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Ryanair, applause

Time of past OR future Camino
CF 2006, CP 2013, Salvador2017,
Inglés 2019
The following article from today's Irish Times strikes me as worth sharing. My guess, not a fact, is that a lot of pilgrims use it to get to points relative to their start point on Northern caminos, including those beginning in France.

Ryanair may be annoying but it’s a national treasure​

“Typical Ryanair” has become a haughty clarion call for Ireland’s middle class

Perpignan airport in French Catalonia could not be more different from London’s Heathrow. It is small, hardly more than one room and is located on a sparse plain in view of the Pyrenees. There is no high-speed train to a metropolis like London. It services about seven incoming flights a day (two of which are Ryanair) – compared with Heathrow’s 650. Border patrol is managed by two surly Frenchmen. And crucially it is rarely the locus of mass air travel disruption.
Meanwhile, Heathrow has become the poster child of post-pandemic travel chaos: lost luggage, overcrowding, lengthy delays. And this week it reached an apogee. Thanks to a systemwide failure in UK air-traffic control services on Monday, flights in and out of the country were grounded. Flights over UK airspace were diverted. By day’s end, 1,200 were cancelled. And though the fault itself was quickly resolved, it proved the behemoth airports like Heathrow and Stansted cannot help but suffer the domino effects. Tuesday saw more cancellations and increasingly aggrieved passengers sleeping on terminal floors. Once again – as is becoming the norm – the UK was beset by chaos. And it became the rest of Europe’s problem too.
Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, issued a candid apology. “We had a very difficult day yesterday,” he conceded, having to cancel about 250 flights on Monday (affecting 40,000 passengers), and a further 70ish on Tuesday. “It’s simply not acceptable that UK NATS [National Air Traffic Services] would allow their systems to be taken down,” O’Leary seethed.
And fairly so: the systems failure coinciding with one of the busiest travel days of the year has resulted in the worst day for UK air travel since the Icelandic volcano eruption in 2010 clogged European skies with thick clouds of ash.
Lucky few
But in the course of the disastrous day some emerged unscathed. I was among the lucky few: in spite of everything, Ryanair efficiently (and very cheaply) got me to Perpignan airport on Tuesday morning. Perhaps this is why I am so well-disposed to the carrier today.
But – even after O’Leary’s apology – we ought to remember Ryanair’s track record. In the first half of 2022, the airline cancelled 0.3 per cent of its flights – making it the best-performing on that metric worldwide. Meanwhile, as of last summer, British Airways was the worst-performing UK airline – with a cancellation rate of 3.5 per cent during the first six months of 2022, according to data by air travel intelligence company OAG. You were 12 times more likely to have had a BA flight cancelled than a Ryanair one. My sense that Ryanair is a friend is not just a sense – it’s written in the data.
But it is – evidently – still all too easy to sneer. “Typical Ryanair” has become a clarion call for Ireland’s middle class. Perhaps the haughtiness directed to the carrier is driven by aesthetic snobbery: the garish blue-and-yellow branding is an assault on the senses after all. The plasticky interiors of the planes, thinly cushioned seats, the sardine-like internal structure hardly scream “expensive”. The tinny trumpet that sounds every time a flight arrives on time is annoying and then there’s the broad-stroke disinterest in the passengers’ quality of experience.
Sure. All of these things are true. And of course we can listen to every anecdote about the time they charged too much for a bag and flogged unnecessary flight insurance and expensive meal deals. But the services remain remarkably cheap: a study by the Times of London found Ryanair coming in as the cheapest option in 71 per cent of cases, including ancillary fees. And, at the end of the day, we simply cannot expect to pay McDonald’s prices for dinner at Chapter One. I could book a flight from Dublin to London next weekend right now for £15/€17.45. For that price, we should tolerate some of the Spartan conditions.
So why do we take so little pride in the plucky budget airline? Neither its low cost nor its reliability seem sufficiently powerful to turn the brand into a national treasure. Perhaps its sheer scale will force us into accepting its influence: it is now the most used airline in Europe, sometimes transporting tens of millions of passengers across the continent each week. In May, Ryanair announced an order for a further 300 aircraft from Boeing – this will nearly double its passenger capacity over the next 10 years.
More than any of that, Ryanair has been central to the proliferation of Irish soft power. As a pioneer in affordable air travel, it has opened up the continent, having a sculpting force on the social fabric of Europe itself. It has – as Martin Vander Weyer argues in the Spectator – “smashed state carriers’ cartels”. And all of this for fares frequently cheaper than a train ticket from London to Manchester, and a trip more convenient than the ferry from Dublin to Holyhead.
Ryanair has legitimate claim to being among the greatest Irish brands – like Marks & Spencer’s to England; Toblerone to Switzerland; Ikea to Sweden. It can be hard to see that when stuck in a melee of air traffic control systems failures. But its record tells another story.
 
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I'll admit that I avoid Ryanair as much as possible. As an employee I wouldn't want to be treated like they (try to) treat their employees, so I prefer airlines whose practices towards staff are not quite as brutal, even if it is more expensive or takes longer.
 
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I'll admit that I avoid Ryanair as much as possible. As an employee I wouldn't want to be treated like they (try to) treat their employees, so I prefer airlines whose practices towards staff are not quite as brutal, even if it is more expensive or takes longer.
I quite agree. I avoid them too. Unless I really have no option, but fair is fair, let the lady who wrote the article share her opinion. I posted it precisely to let people react. Thanks to yourself and previous poster. Then others can make up their own minds. (I think O'Leary loves to be hated. It pays his wages...)
 
Let RyanAir bang their own drum guys as few passengers would ever dream of doing it for them...
But, having said that, I use them all the time.
Remember the old adage: "You get what you pay for"...
So my expectations for a $30 flight from London to Biarritz to start my Camino are never high; I just grit my teeth, do as I'm told and breath a sigh of relief once I'm off the plane at the other end.
Its a flying bus after all, nothing more - it gets me safely to where I want to go - and that's the important part. I don't expect frills and treats - so I'm never disappointed.
I'll be using them again on Saturday and you know what ?
For me, flying RyanAir is simply part of the Camino experience - just like an annoying blister - the memory quickly fades unless you rub salt in it !!
 
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Ryanair: no frills, rules enforced, frequently exasperating. But Ryanair has always delivered the primary outcome for me - getting me there and on time, unless there are factors (like poor weather) beyond their control. And all at a really competitive price. Works for me.
Whether a person can accept the Ryainair way, or not, tells you a lot about their temperament.
 
I’ve flown Ryanair in the distant past but I do not fly with them anymore. I either choose another airline with less convenient date and time and higher ticket price or the train - longer journey and more expensive, too.

The article acknowledges that “we can listen to every anecdote about the time they charged too much for a bag and flogged unnecessary flight insurance and expensive meal deals. But the services remain remarkably cheap.”

That “Ryanair is coming in as the cheapest option in 71 per cent of cases, including ancillary fees”.

That, as a pioneer of cheap air travel, they were “a sculpting force on the social fabric of Europe itself”, and there’s even an opinion that they “smashed state carriers’ cartels”.

People want cheap flights. The cheaper the better …
 
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My post got me thinking back to my first ever flight with Aer Lingus, the national carrier. When that meant something.
1969. From Glasgow to Dublin, a single ticket cost 10 shillings short of my monthly salary of £9.00. Plenty of frills, but who misses them now on short trips of under three hours?
Let us all enjoy either reminiscing or complaining...🤣

ps, my school exam results almost doubled the salary I got, much to the horror of other girls working in the bank who were still on £5 per week... irrrelevant, but perhaps research info for younger people! 😁
 
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You might not believe this but …

The way Ryanair ‘smashed’ the cartel was to have loss leading flights. Managed to get 2 return flights UK - Dublin so my daughter who was at University could have a weekend break with a friend. They offered tickets at 1 penny each way for each person tax paid. Two returns for £0.04

The money saved helped pay some of her many other costs of being a student
 
Just my gut feeling (though I did a rapid check on Wikipedia to confirm it):

I think that Ryanair and their success story is unique among budget airlines, certainly in Europe. I think that it is mainly thanks to O’Leary who became Ryanair’s CEO in 1994. Two year’s earlier, in 1992, the European Union's deregulation of the air industry in Europe gave carriers from one EU country the right to operate scheduled services between other EU states and represented a major opportunity for Ryanair.

Michael O’Leary grabbed this once in a lifetime opportunity and made the most of it.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
They offered tickets at 1 penny each way for each person tax paid. Two returns for £0.04
I'd fly them for that price.🙃
I got a 25€ ticket from Santiago to Zurich once on Swiss Air - they had just started to fly that route. Now a one-way ticket costs more than 10 times that much.

It's worth checking out flying through ''unusual' cities; you may find deals like that

For me, flying RyanAir is simply part of the Camino experience - just like an annoying blister
A perfect simile. Somehow I don't think they'll want to use this on any of their ads, though. 🤣
 
I'll admit that I avoid Ryanair as much as possible. As an employee I wouldn't want to be treated like they (try to) treat their employees, so I prefer airlines whose practices towards staff are not quite as brutal, even if it is more expensive or takes longer.
How do they treat their employees ?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I once flew Stansted-Zaragoza with Ryanair for £1. The bus into town cost more. I took the train and bus to Canfranc, Pau and Biarritz - and flew home for €1. I was tempted to tell friends I'd taken sandwiches and slept in bus shelters....

Seriously, if you pay attention to the conditions, Ryanair are a tremendous bargain. I fly regularly Gatwick - Dublin at a price 1/5 of that I'd have paid 30 years ago. And I've been to places I'd never heard of (Vasteras, anyone? Rodez?) It's the only airline flying to Biarritz year round.

O'Leary is a bean counter. He's not interested in aeroplanes, just the bottom line.
 
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Let RyanAir bang their own drum guys as few passengers would ever dream of doing it for them...
But, having said that, I use them all the time.
Remember the old adage: "You get what you pay for"...
So my expectations for a $30 flight from London to Biarritz to start my Camino are never high; I just grit my teeth, do as I'm told and breath a sigh of relief once I'm off the plane at the other end.
Its a flying bus after all, nothing more - it gets me safely to where I want to go - and that's the important part. I don't expect frills and treats - so I'm never disappointed.
I'll be using them again on Saturday and you know what ?
For me, flying RyanAir is simply part of the Camino experience - just like an annoying blister - the memory quickly fades unless you rub salt in it !!
Indeed . I guess I fly them about 10-15 times a year. Their network is fantastic and schedule tends to work for me too. I quite like modular pricing as I tend to travel light. I actually struggling to think of a bad expeoncw tbh!
 
How do they treat their employees ?
To a large extent, the employment conditions of Ryanair employees depend on the European country in which they are employed and how their employment conditions and status compares to employees in the same country and in a comparable job. Do we want to discuss these conditions for some 30+ countries and for I don’t know how many different jobs, ranging from aircraft pilot and cabin crew to airport staff and online booking and information staff?

Are we seriously interested in such a detailed discussion or could we not just simply accept that some forum members have their reasons for not flying Ryanair and others have their reasons for flying Ryanair and nobody tries to convince the other that they must do as they themselves do or feels the urge to challenge the personal reasons of others?
 
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To a large extent, the employment conditions of Ryanair employees depend on the European country in which they are employed and how their employment conditions and status compares to employees in the same country and in a comparable job. Do we want to discuss these conditions for some 30+ countries and for I don’t know how many different jobs, ranging from aircraft pilot and cabin crew to airport staff and online booking and information staff?

Are we seriously interested in such a detailed discussion or could we not just simply accept that some forum members have their reasons for not flying Ryanair and others have their reasons for flying Ryanair and nobody tries to convince others that they must do as they themselves do or challenges the personals reasons of others?
No but if someone is choosing not to use a company due to how they treat their employees (as opposed to their own travelling experience) l am just interested to hear their substantiation for this.
 
No but if someone is choosing not to use a company due to how they treat their employees o l am just interested to hear their substantiation for this.
And you had never heard or read anything about controversy of this kind during Ryanair’s 30 years of existence and all the ink and air that has been spent in our news media about it?
 
And you had never heard or read anything about controversy of this kind during Ryanair’s 30 years of existence and all the ink and air that has been spent in our news media about it?
Not that much with relation to employee relations tbh. Some of course. Thats inevitable.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Thanks Kirkie for this article
We have flown with Ryanair since they started in Stansted in the 1990s
never had a problem with them
Always got us from A to B on time
Flown with other airlines as well and apart from the leather seats on BA we did not find any difference

and don’t tell me that people don’t complain about other airlines
Many just want to get on the bandwagon and moan about Ryanair….following like lemmings methinks with a snobbery somewhere in the mix

Once I heard someone in the queue complaining about Ryanair….in the queue to get onboard mind you!
well being a nosey min I asked them how much they paid for their ticket….hah £20 he said!
I replied that for £200 he could have booked a leather seat with BA and had a bag of crisps thrown in!


I’ve just Google’s a flight for next week on Ryanair….a day return or an overnight stay for less than £40!
A train ticket in the UK to Brighton would cost twice that

also I love the non reclining seats on Ryanair
When customers on other airlines in front want to get comfortable and recline they’re almost sitting on my lap

40 years ago when the children were small, the cheapest way of getting to Ireland was the train, and the boat and the train again
It was murder I can tell you and pure hell

Then heaven appeared in the form of Ryanair and peace was restored in our lives!

Ryanair enabled millions of people to travel at low cost when otherwise they would not have been able to go anywhere

so….
From where I’m standing….GOD BLESS RYANAIR

PS I’m not that silly, I avidly collect Avios points to travel free with BA!!
 
Not that much with relation to employee relations tbh. Some of course. Thats inevitable.
Then I’d say that we leave @Kirkie’s thread to our personal memories and reminiscing about our experience of Ryanair flights, ticket price structure etc instead of attempting to get our knowledge of Ryanair-specific labour disputes up to scratch :cool:. Google has plenty of information about it 😇.

@Glenshiro described it succinctly: O'Leary is a bean counter. He's not interested in aeroplanes [and may I add: or more general concerns] just the bottom line.
 
Then I’d say that we leave @Kirkie’s thread to our personal memories and reminiscing about our experience of Ryanair flights, ticket price structure etc instead of attempting to get our knowledge of Ryanair labour disputes up to scratch :cool:. Google has plenty of information about it 😇.

@Glenshiro described it succinctly: O'Leary is a bean counter. He's not interested in aeroplanes [and may I add: or more general concerns] just the bottom line.
As an ex CFO and then CEO, and a significant stockholder I do hope he is a bean counter!!!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Thanks Kirkie for this article
We have flown with Ryanair since they started in Stansted in the 1990s
never had a problem with them
Always got us from A to B on time
Flown with other airlines as well and apart from the leather seats on BA we did not find any difference

and don’t tell me that people don’t complain about other airlines
Many just want to get on the bandwagon and moan about Ryanair….following like lemmings methinks with a snobbery somewhere in the mix

Once I heard someone in the queue complaining about Ryanair….in the queue to get onboard mind you!
well being a nosey min I asked them how much they paid for their ticket….hah £20 he said!
I replied that for £200 he could have booked a leather seat with BA and had a bag of crisps thrown in!


I’ve just Google’s a flight for next week on Ryanair….a day return or an overnight stay for less than £40!
A train ticket in the UK to Brighton would cost twice that

also I love the non reclining seats on Ryanair
When customers on other airlines in front want to get comfortable and recline they’re almost sitting on my lap

40 years ago when the children were small, the cheapest way of getting to Ireland was the train, and the boat and the train again
It was murder I can tell you and pure hell

Then heaven appeared in the form of Ryanair and peace was restored in our lives!

Ryanair enabled millions of people to travel at low cost when otherwise they would not have been able to go anywhere

so….
From where I’m standing….GOD BLESS RYANAIR

PS I’m not that silly, I avidly collect Avios points to travel free with BA!!
USA folks may correct me but I always saw Southwest Airlines as the forerunner of the ‘low cost model’ and from what I can remember they were much acclaimed back in the early 90s from West Coast. I used them a.lot and they were seen as hugely innovative , though no realmdiff from the LCCs you see today. For what it worth ‘low cost’ doesn’t really mean ‘cheap fares’ it means low operating costs. 1 type of aircraft which hugely reduces crew, engineering, and equipment costs , and offers significang operational robustness on punctuality and so on.
 
USA folks may correct me but I always saw Southwest Airlines as the forerunner of the ‘low cost model’ and from what I can remember they were much acclaimed back in the early 90s from West Coast. I used them a.lot and they were seen as hugely innovative , though no realmdiff from the LCCs you see today. For what it worth ‘low cost’ doesn’t really mean ‘cheap fares’ it means low operating costs. 1 type of aircraft which hugely reduces crew, engineering, and equipment costs , and offers significang operational robustness on punctuality and so on.
I don’t think I said that Ryanair was the forerunner of low cost aviation but it did start flying in 1985 well before Southwest.
most people aren’t interested in low cost meaning low costs in terms of aircraft, operating costs engineering etc, etc,
People just want low cost fares and from the crowds I see getting onto the Ryanair flights, low cost does mean cheap fares
But thank you for your information
 
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The following article from today's Irish Times strikes me as worth sharing. My guess, not a fact, is that a lot of pilgrims use it to get to points relative to their start point on Northern caminos, including those beginning in France.

Ryanair may be annoying but it’s a national treasure​

“Typical Ryanair” has become a haughty clarion call for Ireland’s middle class

Perpignan airport in French Catalonia could not be more different from London’s Heathrow. It is small, hardly more than one room and is located on a sparse plain in view of the Pyrenees. There is no high-speed train to a metropolis like London. It services about seven incoming flights a day (two of which are Ryanair) – compared with Heathrow’s 650. Border patrol is managed by two surly Frenchmen. And crucially it is rarely the locus of mass air travel disruption.
Meanwhile, Heathrow has become the poster child of post-pandemic travel chaos: lost luggage, overcrowding, lengthy delays. And this week it reached an apogee. Thanks to a systemwide failure in UK air-traffic control services on Monday, flights in and out of the country were grounded. Flights over UK airspace were diverted. By day’s end, 1,200 were cancelled. And though the fault itself was quickly resolved, it proved the behemoth airports like Heathrow and Stansted cannot help but suffer the domino effects. Tuesday saw more cancellations and increasingly aggrieved passengers sleeping on terminal floors. Once again – as is becoming the norm – the UK was beset by chaos. And it became the rest of Europe’s problem too.
Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, issued a candid apology. “We had a very difficult day yesterday,” he conceded, having to cancel about 250 flights on Monday (affecting 40,000 passengers), and a further 70ish on Tuesday. “It’s simply not acceptable that UK NATS [National Air Traffic Services] would allow their systems to be taken down,” O’Leary seethed.
And fairly so: the systems failure coinciding with one of the busiest travel days of the year has resulted in the worst day for UK air travel since the Icelandic volcano eruption in 2010 clogged European skies with thick clouds of ash.
Lucky few
But in the course of the disastrous day some emerged unscathed. I was among the lucky few: in spite of everything, Ryanair efficiently (and very cheaply) got me to Perpignan airport on Tuesday morning. Perhaps this is why I am so well-disposed to the carrier today.
But – even after O’Leary’s apology – we ought to remember Ryanair’s track record. In the first half of 2022, the airline cancelled 0.3 per cent of its flights – making it the best-performing on that metric worldwide. Meanwhile, as of last summer, British Airways was the worst-performing UK airline – with a cancellation rate of 3.5 per cent during the first six months of 2022, according to data by air travel intelligence company OAG. You were 12 times more likely to have had a BA flight cancelled than a Ryanair one. My sense that Ryanair is a friend is not just a sense – it’s written in the data.
But it is – evidently – still all too easy to sneer. “Typical Ryanair” has become a clarion call for Ireland’s middle class. Perhaps the haughtiness directed to the carrier is driven by aesthetic snobbery: the garish blue-and-yellow branding is an assault on the senses after all. The plasticky interiors of the planes, thinly cushioned seats, the sardine-like internal structure hardly scream “expensive”. The tinny trumpet that sounds every time a flight arrives on time is annoying and then there’s the broad-stroke disinterest in the passengers’ quality of experience.
Sure. All of these things are true. And of course we can listen to every anecdote about the time they charged too much for a bag and flogged unnecessary flight insurance and expensive meal deals. But the services remain remarkably cheap: a study by the Times of London found Ryanair coming in as the cheapest option in 71 per cent of cases, including ancillary fees. And, at the end of the day, we simply cannot expect to pay McDonald’s prices for dinner at Chapter One. I could book a flight from Dublin to London next weekend right now for £15/€17.45. For that price, we should tolerate some of the Spartan conditions.
So why do we take so little pride in the plucky budget airline? Neither its low cost nor its reliability seem sufficiently powerful to turn the brand into a national treasure. Perhaps its sheer scale will force us into accepting its influence: it is now the most used airline in Europe, sometimes transporting tens of millions of passengers across the continent each week. In May, Ryanair announced an order for a further 300 aircraft from Boeing – this will nearly double its passenger capacity over the next 10 years.
More than any of that, Ryanair has been central to the proliferation of Irish soft power. As a pioneer in affordable air travel, it has opened up the continent, having a sculpting force on the social fabric of Europe itself. It has – as Martin Vander Weyer argues in the Spectator – “smashed state carriers’ cartels”. And all of this for fares frequently cheaper than a train ticket from London to Manchester, and a trip more convenient than the ferry from Dublin to Holyhead.
Ryanair has legitimate claim to being among the greatest Irish brands – like Marks & Spencer’s to England; Toblerone to Switzerland; Ikea to Sweden. It can be hard to see that when stuck in a melee of air traffic control systems failures. But its record tells another story.
Maith thu Ryanair and Micheal.
 
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As an American who has never flown Ryanair, I will follow the advice that my grandma used to give me. "It is not your business". Thanks grandma. I have always listened to Europeans speak of Rynair. But it is not my business.
 
The Aussie equivalent of RyanAir would be Jetstar. I'll pen no more except to paraphrase a well known political saying here in that they are necessary 'to keep the 🤬 honest'... 🤭 😇
👣🌏
Ahh no, Ryan Air are much much much worse than Jetstar. At least Jetstar don't try & flog lottery tickets! Give me Aer Lingus any day ☘️
 
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O'Leary explicitly modelled Ryanair on Southwest when he took over the running as CFO in 1988. Southwest started up in 1971.
Yes, Southwest was flying then- I used to fly from Austin to Dallas when I was in college to go to the orthodontist to get my braces tightened. Cost $19. Also before 9/11 so no security lines, so was faster than driving. I could go to morning classes and see the dentist in the afternoon.
 
Yes, Southwest was flying then- I used to fly from Austin to Dallas when I was in college to go to the orthodontist to get my braces tightened. Cost $19. Also before 9/11 so no security lines, so was faster than driving. I could go to morning classes and see the dentist in the afternoon.
Used to fly Southwest alot 1993 onwards for about 10 years and always loved it! Mainly LAX or SFO into Vegas. The staff were always good and the service seen as quirky. I was studying at the time and many academic papers held them up as a model company from a customer service standpoint.

My memory may be failing me but before 911 could non travelling people go to the departure gates on domestic flights to see people off?
 
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Used to fly Southwest alot 1993 onwards for about 10 years and always loved it! Mainly LAX or SFO into Vegas. The staff were always good and the service seen as quirky. I was studying at the time and many academic papers held them up as a model company from a customer service standpoint.

My memory may be failing me but before 911 could non travelling people go to the departure gates on domestic flights to see people off?
In the US, you could walk in the front door of the airport and go to the gate with your family. The only security was maybe a metal detector as you were boarding the plane (after a rash of hijackings this came into being).

I do remember as a child flying in the 70's from Kansas City to Frankfurt to visit my dad a few times that he was not allowed to come to the gate to pick us up. This was during a time of turmoil in Europe and we were sometimes stopped at car checkpoints on the way home from Frankfurt as the authorities were on the lookout for some terror factions.
 
Since the first lockdown Ryanair don’t fly to Brittany any longer. So getting to London is either by train and ferry or train to Paris and Eurostar.

And à propos low cost airlines, what happened to Freddy Laker?
“On June 15, 1971, Laker Applied to the UK Air Licensing Board to launch the world's first low-cost transatlantic airline with fares starting as low at £32.50 ($38.45) one-way. At the time, this was a third of the price British Airways and major American carriers were charging for flights across the pond.” from Wikipedia
I flew to New York on his Skytrain, from London I suppose (can’t remember). Wonderful animated atmosphere on the plane, everybody had brought their picnic and we were all celebrating that we could fly so cheaply with no frills.
 
Used to fly Southwest alot 1993 onwards for about 10 years and always loved it! Mainly LAX or SFO into Vegas. The staff were always good and the service seen as quirky. I was studying at the time and many academic papers held them up as a model company from a customer service standpoint.

My memory may be failing me but before 911 could non travelling people go to the departure gates on domestic flights to see people off?
Yes! We could go and wish our loved ones a safe
travel, and watch them go into the aircraft. Now, unless it’s a military person leaving they will let the family go with them to the gate…unless the security (TSA) trumps the pass and refuses to allow it.
 
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I love Ryanair. Mainly fly it from SCQ back to Madrid the day before I have to bail back to the states. I find the Ryanair flight times more convenient than Iberia, and like way less expensive. Never had a cancellation, never even a late flight. I do however "splurge" and get an upgraded seat (that also includes priority boarding), so maybe that is why it seems ok for me. For a flight that lasts about an hour, I kind of enjoy how the inside of the plane resembles a municipal bus.
 
Since the first lockdown Ryanair don’t fly to Brittany any longer.
That's a shame. I was on one of the first flights from Stansted to Dinard. There was an article in the paper offering free flights, so I rang my Mum, the only person I knew who could travel at short notice, and we had a wonderful couple of days in Dinard and St-Malo.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I love Ryanair.
Likewise. Read their rules, pay for what you need, and get what you paid for. No fuss, no hassles on any recent flights since they tightened up on what could come into the cabin, but don't arrive three hours early in SDC - that's unnecessary!!
 
The following article from today's Irish Times strikes me as worth sharing. My guess, not a fact, is that a lot of pilgrims use it to get to points relative to their start point on Northern caminos, including those beginning in France.

Ryanair may be annoying but it’s a national treasure​

“Typical Ryanair” has become a haughty clarion call for Ireland’s middle class

Perpignan airport in French Catalonia could not be more different from London’s Heathrow. It is small, hardly more than one room and is located on a sparse plain in view of the Pyrenees. There is no high-speed train to a metropolis like London. It services about seven incoming flights a day (two of which are Ryanair) – compared with Heathrow’s 650. Border patrol is managed by two surly Frenchmen. And crucially it is rarely the locus of mass air travel disruption.
Meanwhile, Heathrow has become the poster child of post-pandemic travel chaos: lost luggage, overcrowding, lengthy delays. And this week it reached an apogee. Thanks to a systemwide failure in UK air-traffic control services on Monday, flights in and out of the country were grounded. Flights over UK airspace were diverted. By day’s end, 1,200 were cancelled. And though the fault itself was quickly resolved, it proved the behemoth airports like Heathrow and Stansted cannot help but suffer the domino effects. Tuesday saw more cancellations and increasingly aggrieved passengers sleeping on terminal floors. Once again – as is becoming the norm – the UK was beset by chaos. And it became the rest of Europe’s problem too.
Michael O’Leary, chief executive of Ryanair, issued a candid apology. “We had a very difficult day yesterday,” he conceded, having to cancel about 250 flights on Monday (affecting 40,000 passengers), and a further 70ish on Tuesday. “It’s simply not acceptable that UK NATS [National Air Traffic Services] would allow their systems to be taken down,” O’Leary seethed.
And fairly so: the systems failure coinciding with one of the busiest travel days of the year has resulted in the worst day for UK air travel since the Icelandic volcano eruption in 2010 clogged European skies with thick clouds of ash.
Lucky few
But in the course of the disastrous day some emerged unscathed. I was among the lucky few: in spite of everything, Ryanair efficiently (and very cheaply) got me to Perpignan airport on Tuesday morning. Perhaps this is why I am so well-disposed to the carrier today.
But – even after O’Leary’s apology – we ought to remember Ryanair’s track record. In the first half of 2022, the airline cancelled 0.3 per cent of its flights – making it the best-performing on that metric worldwide. Meanwhile, as of last summer, British Airways was the worst-performing UK airline – with a cancellation rate of 3.5 per cent during the first six months of 2022, according to data by air travel intelligence company OAG. You were 12 times more likely to have had a BA flight cancelled than a Ryanair one. My sense that Ryanair is a friend is not just a sense – it’s written in the data.
But it is – evidently – still all too easy to sneer. “Typical Ryanair” has become a clarion call for Ireland’s middle class. Perhaps the haughtiness directed to the carrier is driven by aesthetic snobbery: the garish blue-and-yellow branding is an assault on the senses after all. The plasticky interiors of the planes, thinly cushioned seats, the sardine-like internal structure hardly scream “expensive”. The tinny trumpet that sounds every time a flight arrives on time is annoying and then there’s the broad-stroke disinterest in the passengers’ quality of experience.
Sure. All of these things are true. And of course we can listen to every anecdote about the time they charged too much for a bag and flogged unnecessary flight insurance and expensive meal deals. But the services remain remarkably cheap: a study by the Times of London found Ryanair coming in as the cheapest option in 71 per cent of cases, including ancillary fees. And, at the end of the day, we simply cannot expect to pay McDonald’s prices for dinner at Chapter One. I could book a flight from Dublin to London next weekend right now for £15/€17.45. For that price, we should tolerate some of the Spartan conditions.
So why do we take so little pride in the plucky budget airline? Neither its low cost nor its reliability seem sufficiently powerful to turn the brand into a national treasure. Perhaps its sheer scale will force us into accepting its influence: it is now the most used airline in Europe, sometimes transporting tens of millions of passengers across the continent each week. In May, Ryanair announced an order for a further 300 aircraft from Boeing – this will nearly double its passenger capacity over the next 10 years.
More than any of that, Ryanair has been central to the proliferation of Irish soft power. As a pioneer in affordable air travel, it has opened up the continent, having a sculpting force on the social fabric of Europe itself. It has – as Martin Vander Weyer argues in the Spectator – “smashed state carriers’ cartels”. And all of this for fares frequently cheaper than a train ticket from London to Manchester, and a trip more convenient than the ferry from Dublin to Holyhead.
Ryanair has legitimate claim to being among the greatest Irish brands – like Marks & Spencer’s to England; Toblerone to Switzerland; Ikea to Sweden. It can be hard to see that when stuck in a melee of air traffic control systems failures. But its record tells another story.
As an American who lived in Germany for the last few years, I used Ryan Air to travel all over Europe for pennies. I love it. It’s not fancy, but it’s super cheap, and flies to cities I would not have otherwise visited. Besides, in the US the flights across country can take 6-7 hours, which might not be bearable on Ryan Air, but long flights from our town in Germany were only 2-3 hours. We could easily suck it up for that long to visit cool European destinations. Yay Ryan Air!
 
As an American who lived in Germany for the last few years, I used Ryan Air to travel all over Europe for pennies. I love it. It’s not fancy, but it’s super cheap, and flies to cities I would not have otherwise visited. Besides, in the US the flights across country can take 6-7 hours, which might not be bearable on Ryan Air, but long flights from our town in Germany were only 2-3 hours. We could easily suck it up for that long to visit cool European destinations. Yay Ryan Air!
Probably worth saying that in terms of comfort the seat pitch (the distance between any point on a seat to the same on the seat in front) , and the seat width vary very little by airline in economy class -pitch tends to be 30-32 inches and width tends to be 17-18 inches!
 
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I don’t think I said that Ryanair was the forerunner of low cost aviation but it did start flying in 1985 well before Southwest.
most people aren’t interested in low cost meaning low costs in terms of aircraft, operating costs engineering etc, etc,
People just want low cost fares and from the crowds I see getting onto the Ryanair flights, low cost does mean cheap fares
But thank you for your information
Indeed but the point I was making was that some folks think that Ryanair can offer more such competitive fares due to offering ‘less’ but it is because they have a much lower cost base than many more traditional carriers.
 
Indeed but the point I was making was that some folks think that Ryanair can offer more such competitive fares due to offering ‘less’ but it is because they have a much lower cost base than many more traditional carriers.
Hi Travelling man,
yes I did actually “get” the point you were making on your no. 24 post
Hence my reply on post no26
Thanks once again for the information and maybe we can now stop the pot boiling!
 
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