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Live - Camino Francés What does it mean

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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Can anybody tell me why it says Portugal, when we are in Spain
It's a long distance bicycle trail that coincides with the Camino Frances for a little while in the area of Castilla y Leon near Burgos.

The name of this trail is EuroVelo 1.
Your photo is taken from the direction towards Portugal.
On the other side of the pole it says France.
It starts in Norway and goes through Denmark.

The big circle triangle and the two small ones circles indicate to the biker to continue straight on.

Buen camino! ☺
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
There's more meaning ;): the red colour means that the trail is longer than 100 km and the letters IMBA mean International Mountain Bicycling Association.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Well, actually, I didn’t, and I’m not usually so obtuse . . . I thought it just meant that it was a cycle route – two wheels with a person on top.
OK, the "spear" of the triangle indicates the direction. In this case it is straight. If the spear would be to the right/lefthand side you know the answer now :D

I'm not a cyclist but I know that these signage is much more consistent (because of the travelling speed too, I'd say) than the pointing of the shells on the Caminos for example. Arrows are much more direction clear but even as experienced walker I made a mistake because the arrow was painted very ambigiously (after all they are just 2D, hahaha). 8km more but it was a lovely day ;)
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
OK, the "spear" of the triangle indicates the direction. In this case it is straight. If the spear would be to the right/left hand side you know the answer now
Or is it:
Biker falling off bike to the right on trail 9 and biker falling off bike to the left on trail 10. 🙃🙃🙃

Cycling signage.jpg
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
You mean that there are now dedicated unicycle routes? If you ride a unicycle to Santiago do you have to do a minimum of 200km like bicyclists to get a Compostela, or is that halved to 100km? ;)
Answering your question with a straight face, a unicycle is considered a bicycle for Compostela eligibility. The 200 km minimum distance applies. This, too, has been done...

Just sayin...
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Answering your question with a straight face, a unicycle is considered a bicycle for Compostela eligibility. The 200 km minimum distance applies. This, too, has been done...

Just sayin...
Oooooohhhhhh! Now my brain hurts!! And next you are going to tell us that a tricycle is a bicycle too?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
YES. Basically, if it has wheels and and pedals, and you MUST use the pedals to propel you forward, the device is a bicycle for Compostela eligibility purposes. It does not matter if you pedal with your feet or arms.

One, two or three wheels, or four for that matter, if it uses pedal propulsion, even in part, it is a bicycle insofar as the Pilgrim Office is concerned. The key principle here is that you MUST PEDAL to move forward.

Several years ago, I saw a paraplegic man in an arm-powered trike-wheelchair arrive and qualify at the Pilgrim Office. Ironically, if he had been helped in a conventional wheelchair by a walking assistant / helper, the 100 km limit would have applied. However, because this special trike had arm-powered pedals, it was deemed a bicycle, and the 200 km limit applied. Fortunately, the pilgrim had planned for this and started far enough back to meet this test.

Just as an observation and an aside, an arm-powered trike wheelchair would be perfect for electric motor assist operation, like an e-bike. But I am not aware this has been done commercially. The market must be very limited. Just an observation...
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
So if you are bipedal or ride a quadruped, only 100km is required, but if you are bi-pedal, then its 200km?
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
All sorts of questions springing to mind now :cool: Do riders of a tandem have to cycle 200km each - a total of 400km? Or are they both deemed to have ridden their own 200km independently and concurrently? And what would be demanded from this bunch?
trandem.jpg
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
It's not intuitive I think. Although we figured it out at the time - the bike trail joins, follows and leaves the Camino Frances over quite a short stretch of the road and you can see all three variations of the sign - and I now know what the signs mean, what I still "see" is what I saw at first: a happy little red car rolling along the road, in the same direction or the opposite direction to this one: 🚗. 😊
 
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pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018
Basically, if it has wheels and and pedals, and you MUST use the pedals to propel you forward, the device is a bicycle for Compostela eligibility purposes. It does not matter if you pedal with your feet or arms.
How about riders of velocipedes? They don't pedal!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
It's not intuitive I think. Although we figured it out at the time - the bike trail joins, follows and leaves the Camino Frances over quite a short stretch of the road and you can see all three variations of the sign - and I now know what the signs mean, what I still "see" is what I saw at first: a happy little red car rolling along the road, in the same direction or the opposite direction to this one: 🚗. 😊
So cute :D
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
So if you are bipedal or ride a quadruped, only 100km is required, but if you are bi-pedal, then its 200km?
Bipedal would define an upright, walking person or other bipedal species. The 100 km limit applies.

Quadrupedal would be a being (typically an animal) walking on all fours. Again, one would only have to walk 100 km as well.

However, if you use a mechanical device having pedal or analogous crank power to move forward on 2 or 4 wheels, then that is a bicycle. The 200 km limit applies.

A unicycle with one wheel and pedals, as well as a tricycle, with 3-wheels, also falls in the bicycle definition.

Hope this clarifies...
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
How about riders of velocipedes? They don't pedal!
Show me a velocipede large enough to be ridden...and I will run the other way...

However, technically, this would be like riding a horse... 200 km...
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Show me a velocipede large enough to be ridden...and I will run the other way... However, technically, this would be like riding a horse... 200 km...
There are velociraptors and centipedes in the animal kingdom but the velocipede is a human invention dating back to 1817. There is a modern version, electro-assisted and developed at Saarland University in Germany. The photo shows the velocipede model Draisine 200.0 with the professor who designed it and his student team. No pedalling and it is surely more like walking than riding a horse. Is 100 km sufficient for a Compostela? Or perhaps a compromise: 150 km?

 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Ah, I didn't know this: you push with both feet at the same time:

 

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