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What historical evidence exists of Jewish influences on the Camino de Santiago?

Farish

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Summer 2016
#1
I am a university student and I’m conducting research to write a final paper for my class about Jewish influence on the Camino de Santiago. I would love to interview any Sephardic Jews with stories about the Camino or anecdotes if you have seen evidence of Judaic influence/presence on the Camino! If anyone has researched this topic, please comment! There are few sources for me to examine, and I would appreciate the help!
 

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SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#2
Hi and welcome to the forum @Farish

Are you researching Jewish settlements on/alongside the Camino, interaction (and sadly often conflicts between Jews and Christians) or Jewish influence on the pilgrimage itself?

The biggest influence was certainly that Saint James himself was born a Jew, as was that carpenter he followed ;-)

Buen Camino, SY
 

Farish

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Summer 2016
#3
Thank you for such a prompt reply! I’m looking at Jewish influence on the pilgrimage itself, but that would certainly encompass the developments of the communities that dot the route and interactions/conflicts between Christians and Jews!
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#5
You probably will find interesting the complicated and ambiguous history of the current Castrillo Mota de Judíos. It is close to the Camino, and in the way of cyclists that try to avoid the tough Mostelares heights.
There were Jews neigborhoods ("aljamas") in many villages and cities, notably Estella.
See http://www.redjuderias.org/google/google_maps_print/estella-es.html ;
and Raíces, revista judía de cultura. https://dialnet.unirioja.es/ejemplar/219692
(in Spanish, apparently, not online).
Also, Ponferrada
http://www.bierzotv.com/el-camino-d...-de-los-judios-en-el-bierzo-durante-400-anos/
If you have problem with Spanish, look at "Jews and Christians in Medieval Castile", from Maya Soifer Irish. There is a chapter about Camino. Some sections are in Google Books; with useful bibliography.
 

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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#6
I am a university student and I’m conducting research to write a final paper for my class about Jewish influence on the Camino de Santiago. I would love to interview any Sephardic Jews with stories about the Camino or anecdotes if you have seen evidence of Judaic influence/presence on the Camino! If anyone has researched this topic, please comment! There are few sources for me to examine, and I would appreciate the help!
Welcome Farish, I would also suggest that you contact @scruffy1 as I am sure he would be able to give you much information on the subject.
 

Farish

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Summer 2016
#10
This is an undergraduate paper, and while yes, I have been searching Google and my university’s library for a month or two so far, it is difficult to find material on this particular topic for some reason.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#11
Really? The OP wants to interview people. Specifically Sepharadic jews who have walked the Camino. I would be tempted to think that his paper/web reseach is already done. Unless you are a Sephardic Jew who has walked the Camino or can refer the OP to one, how are you contributing to the OP?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#12
@Anemone del Camino to whom are you replying? It looks as if you are answering the post before, which was from the original poster.

I pause before hitting the "post" button. Especially when I could be upsetting a new member who may be feeling a bit unsure.

With everyone, old and new members, I also try to remember my Camino lessons, especially that of tolerance and kindness, while on the forum. I often don't succeed, but I try.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#13
@Anemone del Camino to whom are you replying? It looks as if you are answering the post before, which was from the original poster.

I pause before hitting the "post" button. Especially when I could be upsetting a new member who may be feeling a bit unsure.

With everyone, old and new members, I also try to remember my Camino lessons, especially that of tolerance and kindness, while on the forum. I often don't succeed, but I try.
Kanga, if you look at the time of the OP's second post and mine, you would see they are posted a minute apart. In other words, we were typing at about the same time, the OP beating me by a few seconds.

I am responding to those telling the OP what to read instead of answering the question.

So no, no need to pause not to offend the OP, quite the contrary, trying to help the OP get answers asked for and not things he or she may already know. Thank you.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#14
I am a university student and I’m conducting research to write a final paper for my class about Jewish influence on the Camino de Santiago. I would love to interview any Sephardic Jews with stories about the Camino or anecdotes if you have seen evidence of Judaic influence/presence on the Camino! If anyone has researched this topic, please comment! There are few sources for me to examine, and I would appreciate the help!
Hi, Farish,
You actually asked "only" about Camino (de Santiago, presumably) but there are a lot of Caminos de Santiago in Spain, Portugal, France and throughout Europe:
http://www.rayyrosa.com/loscaminos
Which one are you interested in?
Are you interested in personal experiences of nowadays Camino pilgrims that are Jewish?
Are you aksing for info on Juderias (remains) and rest of the judaic influence?
Regarding that influence - architecture (the easiest), literature, gastronomy, music/dances etc?

I think you should be a bit more specific and here you can find a wealth of information from certain forum members. Photos included (as in one of the previous posts).

Good luck with your final paper and us :D

Ultreia!
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Camino(s) past & future
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
#15
Further apology: I am neither Jewish nor Spanish, and as someone pointed out, I can't point you to anyone to interview. But I think you were also asking about where to look for more information. I think there is a rich history throughout Spain, and from my limited travels there, especially in Toledo. I think first person interviews of Jews who have walked the Camino, their reasons, and their impressions, would be interesting. I also think there are current events, such as the recent offer of right of return citizenship, and the pros and cons discussed by those eligible, as well as genetic studies of Sephardic Jews and Spaniards, that are equally interesting. since I am a big fan of history, religion, and architecture, the intertwined aspect of those in Toledo fascinates me. It may be difficult to find historical or current contributions to the Camino but surely they existed--if in no other way, the contributions made to literature, science, and philosophy at that time. And for those who believe in love, there is the (unproved) story of Alfonso VIII and Rachel of Toledo, though like all great love stories, it has a tragic end.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#16
I repost @wayfarer 's suggestion here as it is brilliant and might get lost otherweise! To the OP, to contact a forum member directly just click on the linked name (blue) and send them a PM. Buen Camino, SY

Welcome Farish, I would also suggest that you contact @scruffy1 as I am sure he would be able to give you much information on the subject.
PS @scruffy1 is from Jerusalem and has walked the Camino ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#17
AS usual a great range of opinions, some excellent source suggestions and even a small lesson on posting procedures. When I first read the original OP I was almost going to suggest (tongue in cheek) that after Ferdinand II of Aragon & Isabella I of Castille there were virtually no Jews in Spain. They either converted to Christianity or left the country. However after a re-read of the OP its clear he/she is focusing on "influence" on the Camino which is definitely a really interesting topic. Might end up with a Masters Topic. Buen Camino!!
 

Pingüigrino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Aragones, Vasco del Interior, Baztanes. (Frances Winter, La Plata, Camino de Invierno, Mozarabe, Norte, Primitivo.)
#18
Hi.
Like Saint Mike II said, from the beginining of XVI century there are not recognised Jews at Spain. And before those years the jews were not well seen by christians. They lived at Juderias, like Ghetos neighborhoods, ( when entering in Belorado, you walk in one of these Juderias) being from time to time accused of doing all kind of iniquities. IMHO, Jews had no reasons for interact with pilgrims, quite the oposite, to avoid been accused of abusing them. Those where bad times for jews all along West Europe, ( and many places of East Europe too, i´m afraid) Like Felipe suggest, Castrillo Mota de Judios, has a ambiguous history. The name of this town was Castrillo Matajudios ( Small-castel Killer of Jews , more of less) till the 25th october 2015. ( Yes, last year)
It could be interesting too considering that the open pilgrimage for all kind of persons is a modern "invention", lets say of the late 25-30 years, when this trip witch had been a catholic peregrination the late 400 years from the moment of birth of Protestantism, became a kind of tourist atraction. ( King Henry VIII of England baned the peregrination to Santiago. This ban were lifted during XX century) Luther and Calvino baned the pilgrimages too... I dont know what Jewish Doctors of Law thougth about that, but I think the jews were not encouraged to visit Santiago, and of course they would not be welcomed by the Spanish authorities, nor the Catholic Church nor the common people. When I was young, lets say 50 years ago, many people distrusted jews, and some old people used this word like a insult.
Fortunately those times finished years ago, but all those reasons are what make me think it would be difficult fo find a link between the Camino de Santiago and Jews.
Buen Camino to you , all honest people.

http://www.diariodeburgos.es/notici...di/abarcara/5/siglos/influencia/judia/comarca
 
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Rainerbernd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
On St James ways since 1971
#19
I am a university student and I’m conducting research to write a final paper for my class about Jewish influence on the Camino de Santiago. I would love to interview any Sephardic Jews with stories about the Camino or anecdotes if you have seen evidence of Judaic influence/presence on the Camino! If anyone has researched this topic, please comment! There are few sources for me to examine, and I would appreciate the help!
Olá Farish, for your research you should contact Christoph Kühn at Biblioteca Jacobina in Cologne. This special library has tons of information.
Link http://www.pilgerbibliothek.de/:
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#20
Major DOOH! moment (also called a senior moment) just remembered this well known verse from the poem "La Preciosa" from the ~13th Century, Roncesvalles, and printed on a lot of nowadays credenciales:

“La puerta se abre a todos, enfermos y sanos; no sólo a los católicos sino aun a paganos, a judíos, herejes, ociosos y vanos”

As far as I know that poem referred to the general hospitality in Roncesvalles, not only the pilgrim-specific one.

Also a good contact point might be Jose Luis Barreda at http://bibliotecajacobea.org in Carrion de los Condes (Palencia).

Buen Camino, SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
#21
In Galicia the most important juderías Allariz, Ribadavia, Ourense, Monforte and A Coruña weren´t near the Camino Francés but porbably some families (doctors, shoemakers, tailors) lived near the Camino in places like Portomarín and Sarria to provide services to pilgrims
 

Pingüigrino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Aragones, Vasco del Interior, Baztanes. (Frances Winter, La Plata, Camino de Invierno, Mozarabe, Norte, Primitivo.)
#22
Major DOOH! moment (also called a senior moment) just remembered this well known verse from the poem "La Preciosa" from the ~13th Century, Roncesvalles, and printed on a lot of nowadays credenciales:

“La puerta se abre a todos, enfermos y sanos; no sólo a los católicos sino aun a paganos, a judíos, herejes, ociosos y vanos”

As far as I know that poem referred to the general hospitality in Roncesvalles, not only the pilgrim-specific one.

Also a good contact point might be Jose Luis Barreda at http://bibliotecajacobea.org in Carrion de los Condes (Palencia).

Buen Camino, SY
Yes, it is true. This was what this poem said. And probably it was true, because the hospitality was a very important tradition, but please note that Roncesvalles being a very important place in the Camino de Santiago, was the VERY important place too on the border, on the Pyrenees, and probably there were some kind of hospitality on that place centuries before St. James tomb were found, during Roman empire . That was the reason of the hospitality, because any person crossing the border, probably would die if the hospitality were denied, but at other places existed laws about who can be called a pilgrim and who nor. And those who call themselves pilgrims, but where´nt according those laws, could finishing their lives rowing in a galley, diging for plumb or mercury in a deep mine or on the gallows All along Spain is easy to find trace of our jewish heritage ( probably in my family there was any of those converts jews), many juderias, synagogues, etc. But if you research the history of Spain, you will find jews were a hated people, second class vassals ( No citizens in those years) despite their prosperity (perhaps BECAUSE their prosperity)...
This is the reason IMHO because Farish cant find many resources about the influence of jewish/judaic on the Camino itself. Because probably there was not this influence, like a wrote in my previous post, jews usually lives on their own "ghettos" , the aljamas, what we know actually like Juderias.
But not being a expert historian about this thematic, would like to learn anything new about this.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#23
Hola SY I think this is the correct translation?? (Or at least I hope so).

"The door is open to everyone, sick and healthy; not only Catholics but even pagans, Jews, heretics, idle and vain "

I hope that this is still the creed / philosophy of the Camino today. A true Buen Camino to all.
 

Pingüigrino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Aragones, Vasco del Interior, Baztanes. (Frances Winter, La Plata, Camino de Invierno, Mozarabe, Norte, Primitivo.)
#24
Hola SY I think this is the correct translation?? (Or at least I hope so).

"The door is open to everyone, sick and healthy; not only Catholics but even pagans, Jews, heretics, idle and vain "

I hope that this is still the creed / philosophy of the Camino today. A true Buen Camino to all.
Yes it is. Nowadays every well meaning person is welcome to the Camino.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#25
Hola SY I think this is the correct translation?? (Or at least I hope so).

"The door is open to everyone, sick and healthy; not only Catholics but even pagans, Jews, heretics, idle and vain "

I hope that this is still the creed / philosophy of the Camino today. A true Buen Camino to all.
Very good translation and yes, because it is in the Camino spirit, it is still printed on many credenciales ;-) Buen Camino, SY
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#26
...like a wrote in my previous post, jews usually lives on their own "ghettos" , the aljamas, what we know actually like Juderias.
From my memory walking Frances in 2009 and 2011 there is one of the biggest juderias/aljamas on CF in Estella. Generally the part of the town to the right over the river as you enter.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#28
Hi.
They lived at Juderias, like Ghetos neighborhoods, ( when entering in Belorado, you walk in one of these Juderias)
.
I find those old Jewish neighborhoods fascinating. I had a guidebook which mentioned several of them, but it really would be interesting to to go through some of the Camino towns with a historian, or at least a map with some details of them.
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#32
I have met a number (well, 6 or 7) Jews on the Camino, and the two sephardim were Israeli-- one of them descended from the Valencian community via Salonika, whose grandmother was preserved from the trains heading north to the death camps by the heroic Spanish consul there during the 1940s. Otherwise, they were Ashkenazi from the US and none of them knew much of Spanish Jewish history. The excellent Red de Juderias site was mentioned early on in this thread. The church of San Lorenzo in Sahagun was built (by Muslim masons) quite close to the juderia there which, if memory serves me well, was expelled in the 1430s
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#33
I have met a number (well, 6 or 7) Jews on the Camino, and the two sephardim were Israeli-- one of them descended from the Valencian community via Salonika, whose grandmother was preserved from the trains heading north to the death camps by the heroic Spanish consul there during the 1940s. Otherwise, they were Ashkenazi from the US and none of them knew much of Spanish Jewish history. The excellent Red de Juderias site was mentioned early on in this thread. The church of San Lorenzo in Sahagun was built (by Muslim masons) quite close to the juderia there which, if memory serves me well, was expelled in the 1430s
Generally Ashkenazi are (were) East European Jews and Sefards are (were) West European Jews. Ashkenazis were mostly either executed in nazi camps or transfered to nowadays Israel whereas Sefards still remains (although many of them forcefully embraced Christianism back in the history) in France and Spain. Their culture is just amazing.

Just a bit of it here:
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#34
Sephardim were also sent to the camps whenever the Nazis could get hold of them-- they were scattered about the Mediterranean, and Italian, Adriatic-region, and French Sephardim suffered terribly. Spanish diplomats, most notably in Greece, Bulgaria, and Hungary, exercised their authority under traditional Spanish citizenship laws which accorded citizenship to anyone descended from a Spanish subject and provided them with protection. Sephardim can be found in all sorts of places, with a synagogue and school about 3km walk from me in Ottawa-- Haketia, an Iberian/Moroccan version of Ladino, is still spoken by a few older residents.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#35
Hervas on the Via de la Plata has a well-preserved Juderia, although no Jews (except for one Israeli woman who moved there a few years back) actually live there ...
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#36
This is an undergraduate paper, and while yes, I have been searching Google and my university’s library for a month or two so far, it is difficult to find material on this particular topic for some reason.
Likely because the degree of influence is minor --- the only link I can think of is in the so-called Grand Tour that some wealthy European youths engaged in between the end of the Middle Ages and the 19th centuries. It was structured around pilgrimages to Rome and Jerusalem, by varied means of transport, and the Camino was likely included by some as a variant.

Because of the presence of the Templars, likely not even the banking services traditionally provided by the Jews were in much demand on the Camino.

I concur with the suggestions of many that whatever influence will most likely be found in places along the Camino than in the Camino itself.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#37
Major DOOH! moment (also called a senior moment) just remembered this well known verse from the poem "La Preciosa" from the ~13th Century, Roncesvalles, and printed on a lot of nowadays credenciales:

“La puerta se abre a todos, enfermos y sanos; no sólo a los católicos sino aun a paganos, a judíos, herejes, ociosos y vanos”

As far as I know that poem referred to the general hospitality in Roncesvalles, not only the pilgrim-specific one.
It's a shorter and simplified version of the welcome sign at the pilgrim hostel at Roncesvalles -- BTW "pagan" in the Middle Ages referred usually to Muslims. The word "ociosos" basically means "tramps".

It's a good illustration of the fact that mediaeval European Catholics were nothing like the caricature that is made of them, but they were as friendly, tolerant, welcoming as we are ourselves on our better days.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#38
Actually, all along the Camino Sanabres, you will see Via de la Plata marker stones in both Arabic and in Hebrew, as well.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
#39
Claudia Roden the food writer was the first to point out that Tarta De Santiago was, in essence, a Jewish Passover cake (see' The food of Spain' Claudia Roden page 472 for a cracking recipe!)

Roden also pointed out that in addition to existing Jewish communities in the area Jews from Andalucia who were fleeing the BerberAlmohads attempts to convert them went to Galicia in the 12th and 13th centuries.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#41

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#43
Another marker (see above) on the Via de la Plata ...
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#44
Hervas (sorry for the duplicate photo!)... hervas 1.JPG hervas 1.JPG hervas 2.JPG hervas3.JPG hervas4.JPG hervas5.JPG
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: September - October 2016
Porto > Santiago - April 2018
#46
If no one else suggested it Pilgrimage and the Jews by David M. Gitlitz and Linda Kay Davidson may be a good resource for you. Buen Camino.
 

caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
#47
and isn't the municipal albergue issac santiago in los arcos named after a converted jew? the info is probably from a death/burial register book.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#48
If no one else suggested it Pilgrimage and the Jews by David M. Gitlitz and Linda Kay Davidson may be a good resource
Are you familiar with the contents of this book? Amazon allows a search of the book and when I entered camino or Santiago or Compostela it came up with zero results. Judging by the table of contents, it seems to be a book about Jewish pilgrimages with destinations that are, obviously, to sites outside of Spain?
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#49
The verse that immediately follows the often quoted four lines of the "Preciosa" song/poem about the medieval travellers' inn/hospital Roncesvalles goes something like this:

Here the six works of misericodia are practiced
that God commanded you to undertake,
so that, when the Year of Celestial Glory comes,
you will not be judged guilty, and thus you will not be separated from the faithful.
Today, the four lines about giving food and shelter to all, including non-Christians, are usually presented as proof of a tolerant society of equals of the different faiths in the Middle Ages but that is a romantizing view. Even at the best of times, non-Christians were second class citizens in the Hispanic kingdoms.

PS: I translated this from Spanish with the help of Google. Does anyone know of a French or English version of the whole 168 verses of La Preciosa?
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances: September - October 2016
Porto > Santiago - April 2018
#50
Are you familiar with the contents of this book? Amazon allows a search of the book and when I entered camino or Santiago or Compostela it came up with zero results. Judging by the table of contents, it seems to be a book about Jewish pilgrimages with destinations that are, obviously, to sites outside of Spain?
What you say is true, but David and Linda did meet on the Camino, and fell in love with each other as well as the pilgrimage stories of the Jews. I suggested it (no help to the OP, who I see asked in 2016) for anyone interested in the seeming mysterious answer to the question regarding Jews on pilgrimage in general. They were doing it before there were Christians so it makes sense to understand that story to get the whole picture.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2035 km of the way to Saint James in Galicia done.
#51
I suggested it (no help to the OP, who I see asked in 2016) for anyone interested in the seeming mysterious answer to the question regarding Jews on pilgrimage in general.
I'm sure it's an interesting book.

I have another one of their books, on the Pilgrimage to Santiago, The Complete Cultural Handbook, both in electronic and printed form, and while there is mention of Jewish presence in medieval Spain and along the Camino de Santiago in particular, there are next to no references in the book - perhaps three at best - to traces of this past that can actually be seen along the Camino Francés today. Unless I'm mistaken?
 
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