to be quiet, clean, and careful. Compeled to be on an inward journey, not having a lark of a holiday.
They inspire and humble me because I am able to do the Camino out of my abundant blessings.
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
#41
Well said, Skilsaw.

Some, maybe many, are on the camino for strictly religious reasons, but many, like us, are there on annual holiday leave, because we love the whole challenging, life changing, spiritual experience and we love Spain. So we need to remember we are using facilities provided by the Spanish people, and that every Euro we spend, supports them and the infrastructure. Personally, our camino experience is so enriched by interaction with the locals . . . a big part of our journey.

IMHO . . . the pilgrims who stay in every night with their "peanut butter sandwiches" and never eat 'out' are missing such interaction and enrichment, and those who rarely contribute to "Donativo" albergues. are abusing the system. We are so lucky to be able to walk across a foreign country with such a wonderful support system of generous, friendly people. Lets appreciate and support it when we can.
 

camino-david

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
#42
Well said Skilsaw and CarolH,
By coincidence, today I worked out the exact cost of my Camino Frances and Finisterre in September and October last year, from the time I left St Jean to Finisterre and back to Santiago. It excludes flight costs in getting to Biarritz (for St Jean) and from Santiago. It cost me an average of 38.19 euros per day, which sounds high but did include 10 hotel nights (average 37.40 per night) Burgos (1), Leon (1), Villafranca del Bierzo (1), Santiago (4) and Finisterre (3). If I had stayed in hostels instead, my average cost per day would have been 32.33 euros. Unless provided in the hostels, I had a simple breakfast in a bar, made up my lunch bocadillos with items from a mercado, and ate the Menu del Dia in restaurants in the evenings, except at the two celebration dinners with Camino friends at Santiago and a glorious dinner of pulpo and pigs ear in Arco. It also included some small presents and souvenirs, entry fees and other small items. I was not frugal, but careful. All this means that the consensus opinion of these postings is that $30 a day is adequate, eating good healthy food and sleeping in a reasonably comfortable bed albeit with the snorers, early risers etc.
Buen Camino. David
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#43
This is a route to be enjoyed on many levels. It is a wonderful thing that it can be done cheaply. The opportunity to see so much for so little is one of the qualities of the Camino.

At the same time, there is a lot of enrichment which can come from spending more, if you have te resources. Upgrades such as eating in local restaurants rather than from the grocery store, sampling the local wines, staying in rooms in private houses, upstairs from the bars and restaurants, or even in the historical places such as the paradores all add to the experience. Some of our best memories have been staying in private homes, eating dinner with the owners, struggling with language all night, sampling their home made foods. Not as cheap as an albergue, but different.

If your question was "how cheaply can I do it", you have some answers. If your question is, "how much should I spend for the best trip", well that is tough, and each individual will have a different answer. Just be open to the idea that extra money, if you have it, can be well spent out there.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
#44
Lets not beat around the bush.

Assuming we are talking about the Camino Fances, Roncesvalles to Santiago ......

500 euros , excluding getting there and back will be sufficient ,........ Just!

1000 euros will provide for a Camino without restrictions.



Ps. It is hardly fair to give a 5 euro donation for dinner , bed and breakfast. :roll:
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#45
In an albergue with a donativo I always gave 5 € for the lodging ( = price in most municipales ) and another 9 or 10 € when dinner was served ( same amount as I would have spent if taking menu peregrino ). Another 2.50 € is they had breakfast. Some albergues got a little extra.
I personally would not feel at ease with myself when giving less than those amounts.
I was shocked to see how some people did spent over 20 € for beers in local bar but gave one ( 1!!! ) € as a donativo for food and lodging.
On the other hand we met a lovely young guy who did not have that much to spend. He had some mishaps with his backpack and at a certain albergue the hospitalero got the boy a second hand backpack ( little worn out and not that practical but it would do the trick ). That young man insisted to put something in the donativo box , although it was obvious he would set himself back a couple of days ).
An hospitalera also told me she regularly finds buttons in the donativo box!! Of course everyone knows that a button is really worth 10 € :evil:
 

gregdedman

Active Member
#46
When I travel I try not to let money rule my decisions too much.
Most people will live (or walk) within their means.
If you take $1000 then you'll probably not come home with much but the Frances can be walked for less, dependant on your personal limits.

I have walked the Camino with a friend (who loved foodie treats :) I spent 500euros (thats all I had), she spent 800 euros, took us both 33 days and we stayed at approx 60% same places.
15 euro a day is totally possible if you are sensible although when you return home you'll see items on the shelves a little differently, for a while comparing it to XXX many days budget on the Camino! :D
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#47
New postby SabineP on Fri Jun 03, 2011 7:30 am
In an albergue with a donativo I always gave 5 € for the lodging
Yes, that is what I generally do too, but I found it interesting that in a number of albergues on the Vezelay path I was told it was donativo, but with a minimum of 5 Euros. In these instances I generally gave a little more to help them support fellow pilgrims.

On the point of food though I have to point out that (and again, this is particulalry relevant to the Vezelay path) in many instances one did not have the option of going to a resaurant to "upgrade' one's experience, as in many of these little villages there were no resaurants or bars, and it was quite often, only through the generosity of the locals - who had stocked the cupboards, that I was able to rustle up a hot meal at night (a service for which I always left money - sometimes because things had a price on them, but always because that was the fair thing to do.)

Janet
 

Tia Valeria

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#48
As a couple, using albergues and cheap 'habitaciones', our 24 days actually in Spain cost us 50 euros per day average. The fare to reach Spain was extra.
We often shared a Plata Combinada or added a racion rather than eating the menu del dia, which you cannot share.
If you are on your own about 30-35 euros per day, at current prices, should be sufficient.
We carried most of ours on a Cash Card. Our thought was that it was better to take more than needed this way than run short.
Buen Camino
Tia Valeria
 

jennysa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Camino Aragones 2012, 2017, Via Francigena 2016 & 17,
#49
I have just completed the Camino, and my daily costs averaged out at less than 30 euros a day. Some albergues just ask for a donation and I saw that quite a few pilgrims considered them to be 'free'. Accommodation varied from 5 to 10 euros. Pilgrims' meal is max 10 euros and if you do your own meals in the albergues with kitchens, you can make a decent meal for 5 euros - particularly if you use up pasta etc that pilgrims from the previous evening left behind. A cup of coffee is about 1.20 euros, a beer about 1.50 euros. I used to buy a loaf of bread, cheese, tomato, bananas, yoghurt, a bar of chocolate daily which I used for breakfast and lunch. I would buy a bocadillo with a tortilla occasionally for breakfast or lunch and the prices varied from 1.50 euros to 3 euros. However, that bocadillo would do for breakfast and lunch. I avoided all the breakfasts for 3 euros as I wanted something more substantial than a cup of coffee and toast and jam.
 
#50
I did the entire camino from SJPDP to Santiago in 20 days. The tickets to get there were 100 euros and during the 20 days that i spent there i spent 250 Euros, living without luxury, cooking or just making my own sandwiches, and sleeping in the cheapest albergues. Also i didn't spent i accomodations in the last days because i met with my father who did the camino from Leon to Santiago

I spent from 5 to 15 euros. 5 to eat, usually 5 to the albergue, and another 5 just to eat more or drink xD.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), Primitivo(13), Norte(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18)
#51
If you are just asking about the cost to walk the Camino, less transportation to and from, you can reasonably do it on as little as 20 Euro's but easily on 30 Euro's a day. I am sure there are those who could do it on less but an average day would be Albergue (muni) 5 Euro, Peregrino dinner 8-10 Euro, and then coffee, road snacks, drink other than water etc. 5-10 Euro. I walked in 33 days so 660 to 990 Euros. Your costs to get to and from are dependent on where you are coming from and how far in advance you purchase your tickets.

Ultreya,
Joe
 
#52
My wife and I finished the Camino Frances mid-Sept. We took exactly 5 weeks (35 days) to complete it. We spent 79 Euro per day as a couple OR, just under 40 Euro each. That being said...included in this cost is the fact that we treated ourselves to hotel rooms for a few nights in Burgos and a night in Leon. Additionally, I had to go to the doctor which cost me 70 Euro as well.... I think once you take all this out of the equation we were around 35 Euro a day. Accom averages about 8 Euro and Pilgrims meals probably 10 Euro. The other money was spent on lunches, and our one true love....COFFEES!!!

Check out all the details here if you are interested...

http://www.getupandglobe.com/balancing- ... -santiago/

All the best!
 
#53
Cost per day - Camino St James

My daughter and I walked the Camino St James from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago last August. We omitted the section from Burgos to Leon due to lack of time. It cost us 35Euro a day each for everything - accommodation food, coffee, beer, some items from the pharmacy, bus from Burgos to Leon and 2 nights in a hotel.
Coming from Australia, that is so cheap. The fruit was the best I have eaten for years - big, juicy and very flavoursome.
I intend to walk the camino from Le Puy to St Jean next September which blogs suggest is more expensive so any information on that camino is welcome
Buon camino.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#54
Le Puy to St Jean
I added 5E per day, and it worked out well. The demi-pension includes dinner and breakfast, so often you will have a package deal with your accommodation. It typically was in the mid-twenty Euro range, so lunch, coffee, and beverage were the only additional costs each day.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#55
From Le Puy to SJPP, I was running about 35E per night for Demi-pension, using private gites and some chamber d'hotes. Groceries for a picnic lunch would add about 5e to that. Municipal gites are less expensive and often offer cooking facilities but I am bashful about my poor French so tend to avoid them.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#56
Just got back from walking entire le Puy route with my husband, spent 40 Euros per person per day all up, including drinks and picnic lunch, some restaurant meals, some self catered, superb demipension most of the time, shared rooms for about 7 out of 42 nights., includes incidentals like pharmacy items....http://www.gittiharre.blogspot.co.nz
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#57
I am bashful
There is a price for that! :D About five Euro a day, is my guess.

I know it is difficult to move past a lifetime of quietude, but the Camino provides an excellent opportunity to be bold. Pilgrims and locals alike are very supportive, even of poor language skills, so just do your friendly best to not be bashful. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#58
falcon269 said:
There is a price for that!
And a benefit as well. I find the 12-20 people sharing a private gite to be plenty; I have no need of the 50-60 at the municipal. Besides, the food is better, the rooms are quieter, there is less competition for the ablution facilities, etc etc. As always, your mileage may vary.
 

Tia Valeria

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#59
Some of us have spent a life-time working with people and their needs. For us the extra paid for a quiet night and a reflective Camino is money well spent.
There was still opportunity to mix with others and share fellowship, but time apart was important too.
Our costs, travelling as a couple were between 30 euros and 35 euros each per day including accomodation, meals and drinks.
 
Last edited:
#60
I just met a couple from D.C. who just returned a couple of months ago and stayed in private rooms along the way. It was the wife's second Camino. They still had plenty of opportunities to meet other people and to enjoy the camaraderie of the Way.

Two days until I leave for SJPP...
 

myschf

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
StJPdP-Santiago(2012)
#61
[quote="BoldenMD"}

Two days until I leave for SJPP...[/quote]

Happy Feet and Happy Trails! Buen Camino! :D
 
#62
This depends on your traveling style such as where you're planning to sleep and eat. Albergues should be on a range from €5-10 per night, some m,ay be less. I did the camino last month and my expenses were much higher for many reasons, I 'd stayed in pensions and hotels this costs in the € 35-65 range, ate in restaurants, figure a pilgrim's menu at €8-12, cafe con tostas usually €3. Don't let me scare you on this I'm a retired old fart in my seventies, so I needed a good comfortable bed, shower, etc.,usually breakfast was included in the price, but not always. Frequently I took snacks, but more frequently I had coffee and refreshment in cafes along the camino. Decide how you'd like to do the camino, ten it'll be easier to zero in on cost. Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
{July 2012 /April 2013}
#63
I rarely spent more than €20 per day and it didn't feel like a hardship. Most albergues cost €5. You can get a cheap pilgrim meal for under €10. Bought breakfast and lunch in supermarkets. The rest was on water and snacks. You can spend up to €40 if you stay in a hotel or private albergue, don't eat from the pilgrim menu and have a few beers. Each to their own but it can be done on a budget. Buen Camino.
 

Pibrac

New Member
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Sept-oct 2012 Camino Frances SJPP-SdC-Fin-Mux
June-july 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-
#64
It costs about 1.50 Euros per km.
 

Tia Valeria

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#65
It costs about 1.50 Euros per km.
Does this exclude the cost of accomodation? Even using albergues it would cost more than that surely with food and drink.
Presumably the cost rises also as the number of kms per day lessens and the days spent on the Camino therefore increase.

Our personal costs per km would therefore vary between 1.5€ and 2€ depending on the diatance walked and as much as 3€ per km if we stayed in a pension, hostal etc.
IMHO costs per day are a better way of assessing a budget.
 
Last edited:

dougfitz

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#66
It costs about 1.50 Euros per km.
I have muttered about this somewhere else, but the main cost drivers are daily costs, not per km costs. These are things like meals and accommodation, and are clearly daily. Incidental wear and tear on clothing, equipment and footwear might be distance related, but unlikely to be significant if they can be measured at all.

If the quoted statement were true, it wouldn't matter if you took 30 or 40 days to walk the CF, yet most people would understand that the longer time is likely to cost 30% more than the shorter one.
 

dougfitz

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#68
It's an average.
That might be so, but my objection is still valid.

Let me explain it this way. If you walked the 800km from SJPP to SDC in 30days at an average cost of 1.50Euro/km the total cost would be 1200Euro. That means it cost you 40Euro/day. Your friend walks in 40 days, staying in 10 more albergues as a result. The hospitaleros don't give her a discount for being slower, so she pays the same 40Euro/day or a total of 1600Euro. On average her cost per km is 2Euro.

You are both asked by a colleague what they might expect to pay if they walked the same Camino. They estimate it will take 35 days to complete the walk. Which is the best total cost estimate, 1200Euro, 1600Euro or 1400Euro?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012), Camino del Norte (2013), Camion Frances (2014)
#69
Another way to look at it is to compare it to our day-to-day living expenses in our "normal lives" back home. My wife and I together spent 2 months in Spain last year spending a total of around $5000 (which includes 40 days on the Camino). We stayed 50-50 between albergues and pensions and ate as much as our bodies could handle (and we still lost weight). That comes out to $83/day or better yet, $35,000/year. What? We can have a roof over our heads, a comfortable bed to sleep in, all the food we want to eat, great company AND be healthy for $30,000 a year?

I'm sorry but looking at it as a "cost per mile" seems to goal oriented for me. Looking at the daily, monthly or even annual costs seems to put my life into perspective, especially when I start thinking, "I can't afford it."

How can I afford not to?
 

Pygar

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Leon to Santiago
#70
I feel you can get by on 20-30 euros a day, I did. And I wasn't really trying to save money. I didn't eat a lot, but I enjoyed
what I did eat. I drank a lot of soda and beer and water to keep hydrated. Locals will approach you with rooms to rent while you are in the plaza, at the cathedral. We did that 2 nights and it was great. About 15 euros per person. Private shower, only 4 people to a room. One was over a loud night club, but we were so tired it didn't bother us.
 

donalomahony

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
"Camino Frances" 2013, "Burgos to Leon," February 2014 - "Frances" June '14
#71
My 15 yo Daughter and I walked from SJPP to STO this Summer: €30 per day each, staying in albergues €5 to €10 a night, always gave €5 each to donativos, sometimes €10 each, unexpected costs were pharmacy bits and pieces but good value in Spain. Did stay in Orrison (expensive but an experience) Costs can be really cut where u see good cooking facilities on arrival especially if you organise a group to share costs!
 

GSatt22

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#72
I just completed my Camino, from SJPdP to Santiago and it took 35 days. In cash I spent just under 44 Euro a day. This included bag transport every day (8 Euro), accommodation on 11 occasions (i stayed in Casa Rurals, Hostals most of the time and many have credit card facilities), donations to the office in SJPdP and the churches i visited, museums when there was one, lots of Compeed and in Astorga 16 Euro on chocolate (Astorga is close to heaven, every second shop is a chocolatier and they have a Gaudi masterpiece to sit in front of and watch the sun go down while you savour the chocolate you did not give away). Oh, i also had everything laundered a couple of times (one place which does this is the new hostal in Moratinos, it cost 5 Euro and was worth every cent).
 

Tumbleweed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#73
From SJPdP to Santiago 33 days walking with 1 rest day. Total 34 days, I spent 800 Euro. 95% of the time I stayed in Municiple Albergues, 5% I stayed in private Albergues. I only had 2 pilgrams menus. Mostly I cooked with some friends in the Alburgues or just had something small. A pilgrims life can be hard :) I hand washed my clothing but once in a while shared a washer and dryer with others (a blessing to say the least). I didn´t drink alcohol, didn´t take taxi´s or buses................I had an incredible journey.............Peace be with all who take the way.
 

biarritzdon

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#74
Congratulations on completing your Camino. I think 23 euros/day is a bit low for budgeting purposes but you did it so good on you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
August (2013)
#75
I finished the Camino on September 30th. It came out that I averaged 48€ a day. I am not sure why I spent more than "average". I cooked some meals but most of the time I did have the pilgrim meals. I had a private room a few times. I did not put myself on a budget so that might have been a problem.
I mistakenly thought that this was a once in a lifetime trip and did not worry about money. Now I am wondering when I can do it again ;-)
 

biarritzdon

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#76
I finished the Camino on September 30th. It came out that I averaged 48€ a day. I am not sure why I spent more than "average". I cooked some meals but most of the time I did have the pilgrim meals. I had a private room a few times. I did not put myself on a budget so that might have been a problem.
I mistakenly thought that this was a once in a lifetime trip and did not worry about money. Now I am wondering when I can do it again ;-)
You are much closer to spending the average per diem, mine is usually around 50 which includes my minuscule cost of transport to and from Biarritz, including airfare to Porto this year.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
#77
If I try to sort the expenses on the camino without travel and extraordinary costs I spent average 30 to 35 Euros. Some sections were cheaper than others; I managed on 500 Euro that I drew in Burgos for 18 days or about 25 Euro per day. When the weather got colder, I started eating a bocadillo at the bar every day for lunch and occasionally stopped for a hot cup of tea ... the costs went up. Compeed and Ibuprofen add up too.

I note that there were not many donativo albergues; most that were donativo have had to charge a modest fee of at least 5 Euro due to people not contributing.

I will remark on the comment that had a fellow putting beer off the shelf into a freezer. That drives the costs up for the vendor. I find this lack of personal integrity distressing at one level.
 
Camino(s) past & future
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Camino Fisterra/Muxía 2013
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Camino del Norte 2016
#78
I din't care much about how much I spent so I used € 950 but that includes taxi from Pamplona, hotel in SJPdP. I also had to stay in an hotel in Pamplona and Compostilla during the camino. I was out 23 days. Excluding taxi and hotel i SjPdP i spent an average of €33 on my 23 days on the Camino Francés. I stayed in 2 donotivos and paid €10 in those as the people in front of me in the queue didn't pay anything at all.

I kept an expenses journal so I have a day by day expenses list as well.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#79
You can spend as little as an average of 15 euros per day - I know since that is what I spent the first time around on the Francés (I also kept an expense journal). The difference is that I never stayed in private albergues except for in SJPP and rarely ate a menu de peregrino. I would stop for a café con leche a couple of times a day but bought supplies for lunch and dinner. Towards the end I would tend to stop and have breakfast at a café. This does not include farmacy supplies.

On the Vía de la Plata it was more like 20-25 euros as we had to stay at times in private albergues. I usually also had breakfast in a café and a salade as a late lunch everyday + a clara con limón in the afternoon. This past summer on the Sanabrés it was again more like 15-20 euros as most of the albergues were of the Xunta de Galicia for 6 euros and we usually shopped for food. On about 3 occasions our group went out to lunch together but this was no more than 10 euros p.p. even in the cities of Ourense and Santiago.

I never thought that I was being cheap (gave 10 euros in donativos) but saved by not staying in private albergues unless absolutely necessary. I also stayed away from the pilgrim menu but that is also because I am a vegetarian and prefer to buy fresh fruits and vegetables along the way.
 
#80
Hi all, first time poster here,
I am looking to the camino frances this summer, not sure when exactly. i was just wondering what kind of cost am i looking at in general. how much would i be spending on accomodation and how much on food. is it possible to camp in places along the way?

thanks
Hi Firsttimer,
You have not shown where you are from but please note that the exchange rate is a factor you need to consider. In my case that has changed quite a bit since I first decided to walk the Camino Frances. I am from the USA and the rate of exchange has varied from $1.30/Euro to $1.40 (plus bank charge).
Check out used equipment exchanges on line and consignment or used clothing stores, etc, to hold down costs.
Stefania
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#81
Firsttimer has not visited the Forum since Sep. 6, 2010, so may not be interested in costs or the exchange rate.;)
 

ParistoCapeCod

"Come on mom this 14k isn't going to walk itself."
Camino(s) past & future
April 2016 Lugo to SdC. Hospitalera August 2016. Camino del Norte June-July 2014, some of Arles, Le Puy and Vézelay routes.
#83
I recorded similar costs in 2007 but things had gone up by last year.
There are very few albergues for 5 euro. Excepting for those in Galicia, most were closer to 10 euro
A cup of coffee in small cafe-bars was 1.50 euro. Breakfast of a coffee and tostados was 2.50 euro.
A bocadillo was anything between 4 and 6 euro
The Menu del Peregrionos were nearly all 10 euro (or more).
A glass of beer (small) or wine was 1.50 euro.

If the average pilgrim spends about 3 euro during the morning - for breakfast and later a cold drink or coffee, a chocolate or Madelena
5 euro for a bocadillo or other lunch and an afternoon coffee/cola cao or soft drink
12 euro for dinner and a drink - that equals 20 euro just for basic food and drink.

Add Between 5 euro and 10 euro for albergues and the occasional entrance fees to museums or cathedrals and the minimum comes to 30 euro.

Platos combinados are often cheaper than a full menu
Here is one from last year.
That's the first I read of Platos combinatos and the photo of a menu was most helpful! Gracias
 
Camino(s) past & future
Past: SJPdP -> Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Future: Santo Domingo de la Calzada -> Santiago
#85
I spent on average of 40 euros per day for my two week walk in October, and I ate and drank well after comfortable nights :)
 

colinb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino (September 2012) Ponderrada to Santiago
(May 2013) St. Jean to Santiago
(June 2014) Assisi to Rome. The St. Francis Way
(2015) Portuguese Camino. Lisbon to Santiago.
( Easter 2016) King Ludwig Way.
(Summer 2016) Ignatian Way. Loyola to Manresa.
#86
I spent on average of 40 euros per day for my two week walk in October, and I ate and drank well after comfortable nights :)
This year (2013) my wife and I left SJPDP 27 May and arrived Santiago 2July. I would estimate 30 to 35 euros each per day. We did a daily blog at candmcamino
 

Tia Valeria

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#87
That's the first I read of Platos combinatos and the photo of a menu was most helpful! Gracias
We learnt that if you have either menu de peregrino or menu del dia you have to have one menu each. If you have platos combinados you can share it. We would often buy a main dish and a side dish eg pollo milanesa plus an ensalada (simple or mixta) The main dish usually had chips so we didn't need extra.
Useful if you are eating with a companion. Otherwise the menu del dia is often the best economic option as water/wine and bread is included.
You could also have one menu and one combinados if there are 2 or more, giving the best of both worlds. :)
One place gave us so much on the platos combinados that we saved some for a sandwich later
 

pattymo97206

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked 360km (2012) Planning 790K May (2014)
#88
I am planning on 50 euros a day. I want to cover all bases and I am sure I will not be staying in the munis everynight. (My husband has told me I snore like a moose dog, but.......I don't believe him!) o_O

Uh, what is a moose dog?:confused:(confused and I am that, a lot)
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#89
This year (2013) my wife and I left SJPDP 27 May and arrived Santiago 2July. I would estimate 30 to 35 euros each per day. We did a daily blog at candmcamino
Very much interested to hear your account of this pilgrimage - can u contact me - how do we invite each other? I am also on facebook. Plan to walk Jan2016 with my best friend for her 50th birthday.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#90
I din't care much about how much I spent so I used € 950 but that includes taxi from Pamplona, hotel in SJPdP. I also had to stay in an hotel in Pamplona and Compostilla during the camino. I was out 23 days. Excluding taxi and hotel i SjPdP i spent an average of €33 on my 23 days on the Camino Francés. I stayed in 2 donotivos and paid €10 in those as the people in front of me in the queue didn't pay anything at all.

I kept an expenses journal so I have a day by day expenses list as well.
Hi what is the difference between Camino Frances and Camino de Santiago ? Pardon my ignorance - I am only just beginning to familiarise myself with terminology as I want to walk the Camino (all 34 days) in one trip.
 
Camino(s) past & future
none
#91
From SJPdP to Santiago 33 days walking with 1 rest day. Total 34 days, I spent 800 Euro. 95% of the time I stayed in Municiple Albergues, 5% I stayed in private Albergues. I only had 2 pilgrams menus. Mostly I cooked with some friends in the Alburgues or just had something small. A pilgrims life can be hard :) I hand washed my clothing but once in a while shared a washer and dryer with others (a blessing to say the least). I didn´t drink alcohol, didn´t take taxi´s or buses................I had an incredible journey.............Peace be with all who take the way.
Wow - what a positive and awesome post! Well done - you have inspired me to ensure that I make notes to get the best possible experience. thanks!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
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#92
Hi what is the difference between Camino Frances and Camino de Santiago ? Pardon my ignorance - I am only just beginning to familiarise myself with terminology as I want to walk the Camino (all 34 days) in one trip.
Hola Ashna and welcome.
There are several Caminos to Santiago, each with its own name Francés, Norte, Inglés, Primitivo (=primary/first/original) etc which can be confusing. The Francés is the one currently most used and often referred to as the Camino de Santiago, it is also labelled as that as a World Heritage site. I expect that this is the one you are aiming to walk, but it is also worth looking at the history of the others and posts on the other parts of the forum.
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2013
Camino Fisterra/Muxía 2013
Camino Inglés 2013
Camino del Salvador 2014
Camino Primitivo 2014
Caminho Portugues 2015
Camino del Norte 2016
#93
Hi what is the difference between Camino Frances and Camino de Santiago ? Pardon my ignorance - I am only just beginning to familiarise myself with terminology as I want to walk the Camino (all 34 days) in one trip.
I saw that Tia answered you question. I walked the Frances in 23 days and then I walked to Finiaterre ans Muxía and back to SdC before I walked the Camino Inglés.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#94
Jenny Anderson:
I finished the trail in the Winter of 2011 – World Record – 9 days, 5 hours, 29 minutes. -Jenny Biondi Anderson
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#96

Nandy61

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 CF StJPP to Santiago
2014 CF Leon to Santiago
2015 Primitivo
#97
#98
For years, I have ignored negative comments regarding speed records. But, today I feel compelled to speak up for myself and for others that might receive similar feedback. I ran/hiked The Camino de Santiago in 2011 for the Fastest Known Time (FKT). I continue to read several remarks such as “What a shame! That's tragic! or It’s a pilgrimage trail and what could she have possibly seen running it?”

My pilgrimage consisted of nine days on a trail by myself, encountering only three other pilgrims the entire way, up and down mountain ranges in snowstorms, through ice, sleet, freezing rain, and I ran/hiked every single step in solitude. This pilgrimage of mine not only tested my limits, but also allowed me to contemplate my life (past, present, and future) in complete silence, humbled by the hard days, the climate and the terrain. I saw storms, cathedrals, vineyards, and animals (wild and domestic). I saw the trail lit only by the moonlight. I saw the gently falling snow on a quiet morning. I saw each town at the moment before the rooster crowed as I was the only one hobbling down its streets in the early morning hours. I saw graffiti saying “Dónde están tus suenos? Vivelos antes de morir” (Where are your dreams. Live them before you die.)… and so I did. I saw myself humbled by all of God’s beauty in a country that mesmerized me. It was my cross to carry, my pain to endure, my choice. It was just me, the trail, and the elements. It was how I chose to journey, and it was good.

I am a working mom of three kids with a current reality of not being able to spend weeks away from home like most people that do these long trail adventures. My point is that we all have our journey that we choose. Some may walk. Some may run. Some may want the company of others. Some may want solitude. Some may want summer heat while others prefer the snows of winter. Why judge each other’s journey and the choices we make as to why we journey the way we do? We all have our own purpose, our own demands of life, and our own pace. Let’s not judge one another. Just be kind and respect the journey for the journey’s sake.
 

jstorybook

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
October-November 2013
#99
Hi all, first time poster here,
I am looking to the camino frances this summer, not sure when exactly. i was just wondering what kind of cost am i looking at in general. how much would i be spending on accomodation and how much on food. is it possible to camp in places along the way
For years, I have ignored negative comments regarding speed records. But, today I feel compelled to speak up for myself and for others that might receive similar feedback. I ran/hiked The Camino de Santiago in 2011 for the Fastest Known Time (FKT). I continue to read several remarks such as “What a shame! That's tragic! or It’s a pilgrimage trail and what could she have possibly seen running it?”

My pilgrimage consisted of nine days on a trail by myself, encountering only three other pilgrims the entire way, up and down mountain ranges in snowstorms, through ice, sleet, freezing rain, and I ran/hiked every single step in solitude. This pilgrimage of mine not only tested my limits, but also allowed me to contemplate my life (past, present, and future) in complete silence, humbled by the hard days, the climate and the terrain. I saw storms, cathedrals, vineyards, and animals (wild and domestic). I saw the trail lit only by the moonlight. I saw the gently falling snow on a quiet morning. I saw each town at the moment before the rooster crowed as I was the only one hobbling down its streets in the early morning hours. I saw graffiti saying “Dónde están tus suenos? Vivelos antes de morir” (Where are your dreams. Live them before you die.)… and so I did. I saw myself humbled by all of God’s beauty in a country that mesmerized me. It was my cross to carry, my pain to endure, my choice. It was just me, the trail, and the elements. It was how I chose to journey, and it was good.

I am a working mom of three kids with a current reality of not being able to spend weeks away from home like most people that do these long trail adventures. My point is that we all have our journey that we choose. Some may walk. Some may run. Some may want the company of others. Some may want solitude. Some may want summer heat while others prefer the snows of winter. Why judge each other’s journey and the choices we make as to why we journey the way we do? We all have our own purpose, our own demands of life, and our own pace. Let’s not judge one another. Just be kind and respect the journey for the journey’s sake.
I never minded the runners just the reminders from other pilgrims as they passed me by because I walked too slow even though we most likely ended the day staying in t h e same Alburges. During the middle ages while most pilgrims walked the richer ones would ride horses or donkeys. While walking was much slower they all eventually arrived at the same place.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPP - Finisterre)
For years, I have ignored negative comments regarding speed records. But, today I feel compelled to speak up for myself and for others that might receive similar feedback. I ran/hiked The Camino de Santiago in 2011 for the Fastest Known Time (FKT). I continue to read several remarks such as “What a shame! That's tragic! or It’s a pilgrimage trail and what could she have possibly seen running it?”

My pilgrimage consisted of nine days on a trail by myself, encountering only three other pilgrims the entire way, up and down mountain ranges in snowstorms, through ice, sleet, freezing rain, and I ran/hiked every single step in solitude. This pilgrimage of mine not only tested my limits, but also allowed me to contemplate my life (past, present, and future) in complete silence, humbled by the hard days, the climate and the terrain. I saw storms, cathedrals, vineyards, and animals (wild and domestic). I saw the trail lit only by the moonlight. I saw the gently falling snow on a quiet morning. I saw each town at the moment before the rooster crowed as I was the only one hobbling down its streets in the early morning hours. I saw graffiti saying “Dónde están tus suenos? Vivelos antes de morir” (Where are your dreams. Live them before you die.)… and so I did. I saw myself humbled by all of God’s beauty in a country that mesmerized me. It was my cross to carry, my pain to endure, my choice. It was just me, the trail, and the elements. It was how I chose to journey, and it was good.

I am a working mom of three kids with a current reality of not being able to spend weeks away from home like most people that do these long trail adventures. My point is that we all have our journey that we choose. Some may walk. Some may run. Some may want the company of others. Some may want solitude. Some may want summer heat while others prefer the snows of winter. Why judge each other’s journey and the choices we make as to why we journey the way we do? We all have our own purpose, our own demands of life, and our own pace. Let’s not judge one another. Just be kind and respect the journey for the journey’s sake.
I can't imagine why anyone would criticize this person's journey. That is an amazing feat! Incredible!
 

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