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What AI ChatGPT knows about the Camino Frances

pepi

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Last: Sept 2022
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I am very intrigued by the impressive text capability of the AI App ChatGPT. It is free of charge (for the time being) and can create text of astonishing quality in a number of languages. I asked the robot some questions about the CF:

Q: I am interested in walking the Camino de Santiago, what can you tell me about it?

A: The Camino de Santiago, also known as the Way of St. James, is a network of pilgrimage routes that lead to the cathedral in Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain, where the remains of the apostle St. James are believed to be buried. The most popular route is the Camino Frances, which starts in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France and covers approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) through the Pyrenees and across northern Spain to Santiago. The pilgrimage can take anywhere from a few weeks to a month to complete, and many people choose to walk the route as a spiritual journey or for the physical challenge. There are also other routes, such as the Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo, and Camino Ingles that also lead to Santiago.

Q: Tell me more about the Camino Frances

A: The Camino Frances is the most popular and traditional of the routes of the Camino de Santiago. It is a journey of approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) that begins in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France and ends in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. The route takes walkers through the Pyrenees and across northern Spain, passing through several provinces including Navarra, La Rioja, Burgos, and León. Along the way, there are many small towns and villages where Pilgrims can rest and resupply. The route is marked by yellow arrows and scallop shells, the symbol of the Camino, which helps to guide the way.
Many people choose to walk the Camino Frances as a spiritual journey, but it is also a challenging physical endeavor. The route can take anywhere from a few weeks to a month to complete, depending on the pace of the individual. The terrain varies from flat sections to steep climbs, and the weather can be unpredictable, particularly in the mountains.
The Camino Frances traditionally starts on the first of April, but it is possible to start any day of the year. Many people prefer to start in Spring or Autumn, as the weather is more moderate. There are also many different types of accommodation available along the route, from albergues (pilgrim hostels) to hotels and private rooms, so it is possible to plan a trip that suits your budget and preferences.

Q: What would be my stages and places to stay overnight?

A: The Camino Frances is typically broken down into stages, with each stage covering a certain distance and ending in a specific town or village where Pilgrims can rest and spend the night. The exact stages and places to stay will depend on the route you take and the distance you are able to walk each day, but here is a general overview of some of the most common stages and overnight stops along the Camino Frances:
  • Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Roncesvalles: This is the first stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Roncesvalles, which has several albergues (pilgrim hostels) as well as hotels and private rooms.
  • Roncesvalles to Zubiri: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the Pyrenees. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Zubiri, which has several albergues and a few small hotels.
  • Zubiri to Pamplona: This stage covers a distance of approximately 23 kilometers (14 miles) and takes walkers through the beautiful Navarra region. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Pamplona, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Pamplona to Puente la Reina: This stage covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles) and takes walkers through the countryside and small towns. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Puente la Reina, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Puente la Reina to Estella: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Estella, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Estella to Logroño: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Logroño, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Logroño to Burgos: This stage covers a distance of approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Burgos, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Burgos to León: This stage covers a distance of approximately 72 kilometers (45 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in León, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • León to Santiago de Compostela: This is the final stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Santiago de Compostela, where the remains of the Apostle St. James are believed to be buried. Santiago has many options of accommodation, from hotels to hostels and private rooms.
Please note that this is a general overview and depending on your physical abilities, time, and preferences you may want to adjust the stages and places to stay.

Q: Your information "León to Santiago de Compostela: This is the final stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles)" is not correct, reconsider

A: I apologize for the confusion, you are correct that the distance from León to Santiago de Compostela is not 100 kilometers (62 miles). It can vary from around 100km to 120km depending on the route taken. The exact distance and stages will depend on the specific route you take and the pace you set for yourself. My apologies for any confusion caused by the mistake in my previous answer. The Camino de Santiago is a long journey and the distance can vary, so it's important to plan your stages and overnight stops based on your own abilities and preferences.

Q: Again, not correct. The 100km covers the last stages from Sarria bro Santiago, can you find out more?


A: I apologize for any confusion caused by my previous statements. You are correct, the last 100km from Sarria to Santiago is commonly considered as the minimum distance to be walked to obtain the Compostela, the certificate that accredits that the pilgrim has completed the camino. The camino Frances covers a distance of about 790km starting in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France, and goes through several provinces in Spain including Navarra, La Rioja, Burgos, León and Galicia. The exact distance and stages will depend on the specific route you take and the pace you set for yourself. It is important to plan your stages and overnight stops based on your own abilities and preferences. Also, it's important to consider that the Camino de Santiago is not only a physical journey but also a spiritual one, and the distance is not the only objective, the experiences and personal growth that you can get from this journey are invaluable.

The speed and fluency of responding are very impressive, however, the machine still has to learn more about the CF.
It is fun to let AI compose texts on a zillion subjects.


PS: Could not resist asking the perpetual forum question:

Q: How would my packing list for a summer Camino look like?

A: When packing for the Camino de Santiago, it's important to keep in mind that you will be walking long distances each day, so you'll want to pack light and bring only the essentials. Here is a general packing list for a summer Camino:
  • Good quality walking shoes or boots: These should be comfortable and well-broken in, as you will be walking for several hours each day.
  • Comfortable clothing: Bring a mix of lightweight, quick-drying clothing such as shorts, t-shirts, and long-sleeved shirts, as well as a waterproof jacket or rain poncho.
  • Sleeping bag and sleeping mat: If you plan to stay in albergues (pilgrim hostels) or other communal accommodations, you will need to bring your own sleeping gear.
  • Backpack: A comfortable, lightweight backpack that can hold all of your belongings.
  • Hydration system: A water bottle or hydration system to stay hydrated during the day.
  • Headlamp or flashlight: For early morning starts or for when you are in the Albergue and the lights are out.
  • First Aid kit: Include essentials such as blister plasters, painkillers, and insect repellent.
  • Personal hygiene items: Toothbrush, toothpaste, wet wipes, small towel, and toiletries.
  • Sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat: to protect yourself from the sun.
  • Cash and Credit Card: Bring enough cash for small purchases along the way and a credit card as a backup.
  • ID or passport and pilgrimage credentials: You will need these to get your Compostela at the end of the Camino.
  • Personal items such as a book, journal, or music player to entertain yourself during breaks.
It's important to keep in mind that you will be carrying everything you bring, so be mindful of the weight and size of your items. Remember that along the way you will find places to buy and wash clothes, so you can pack light. And remember that less is more, the less you bring, the easier and more comfortable your journey will be.
 
Last edited:
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
It seems to compile and synthesize info from various websites. Pretty impressive, though I'm glad that experienced humans can give better info -- for now, lol!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Very amusing. I can see that people who have real life experience are still needed. Phew!
That's for sure. On another thread regarding the Le Puy way the OP, who is planning a walk and also happens to be doing a PhD relating to AI, used ChatGPT to try to plot a 15km per day course from Le Puy. It was wildly inaccurate for almost every stage from Le Puy to SJPP, and indicated it would take just 16 'stages'. It was also way off for SJPP to SdeC - but not so much as the Le Puy, which I guess indicates there was more source information 'out there'. I don't know ... I'd never heard of ChatGPT until then.

Anyhoo, the OP was just curious to see how accurate, or not, it would be - and the humans were able to give her the feedback. Good to know we are not yet obsolete.😍
 
After further experimenting with the app, I come to the following conclusion:

1. Of course (like in reality), info and questions regarding the Camino are not of major general interest, hence, the information provided is (still) sketchy and faulty. Nevertheless, I admit to being impressed by the results of my packing-list question, it could serve as a template response to all these repetitive forum posts.

2. I tested other subjects that are of far more general significance and I am flabbergasted by the eloquent and well-texted responses, especially also in other languages such as German, French, and Japanese. (I checked out the latter with my son whose mother tongue is Japanese)

3. The Artificial Intelligence of ChatGPT is at its infant stage; it will establish its permanent position next to search engines like Google, Wikipedia, etc., quickly, because its user experience is in many ways more lively and fun, with time it will strongly compete with rome2rio and the likes. (And it will eventually and hopefully eliminate the questions of "how to get from Pamplona to SJPdP" in this forum.)

But as correctly pointed out by others in this thread, the app will never replace personal experience and subjective in-depth knowledge about specific subjects. (And it most certainly will never ever replace the experience of walking the Camino!) I welcome it as a tool that – like all others alike – can be of great assistance, but usage of which must always be carefully weighed and differentiated.
All in all, chatboxes like this have a great future (for those who know how to use them).
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
The first edition came out in 2003 and has become the go-to-guide for many pilgrims over the years. It is shipping with a Pilgrim Passport (Credential) from the cathedral in Santiago de Compostela.
I am very intrigued by the impressive text capability of the AI App ChatGPT. It is free of charge (for the time being) and can create text of astonishing quality in a number of languages. I asked the robot some questions about the CF:

Q: I am interested in walking the Camino de Santiago, what can you tell me about it?

A: The Camino de Santiago, also known as the Way of St. James, is a network of pilgrimage routes that lead to the cathedral in Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain, where the remains of the apostle St. James are believed to be buried. The most popular route is the Camino Frances, which starts in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France and covers approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) through the Pyrenees and across northern Spain to Santiago. The pilgrimage can take anywhere from a few weeks to a month to complete, and many people choose to walk the route as a spiritual journey or for the physical challenge. There are also other routes, such as the Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo, and Camino Ingles that also lead to Santiago.

Q: Tell me more about the Camino Frances

A: The Camino Frances is the most popular and traditional of the routes of the Camino de Santiago. It is a journey of approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) that begins in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France and ends in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. The route takes walkers through the Pyrenees and across northern Spain, passing through several provinces including Navarra, La Rioja, Burgos, and León. Along the way, there are many small towns and villages where Pilgrims can rest and resupply. The route is marked by yellow arrows and scallop shells, the symbol of the Camino, which helps to guide the way.
Many people choose to walk the Camino Frances as a spiritual journey, but it is also a challenging physical endeavor. The route can take anywhere from a few weeks to a month to complete, depending on the pace of the individual. The terrain varies from flat sections to steep climbs, and the weather can be unpredictable, particularly in the mountains.
The Camino Frances traditionally starts on the first of April, but it is possible to start any day of the year. Many people prefer to start in Spring or Autumn, as the weather is more moderate. There are also many different types of accommodation available along the route, from albergues (pilgrim hostels) to hotels and private rooms, so it is possible to plan a trip that suits your budget and preferences.

Q: What would be my stages and places to stay overnight?

A: The Camino Frances is typically broken down into stages, with each stage covering a certain distance and ending in a specific town or village where Pilgrims can rest and spend the night. The exact stages and places to stay will depend on the route you take and the distance you are able to walk each day, but here is a general overview of some of the most common stages and overnight stops along the Camino Frances:
  • Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Roncesvalles: This is the first stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Roncesvalles, which has several albergues (pilgrim hostels) as well as hotels and private rooms.
  • Roncesvalles to Zubiri: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the Pyrenees. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Zubiri, which has several albergues and a few small hotels.
  • Zubiri to Pamplona: This stage covers a distance of approximately 23 kilometers (14 miles) and takes walkers through the beautiful Navarra region. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Pamplona, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Pamplona to Puente la Reina: This stage covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles) and takes walkers through the countryside and small towns. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Puente la Reina, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Puente la Reina to Estella: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Estella, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Estella to Logroño: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Logroño, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Logroño to Burgos: This stage covers a distance of approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Burgos, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Burgos to León: This stage covers a distance of approximately 72 kilometers (45 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in León, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • León to Santiago de Compostela: This is the final stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Santiago de Compostela, where the remains of the Apostle St. James are believed to be buried. Santiago has many options of accommodation, from hotels to hostels and private rooms.
Please note that this is a general overview and depending on your physical abilities, time, and preferences you may want to adjust the stages and places to stay.

Q: Your information "León to Santiago de Compostela: This is the final stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles)" is not correct, reconsider

A: I apologize for the confusion, you are correct that the distance from León to Santiago de Compostela is not 100 kilometers (62 miles). It can vary from around 100km to 120km depending on the route taken. The exact distance and stages will depend on the specific route you take and the pace you set for yourself. My apologies for any confusion caused by the mistake in my previous answer. The Camino de Santiago is a long journey and the distance can vary, so it's important to plan your stages and overnight stops based on your own abilities and preferences.

Q: Again, not correct. The 100km covers the last stages from Sarria bro Santiago, can you find out more?


A: I apologize for any confusion caused by my previous statements. You are correct, the last 100km from Sarria to Santiago is commonly considered as the minimum distance to be walked to obtain the Compostela, the certificate that accredits that the pilgrim has completed the camino. The camino Frances covers a distance of about 790km starting in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France, and goes through several provinces in Spain including Navarra, La Rioja, Burgos, León and Galicia. The exact distance and stages will depend on the specific route you take and the pace you set for yourself. It is important to plan your stages and overnight stops based on your own abilities and preferences. Also, it's important to consider that the Camino de Santiago is not only a physical journey but also a spiritual one, and the distance is not the only objective, the experiences and personal growth that you can get from this journey are invaluable.

The speed and fluency of responding are very impressive, however, the machine still has to learn more about the CF.
It is fun to let AI compose texts on a zillion subjects.


PS: Could not resist asking the perpetual forum question:

Q: How would my packing list for a summer Camino look like?

A: When packing for the Camino de Santiago, it's important to keep in mind that you will be walking long distances each day, so you'll want to pack light and bring only the essentials. Here is a general packing list for a summer Camino:
  • Good quality walking shoes or boots: These should be comfortable and well-broken in, as you will be walking for several hours each day.
  • Comfortable clothing: Bring a mix of lightweight, quick-drying clothing such as shorts, t-shirts, and long-sleeved shirts, as well as a waterproof jacket or rain poncho.
  • Sleeping bag and sleeping mat: If you plan to stay in albergues (pilgrim hostels) or other communal accommodations, you will need to bring your own sleeping gear.
  • Backpack: A comfortable, lightweight backpack that can hold all of your belongings.
  • Hydration system: A water bottle or hydration system to stay hydrated during the day.
  • Headlamp or flashlight: For early morning starts or for when you are in the Albergue and the lights are out.
  • First Aid kit: Include essentials such as blister plasters, painkillers, and insect repellent.
  • Personal hygiene items: Toothbrush, toothpaste, wet wipes, small towel, and toiletries.
  • Sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat: to protect yourself from the sun.
  • Cash and Credit Card: Bring enough cash for small purchases along the way and a credit card as a backup.
  • ID or passport and pilgrimage credentials: You will need these to get your Compostela at the end of the Camino.
  • Personal items such as a book, journal, or music player to entertain yourself during breaks.
It's important to keep in mind that you will be carrying everything you bring, so be mindful of the weight and size of your items. Remember that along the way you will find places to buy and wash clothes, so you can pack light. And remember that less is more, the less you bring, the easier and more comfortable your journey will be.
The distance from Burgos to Leon is 180 km, not 72 km.
 
I, for one use technology to find out information but I am quickly learning for myself that the more acronyms I come across and initials the more I become leery and afraid of us losing control over our technological creations.
You know what is better and satisfying then Camino technology? Following the arrows and being in touch with your rhythm and body and knowing pretty well how far and how long you have walked without a cell phone or app.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
325765278_1496250400863102_6707523186665645734_n.jpg
 
Like the internet, a percentage of the info will always be incorrect. Concern arrives as more things like encyclopedias are no longer in print and more people come to believe everything on the internet to be the truth. What happens if the internet go down? Does everyone become stupid without their internet, Kindle, and AIs?
 
Like the internet, a percentage of the info will always be incorrect. Concern arrives as more things like encyclopedias are no longer in print and more people come to believe everything on the internet to be the truth. What happens if the internet go down? Does everyone become stupid without their internet, Kindle, and AIs?
Maybe it will be addition by subtraction. We can only hope.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I am very intrigued by the impressive text capability of the AI App ChatGPT. It is free of charge (for the time being) and can create text of astonishing quality in a number of languages. I asked the robot some questions about the CF:
...
Q: What would be my stages and places to stay overnight?

A: The Camino Frances is typically broken down into stages, with each stage covering a certain distance and ending in a specific town or village where Pilgrims can rest and spend the night. The exact stages and places to stay will depend on the route you take and the distance you are able to walk each day, but here is a general overview of some of the most common stages and overnight stops along the Camino Frances:
  • Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Roncesvalles: This is the first stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Roncesvalles, which has several albergues (pilgrim hostels) as well as hotels and private rooms.
  • Roncesvalles to Zubiri: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the Pyrenees. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Zubiri, which has several albergues and a few small hotels.
  • Zubiri to Pamplona: This stage covers a distance of approximately 23 kilometers (14 miles) and takes walkers through the beautiful Navarra region. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Pamplona, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Pamplona to Puente la Reina: This stage covers a distance of approximately 27 kilometers (17 miles) and takes walkers through the countryside and small towns. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Puente la Reina, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Puente la Reina to Estella: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Estella, which has several albergues and small hotels.
  • Estella to Logroño: This stage covers a distance of approximately 30 kilometers (19 miles) and takes walkers through the region of La Rioja. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Logroño, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Logroño to Burgos: This stage covers a distance of approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in Burgos, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • Burgos to León: This stage covers a distance of approximately 72 kilometers (45 miles) and takes walkers through the region of Castilla y León. Pilgrims typically spend the night in León, which is a larger city with many different types of accommodation available.
  • León to Santiago de Compostela: This is the final stage of the Camino Frances, and it covers a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles). Pilgrims typically spend the night in Santiago de Compostela, where the remains of the Apostle St. James are believed to be buried. Santiago has many options of accommodation, from hotels to hostels and private rooms.
Please note that this is a general overview and depending on your physical abilities, time, and preferences you may want to adjust the stages and places to stay.
...
Looking at the stages, it is clear that you build up strength and are capable of longer walks as you go along. Early on it is Roncesvalles to Zubiri and Zubiri to Pamplona. Later, it is Burgos to Leon and Leon to Santiago. To be fair, our earliest surviving pilgrims guide also had some stages that would be considered excessively long for today's walkers.
 
I recently made a "deep fake" of a CGI-generated person-image speaking a paragraph I had written. The image looked like a real person but its motions made it obvious it wasn't. The app that did it also had some version of ChatGPT to "extend" my text. My paragraph started "I am 伟思礼" but then said that it wasn't my real name. The rest of the paragraph had nothing to do with names, but the AI extension was all about the importance of one's name to one's identity, and it's third paragraph was 100% identical to its first. Just another reason I say "there's no such thing as artificial intelligence, but there is plenty of artificial stupidity."
 
ChatGPT analyzes what words in your prompt, then assembles sentences similar to documents that have been fed to it that also use those words. And even if it gets the topic right, it doesn't necessarily "peak" truth. A friend of mine asked it for Ayn Rand's take on a bible verse. ChatGPT claimed her interpretation was blah blah when in fact she never said anything about the verse. Compare https://www.cheatsheet.com/entertai...tten-attacked-elvis-presley-and-his-fans.html to this chatGPT output:temp.jpg
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
I asked ChatGPT to create an itinerary for a two-week Camino de Santiago ending at Santiago de Compostela and indicate the number of kilometers per leg. This is what it sent me 😁

Day 1-2: St. Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles (35 km)

  • Start the Camino de Santiago from St. Jean Pied de Port.
  • Walk through rolling hills and forest, reaching Roncesvalles.
  • Spend the night in Roncesvalles, visiting the church and the nearby museum dedicated to the Camino.
Day 3-4: Roncesvalles to Pamplona (26 km)

  • Continue walking through rolling hills and farmland, passing through small villages.
  • Reach Pamplona, famous for the Running of the Bulls.
  • Spend two nights in Pamplona, visiting the old town and the bullring.
Day 5-6: Pamplona to Puente la Reina (31 km)

  • Walk through the Navarran countryside, passing by vineyards and picturesque villages.
  • Reach Puente la Reina, a town known for its medieval bridge.
  • Spend two nights in Puente la Reina, visiting the local churches and the nearby Roncesvalles Monastery.
Day 7-8: Puente la Reina to Estella (29 km)

  • Continue walking through rolling hills and farmland, reaching Estella.
  • Spend two nights in Estella, visiting the local churches and the nearby Irache Monastery.
Day 9-10: Estella to Logroño (27 km)

  • Walk through the La Rioja region, famous for its wine.
  • Reach Logroño, the capital of La Rioja.
  • Spend two nights in Logroño, visiting the old town and the local churches.
Day 11-12: Logroño to Najera (22 km)

  • Walk through the La Rioja countryside, reaching Najera.
  • Spend two nights in Najera, visiting the local churches and the nearby Najera Monastery.
Day 13-14: Najera to Santiago de Compostela (35 km)

  • Continue walking through rolling hills, reaching Santiago de Compostela.
  • Spend the final two nights in Santiago de Compostela, visiting the Cathedral and the nearby museums dedicated to the Camino.
Note: This itinerary assumes an average daily walk of 20-25 km and can be adjusted based on the traveler's pace and preferences. The listed destinations are suggestions, and travelers can add or subtract stops as desired.
 
Have you tried the new "custom GPTs"...? here's one with focus on the Camino. It also includes daily stats... seems to have improved with the new models.

La verdad es que es curioso. It does not replace peer-to-peer info ;-) but it helps.

Buen Camino!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.

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