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Route suggestions once you've done all the obvious caminos?

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
 
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irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
ever thought of doing the Via Alpina. It's not the Camino, but does seem to be an incredible hiking journey. (not trying to take you out of "pilgrim" mode. It is worth checking out
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
I would say Vía de la Plata is your obvious choice, it can be hot, yes, but if you are sensible and walk at the right times, you should have no problem.

On a less sociable level, you will find stunning caminos like Lebaniego-Vadiniense, Geira-Arrieiros, Baztan, and perhaps a combo with Invierno+Fisterra/Muxia!
 

skevin

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 - SJPP to SdC
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
I’m on the Madrid at the moment - fancy high quality €5 albergue la all to yourself?

It’s a very flat walk through agricultural farmland, mainly. No shade. Carry food and water etc but it’s been very pleasant. 4 stars out of 5. Under 3 weeks Madrid to Sahagun, where it joins the Frances, if you so desire.
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
I’m on the Madrid at the moment - fancy high quality €5 albergue la all to yourself?

It’s a very flat walk through agricultural farmland, mainly. No shade. Carry food and water etc but it’s been very pleasant. 4 stars out of 5. Under 3 weeks Madrid to Sahagun, where it joins the Frances, if you so desire.
Thanks skevin - that's an interesting proposition. The Madrid camino does interest me. Are you totally alone there though? I don't mind the odd night on my own, but I wouldn't want every night to be like that because I'm quite a socialble person.
 
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Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
ever thought of doing the Via Alpina. It's not the Camino, but does seem to be an incredible hiking journey. (not trying to take you out of "pilgrim" mode. It is worth checking out
I'd not heard of it to be honest. Just googled it and it does look beautiful, but the prospect of Switzerland does ring budget alarms for me. I really can't afford much more than about 40 euros a day. That's probably not feasible, right?
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
I would say Vía de la Plata is your obvious choice, it can be hot, yes, but if you are sensible and walk at the right times, you should have no problem.

On a less sociable level, you will find stunning caminos like Lebaniego-Vadiniense, Geira-Arrieiros, Baztan, and perhaps a combo with Invierno+Fisterra/Muxia!
Thanks Amancio. I definitely want to do the Plata, but rather feared I'd left it too late in the year for that now. Have you tried walking it yourself in the summer?
 

skevin

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 - SJPP to SdC
Thanks skevin - that's an interesting proposition. The Madrid camino does interest me. Are you totally alone there though? I don't mind the odd night on my own, but I wouldn't want every night to be like that because I'm quite a socialble person.
Generally it has been just me - sometimes one other or a couple of cyclists. No albergues from Madrid to Segovia but sufficient and affordable hostels. Excellent network of municipal albergues after. Def not a party trail but I’ve found it quite nice . Long stretches without services , carrying water etc ….
 

Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
Baztan, Madrid, Catalan way ....just a couple thoughts. One of our most memorable was doing the Frances from Santiago to SJPDP. Completely different.
 
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Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Baztan, Madrid, Catalan way ....just a couple thoughts. One of our most memorable was doing the Frances from Santiago to SJPDP. Completely different.
A backwards camino - intriguing! Did you find any other people doing it in that direction? I imagine it must be a little strange seeing a different camino family every single day.
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Look into the Camino Ignatius or maybe a camino through France.

I did the Catalan in autumn and it was lonely. It would be gorgeous in the spring with the fruit trees in bloom but probably still lonely.
Thanks Rick. I'd never heard of the camino Ignatius before. That's quite an intriguing one.
I'm very tempted by a French camino, probably le Puy, but am a bit uncertain about the costs and difficulty of trying it in a holy year.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Thanks Rick. I'd never heard of the camino Ignatius before. That's quite an intriguing one.
I'm very tempted by a French camino, probably le Puy, but am a bit uncertain about the costs and difficulty of trying it in a holy year.
I should have added that I have no experience with any French camino nor the Ignatius except for the few days where it and the Catalan coincide (but heading in opposite directions).
IMG_20191024_104614.jpg Screenshot_20200617-093026-01.jpeg
Six of the seven pilgrims I met in my two weeks on the Catalan were walking the Ignatius.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
You haven't mentioned the Invierno. I found it a bit solitary in some stages, but I was walking very short stages to start, and deliberately staying in private rooms. There were up to 7 pilgrim sightings on any given day, and I expect it would increase in the summer. Have a look at some of the current Invierno threads for more information and impressions.
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Thanks Amancio. I definitely want to do the Plata, but rather feared I'd left it too late in the year for that now. Have you tried walking it yourself in the summer?
erm... I love La Plata in late April and mid may, but from Salamanca onwards, it can be reasonably bearable u to mid June, I guess.

If you do from León to Ponferrada, then take Invierno, then Fisterre-Muxia, it should be quite nice at late spring/beginning of May, you would have a nice 16 day Camino, a very nice one, indeed!
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Going through the list of ones I've walked besides the ones you have already done I came up with this:

1) Vía de la Plata or just the Sanabrés which is northern
2) Camí Catalán (also know as Camí Sant Jaume) through Huesca. We then continued on the Aragonés).
3) The Mozárabe from Almería, Granada or Málaga
4) The Inglés
5) Levante
6) Lana

Besides 2 and 4, the rest are in the south so maybe not ideal during the time period you mention although I've walked the Plata and the Levante in July.

How much company you will have is questionable. Except for the Plata in Spring, the Sanabrés which is fairly short and the Inglés which is very short, the others are not widely walked. On the Levante I met up with 1 pilgrim between Valencia and Toledo and two between Toledo and Zamora.
 

Kevin Considine

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2021
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
Invierno, Aragones, English , or outside of Spain; Via Piodensis in France, Via Francigena or Via Francesco in Italy, or 88 Temple in Japan. Comparisons of most of these to Camino Frances at How Other Pilgrimages compare to Camino Frances
 
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Jim Bispham

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
France 2015, Portugues, 2017, del Norte & Ingles
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
Try the Camino route from Alicante to Santiago and then out to Muxia or Finisterre, so a coast to coast across Spain.. From Alicante I only saw 4 other pilgrims untile around 100km from Santiago.
 

John Vissers

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
camino el madrid
I’m on the Madrid at the moment - fancy high quality €5 albergue la all to yourself?

It’s a very flat walk through agricultural farmland, mainly. No shade. Carry food and water etc but it’s been very pleasant. 4 stars out of 5. Under 3 weeks Madrid to Sahagun, where it joins the Frances, if you so desire.
Thanks! we are planning to walk the Madrid in mid September and having difficulty learning anything about this route. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
10/22 Aragones/Frances
Thanks Amancio. I definitely want to do the Plata, but rather feared I'd left it too late in the year for that now. Have you tried walking it yourself in the summer?
Look into the Camino Ignatius or maybe a camino through France.
I love La Plata in late April and mid may, but from Salamanca onwards, it can be reasonably bearable u to mid June, I guess.
Just a couple of comments above. I have walked the Le Puy Camino. It is really beautiful. It has a very diverse landscapes. I can not speak any French and it makes things a little difficult. When I walked it I had no google translate or even a phrase book. Most of the people are older. Most are French, some Germans. I was the only American. The experience is much different. Gites are a different experience. Walking can be lonely if you are a solo pilgrim but wonderful. Planning is needed as Gites serve dinner and owners of GItes want to know the day before how many people they are cooking for. The food is out of this world and I have never had a pilgrim dinner in Spain that can shine the shoes of a Gite Dinner. It is not an easy camino especially during the early stages but the beauty makes up for it.
I walked the VDLP last year starting towards the end of October and it was very hot for at least 7-10 days leaving Sevilla. 90+F every day. Carried 3 liters of water, 2 frozen and food. Planning is needed also as there are days with nothing from one town to the next. It is a far more mental challenge than a physical one I felt. Not muc scenery early on unless you are into looking at Olive tree groves. I passed very few pilgrims during the day. There were some at night but where there are small groups of French or Germans walking together, virtually everyone I met on the VDLP were solo walkers and wanted to keep it that way. It doesn't mean they weren't friendly and warm when we were in the albergues.
Both are great experiences, both very different from each other and very different from the more popular Spanish and Portuguese caminos.
There is virtually no other languages spoken in the towns and villages other then the native tongue. It was only a real problem a few times in France. Most of the people in France I do not think the consider themselves pilgrims. I think they are more hikers walking a camino. In the evenings, at dinner I did not come across more than a few people hikers or owners who spoke or wanted to speak any English at all.
In Spain the same is true in the villages and towns. I have a working knowledge of Spanish and can hold my own, There are more larger cities you go through like Merida, Zamora and Salamanca and lots of Roman history and lovely cities on the VDLP. Both very different from each other and also the popular routes. Both are unique and have wonderful memories just waiting to be made.
 

Old walker

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
LePuy07, CF 08, Arles17, Via Regia '18,
ever thought of doing the Via Alpina. It's not the Camino, but does seem to be an incredible hiking journey. (not trying to take you out of "pilgrim" mode. It is worth checking out
Have you considered the Arles route? It's a beautiful hike. No worry about crowds. - More arduous than the Via Regia, and less elevation gain than the Southwest Coast Path in England, which excels in scenic beauty, but lacks Camino pilgrims experience. The via Francigena was next on our list but have had to cancel twice during the past two years because of covid concerns. At 81, those years matter.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Frances from Le Puy-en-Velay ('10-12) from Montgenevre '14-15) from Vezelay ('18), from Seville 2020
I've walked the Frances, Norte, and Primitivo. I have always started in France. From le-Puy-en-Velay, Montgenevre (then thru Arles), and Vezelay. When I started my Caminos, my French was very basic and now I'm better. When I think about it, I've always met people on Camino whose only language was not European: Japanese, Korean, and Filipino pilgrims come to mind. How did they do it? They inspire me. For the reasons already described, Caminos in France are amazing. The French are helpful even if they don't speak English. Parisians may be snooty, but when you are south of Paris all is well. Please consider this a full-throated endorsement.
P.S. I use Miam-Miam DoDo guidebooks. They come out every year and give you all the lodging available, current prices, etc. Use the pictographs (though there are also pages of useful vocabulary words in several languages.) France gets my full-throated endorsement.
 

Roland49

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF2019, CP2023!
How about the Via Francigena? From Lucca to Rome?
Or the Via Regia from te polish/german border to Vacha or Fulda (very rural)?

There are so many options!
 

Old walker

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
LePuy07, CF 08, Arles17, Via Regia '18,
We can recommend the Via Regia, from Gorlitz to Vacha. As another ancient route (more than 2000 years old) , it has a rich cultural history, notable towns and cities, and relatively recent development of simple pilgrim's resources for lodging, mostly in rectory buildings associated with churches. Water is readily available (all cemeteries have potable water) but casual access to food wasn't on the trail. We encountered few through hikers in the spring. There is a reason wind mills dot the landscape; lots of wind! Leave your poncho (think sail) at home and bring a jacket with a hood. Happy to share details of the journey!
 

lindam

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Thanks! we are planning to walk the Madrid in mid September and having difficulty learning anything about this route. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
You will find a sub-forum on this forum to help you with many planning details for the Madrid Camino. For up-to-date information, you might also look here: https://www.rayyrosa.com/camino-de-madrid (if opened on Chrome it is easily translated into English). Ray and Rosa are dedicated pilgims who offer accommodation along the Madrid Camino in a space they built and designed on their own property for the sole purpose of welcoming pilgrims along the way (their warm hospitality also includes the offer a lovely evening meal). Happy planning!
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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@Ungawawa, I can only add two from experience and one by association

1) Le Puy - no real difficulties for me (aged 74 at the time and "match-fit"). My only French was "Je regret, mais Je n'parle pas Francais. But I am certain that my hearers knew that already, but I tried and always had a good experience.

The sending out from Le Puy Cathedral is unique: for various reasons, for a short interval I was bolted to the floor and could not step forward to make my departure.

As @lt56ny says above, you can expect a grand experience, but not certain what the last few years have done to "gite d'etape" (these are hostels, gite without qualification tend to be mini hotels with a tariff to suit).

While, for me, just about everyday was an adventure, standouts six year later include:
Meeting three couples from Nice: at Saint-Come-d-Olt: in 2015 they had walked for a week from Le Puy - their 2016 intention was Figeac (Fijac) - they invited me to sit with them for dinner that night and I encountered them again.
Dinner at Livinhac-le-Haut, beside an Australian woman and her Kiwi husband. She warned me he was writing a novel. I found out later she was the co-author and that some of my unique attributes found their way into their joint product;
Lauzerte: a medieval town on top of a volcanic plug
Moissac and Gite (d'etape) La Petite Lumiere: hard to walk up to after a long day - but what a welcome. This was my first rest day after two weeks on the road - the website says NOUS SOMMES OUVERTS.
Euaze: and the Roman treasure and a concert and a La Gite (d'etape) La Grange de Marie France: an excellent cook and a magnificent evening meal with Armagnac. And open.
Arthez-de-Bearn and the first sighting of the Pyrenees, still with snow (late April)

2) Via Francigena from Canterbury. For a walker this can be a lonely route: in three weeks (and 600 km) saw possible walkers in the distance once as they went into a shop. But so many adventures and so much kindness given to me by so many. (Je regret, ...) I was booked to return in late March 2020 ... I can't wait to rebook and to restart with about 1,400 km still ahead of me.

3) By association the Ignatian from near Bilbao via Logrono to near Barcelona. A near associate has walked this route and I should take the time to chat to him about his experiences. Nearly all the preferred route uses existing marked routes. I can see them in my preferred tool of WayMarkedTrails.org with the final section selected for this purpose.

Kia kaha, kia māia, kia manawanui (take care, be brave, strong and patient)
 
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backpack45

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
(As well as several you already mentioned) we have hiked the LePuy (GR65), Arles, and Vezeley routes. My favorite of those was the LePuy, Ralph's was the Vezelay. We also did the GR from Geneva as it leads into LePuy. Some of these routes are isolated in parts, but we did most of them 10+ years ago, so they have only become more popular. When we are on the lesser known routes, we often are able to be the only guests with our hosts (and we usually check in the guidebooks to see if they speak any English), which I often enjoy because you feel like a member of the household and get to eat with the family. I would not recommend doing the route from Granada (Via de la Plata) this late in the season--it gets exceedingly hot!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Depending on the time available an alternative would be the Ruta do Mar from Ribadeo (along the coast) to San Andrés de Teixido and then down to Ferrol and the Inglés. However there is little infrastructure etc (or signing in places). There is a sub-forum with more details and a guide book written by @Dave of this forum.
I think we would stll classify it as for pioneers and the adventurous.....
 

Barbara

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Try the Camino route from Alicante to Santiago and then out to Muxia or Finisterre, so a coast to coast across Spain.. From Alicante I only saw 4 other pilgrims untile around 100km from Santiago.
There's a reason for that. Long days through a flat and hot plain, usually with the wind in your face. Not many places to stay or eat.
 

Fred Gaudet

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1341
Camino Mozarabe connecting to the VDLP and then to the Sanabres.
Camino Olvidao from Bilbao to Ponferada and then onto the Invierro.
Camino Dos Faros along the north coast of Spain.
 

Suzanne H

Camino Junkie
Time of past OR future Camino
Next: 2023, UK C2C/Hadrian's Wall & Arles???
Hiya! Because you mention having walked "the most popular routes" I have to agree that the le Puy should be on your short list. It is one of my favorites (if not THE fave) and I look forward to walking in France again. I think you've received a lot of important details here already but I will add that departing le Puy cathedral was a high point, arriving SJPdP on foot through the gates of the old town was another, there was a reasonable amount of solitary time and group meals at the gites were terrific... really a splendid walk and historically relevant to the greater Camino story, if that is important to you. The first ten days of walking is challenging so planning shorter days and taking ones time is a good idea. But having a reservation every day gives one all the time they need to rest and arrive in one piece. The only drawbacks were that my lack of language skills limited me; and more importantly, my lack of planning to continue walking onward into Spain and to Santiago left me wanting more ... bonne journée!!
 
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Canche

Volcano Climber
Time of past OR future Camino
Norte/Frances 2016, San Salvador & Primitivo 2021
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
Camino Invierno, Sanabres and Ruta do Mar
 

Canche

Volcano Climber
Time of past OR future Camino
Norte/Frances 2016, San Salvador & Primitivo 2021
I'm looking for camino or trail suggestions now I have walked the most popular camino routes. Having done the Frances (both Aragones and St Jean variants), Norte, Portuguese (both central and coastal), Finisterre & Muxia, San Salvador and Primitivo, I'm stuck for where to choose next. (A nice problem to have for sure!)

Of course I can always just repeat caminos and they'd be different, but I would like to try something new instead of just repeating the same route.

Are there any seasoned pilgrims out there with suggestions for really great caminos or camino-spirited trails that could be done in the late spring/summer (which I guess excludes Via De La Plata, based on temperature!)? My only request is that I'd like to have at least some social contact in the evenings, so nothing too solitary.

Many thanks in advance!
Camino Olvidado
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
erm... I love La Plata in late April and mid may, but from Salamanca onwards, it can be reasonably bearable u to mid June, I guess.

If you do from León to Ponferrada, then take Invierno, then Fisterre-Muxia, it should be quite nice at late spring/beginning of May, you would have a nice 16 day Camino, a very nice one, indeed!
Thanks Amancio. I haven't done Invierno so it's a strong candidate, especially combining it with Finisterre as you suggest :)
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Not a camino but this French reportage by Sylvain Delage in Ouest-France describes a new 3000 km (!!) French GR route named Hexatrek from Hendaye to Wissembourg. See more here
Holy moly! That's one for when I'm retired ^^ Thank you!
 
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Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
@Ungawawa, I can only add two from experience and one by association

1) Le Puy - no real difficulties for me (aged 74 at the time and "match-fit"). My only French was "Je regret, mais Je n'parle pas Francais. But I am certain that my hearers knew that already, but I tried and always had a good experience.

The sending out from Le Puy Cathedral is unique: for various reasons, for a short interval I was bolted to the floor and could not step forward to make my departure.

As @lt56ny says above, you can expect a grand experience, but not certain what the last few years have done to "gite d'etape" (these are hostels, gite without qualification tend to be mini hotels with a tariff to suit).

While, for me, just about everyday was an adventure, standouts six year later include:
Meeting three couples from Nice: at Saint-Come-d-Olt: in 2015 they had walked for a week from Le Puy - their 2016 intention was Figeac (Fijac) - they invited me to sit with them for dinner that night and I encountered them again.
Dinner at Livinhac-le-Haut, beside an Australian woman and her Kiwi husband. She warned me he was writing a novel. I found out later she was the co-author and that some of my unique attributes found their way into their joint product;
Lauzerte: a medieval town on top of a volcanic plug
Moissac and Gite (d'etape) La Petite Lumiere: hard to walk up to after a long day - but what a welcome. This was my first rest day after two weeks on the road - the website says NOUS SOMMES OUVERTS.
Euaze: and the Roman treasure and a concert and a La Gite (d'etape) La Grange de Marie France: an excellent cook and a magnificent evening meal with Armagnac. And open.
Arthez-de-Bearn and the first sighting of the Pyrenees, still with snow (late April)

2) Via Francigena from Canterbury. For a walker this can be a lonely route: in three weeks (and 600 km) saw possible walkers in the distance once as they went into a shop. But so many adventures and so much kindness given to me by so many. (Je regret, ...) I was booked to return in late March 2020 ... I can't wait to rebook and to restart with about 1,400 km still ahead of me.

3) By association the Ignatian from near Bilbao via Logrono to near Barcelona. A near associate has walked this route and I should take the time to chat to him about his experiences. Nearly all the preferred route uses existing marked routes. I can see them in my preferred tool of WayMarkedTrails.org with the final section selected for this purpose.

Kia kaha, kia māia, kia manawanui (take care, be brave, strong and patient)
Thanks for your detailed and thoughtful response. The Le Puy is really calling to me - I'm just not sure whether to try this year or wait till a potentially less crowded one, that's all :)
 
Time of past OR future Camino
CDN, Primitivo, Sanabrés, Portugués, Ruta do Mar,
What about Ruta do Mar from Ribadeo to Ferrol? It's on the Cantábrico and definitely not extremely hot this time of year. Just saying;-)
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Depending on the time available an alternative would be the Ruta do Mar from Ribadeo (along the coast) to San Andrés de Teixido and then down to Ferrol and the Inglés. However there is little infrastructure etc (or signing in places). There is a sub-forum with more details and a guide book written by @Dave of this forum.
I think we would stll classify it as for pioneers and the adventurous.....
Thanks, combining that with the Ingles is a really great idea. 50% quiet coastal route, 50% busy land route - sounds great!
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Camino Mozarabe connecting to the VDLP and then to the Sanabres.
Camino Olvidao from Bilbao to Ponferada and then onto the Invierro.
Camino Dos Faros along the north coast of Spain.
Thanks Fred. The Dos Faros is definitely one I'm considering doing, perhaps with a tent in my pack too.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Time of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
France has four well-marked routes that connect up shortly before SJPP; the route from Le Puy is the most-traveled. The Le Puy route is fed from the east by a route from Geneva and one from the northeast coming from Cluny. There are at least two routes across Switzerland coming into Geneva. Germany is *full* of well-marked routes, with major ones coming across Bavaria into Switzerland, or through Cologne and connecting into northeast France. Poland has two routes, one westerly into Germany, one south into Czech Republic (that one connects into Switzerland).

https://www.traildino.com/trace/continents-Europe/countries-Pilgrims_Ways
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

Ungawawa

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions, if I didn't reply personally. So many suggestions here I'm going to be busy for the next decade :)
 
Time of past OR future Camino
CDN, Primitivo, Sanabrés, Portugués, Ruta do Mar,
Thanks, combining that with the Ingles is a really great idea. 50% quiet coastal route, 50% busy land route - sounds great!
Coastal route is by far very rewarding in every aspect possible. From breathtaking landscapes every step of the way, and the history and of course, the cuisine:) The Inglés, this time of year is very busy indeed.
You have choices to make and once you do I wish you a memorable Buen Camino!
Ultreïa!
 
Time of past OR future Camino
CDN, Primitivo, Sanabrés, Portugués, Ruta do Mar,
Depending on the time available an alternative would be the Ruta do Mar from Ribadeo (along the coast) to San Andrés de Teixido and then down to Ferrol and the Inglés. However there is little infrastructure etc (or signing in places). There is a sub-forum with more details and a guide book written by @Dave of this forum.
I think we would stll classify it as for pioneers and the adventurous.....
Just walked the Ruta do Mar, and indeed there are absolutely no signs posted along the way. However this Camino can be done simply by following the Camino Natural de la Ruta del Cantábrico all the way to Ladrido - signed all the way and does not allow for anyone getting lost. From there it is mostly asphalt walking sections, but not all. Dave's guidebook helps somewhat, but the locals are very helpful, too.
 

skevin

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2015 - SJPP to SdC
You will find a sub-forum on this forum to help you with many planning details for the Madrid Camino. For up-to-date information, you might also look here: https://www.rayyrosa.com/camino-de-madrid (if opened on Chrome it is easily translated into English). Ray and Rosa are dedicated pilgims who offer accommodation along the Madrid Camino in a space they built and designed on their own property for the sole purpose of welcoming pilgrims along the way (their warm hospitality also includes the offer a lovely evening meal). Happy planning!
Yes - I didn’t end up staying with Ray and Rosa but they helped me a couple of time via WhatsApp with accomodation. Both legends. Gronze has everything you need really. I found the signage 9/10. Was very hard in the last month with the heat. Planning necessary. Albergues are high quality after Segovia.
 

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
The European Costal route is lovely. Walked from Algeciras to Cadiz to Sevilla. But there is a continuing route along the coast as well.
 
How to avoid failure "be prepared"
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc

Leaderene

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
Camino Portuguese
Camino Ingles
Thanks Rick. I'd never heard of the camino Ignatius before. That's quite an intriguing one.
I'm very tempted by a French camino, probably le Puy, but am a bit uncertain about the costs and difficulty of trying it in a holy year.
Hi, I started my Camino experience at Le Puy and walked in sections to Santiago because of life commitments etc. I loved walking in France and on the Via Podenisis, it's actually still my favourite. I would not expect it to be affected by the Holy Year at all though others may have other news. It comes highly recommended by me. I walked mainly in the spring and autumn and the scenery is fabulous.
 

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