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Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Sleeping Bag Weight for CF in Oct: Share Your Tips!

MARSKA

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Sept/Oct 2023
OK- the title was made using the "title producer" that Ivar turned on. Not too bad! I added "for CF in Oct"

I'd like to hear from anyone willing to share - how much did / does your sleeping bag (or sleep kit) weigh for a trip equivilant to an Oct CF? Do you usually add a mat (or some type of sleeping pad)? I have an excellent bag that I've used for through-hiking but after reading posts regarding bags, I'm sure it is warmer than I need- in addition to being too heavy.

So I'm shopping for a sleep kit or bag for my first Camino and I'm trying to figure out what % of the total weight I carry should be for comfort at night. Or - how much weight do I designate to a sleep kit?

Buen Camino!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
My first Camino - Sept/Oct 2017 - I purchased a lightweight down sleeping bag - around 800 gms.

Used it in Roncesvalles, and sent it home from Burgos. Would have been good to have had it one other night at a municipal albergue that didn’t provide blankets, but I survived...

Did not bother with sleeping bag for Caminos in 2018 and 2019.

Will probably take it on next Camino on the basis of not pre-booking accommodation in the interests of simplicity and flexibility but taking my chances on finding a bed each night and being prepared to sleep out if no reasonable accommodation cannot be found.

Have heard that some albergues ceased providing blankets as a COVID management measure but have no feel for how widespread this is now...
 
how much did / does your sleeping bag (or sleep kit) weigh
Your sleep kit includes the clothes that you can wear to bed. It is more flexible to have a minimal sleeping bag (or even just a liner) combined with a down jacket, buff, wool socks, and second layer of long underwear, than it is to have a warmer sleeping bag.

For October, I would take a silk liner, light weight down blanket, down vest and wool long underwear, to be added to my normal evening layers. Then, I could sleep in up to 2 layers of pants, 3 layers of wool or down on my upper body, warm socks, and a buff or hat - all inside the liner and down blanket/quilt
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
No sleeping pad necessary - in fact sleeping pads are one of the most discarded items on the Camino.
I use a silk sleep sack that I made along with a tiny down blanket that I tuck inside on cool/cold nights. Altogether my "system" weighs about one pound/450 grams.
 
I have a 16 oz Down Montbell spiral hugger 5. They are no longer available for purchase, we bought them back in 2010 and used them for years camping and now on the Camino in winter.
 
You do not need a sleeping pad unless you are planning to sleep outdoors. You also don't need a pillow - they are provided. But I do make sure my sleeping bag liner is fitted over the pillow so I don't have my head on the disposable pillow case.

Whether or not you need a sleeping bag or what temperature rating sleeping bag you need depends on whether or not you are a cold or a warm sleeper and season. But - be aware - cold night temps can even occur in the summer months. On my Frances Camino - I had a couple very warm nights and decided to mail my sleeping bag home from Pamplona. And right after Pamplona - temps got unseasonably cold for June/July. I was VERY cold every night until I reached Finisterre. I slept with ALL my clothes, my sleeping bag liner, and my turkish towel was used as a blanket. If there were blankets at the albergue - I used them. If not - I was miserable all night. Nothing worse than not sleeping after a physically exhausting day.

Anyhow - even in summer months - I now carry a silk sleeping bag liner and a summer rated down sleeping bag. That is probably enough - even in October since you will be sleeping indoors.

In terms of weight of the bag - I look for the lightest down sleeping bag that I can afford. I aim to keep my sleeping bag less than 500 grams, but now have one that is only 350 grams and it is plenty warm most nights indoors. My silk liner weights 100 grams - so a total of 450 grams.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
In terms of weight of the bag - I look for the lightest down sleeping bag that I can afford. I aim to keep my sleeping bag less than 500 grams, but now have one that is only 350 grams and it is plenty warm most nights indoors.
Can you share the name of your sleeping bag or a link?
 
Can you share the name of your sleeping bag or a link?
I think my lightest sleeping bag is the sea to summit flame - summer rated (I think the flame I). Not cheap - I think it is around $350 but I used my REI dividends and a member coupon and got the price down quite a bit. I think my Aegis sleeping bag is around 400-450grams, if I remember correctly, and is much cheaper.
 
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I have yet to find my perfect setup. My 240g down sleeping bag did quite well, but for some nights, it was to warm even when used only as a blanket. (and i need something covering me at night for reasons unknown)
Maybe i'll go that far next time to take an extra liner. This might be a little redundant.

(bag is the Cumulus Magic Zip 100)
 
I'm using a Cocoon Silk/Merino mix travel blanket that weighs 350 grams and take little to no space. As mentioned before by other pilgrims, the whole sleep setup for people is normally much more than one item. Lots of clothes including a pair of socks that I do not use for hiking are used in addition based on room temperature.

When talking about October I would add a buff and a hat for sleeping. Might even switch a merino shirt for sleeping with an insulated long sleeve base layer shirt.
 
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I always take a 2 season cheap enough sleeping bag that packs down small and quickly. you can get away with a liner but in autumn / fall there are some chilly nights ( 4-7 c ) and although there are blankets often available.. better safe than sorry for me.

I'd pick my sleeping bag over other items if I was worrying about pack size / weight. Just make sure it packs down nicely
 
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You do not need a sleeping pad unless you are planning to sleep outdoors. You also don't need a pillow - they are provided. But I do make sure my sleeping bag liner is fitted over the pillow so I don't have my head on the disposable pillow case.

Whether or not you need a sleeping bag or what temperature rating sleeping bag you need depends on whether or not you are a cold or a warm sleeper and season. But - be aware - cold night temps can even occur in the summer months. On my Frances Camino - I had a couple very warm nights and decided to mail my sleeping bag home from Pamplona. And right after Pamplona - temps got unseasonably cold for June/July. I was VERY cold every night until I reached Finisterre. I slept with ALL my clothes, my sleeping bag liner, and my turkish towel was used as a blanket. If there were blankets at the albergue - I used them. If not - I was miserable all night. Nothing worse than not sleeping after a physically exhausting day.

Anyhow - even in summer months - I now carry a silk sleeping bag liner and a summer rated down sleeping bag. That is probably enough - even in October since you will be sleeping indoors.

In terms of weight of the bag - I look for the lightest down sleeping bag that I can afford. I aim to keep my sleeping bag less than 500 grams, but now have one that is only 350 grams and it is plenty warm most nights indoors. My silk liner weights 100 grams - so a total of 450 grams.
What brand is your sleeping bag?
Thanks!
 
What brand is your sleeping bag?
Thanks!
Answered above

I think my lightest sleeping bag is the sea to summit flame - summer rated (I think the flame I). Not cheap - I think it is around $350 but I used my REI dividends and a member coupon and got the price down quite a bit. I think my Aegis sleeping bag is around 400-450grams, if I remember correctly, and is much cheaper.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Ever since my second walk (on the Le Puy, 2011), I have used and loved my 500g Passion One from Yeti (now "Y by Nordisk). Here are features to look for in your system: light weight (1 pound or 450g is sufficient for indoor use), full length zipper (so it opens flat, and can be used as a quilt -- or get a quilt), a price within your budget (several brands have been mentioned by previous posters). Many options are now available, at prices much more moderate than I paid in 2011.
 
I have a Patagonia sleeping bag liner that weighs 290g. It was warm enough for me in late September and early October except for one night where my room could have doubled as a meat fridge.
 
OK - what is a "buff". As an American , "buff" refers to either polishing (buffing) or being naked (in-the-raw).

Great information and special thanks to those who mention the specific brands/models. It is so VERY helpful.

I will be visiting REI soon to get a new backpack, shoes, and bag so I am trying to get as much info as I can from y'all.
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
what is a "buff"
If you google it, it will probably take you to www.buff.com, which is the website for a Spanish company that popularized the article of clothing also known a "tubular neck wear", "neck gaiter", etc. (You can probably understand why the word "buff" is now used generically like kleenex, although it is actually a brand name.) This item is now made by many companies, and they need to use different names, but anyone at REI will know what you mean.

So, a "buff" is a tube of cloth you wear around your neck. They are available in merino wool as well as other fabrics, and now there are other variations is size and style. It is a very useful piece of clothing - provides good warmth, is easy to put on and take off as your temperature changes, can be used as a hat or headband, wet with water on a hot day, etc.
 
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Ahhh Ha! Ok. Neck gaiter. Thanks!
It’s actually a specific type of neck gaiter that has a lot of options for how to use it. I bought my merino wool one at REI a long time ago, but it is a winter season item, so they may/may not have any merino ones now. They probably will have the ’summer’ ones, made of (I think) a cotton blend, but that’s not what you want for October. I’m sure you could find a merino one online, maybe even from REI.

With your mountaineering background, you probably know this, but the most important part of the body to cover up to keep warm is your head because it contains so much blood. Simply wearing a hat to bed is going to keep you as warm as multiple layers of other clothing, maybe warmer. Socks are also important. I don’t have experience on the Camino in October, but for late September and early May, I have always been fine in a silk liner bag, a down blanket, long johns, and maybe a pair of socks. And I tend to always be chilly. During Covid, the albergues didn’t provide blankets, but they seem to be doing so now. So that’s a good possibility as well.
 
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OK - what is a "buff". As an American , "buff" refers to either polishing (buffing) or being naked (in-the-raw).

Great information and special thanks to those who mention the specific brands/models. It is so VERY helpful.

I will be visiting REI soon to get a new backpack, shoes, and bag so I am trying to get as much info as I can from y'all.
A very useful piece of kit. I wouldn't be without one.

Just a note though about the merino ones, some folk (myself included) find them irritating when worn around the neck/head area. I tried soaking mine in fabric softener then vinegar solutions, but no go. And yet I love my light-weight merino long sleeve top, no skin irritation with it.

I think you are starting in Pamplona (?) If so, the Caminoteca store there has camino-themed neck gaiters/buffs. I bought one there last year. Love(d) it!
 
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Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I have several. Here's a photo of one that is made out of recycled water bottles. Phil is wearing one that has a map of Yellowstone National Park made out of some kind of regular scarf material.
20220702_092215.jpg
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
As for weight, my homemade silk liner bag and down blanket together weigh a little more than a pound.

I use the blanket on top for better coverage and because my liner bag is not roomy and I am not blessed with narrow hips. The two layers are slippery, so one trip I used safety pins to keep them together, but got all fancy and sewed on snaps for the last time. Much better!

No, a pad is not at all necessary. You’ll be sleeping indoors, on a bed with a mattress, or at minimum a mat on the floor.
 
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For my CF last year from mid Sep to late Oct I took an AegisMax UL Goose Down sleeping bag, weight 410g. Part of a very light daily pack of 6.5kg + water.
I stayed in a mix of albergue dorms and private rooms and only used it when a blanket was not available.
 
I have yet to find my perfect setup. My 240g down sleeping bag did quite well, but for some nights, it was to warm even when used only as a blanket. (and i need something covering me at night for reasons unknown)
Maybe i'll go that far next time to take an extra liner. This might be a little redundant.

(bag is the Cumulus Magic Zip 100)
Thanks for sharing the brand - I hadn't heard of this company before (not surprised since it is a Polish company). I did notice that most of their bags were pretty heavy - but this is the lightest summer weight bag I have found so far and the price is great compared to most I have found that are light weight. Gonna give it a try - and compare it to my Sea to Summit Spark. Whichever I prefer I will keep - the other will go to my daughter haha... I like that this one has a full zip and can almost be opened to a quilt (looks like the feet area doesn't open fully - but that is OK). In case anyone is wondering - they do ship to the US, shipping was an additional $19 - so still under $200 for a VERY lightweight down summer temp sleeping bag. Hopefully I like it.

And I always bring a silk liner. Yes - a bit redundant - but I ALWAYS use the silk liner unless in a private room with complete bedding. The sleeping bag I don't take out on nights where I know my sleeping bag will be too warm.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
and compare it to my Sea to Summit Spark
i used the Spark 0 on my first Camino and switched to the Cumulus for the Full-Zip on my second. I tend to be rather warm on my feet at night and did end up sweating a lot in the Spark. With the Cumulus i can open the zipper from the bottom to get some air to my feet while i stay warm around my upper body. I think the spark may be a bit warmer due to the collar, but both will be plenty for indoor sleeping most time of the year.
 
I have bought a Sea to Summit Traveller Tr1 down sleeping bag that opens fully to become a blanket. The zip works from both ends so it is very flexible. It's rated 10C and weighs 420g. It has a compression sack which is another 20g. I've tried it out at home and find it very comfortable. I don't get on well with liners because I wriggle a lot in my sleep and they become too constricting.
 
I used a Brownint silk/cotton liner (from Amazon) and a rumpl nano loft blanket last August 25-Sept 20th. Walked SJPD to Burgos, bus to Sarria and walked to SdC. Never used the blanket, but brought it in case I was cold. I mostly slept on top of the liner and only wore shorts. The 2-3 times I got cold, I put on a shirt and put the liner over me and I was fine.
We are going to walk this year from Burgos to either Sarria or SdC and I will probably save weight and leave the blanket at home.
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms

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