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Luggage Transfer Correos

Save the Bottom Bunks for the Elderly

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
How very, very RUDE of them! I would have sent them flying. But then I am not as nice as you are, by all accounts :oops:
I am proud of each of my 70 years. I'm also proud of every gray hair on my head. (I can even tell you how I got most of them.;)) I have no problem answering the question, and get a fair amount of satisfaction when I see surprise on the questioner's face. :p :cool: :D
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
I am proud of each of my 70 years. I'm also proud of every gray hair on my head. (I can even tell you how I got most of them.;)) I have no problem answering the question, and get a fair amount of satisfaction when I see surprise on the questioner's face. :p :cool: :D
My comment was made because where I come from it is very rude to ask a lady her age, unless she's very young (like 12!) . We all differ, thank goodness :)
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
My comment was made because where I come from it is very rude to ask a lady her age, unless she's very young (like 12!) . We all differ, thank goodness :)
Same here. I was raised in the American Deep South, and taught to be a gentleman from my earliest recollections. Part of that was instruction on how -- and how not -- to interact with the ladies.

People, regions, nations and cultures all differ in their customs and traditions. The passage of time, the internet, and the rapid expansion of international travel, have also played considerable roles in creating the many nuances of personal/regional/cultural/national difference we see about us.

That's part of what makes this board, and indeed the Camino itself, so engaging and fascinating.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
When I was last in China people were very straightforward about asking my age. They always expressed extreme surprise at how old I was. Love that!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
My comment was made because where I come from it is very rude to ask a lady her age, unless she's very young (like 12!)
I think most of us come from that background. However, it is great to be able to enjoy casting conventions to the wind!
 

long trails

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
I did find that if you ask the albergue reception folk for a lower bunk (in Spainish helps of course!) that they would often comply.
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
Being young isn't an accomplishment.
It just is.
Getting older requires a certain amount of skill.
And a sense of humor.
;)
 

Michael fletcher

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances 2010 ,Santiago to Finisterre 2010,G.R.11 Pyrenees 2011, Vi Augusta, Via de la Plata, Via de Sanabria 2013,Camino del Norte ,Camino Primitivo 2015.Camino de Levante planned Spring 2017.
Michael Fletcher
Small world...my maiden name is Penny Fletcher and I have a brother Michael.
Have an awesome walk !
Thanks Penny will try to keep up the Fletcher's good name. Mike
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving August 25, (2014) for Camino Frances starting in SJPP.
Well, I'm coming back. Yep. After a two year hiatus I am returning to the Camino. Two years older and missing that Camino feeling of deep reflection, complete connection to the Earth, divine blessing and blister bursting pace, I have pledged to re-lose the pounds I gained post-Camino. Sure, it would have been easier to just NOT eat that second helping, to actually go out and walk or swim or bike, but somehow in the last two years my sixty something body slowed down, my mind said "It's only a few ounces", and I slid down that slippery slope to fat again.
That, and I miss the Camino mind set, that enveloping reality of walk-think-pray-eat-sleep-repeat that consumes you and transforms you, strips you bare and beats you down then rebuilds you to your real self.
I want my real self back. My comfort zone is uncomfortable. Nothing makes sense anymore. I want pain(but not too much) and lukewarm food, and real deep red wine.
I thought I was hot stuff, and very lucky, for the first two weeks of my Camino in 2015. I was constantly blessed with the bottom bunk! How fortunate! Then I saw a small sign in an Albergue that said in Spanish "Save the Bottom Bunks for the Elderly." I was not lucky, I was Elderly.
Just one of the many ways the Camino took me down a notch and held that big mirror to my true self.
I'm coming for you, St. James.
Are you ready?
I
Well, I'm coming back. Yep. After a two year hiatus I am returning to the Camino. Two years older and missing that Camino feeling of deep reflection, complete connection to the Earth, divine blessing and blister bursting pace, I have pledged to re-lose the pounds I gained post-Camino. Sure, it would have been easier to just NOT eat that second helping, to actually go out and walk or swim or bike, but somehow in the last two years my sixty something body slowed down, my mind said "It's only a few ounces", and I slid down that slippery slope to fat again.
That, and I miss the Camino mind set, that enveloping reality of walk-think-pray-eat-sleep-repeat that consumes you and transforms you, strips you bare and beats you down then rebuilds you to your real self.
I want my real self back. My comfort zone is uncomfortable. Nothing makes sense anymore. I want pain(but not too much) and lukewarm food, and real deep red wine.
I thought I was hot stuff, and very lucky, for the first two weeks of my Camino in 2015. I was constantly blessed with the bottom bunk! How fortunate! Then I saw a small sign in an Albergue that said in Spanish "Save the Bottom Bunks for the Elderly." I was not lucky, I was Elderly.
Just one of the many ways the Camino took me down a notch and held that big mirror to my true self.
I'm coming for you, St. James.
Are you ready?
I may be Elderly, but I'm feisty.
white hair and all, I was never offered the bottom bunk even when struggling to get into the top one. So much for manners.
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
Oh oh.
I got a bottom bunk for tonight.
Is that a bad sign??
 

Kathy Murphy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking (Aug 31/16)
Well, I'm coming back. Yep. After a two year hiatus I am returning to the Camino. Two years older and missing that Camino feeling of deep reflection, complete connection to the Earth, divine blessing and blister bursting pace, I have pledged to re-lose the pounds I gained post-Camino. Sure, it would have been easier to just NOT eat that second helping, to actually go out and walk or swim or bike, but somehow in the last two years my sixty something body slowed down, my mind said "It's only a few ounces", and I slid down that slippery slope to fat again.
That, and I miss the Camino mind set, that enveloping reality of walk-think-pray-eat-sleep-repeat that consumes you and transforms you, strips you bare and beats you down then rebuilds you to your real self.
I want my real self back. My comfort zone is uncomfortable. Nothing makes sense anymore. I want pain(but not too much) and lukewarm food, and real deep red wine.
I thought I was hot stuff, and very lucky, for the first two weeks of my Camino in 2015. I was constantly blessed with the bottom bunk! How fortunate! Then I saw a small sign in an Albergue that said in Spanish "Save the Bottom Bunks for the Elderly." I was not lucky, I was Elderly.
Just one of the many ways the Camino took me down a notch and held that big mirror to my true self.
I'm coming for you, St. James.
Are you ready?
I may be Elderly, but I'm feisty.
Coleen, so well said. The Camino feeling is lacking for me as well even though I walk frequently at home. Camino is the new walk every day; always moving ahead in life, one step at a time; the wonderful camaraderie; the minimalistic experience of food & shelter. It's heart warming to need less and feel so good. I walked last fall and am thinking of returning in 2018. Now I know that there is no need to have an agenda, a daily requirement, an end date. Just walk ... and feel good about yourself. I'll be 70 when I return with a few more aches and pains. I appreciate so much getting the bottom bunk. My thanks to other Caminantes for being so kind.
Camino Kathy from Canada
 

Kiwi rambler

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2010
Camino Portugal 2014
Camino from Le Puy 2016
I don't consider 60-something elderly. It's the new 50. To me elderly is 70. Subject to change the closer I get :)
Don't be daft. 70 isn't elderly. Not if you are walking 20 kms or more a day. But it does merit the bottom bunk.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
Don't be daft. 70 isn't elderly. Not if you are walking 20 kms or more a day. But it does merit the bottom bunk.
Really. Insulting me? Have you not bothered to read the previous posts. 3 messages in and you already show your ignorance. good job.
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
I want my real self back. My comfort zone is uncomfortable. Nothing makes sense anymore. I want pain(but not too much) and lukewarm food, and real deep red wine.
OMG I sooo get this statement .... I want my real self back too!!!

I thought I was hot stuff, and very lucky, for the first two weeks of my Camino in 2015. I was constantly blessed with the bottom bunk! How fortunate! Then I saw a small sign in an Albergue that said in Spanish "Save the Bottom Bunks for the Elderly." I was not lucky, I was Elderly.
Just one of the many ways the Camino took me down a notch and held that big mirror to my true self.
:( Everyone thinks someone older than THEM are elderly .... Good luck with that generalisation :p.... don't ever make the mistake of having that discussion with me while I climb the Pyrenees !!!!! Thanks !!!! Elderly is a number !!! :eek:
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
IF I can clamber up and down from the top bunk, I prefer it. Less likely to be bitten by bed bugs.
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
Not so bad being elderly if it gets you the bottom bunk :). I am just 68 years young and I not only got bottom bunks all but one night, I even managed to get beds on occasions. In one albergue, I was a bit late in and there were only top bunks left. The young guy beneath me without any prompting from anyone offered to swap but only after we had all showered and as long as I put the sheets and pillow cases on as he did not want to do that twice. Came back from my shower and he had made the beds and moved all my stuff from top to bottom then took me for a drink and he did not even partake of alcohol. So enjoy being classed as elderly, it can be fun and the youngsters can be great company
Haha now I like that ! :cool:
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
Unbelievable isn't it? :D I can't resist sharing my story and although it was on my first camino a few years ago now, I have never forgotten.

Larrasoaña, municipal albergue. My friend and I were shown to a small room with 2 bunk beds and the hospitalera said to me: ' quick, ladies, grab the bottom bunks' which we of course did. Two young girls are later shown into the room, 18 and 20. We knew that as we'd talked to them on the way whilst helping them with their blisters... Anyway, THEY were the ones who asked us to move to the top bunks :eek:
As my answer was something like 'oh don't be so silly', they proceeded to take their mattresses down and filled the rest of the room with them. A right pain when you wanted to leave or enter the room, we had to walk on their beds. Oh dear, never mind :D:D

PS: Of course, I hasten to add that had they had an injury or otherwise impaired, I would have been the first one to offer my bottom bank. Never mind the age. But they were much fitter than us both.
:D:DThat's the only answer along with just give me a minute while I give my artificial joint a heave ho :cool:
 

offtrail1

Dave Black
Camino(s) past & future
May 9th - June 13rd (2015) St Jean to Santiago
June 1st - June 29th (2016) Leon to Santiago & Finisterra
Funny - At this moment I'm reading this thread in a top bunk in a hostel in Grand Lake, Colorado. I chose it because I can get a glimpse out the window and I'm happy. Im also 77. On my Caminos, I just took what was available, prefer tops .
 

Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
I walked last year with Multiple Sklerosis And Lipedema.....both pain provoking....stair/ladder climbing limiting ailments. I walked every step carrying my backpack. I looked able....I slipped twice off ladders of the top bunk falling flat. I would request the bottom and would be refused. Putting steps one by one forward can be different then that of climbing. Open your heart and eyes to see and encourage those of all abilities to complete this beautiful experience.
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
OK I am going to play devils advocate here. :cool:

Surely if you are fit enough to walk a camino then you are fit enough to take a top bunk?

(runs away with head covered by hands)
Just a short response to the "common-sense" notion that being able to walk long distances proves one fit enough to climb into a top bunk. (I am sure it is held by more folks than @long trails and am not in the slightest offended by this idea, but this is the post that gives me the opportunity to provide another perspective.)

I have very severe neuropathy in my feet, with foot drop on both sides. I'm able to walk with the aid of orthotics. (And drive: When I hit the automobile accelerator or brake too hard, I say to my friends, "You try driving on stilts" :) .)

Without them, climbing ladders (such as trying to get out of a swimming pool), pedaling a bicycle, walking on tiptoes, etc., just doesn't work.

I have other issues that may cut short my Camino attempt, but they are not directly related to my ability to walk long distances. I can do that. Clambering up and down to and from a top bunk is another matter. I can do it, although with somewhat less proficiency than Dr. Johnson's dog walking on its hind legs. I shudder to think of someone with some of the common symptoms of MS being forced to do so.

I don't anticipate any problems for myself but just want to point out that making superficial judgments about others can lead one astray.
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Just a short response to the "common-sense" notion that being able to walk long distances proves one fit enough to climb into a top bunk. (I am sure it is held by more folks than @long trails and am not in the slightest offended by this idea, but this is the post that gives me the opportunity to provide another perspective.)
@long trails Same here. I'm 71. I played American football in my youth (defensive line), and have the all-too-predictable neck, back, knee and ankle problems. I can walk 8 - 15 miles a day for days on end. In fact I recently did so for a two-week period. Ascending/descending ladders and such is rather risky. So are long flights of stairs, particularly if they're steep or uneven.

I also have age-related balance/vertigo issues that are triggered by certain unavoidable head movements. Once I reach Santiago I won't be able to look up at the cathedral ceiling unless I'm leaning against or holding onto something substantial. Every morning when I first arise, I have to sit on the edge of the bed and hold on until the vertigo clears.

I will agree to take the bunk above you, as long as you will agree to catch me when I fall. ;)
 
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Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hey there Alaska, might you be familiar with the acronym "RED" made famously topical by the movie starring Bruce Willis. Keep it in mind should you unintentionally age into the ranks.
Ah! Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman and John Malkovich, the perfect portrayers of R.E.D. :D
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Regarding Helen Mirren, Dame Judy Dench, etc:

I've always preferred strong women -- equals -- partners -- someone who will stand up to me, spit in my eye and tell me I'm wrong. Someone who'll have my back when the ship hits the sand....

It's my Native American blood. Or perhaps I'm actually a Klingon.... ;)

Hijack over; returning to our regularly-scheduled thread.
 
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Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Infinito
No problems, anyone can take my bottom bunk, or my middle bunk [if three-staker such as in US Navy warships]. Life long seaman, served in muchos ships, muchas nights at sea, always took the top bunk even when I had the seniority to take the middle or bottom bunk. Albuergues TOP BUNK, here I go! To all caminantes, good luck y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
No problems, anyone can take my bottom bunk, or my middle bunk [if three-staker such as in US Navy warships]. Life long seaman, served in muchos ships, muchas nights at sea, always took the top bunk even when I had the seniority to take the middle or bottom bunk. Albuergues TOP BUNK, here I go! To all caminantes, good luck y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
@Sailor : There was a time when I also preferred the top bunk. In areas without air conditioning they were always just a bit cooler (aka breezy) and more comfortable. Too, they were generally less affected by the unpleasant -- um -- gaseous emanations that all humans produce during sleep.

Now that I am, by any definition, an old man, I need to take the bottom bunk. This means I must endure whatever conditions/situations/emanations that accompany said location.
 

Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
Elderly is insulting. ... I'm 53 now walked it in total last year at 52. Until I was 50 and M.S. worsened I rode my bike 2-3 times a week for recreational 100 rides. I also competed in body building....as a mother of 5 grandmother of 6. Requiring a bottom bunk has nothing to do about age or ability. I pray that all that think it's funny...never have to request it because your nerve pain is so bad that placing your feet on the ladder to climb is excruciating. And in the morning climbing out after a sleepless night and falling.....I'm not elderly or disabled.....I'm a determined individual that refuses to give up on a lifelong dream because of a diagnosis. Also those you call elderly ....are amazng individuals that likely feel 30 and unfortunately aren't. They should be congratulated and encouraged .... luckily the Camino friends I encountered of all ages were like minded ....and we all encouraged each other....being under 40 doesn't guarantee completion...I watched many younger able Bodied individuals go home unable to physically continue
Just be kind ....generous. ....thoughtful...I have a degree in gerontology a healthcare background ....I see people without labels.
....I dislike the word elderly because it's often used to describe people as somehow less capable .... age is just a number
 
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tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
never have to request it because your nerve pain is so bad that placing your feet on the ladder to climb is excruciating.
I was thinking of balance more than paresthesia when thinking of MS symptoms. Yikes! I haven't had paresthesia in more than a year, but am loaded up with gabapentin (which, luckily, seems to help me with a maintenance dose) in anticipation that the physical stress will trigger it again. GBS for me, not MS.

I also don't take to 'elderly', but will confess to 'decrepitude'! ;)
 

Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
IMG_0034.JPG IMG_0304.JPG
Elderly is insulting. ...I dislike the word elderly because it's often used to describe people as somehow less capable....age is just a number...my greatest example was my 98 year old great grandmother. I'm 53 now walked it in total last year at 52. Until I was 50 and M.S. worsened I rode my bike 2-3 times a week for recreational 100 rides. I also competed in body building....as a mother of 5 grandmother of 6. Requiring a bottom bunk has nothing to do about age or ability. I pray that all that think it's funny...never have to request it because your nerve pain is so bad that placing your feet on the ladder to climb is excruciating. And in the morning climbing out after a sleepless night and falling.....I'm not elderly or disabled.....I'm a determined individual that refuses to give up on a lifelong dream because of a diagnosis. Also those you call elderly ....are amazng individuals that likely feel 30 and unfortunately aren't. They should be congratulated and encouraged .... luckily the Camino friends I encountered of all ages were like minded ....and we all encouraged each other....being under 40 doesn't guarantee completion...I watched many younger able Bodied individuals go home unable to physically continue
Just be kind ....generous. ....thoughtful...I have a degree in gerontology a healthcare background ....I see people without labels.
....I dislike the word elderly because it's often used to describe people as somehow less capable .... age is just a number
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
I am not ready to be called elderly yet, nor do I consider it an insult. Elder, without the ly, seems to have a classy vibe. Perhaps one of you wise people will come up with a good word for female and male pilgrims older than 60 who appreciate bottom bunks.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Pehaps one of you wise people will come up with a good word for female and male pilgrims older than 60 who appreciate bottom bunks.
Oldies in great shape milking their age for comfort? :p
Retireers unaware that bedbugs can drop from the above mattres? :cool:
Golden pilgrim oblivious to 18 stone 30 year old on upper bunk? :eek:
 
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Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
In Spanish they refer to "personas de la tercera edad." People who speak English and Spanish, do you think this has a better or worse connotation than "elderly" in English?
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
The ladders are the worst! I can't turn around to go down backwards and have to go down face first. Edit: facing outward! :confused:
Always a moment of terror!
I count myself lucky when there are ladders and not just having to climb up at the foot of the bed with the structural bars. As for getting down, I now bypass the ladder and just use the bunk in front of mine, as long as the bunks are close enough to each other.

But the horror really is flimsy light weight bunks, at least for those of us heavier than the bunks: yup, you will bring them down with you as you tey to climb up. :eek: I never fell guilty getting the bottom bunk: the person above me can sleep soundly and not wondering when I will collapse on top of him/her. o_O
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
I got into terrible trouble when I referred to myself as a "vieja". Apparently it is an absolute no-no to call anyone "old" in Spanish. I now use the term "señora major".
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I got into terrible trouble when I referred to myself as a "vieja". Apparently it is an absolute no-no to call anyone "old" in Spanish. I now use the term "señora major".
Try "anciana".
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I got into terrible trouble when I referred to myself as a "vieja". Apparently it is an absolute no-no to call anyone "old" in Spanish. I now use the term "señora major".
I think you mean señora mayor
 

kinnear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2007 (September 2017)
Guessing I'll gratefully accept any bed that's offered. I don't imagine the ascent into a top bunk will be too difficult. However, dare I mention that I have some apprehensive moments considering the logistics and possibility of embarrassment negotiating the descent from a top bunk with an "older person's" full bladder!
 

long trails

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
Just a short response to the "common-sense" notion that being able to walk long distances proves one fit enough to climb into a top bunk. (I am sure it is held by more folks than @long trails and am not in the slightest offended by this idea, but this is the post that gives me the opportunity to provide another perspective.)

I have very severe neuropathy in my feet, with foot drop on both sides. I'm able to walk with the aid of orthotics. (And drive: When I hit the automobile accelerator or brake too hard, I say to my friends, "You try driving on stilts" :) .)

Without them, climbing ladders (such as trying to get out of a swimming pool), pedaling a bicycle, walking on tiptoes, etc., just doesn't work.

I have other issues that may cut short my Camino attempt, but they are not directly related to my ability to walk long distances. I can do that. Clambering up and down to and from a top bunk is another matter. I can do it, although with somewhat less proficiency than Dr. Johnson's dog walking on its hind legs. I shudder to think of someone with some of the common symptoms of MS being forced to do so.

I don't anticipate any problems for myself but just want to point out that making superficial judgments about others can lead one astray.
I sympathise with your issue, sounds nasty, but of course it's also possible that a younger person has severe problems with their feet.

So it could be that this unlucky youngster has to clamber up to the upper bunk while the older person underneath has no injuries or issues whatsoever. Despite the 40 year age gap, the senior is in far better shape overal. The albergue manager has overlooked the fact that younger people may have issues with upper bunks.

By all means save a couple of lower bunks for those who might need them (whatever their age) but I think it should always be first come, first served.

I actually walked away from one private albergue once after I asked to inspect the dormitory (it wasn't cheap so wanted a look first). The room was empty but the owner insisted I took one specific upper bunk right next to the bathroom door. It's the last bed anyone would have chosen. I asked if I could choose and he said no, so I smiled and walked on. Funniy enough I met two people later that day who also walked on due to the owner.
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
🤣
I don't consider 60-something elderly. It's the new 50. To me elderly is 70. Subject to change the closer I get :)
I couldn't resist. I'm 71 and I consider myself 36 still in my mind :). Having said that, I rode the Camino back in 2013 at the grand old age of 65 and was very relieved when a very nice young lady gave up her bottom bunk in one of the albergues so that I didn't have to try and haul myself onto the top one. I had been using top bunks where necessary but in this particular albergue there weren't any ladders! I did try, honest, but my upper arms aren't as well exercised as my legs and let me down when I needed them most.
 

Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
Lower bunks for not just elderly ( I don’t like that label )
Age is just a number....one can act more elderly at 20 then others do at 80. ❤
I walked in 2016 at 52. One year after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. Suffering from terrible pain and weakness issues. I’d ask often but was refused most often. I fell off or from ladders twice.
So please try to be thoughtful of all in need out there.
 
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FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
Just be aware that if you book on Booking.com and ask for single beds you may arrive to find a different option has been reserved for you.
Just back from our Porto to Santiago camino. Twice via booking we requested 3 single beds. First time fortunately we had 3 very good bottom bunks in a modern spacious dorm. Second time the owner hadn't replied to my special request and looked sheepish when we arrived. In the end we accepted a small room with two sets of bunks. One of our group bravely volunteered to take a top bunk . The owner grumbled that she was losing 15 euros by not renting out the free top bed.

We learned that we needed to study the pictures more closely.
We have a joint age of 204!
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
Just be aware that if you book on Booking.com and ask for single beds you may arrive to find a different option has been reserved for you.
Just back from our Porto to Santiago camino. Twice via booking we requested 3 single beds. First time fortunately we had 3 very good bottom bunks in a modern spacious dorm. Second time the owner hadn't replied to my special request and looked sheepish when we arrived. In the end we accepted a small room with two sets of bunks. One of our group bravely volunteered to take a top bunk . The owner grumbled that she was losing 15 euros by not renting out the free top bed.

We learned that we needed to study the pictures more closely.
We have a joint age of 208!
 

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