Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Wine: Your favorite, and where you drank it

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I saw the grape, and it was red...

Last night, I did some serious Camino Frances training, drinking 1.5 bottles of pinot noir. I danced and made merry at St. Josef's Winery, about three miles from my front door. I do consider this part of the training ritual.

My personal favorites for wine include pinot noir, pinot grigio, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, and even light bubbly wines---including champagnes.

My favorite ever bottle was named Fin de Nuit---end of the evening--and I shared it with a lovely person under a California night sky, blazing with bright stars and the promise of a long, healthy life. I was about 25 years old, and very strong with a courageous, optimistic attitude. I'm now about 56, and a bit more cautious. I look back on that night and smile.

So....how about your favorite night out while on Camino Frances? What were you drinking, and was there singing or dancing?
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I saw the grape, and it was red...
So....how about your favorite night out while on Camino Frances? What were you drinking, and was there singing or dancing?
My favourite wine is red and I drank it between St Jean and Santiago. :):).
My favourite night out was in St. Julian, wonderful interesting host, four Norwegian ladies, an English lady, and Italian man who didn't have a word of English but who talked to us all evening and yes there was singing and some dancing, but mostly singing.
I have an agreement with alcohol, I drink it and it makes me smart, witty and a great singer, mind you I have seen some videos and I think its time I had a chat as alcohol is not living up to its part of the contract. :):)
 

Griffin57

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
October 2013 StJPdP to Burgos
September 2014 Burgos to SdC
Setember 2015 StJPdP to Burgos
I'm not very good at drinking, I taste the wine rather than drink it but there was a very good one at Hotel San Abad in Villafranca Motes de Oca I had 2 whole glasses!! Slept wonderfully.

But there was this wonderful liqueur in Portomarin ......... apparently I am extra funny after a couple of glasses of those ....... now what was it called??? :rolleyes::po_O
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Somewhere between Pamplona and Logrono. Had dinner with some local Spaniards I had been walking with. Went to a restaurant and we had the menu of the day and a bottle of red to go with it. It was the best I had on either Camino. Wish I had peeled off that label and kept it to see if I can buy it here in the US.
 

Biff

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues - Tui to Santiago (2014, I think)
French - St Jean to Santiago to Finester (2018)
Curse you!! Why didn't you ask before I went on my Camino?? Now I'll have to do another so I can make wine notes for you ......

Best go tell Mrs Biff ....

;)
Biff

PS. Best wine we had was at the hotel in Arcade. Unfortunately, it didn't have a label. It was red.
 
P

PANO

Guest
The wine not to miss on your camino would of course come from the Rioja region. Rioja is made from a blend of grape varieties, with Tempranillo the dominant grape (Garnacha is typically included in the blend to add some fruitiness. Mazuelo and Graciano may also be included)
The wine is known for its structure and tannins, similar to Cabernet Sauvignon, but it also has a fruity characteristic. This is a wine perfect for a drinker who loves Cabernet but is also looking for the dominant cherry flavor that’s often present in a wine like Pinot Noir.
Spain is very proud of its indigenous Tempranillo grape because they have been making it into wine for over 2,000 years. Unlike other countries who have adopted grapes that were originally indigenous to France of Italy, Tempranillo was born and cultivated in Spain, and there is no region for which they are more proud, and taken more seriously, than Rioja.
Rioja is as age-worthy as the wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy, yet it flies under the radar compared to its more well-known peers. This means that a stellar bottle of age-worthy Rioja can be procured for far less than a similarly rated bottle of Bordeaux or Burgundy. It is the great “deal” wine. In fact, the 2013 “wine of the year” as determined by Wine Spectator was a Rioja that can be found for only $63 a bottle while its peers who were further down on the list fetched in the $100’s.
When choosing to buy a Rioja, the most important thing to know is that the wine separates into four levels of classification, which depends on the amount of time the wine spends in oak, and is similar to the Burgundy Cru classification system. The classification of each Rioja will be labeled clearly on the bottle.

The four classifications are:
  • Rioja: This is the basic form of the wine. It has been aged for only a short amount of time in oak, potentially only a few months, and then the wine is bottled and sold. It is in this wine where the juice will taste the “ripest” because the wine is very young.
  • Crianza: For a wine to be labeled a Crianza, it must spend a minimum of 1 year in oak. Following its removal from oak, the wine must spend at least another few months in the bottle, before being sold. This is the level of Rioja that is most widely available on the American market because it’s incredibly affordable, at prices that are usually around $15 or less.
  • Reserva: This is a Rioja made from the best grapes of the harvest, and is only made during years that were considered to have a good growing season. A Reserva must be aged a minimum of 3 years, with at least one year being in oak, and the rest in the bottle. One can find incredible Reserva wines in the $15-$30 range.
  • Gran Reserva: This is a Rioja that is only allowed to be made in years with exceptional growing seasons from the most exceptional grapes harvested. Gran Reserva’s must be aged in oak for at least 2 years, and then must spend at least 3 more years in the bottle. Gran Reservas bring out an immense amount of passion in those who drink them, and it was a Gran Reserva that received the “wine of the year” honor in 2013.
While Rioja goes well with almost anything, the wine goes best with savory flavors like meats and strong cheeses that stand up to the strength of the wine, a pairing that is similar to its peer Bordeaux.
To open and savor a bottle of Gran Reserva in Logroño is likely to remain a lasting memory of your camino.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
The wine not to miss on your camino would of course come from the Rioja region. Rioja is made from a blend of grape varieties, with Tempranillo the dominant grape (Garnacha is typically included in the blend to add some fruitiness. Mazuelo and Graciano may also be included)
The wine is known for its structure and tannins, similar to Cabernet Sauvignon, but it also has a fruity characteristic. This is a wine perfect for a drinker who loves Cabernet but is also looking for the dominant cherry flavor that’s often present in a wine like Pinot Noir.
Spain is very proud of its indigenous Tempranillo grape because they have been making it into wine for over 2,000 years. Unlike other countries who have adopted grapes that were originally indigenous to France of Italy, Tempranillo was born and cultivated in Spain, and there is no region for which they are more proud, and taken more seriously, than Rioja.
Rioja is as age-worthy as the wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy, yet it flies under the radar compared to its more well-known peers. This means that a stellar bottle of age-worthy Rioja can be procured for far less than a similarly rated bottle of Bordeaux or Burgundy. It is the great “deal” wine. In fact, the 2013 “wine of the year” as determined by Wine Spectator was a Rioja that can be found for only $63 a bottle while its peers who were further down on the list fetched in the $100’s.
When choosing to buy a Rioja, the most important thing to know is that the wine separates into four levels of classification, which depends on the amount of time the wine spends in oak, and is similar to the Burgundy Cru classification system. The classification of each Rioja will be labeled clearly on the bottle.

The four classifications are:
  • Rioja: This is the basic form of the wine. It has been aged for only a short amount of time in oak, potentially only a few months, and then the wine is bottled and sold. It is in this wine where the juice will taste the “ripest” because the wine is very young.
  • Crianza: For a wine to be labeled a Crianza, it must spend a minimum of 1 year in oak. Following its removal from oak, the wine must spend at least another few months in the bottle, before being sold. This is the level of Rioja that is most widely available on the American market because it’s incredibly affordable, at prices that are usually around $15 or less.
  • Reserva: This is a Rioja made from the best grapes of the harvest, and is only made during years that were considered to have a good growing season. A Reserva must be aged a minimum of 3 years, with at least one year being in oak, and the rest in the bottle. One can find incredible Reserva wines in the $15-$30 range.
  • Gran Reserva: This is a Rioja that is only allowed to be made in years with exceptional growing seasons from the most exceptional grapes harvested. Gran Reserva’s must be aged in oak for at least 2 years, and then must spend at least 3 more years in the bottle. Gran Reservas bring out an immense amount of passion in those who drink them, and it was a Gran Reserva that received the “wine of the year” honor in 2013.
While Rioja goes well with almost anything, the wine goes best with savory flavors like meats and strong cheeses that stand up to the strength of the wine, a pairing that is similar to its peer Bordeaux.
To open and savor a bottle of Gran Reserva in Logroño is likely to remain a lasting memory of your camino, make sure that you choose company worthy of the treat, certainly not of the "menu peregrino with free Vino tinto included"-type of person.


This is a very generous investment of your time, and I thank you for sharing your knowledge. Interestingly (to me), I have been drinking Tempranillo wines for a few years, and absolutely loving them. Now I have some wonderful information. Also, when I go to my local wine shop I will most certainly be spending some time reading the Spanish wine labels, and am so glad for this education in wine types and classifications. Muchas gracias!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
The wine not to miss on your camino would of course come from the Rioja region. Rioja is made from a blend of grape varieties, with Tempranillo the dominant grape (Garnacha is typically included in the blend to add some fruitiness. Mazuelo and Graciano may also be included)
The wine is known for its structure and tannins, similar to Cabernet Sauvignon, but it also has a fruity characteristic. This is a wine perfect for a drinker who loves Cabernet but is also looking for the dominant cherry flavor that’s often present in a wine like Pinot Noir.
Spain is very proud of its indigenous Tempranillo grape because they have been making it into wine for over 2,000 years. Unlike other countries who have adopted grapes that were originally indigenous to France of Italy, Tempranillo was born and cultivated in Spain, and there is no region for which they are more proud, and taken more seriously, than Rioja.
Rioja is as age-worthy as the wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy, yet it flies under the radar compared to its more well-known peers. This means that a stellar bottle of age-worthy Rioja can be procured for far less than a similarly rated bottle of Bordeaux or Burgundy. It is the great “deal” wine. In fact, the 2013 “wine of the year” as determined by Wine Spectator was a Rioja that can be found for only $63 a bottle while its peers who were further down on the list fetched in the $100’s.
When choosing to buy a Rioja, the most important thing to know is that the wine separates into four levels of classification, which depends on the amount of time the wine spends in oak, and is similar to the Burgundy Cru classification system. The classification of each Rioja will be labeled clearly on the bottle.

The four classifications are:
  • Rioja: This is the basic form of the wine. It has been aged for only a short amount of time in oak, potentially only a few months, and then the wine is bottled and sold. It is in this wine where the juice will taste the “ripest” because the wine is very young.
  • Crianza: For a wine to be labeled a Crianza, it must spend a minimum of 1 year in oak. Following its removal from oak, the wine must spend at least another few months in the bottle, before being sold. This is the level of Rioja that is most widely available on the American market because it’s incredibly affordable, at prices that are usually around $15 or less.
  • Reserva: This is a Rioja made from the best grapes of the harvest, and is only made during years that were considered to have a good growing season. A Reserva must be aged a minimum of 3 years, with at least one year being in oak, and the rest in the bottle. One can find incredible Reserva wines in the $15-$30 range.
  • Gran Reserva: This is a Rioja that is only allowed to be made in years with exceptional growing seasons from the most exceptional grapes harvested. Gran Reserva’s must be aged in oak for at least 2 years, and then must spend at least 3 more years in the bottle. Gran Reservas bring out an immense amount of passion in those who drink them, and it was a Gran Reserva that received the “wine of the year” honor in 2013.
While Rioja goes well with almost anything, the wine goes best with savory flavors like meats and strong cheeses that stand up to the strength of the wine, a pairing that is similar to its peer Bordeaux.
To open and savor a bottle of Gran Reserva in Logroño is likely to remain a lasting memory of your camino, make sure that you choose company worthy of the treat, certainly not of the "menu peregrino with free Vino tinto included"-type of person.
I started a post about Spanish wines but realized I was over my head to describe everything that is available here.
Pano you have failed to mention some other great regional wines from Spain's Ribera del Duero, Bierzo, Txakolina regions, etc, etc.
I live in Pays Basque and we are very partial to our roses because they are less strong for lunch and afternoon aperitifs.
PS you will find many places serving chilled vino tinto only because it more palatable than 4o degree wine.
 
P

PANO

Guest
I started a post about Spanish wines but realized I was over my head to describe everything that is available here.
Pano you have failed to mention some other great regional wines from Spain's Ribera del Duero, Bierzo, Txakolina regions, etc, etc.
I live in Pays Basque and we are very partial to our roses because they are less strong for lunch and afternoon aperitifs.
PS you will find many places serving chilled vino tinto only because it more palatable than 4o degree wine.
You are right of course, I "failed to mention" other regions simply because I was afraid to abuse this forum. Indeed, Spain is a wonderful wine-country and it would be unfair to leave unmentioned exquisite growth such as...

Albariño
This dry, crisp wine is Spain’s most well known white. Its citrus flavors and great acidity make it fantastic for pairing with food and the perfect wine for summer. When it’s served ice cold on a hot day, there is almost nothing better. If you’re a fan of Pinot Grigio, this is the Spanish white wine for you.

Verdejo
This aromatic white wine has similar citrus notes to its cousin Albariño, with aromas of grass and lemon similar to Sauvignon Blanc, making it the perfect wine to try for those who are fans of the later, specifically Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. Verdejo was once used to make a sherry-like white wine, but since the ’70s, winemakers from the Rueda region of the country, which is the region you should look for, have been creating fantastically crisp whites from the grape.

Txakolina
Pronounced chock-oh-LEE-nah, this is a classic example of a wine that is all the rage in the sommelier-influenced wine world, yet the majority of wine drinkers have never heard of it. All the while, the former continues to assume everyone knows what the wine is, and the latter never figures it out. Confusion ensues. But everyone really should know about Txakolina, because it’s delicious. This wine is incredibly refreshing, with aromas of sea air, and a wonderful acidity; it’s also often slightly fizzy, which makes it even more fun to sip. It’s the perfect wine for drinking while lounging at an outdoor cafe or the beach.

Priorat
Made primarily from the red wine grape Grenache, or as the Spanish call it Garnacha, this is a big, dense wine that can approach 15.5 percent in alcohol. In recent years Priorat has become quite the rage for its collecting potential. It’s particularly favorable among wine collectors who enjoy the French wine Châteauneuf-du-Pape, a wine that is also made with Grenache as its base, yet want a wine that is not only a cheaper alternative to the wallet busting Châteauneuf but also has more succulent fruit flavors. It’s this characteristic that causes many people to refer to Priorat as the ultimate sensual wine.

Ribera del Duero
While Rioja has been famous for centuries among wine drinkers, Ribera Del Duero only began to become well known in the 1980s. What’s interesting about this is that the regions are relatively close to one another, with Rioja just Northeast of Ribera del Duero, and the wines are made largely from the same grape, Tempranillo, though in Ribera Del Duero Tempranillo is called Tinto Fino. Some wine critics refer to Ribera Del Duero as “the Malbec of Spain,” because these wines are big, rich and ripe, with bold fruit flavors and tannins that dry out your mouth, perfect for a big, juicy steak dinner. Over the past few years, Ribera del Duero has also begun to challenge its neighbor to the north, Rioja, as Spain’s popular red, with many equating its popularity to how easy it can be to appreciate. If you enjoy California Cabernet or Argentinian Malbec, this wine will be just as easy for you to love.

To enjoy a chilled red in summer is a most sensual experience, indeed; :cool: of course it would be a young, fruity wine.

And one last tip to peregrinos not so familiar with wine: The camino is a fantastic opportunity to learn and to distinguish by spending a few coins for an upgrade from bottom shelf hooch.

(PS: I hasten to mention that the source of the excerpts used in the above is the most eminent wine-knowledge site www.vinepair.com)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
You are right of course, I "failed to mention" other regions simply because I was afraid to abuse this forum. Indeed, Spain is a wonderful wine-country and it would be unfair to leave unmentioned exquisite growth such as...

Albariño
This dry, crisp wine is Spain’s most well known white. Its citrus flavors and great acidity make it fantastic for pairing with food and the perfect wine for summer. When it’s served ice cold on a hot day, there is almost nothing better. If you’re a fan of Pinot Grigio, this is the Spanish white wine for you.

Verdejo
This aromatic white wine has similar citrus notes to its cousin Albariño, with aromas of grass and lemon similar to Sauvignon Blanc, making it the perfect wine to try for those who are fans of the later, specifically Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. Verdejo was once used to make a sherry-like white wine, but since the ’70s, winemakers from the Rueda region of the country, which is the region you should look for, have been creating fantastically crisp whites from the grape.

Txakolina
Pronounced chock-oh-LEE-nah, this is a classic example of a wine that is all the rage in the sommelier-influenced wine world, yet the majority of wine drinkers have never heard of it. All the while, the former continues to assume everyone knows what the wine is, and the latter never figures it out. Confusion ensues. But everyone really should know about Txakolina, because it’s delicious. This wine is incredibly refreshing, with aromas of sea air, and a wonderful acidity; it’s also often slightly fizzy, which makes it even more fun to sip. It’s the perfect wine for drinking while lounging at an outdoor cafe or the beach.

Priorat
Made primarily from the red wine grape Grenache, or as the Spanish call it Garnacha, this is a big, dense wine that can approach 15.5 percent in alcohol. In recent years Priorat has become quite the rage for its collecting potential. It’s particularly favorable among wine collectors who enjoy the French wine Châteauneuf-du-Pape, a wine that is also made with Grenache as its base, yet want a wine that is not only a cheaper alternative to the wallet busting Châteauneuf but also has more succulent fruit flavors. It’s this characteristic that causes many people to refer to Priorat as the ultimate sensual wine.

Ribera del Duero
While Rioja has been famous for centuries among wine drinkers, Ribera Del Duero only began to become well known in the 1980s. What’s interesting about this is that the regions are relatively close to one another, with Rioja just Northeast of Ribera del Duero, and the wines are made largely from the same grape, Tempranillo, though in Ribera Del Duero Tempranillo is called Tinto Fino. Some wine critics refer to Ribera Del Duero as “the Malbec of Spain,” because these wines are big, rich and ripe, with bold fruit flavors and tannins that dry out your mouth, perfect for a big, juicy steak dinner. Over the past few years, Ribera del Duero has also begun to challenge its neighbor to the north, Rioja, as Spain’s popular red, with many equating its popularity to how easy it can be to appreciate. If you enjoy California Cabernet or Argentinian Malbec, this wine will be just as easy for you to love.

To enjoy a chilled red in summer is a most sensual experience, indeed; :cool: of course it would be a young, fruity wine.

And one last tip to peregrinos not so familiar with wine: The camino is a fantastic opportunity to learn and to distinguish by spending a few coins for an upgrade from bottom shelf hooch.

(PS: I hasten to mention that the source of the excepts used in the above is the most eminent wine-knowledge site www.vinepair.com)


Thanks once again for the wealth of information.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
A bloke at our last pilgrim's meeting was on about an admirable Spanish wine grape named Tannat, or something similar.
Anybody have any ideas as to what it could be?
Regds
Gerard
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
Last autumn I was walking the Camino del Sureste and arrived in Rueda at about 11am. I don't normally drink before lunch, but thought it would be fun to be able to boast that I'd drunk Rueda in Rueda, so asked for a copita in a bar on the main drag. The nice barmaid then poured out nearly half a bottle of verdejo for me. It was a deliciously crisp and refreshing drink, but I think the next few km on towards Tordesillas took a little longer than the previous ones...
 

pjacobi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
I've had no problem finding Rioja wine in the US at my local New Hampshire state liquor store. My store has several feet of shelf space devoted to Rioja wine starting at about $7 and up. I like Campo Viejo and El Coto.

Has anyone else found Rioja wine in the US?
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
To open and savor a bottle of Gran Reserva in Logroño is likely to remain a lasting memory of your camino,
I have made a note in my guidebook. Where would you recommend I go, or specifically what to order,once I have found a like minded pilgrim?
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
As above and likewise approaching heresy I must agree with the above, most of the best wines along the Camino are to be found in Galicia and they are white! Albariño and Godello far outclass most of the reds you will meet in cafe/bars and restaurants-be ready to pay for the joy though the Godello is substantially cheaper. Drink all the Rioja you want in Logroño avoid it elsewhere-often approaching rotgut it is usually not a good selection by the glass. The Navarra reds are often more interesting. Ribeira Sacra is another favorite as well as Bierzo. Santiago has several wonderful wineshops, go by the incredible open market, pick your seafood and shellfish, be ready to pay for the Albariño and return to prepare at your lodgings. Savings of 50% and more over restaurant prices!
 
P

PANO

Guest
A bloke at our last pilgrim's meeting was on about an admirable Spanish wine grape named Tannat, or something similar.
Anybody have any ideas as to what it could be?
Regds
Gerard
Tannat is a grape with incredibly thick skins from southwest France that is known for doing very well in warm and humid climates. As the name suggests, Tannat is known for having an incredibly high amount of tannins and when blended with the Syrah it gives the wine a really nice structure, making it a perfect wine for grilled lamb or BBQ.
 
P

PANO

Guest
I have made a note in my guidebook. Where would you recommend I go, or specifically what to order,once I have found a like minded pilgrim?
The camino is about discovery and Logroño is so abundant of good surprises when it comes to food and wine. Be adventurous and leave it to chance (just avoid those obvious tourist spots) or ask around (Spanish clerics btw are often a very good source of information;)) A really recommendable place that comes to mind is located a bit further along the way in Santo Domingo de la Calzada, the restaurant "La Cancela"...ask the owner to bring you his favored Rioja.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
Last autumn I was walking the Camino del Sureste and arrived in Rueda at about 11am. I don't normally drink before lunch, but thought it would be fun to be able to boast that I'd drunk Rueda in Rueda, so asked for a copita in a bar on the main drag. The nice barmaid then poured out nearly half a bottle of verdejo for me. It was a deliciously crisp and refreshing drink, but I think the next few km on towards Tordesillas took a little longer than the previous ones...
It wasn't the length of the path but the width of it that took longer. :):)
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
La Moncloa de San Larzaro in Cacabelos has a wonderful restaurant featuring wood fired grilled meats with a private label red from Bierzo and the Hotel Iacobus in Castrojeriz puts on a nice table with a chilled private label red from a bodega in Logrono.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I saw the grape, and it was red...

Last night, I did some serious Camino Frances training, drinking 1.5 bottles of pinot noir. I danced and made merry at St. Josef's Winery, about three miles from my front door. I do consider this part of the training ritual.

My personal favorites for wine include pinot noir, pinot grigio, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, and even light bubbly wines---including champagnes.

My favorite ever bottle was named Fin de Nuit---end of the evening--and I shared it with a lovely person under a California night sky, blazing with bright stars and the promise of a long, healthy life. I was about 25 years old, and very strong with a courageous, optimistic attitude. I'm now about 56, and a bit more cautious. I look back on that night and smile.

So....how about your favorite night out while on Camino Frances? What were you drinking, and was there singing or dancing?
One of my favorite labels is a rose from the nearby Marmandais region, Crepuscule d'Ete winery has a wonderful merlot rose blend that goes well with cheese and sausage on a hot afternoon. Just like Fin de Nuit, this label says it all, in the twilight of the summer.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
If you have menu del dia and drink the bottles of red that come with them most have a passing resemblance to paint stripper but I did have a red in Naverrette( Rioja) just away from the Camino and the albergue, it was quite good. Go away from pilgrim places if you can, you might encounter better wines.
Try a evening out in Ponferrada, if you have a glass of local wine you can have tapas with it gratis, they do this in a lot of places but this town is among the better ones I have gone on a tapas crawl, more pricey than buying a bottle but you can try a good selection and save on buying a meal.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
After we'd finished walking the Norte we hired a car and toured Galicia. We visited a few bodegas in the Rios Baixias areas and had some memorable Albariños. Almost good enough for my husband to forgive me for making him walk 840 km. And me to forget we were sleeping in a tent.
 

Anita Kulp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hope to walk in 2016.
Given the lively responses on this thread, I have taken initiative to start a new one “Establishing a CGG (Camino Gourmet Guide)“. Lets discuss the idea! Looking forward to your contributions and suggestions.
I am contemplating my first Camino and would love to know in advance. Lively suggestions.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
What a fascinating idea!

I know that Robin, who is currently in Santiago de Compostela, is a very good cook.

Thanks so much for the great comments :)
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
One last word, I have participated in countless communl pilgrim dinners sadly accompanied by wine which cost 2.5 Euro from some hot airless tienda around the corner. If you can't spend more for your wine then drink Estrella, the beer is always good!
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
Sadly..
One glass is my usual limit for a Sauvignon Blanc.
Strait to ma heed you see....

I dreamt once
i was in rolling countryside near sunset in the shadow of a great stone house
A low wall before me and i was resting of my feet enjoying the air of some far and away.

Some woman walks up
My soul knows her....
Intmately.

We sit and drink a white in tall crystal glass made of celestial light. The sunlight liquid amber through the looking glass of time and place...
May be it will be on the Camino?

It was a beautiful dream.

The reality is i bought a nice bottle of white,lit some candles in thoughtfull holders and awaited my lady fair to come...
The candles burned to puddles,
My lady fair was a janus sort...
the wine i discarded..a tainted vintage forever more.

But i will await in some far, Fair Spainish land to share a glass with the most woundrous of people
The Pelegrino
Slainte!
May the road go on forever!
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Like cheese and cured meat, wine in Spain is very very regional. Every camino path passes through one or more wine regions, so it pays to keep your horizons open -- don't limit yourself to any one region or grape or type! Ask for a copa of the best local wine at every place you stop, and you will get a delicious education in all the wide wonders available on this relatively short Way.

Riojas are justifiably famous, but I prefer Ribera del Duero when I am looking for something special. For a really big, delicious Spanish red wine that is not overwhelmingly oak-flavored, you cannot beat red wine from Toro, a little D.O. on the Rio Duero near Zamora. Look for "Prima," a brand widely available; a Crianza sells for about 11 Euro. Let it breathe a few minutes... that first sip will knock your socks off, and the further in you go, the more round and mellow and plummy it gets. Have a bottle with a racion of queso de oveja curado and a tart apple. YUM.

If you love wine, I recommend walking the Camino Invierno. It starts in Ponferrada, home to some of Bierzo's finest... even the unlabeled new "co-op" wine is exceptional. (Pitticum, from Villafranca, is superb; the co-op in Cacabelos has some exceptional wine for sale at exceptional prices, pumped into the bottles or cans you provide using what looks like a petrol pump!)

Within a day you cross into the Valdeorras region, an up-and-coming young D.O. with fruity, tannic wine made with both Mencia and Godello grapes. There's a Vinoteca on the main street of A Rua where you can taste all kinds of local wine, with a voluble and knowledgeable barman, too. The camino here passes along the Sil river valley, with slate mines and vines all along the banks. Sometimes you will find family-owned bodegas open for tastings - ask the barmen or police which ones.

Continue into Ribera Sacra and Ribero regions... I could blather on but I won't.
 

rossmckay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016
Like cheese and cured meat, wine in Spain is very very regional. Every camino path passes through one or more wine regions, so it pays to keep your horizons open -- don't limit yourself to any one region or grape or type! Ask for a copa of the best local wine at every place you stop, and you will get a delicious education in all the wide wonders available on this relatively short Way.

Riojas are justifiably famous, but I prefer Ribera del Duero when I am looking for something special. For a really big, delicious Spanish red wine that is not overwhelmingly oak-flavored, you cannot beat red wine from Toro, a little D.O. on the Rio Duero near Zamora. Look for "Prima," a brand widely available; a Crianza sells for about 11 Euro. Let it breathe a few minutes... that first sip will knock your socks off, and the further in you go, the more round and mellow and plummy it gets. Have a bottle with a racion of queso de oveja curado and a tart apple. YUM.

If you love wine, I recommend walking the Camino Invierno. It starts in Ponferrada, home to some of Bierzo's finest... even the unlabeled new "co-op" wine is exceptional. (Pitticum, from Villafranca, is superb; the co-op in Cacabelos has some exceptional wine for sale at exceptional prices, pumped into the bottles or cans you provide using what looks like a petrol pump!)

Within a day you cross into the Valdeorras region, an up-and-coming young D.O. with fruity, tannic wine made with both Mencia and Godello grapes. There's a Vinoteca on the main street of A Rua where you can taste all kinds of local wine, with a voluble and knowledgeable barman, too. The camino here passes along the Sil river valley, with slate mines and vines all along the banks. Sometimes you will find family-owned bodegas open for tastings - ask the barmen or police which ones.

Continue into Ribera Sacra and Ribero regions... I could blather on but I won't.

No, please, blather away. This is great information for a wine nerd.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks to being able to walk a couple of times with Rebekah, my wine sensors are gradually developing but are still seriously inferior. BUT, I will say that one of the best pieces of advice she gave me was that when the wine that comes with the menu del dia is terrible (as it frequently is), ask for an upgrade. For a few euros more, you are likely to have a much nicer experience.

The other little suggestion I'd make is that if you want to bring home a nice bottle of local wine that's not readily available in the US (I see no point in buying stuff in the duty free that you can get for a few dollars more at your local liquor store), try the vinoteca Vide Vide. It's in central Santiago, a block off the Praza Galiza on the road that circles the old town. At this point, the road is called Fuente de San Antonio (or its equivalent in gallego). I always try to bring home a good bottle for a dear friend who really appreciates the finer wines in life. The staff in this little store took my description of what I know he likes and recommended a couple of bottles, all in the 20-30 euro range, and all from little local wineries. They wrapped it up in bubble wrap and it traveled fine to the US in my checked backpack, wrapped up in my altus poncho, fleece, and dirty socks. Buen camino, Laurie
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Like cheese and cured meat, wine in Spain is very very regional. Every camino path passes through one or more wine regions, so it pays to keep your horizons open -- don't limit yourself to any one region or grape or type! Ask for a copa of the best local wine at every place you stop, and you will get a delicious education in all the wide wonders available on this relatively short Way.

Riojas are justifiably famous, but I prefer Ribera del Duero when I am looking for something special. For a really big, delicious Spanish red wine that is not overwhelmingly oak-flavored, you cannot beat red wine from Toro, a little D.O. on the Rio Duero near Zamora. Look for "Prima," a brand widely available; a Crianza sells for about 11 Euro. Let it breathe a few minutes... that first sip will knock your socks off, and the further in you go, the more round and mellow and plummy it gets. Have a bottle with a racion of queso de oveja curado and a tart apple. YUM.

If you love wine, I recommend walking the Camino Invierno. It starts in Ponferrada, home to some of Bierzo's finest... even the unlabeled new "co-op" wine is exceptional. (Pitticum, from Villafranca, is superb; the co-op in Cacabelos has some exceptional wine for sale at exceptional prices, pumped into the bottles or cans you provide using what looks like a petrol pump!)

Within a day you cross into the Valdeorras region, an up-and-coming young D.O. with fruity, tannic wine made with both Mencia and Godello grapes. There's a Vinoteca on the main street of A Rua where you can taste all kinds of local wine, with a voluble and knowledgeable barman, too. The camino here passes along the Sil river valley, with slate mines and vines all along the banks. Sometimes you will find family-owned bodegas open for tastings - ask the barmen or police which ones.

Continue into Ribera Sacra and Ribero regions... I could blather on but I won't.
Indeed, don't stop.

I was a few paragraphs in when I suddenly smiled...Rebekah, you are such a good writer.
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés(2008,09 14)
Del Norte (2011)
Portuguese(2015,2017)
Inglés 2015
Fisterre (2015 17)
La Moncloa de San Larzaro in Cacabelos has a wonderful restaurant featuring wood fired grilled meats with a private label red from Bierzo and the Hotel Iacobus in Castrojeriz puts on a nice table with a chilled private label red from a bodega in Logrono.
Hey Don I agree on both counts. Excellent restaurants and wines well worth a goodly taste. I would add to your list a restaurant in Molinaseca called Ramon's for the very same reasons. They also serve an orange coloured wine the name of which was erased from my memory after my second pacharan!
 

rossmckay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016
I usually bring home a dozen in a carton, wrapped in socks and underwear, a couple of rolls of packing tape keeping it together. Never have a breakage yet, touch wood.

I'll look up that shop, thanks. Oh, and bless the Spanish wine industry. Bugger all in that shop over 30E
 
Last edited:

rossmckay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016
I drink the 59 cent wine in the cartons. :p

:) I'm not going to try it but I'd never knock it. As I said, context is everything. I fondly remember drinking a cask out of tin cups in the dark while a storm raged around us trying to blow our tent away. That wine tasted lovely. I don't intend to spoil the memory by buying another though. :D
 

waveprof

Enthusiast
Camino(s) past & future
May-June 2013, Camino Frances
I've had no problem finding Rioja wine in the US at my local New Hampshire state liquor store. My store has several feet of shelf space devoted to Rioja wine starting at about $7 and up. I like Campo Viejo and El Coto.

Has anyone else found Rioja wine in the US?
Yes. Usually pretty easy. Catalan whites usually aren't too difficult either. And Basque txakoli if you have a good store
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2015
Below is a pic of all of the wine labels we enjoyed on our Camino. There were several memorable bottles.

On the way to Belorado, I stopped for lunch in Alto - this gem of a restaurant set away from the Camino a couple of hundred meters by the highway. I enjoyed a beautiful salad with a fantastic bottle of 2011 Artadi Tempranillo - it was incredible.

On my birthday, we were in Sahagún where we enjoyed a wonderful birthday feast with a 2009 Muga and fresh made flan.

In Ponferrada, we lunched on brick-oven pizza with a great bottle of Losada.

Departing from Madrid, we suppered in the wine cellar at Botin - the world's oldest restaurant! The LOA and the Irius were very good.
Camino Wine 4.jpg
 

Kathy Beno

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2015
I saw the grape, and it was red...

Last night, I did some serious Camino Frances training, drinking 1.5 bottles of pinot noir. I danced and made merry at St. Josef's Winery, about three miles from my front door. I do consider this part of the training ritual.

My personal favorites for wine include pinot noir, pinot grigio, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, and even light bubbly wines---including champagnes.

My favorite ever bottle was named Fin de Nuit---end of the evening--and I shared it with a lovely person under a California night sky, blazing with bright stars and the promise of a long, healthy life. I was about 25 years old, and very strong with a courageous, optimistic attitude. I'm now about 56, and a bit more cautious. I look back on that night and smile.

So....how about your favorite night out while on Camino Frances? What were you drinking, and was there singing or dancing?

I'll be starting the Camino on Sept. 24 and I do love red wine! I really hope our paths cross and we can toast the Camino with a glass of Rioja. Buen Camino and cheers!
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I'll be starting the Camino on Sept. 24 and I do love red wine! I really hope our paths cross and we can toast the Camino with a glass of Rioja. Buen Camino and cheers!

Wonderful!!
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Below is a pic of all of the wine labels we enjoyed on our Camino. There were several memorable bottles.

On the way to Belorado, I stopped for lunch in Alto - this gem of a restaurant set away from the Camino a couple of hundred meters by the highway. I enjoyed a beautiful salad with a fantastic bottle of 2011 Artadi Tempranillo - it was incredible.

On my birthday, we were in Sahagún where we enjoyed a wonderful birthday feast with a 2009 Muga and fresh made flan.

In Ponferrada, we lunched on brick-oven pizza with a great bottle of Losada.

Departing from Madrid, we suppered in the wine cellar at Botin - the world's oldest restaurant! The LOA and the Irius were very good.
View attachment 19981

I like, no LOVE, this collage!!
 

jayree

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC 2012
Irun to Fisterra 2013
Shikoku 2015
CP 2016
My son is a winemaker and at dinners he is often asked, "What is your favorite wine?"
He usually answers, "The one I'm drinking with you right now."

On the CF my favorite wine was a Palacios "Petalos del Bierzo." In Villafranca del Bierzo, I saw it in the local store and bought two bottles which I shared with a few Camino friends at a paella dinner at Ave Finex cooked by Jesús Jato. After dinner he hosted a memorable Queimada ceremony.
 

Maryimelda

Active Member
Vino tinto ... everywhere and often ;)
I agree. I especially liked the tapas/pinchos that were so often served with a glass of wine. The photo below is a glass of red with accompanying free nibblies that I was served in SDC. I paid the princely sum of 80 eurocents for the lot!!! It was the café right next door to the Pilgrim House (Rua Bella) and might I add the food on the main menu was fabulous and well priced as well.
 

Attachments

  • Europe2015 617.JPG
    Europe2015 617.JPG
    1.3 MB · Views: 33

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
For a really big, delicious Spanish red wine that is not overwhelmingly oak-flavored, you cannot beat red wine from Toro, a little D.O. on the Rio Duero near Zamora.

I'd had Toro a couple of times in England and didn't like it - too strong, too heavy. So I wasn't expecting much when I showed up in Toro one freezing cold day a couple of Decembers ago and had some with my lunch. And Rebekah is quite right, it was unbeatable: smooth, sensuous, and warming - a perfect reward for that killer climb up the last couple of km from the riverside to the lovely town centre

I suspect the canny people of Toro send their less good wines overseas and keep the best to themselves.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2015
In Ponferadda, we stopped for lunch in the town square and enjoyed fantastic fresh-made pizza. The waiter demonstrated a neat wine trick by affixing the cork to the bottle. Pizza and Wine were delicious.
 

waveprof

Enthusiast
Camino(s) past & future
May-June 2013, Camino Frances
While I'm more of a wino than beer drinker, don't let the wink keep you from trying the very very good Spanish beer---3rd only to Czech and Belgian IMO. Galician Estella is especially great, but so is the Barcelona beer, and most Spanish beers are at least quite good.
 

fiona99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Finnisterre and Muxia April/June 2015.
Camino Portuguese. Porto - ?? 2017.
Azofra....not sure if that is right spelling....village shop.....I think the owner of shop had something to do with making the wine.....he didn't speak English and I no Spanish....cost two euros...I was going to buy more expensive wine but he was quite insistent that I should buy his wine
....so lovely we went back for two more bottles.....oooops...:rolleyes::oops:
 

jefferyonthecamino

http://www.barrerabooks.com/ - Guidebooks
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (1994) & (2013 - 2019)
Portugués (2015 - 2019)
de Madrid (2019)
Argentino/Inglés (2020)
I saw the grape, and it was red...

Last night, I did some serious Camino Frances training, drinking 1.5 bottles of pinot noir. I danced and made merry at St. Josef's Winery, about three miles from my front door. I do consider this part of the training ritual.

My personal favorites for wine include pinot noir, pinot grigio, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, and even light bubbly wines---including champagnes.

My favorite ever bottle was named Fin de Nuit---end of the evening--and I shared it with a lovely person under a California night sky, blazing with bright stars and the promise of a long, healthy life. I was about 25 years old, and very strong with a courageous, optimistic attitude. I'm now about 56, and a bit more cautious. I look back on that night and smile.

So....how about your favorite night out while on Camino Frances? What were you drinking, and was there singing or dancing?

my favorite night was a day, 20 odd years ago, when we dumped all our water and filled our flasks at the wine fountain at Irache in August, and then continued walking, it was not a pretty scene, memorable, but not pretty. So I guess that makes D.O. Navarra my favourite on the Camino.

on that note, you cannot go wrong with a Ramón Bilbao (Rioja), now that I can afford it :)
 

Johnny English

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September (2012)
September (2015)
I wanted to try out the famous Pulpo, (octopus), in Galicia. I was told it was almost 'against the law' to drink red wine with it, so I tried some Albarino and thought I'd died and gone to heaven. So that's a recommendation - pulpo de gallega in Santiago and the Albarino - a good reward for the journey's end - that and your best girl by your side of course.
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015 (SJPDP-Finisterre), planning Norte
What: Vino tinto
Where: Camino
Honestly, the best wine was in dark bottles without labels, cost next to nothing (as low as 0,93 EUR per 0,75 l bottle) and you could find them in every shop, big or small. Someone explained that those were the overproduction of big brands therefore sold quietly locally. Certainly, my curiosity wasn't satisfied as to the names, but my taste buds were celebrating. Actually (maybe I was plain lucky, maybe too tired to notice) but the wine with menu de peregrino was also ok. Never tasted like paint thinner but true - I have never indulged on that reference liquid. As long as it didn't taste like Bordeaux, I was fine. Thats one wine I passionately hate.
Bought a lot lot and consumed it all. Singing - YES! Turns out there are a million popular songs that have lyrics in every European language. Or who cares about lyrics.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
I wanted to try out the famous Pulpo, (octopus), in Galicia. I was told it was almost 'against the law' to drink red wine with it, so I tried some Albarino and thought I'd died and gone to heaven. So that's a recommendation - pulpo de gallega in Santiago and the Albarino - a good reward for the journey's end - that and your best girl by your side of course.

Well described!

In my opinion every acid wine combine well with pulpo. In Galician fairs they serve jars of unknown wines and the result is excellent (for me).
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I'm going to be writing extensive journal notes based on all of your comments. A few things I've discovered through this thread:
1. Tempranillo, which I've purchased locally, is from Spain, originally. I really love this wine, so I'm delighted to know more about this.
2. You all seem to love wine, and I'm starting to understand how important wine, bread and food in general is to the Camino. Bread is the staff of life; a loaf of bread, a glass of wine and thou; man can not live on bread alone, but must have wine with it!
3. Regions and the grapes they sustain will differ, and that will be part of the beauty of moving across Spain.
4. Unlabelled wines may be very special, and also, one must rarely refuse a taste.
5. Estella (Estrella?) is the Spanish national beer. Have I got that right?


Have I missed any grand point? Thanks, and thanks, and thanks again!
 

MichaelRpdx

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sep-Oct 2016
5. Estella (Estrella?) is the Spanish national beer. Have I got that right?
There's actually two Estrella beers. Estrella Damm, from a brewery in Barcelona that is pervasive and available in many countries. There is also a lesser known Estrella Galacia which you'll probably also find on the Camino since it's from A Coruña.

Now I'm wondering which beer the forum posters are referring to. The local Estrella Galacia or the better known Estrella Damm.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
There's actually two Estrella beers. Estrella Damm, from a brewery in Barcelona that is pervasive and available in many countries. There is also a lesser known Estrella Galacia which you'll probably also find on the Camino since it's from A Coruña.

Now I'm wondering which beer the forum posters are referring to. The local Estrella Galacia or the better known Estrella Damm.

I figured it was supposed to be "star"--estrella. Somewhere on line, I had seen it spelled sans the "r". I am not a big beer drinker, but I can knock a few Ruby ales back at the local McMenamin's! Some employees in Eugene used to like watching me drink Terminator, as I get silly fast on a stout.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Tonight I'm bringing my friend the bottle of Ribeira Sacra wine I bought in Santiago in the great little wine shop. I thought I'd find some information on the wine, called Algueira Brancellao, to bring along with the bottle. And in the process of looking, I found a NYT article on Ribeira Sacra wines, which is pretty interesting: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/16/dining/tasting-wines-from-ribeira-sacra.html?_r=0
 
P

PANO

Guest
I'm going to be writing extensive journal notes based on all of your comments. A few things I've discovered through this thread:
1. Tempranillo, which I've purchased locally, is from Spain, originally. I really love this wine, so I'm delighted to know more about this.
2. You all seem to love wine, and I'm starting to understand how important wine, bread and food in general is to the Camino. Bread is the staff of life; a loaf of bread, a glass of wine and thou; man can not live on bread alone, but must have wine with it!
3. Regions and the grapes they sustain will differ, and that will be part of the beauty of moving across Spain.
4. Unlabelled wines may be very special, and also, one must rarely refuse a taste.
5. Estella (Estrella?) is the Spanish national beer. Have I got that right?
Have I missed any grand point? Thanks, and thanks, and thanks again!
Great summary CaminoDebrita.
1. Correct! Browse for "Tempranillo" and you'll get a wealth of information
2. Again: nicely said. Anyone on the camino drinking Coke is a barbarian! Quench your thirst with water in the day and a cool beer after arrival; Wine? Its the liquid culture of the region you're walking through, drink it (moderately) and it gives you wisdom...for that evening. Nothing gives you more life-quality than experiencing the contrasts of hardship with the opulence of good food and wine. Better than an orgasm...though Mary, a sprightly grandmother and artist from Oregon walking along on my camino would strongly protest every time I made this claim.
3. You got wisdom already!
4. Taste, taste, taste and soon enough you know what's good!
5. Estrella, nothing better to remove the dust on your tongue after a long day and to prepare your taste-buds for the good stuff.
You did not miss anything...cheers!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Great summary CaminoDebrita.
1. Correct! Browse for "Tempranillo" and you'll get a wealth of information
2. Again: nicely said. Anyone on the camino drinking Coke is a barbarian! Quench your thirst with water in the day and a cool beer after arrival; Wine? Its the liquid culture of the region you're walking through, drink it (moderately) and it gives you wisdom...for that evening. Nothing gives you more life-quality than experiencing the contrasts of hardship with the opulence of good food and wine. Better than an orgasm...though Mary, a sprightly 65 year-old artist from Oregon walking along on my camino would strongly protest every time I made this claim.
3. You got wisdom already!
4. Taste, taste, taste and soon enough you know what's good!
5. Estrella, nothing better to remove the dust on your tongue after a long day and to prepare your taste-buds for the good stuff.
You did not miss anything...cheers!

#2....Good Mary, the sprightly artist, where are you? Speak now, or forever hold your....peace?
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
@PANO , I just returned from a summer BBQ---and prepared well for it by taking two bottles of Spanish wine. One, a Tempranillo, and I drank the whole thing alone! I did offer to share, of course, but many bottles of wine were being consumed, and it just so happened that the consumption of that bottle was destined to be a solo venture. I loved it! Full, delicious, smooth...as have been previous Tempranillos, but I also notice that the heady feeling is completely absent. No mild headache, no feeling of drunkenness whatsoever. Just a nice, mellow feel.

The food was wonderful too, and very cosmopolitan: bbq chicken, bbz ribs, tandoori chicken, bratwurst, and salads of all sorts. I took a Greek cucumber salad, with my own homegrown cucumbers and cherry tomatoes, dressed in (of course) Greek yoghurt with lemon, fresh mint, a fresh clove of garlic, and plenty of sea salt. I also added a tablespoon of curry. That salad was huge, and was mostly eaten up! Delicious with the tandoori chicken!
 
P

PANO

Guest
@PANO , I just returned from a summer BBQ---and prepared well for it by taking two bottles of Spanish wine. One, a Tempranillo, and I drank the whole thing alone! I did offer to share, of course, but many bottles of wine were being consumed, and it just so happened that the consumption of that bottle was destined to be a solo venture. I loved it! Full, delicious, smooth...as have been previous Tempranillos, but I also notice that the heady feeling is completely absent. No mild headache, no feeling of drunkenness whatsoever. Just a nice, mellow feel.

The food was wonderful too, and very cosmopolitan: bbq chicken, bbz ribs, tandoori chicken, bratwurst, and salads of all sorts. I took a Greek cucumber salad, with my own homegrown cucumbers and cherry tomatoes, dressed in (of course) Greek yoghurt with lemon, fresh mint, a fresh clove of garlic, and plenty of sea salt. I also added a tablespoon of curry. That salad was huge, and was mostly eaten up! Delicious with the tandoori chicken!
@CaminoDebrita, as said in my previous post: You did not miss-out anything! :p
 

scott almburg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
Well, the best bottle of wine I drank was on the very first day. After struggling with too much weight in my backpack ( about 14 kg ) , the bottle of red wine I drank at the Orisson albergue tasted mighty good.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Coke with wine is called Kalimotxo. Great drink in the land of the Basque. :)

Ondo Ibili !
From one Basque expat to another.
I spent many a night in West Africa mixing dusty, aged (as in out of date) boxes of Don Simon with chilled Coca-Cola. I hate to admit it is quite refreshing on a 40+c day even though it is quite down market. Aski.
I challenge the wine aficionados find a fine bottle of wine in Cote d'Ivoire or Togo.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
As check in luggage? What happens wrt Customs?
This was some bad advice and a process which can get one in deep trouble with US Customs. Two bottles are the limit and if you transit through many international airport you will be found out.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This was some bad advice and a process which can get one in deep trouble with US Customs. Two bottles are the limit and if you transit through many international airport you will be found out.

I think maybe you misunderstood the post, Don. As long as you declare it, you can bring in as much wine as you can squeeze in your luggage. The duty charge is very low, and I once had six bottles and declared it and they just waved me through. Probably too much paperwork to collect duty on four bottles. I believe that the duty is about $1.50 a bottle after the first two. Not sure on the amount but it's not much.
 
P

PANO

Guest
From one Basque expat to another.
I spent many a night in West Africa mixing dusty, aged (as in out of date) boxes of Don Simon with chilled Coca-Cola. I hate to admit it is quite refreshing on a 40+c day even though it is quite down market. Aski.
I challenge the wine aficionados find a fine bottle of wine in Cote d'Ivoire or Togo.
Been there, they have a tolerable beer, so your barbaric concoction is not a matter of survival....but rather of taste :D
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
My rule of thumb with wine (red or a nice cold fizzy) is the same as for life "never take moderation to excess". I only drink southern French and northern Spanish wine - won't touch New World. A Bordeaux Superior, estate bottled, is quite gorgeous - and I also like my Rioja .. thing to remember is that a Bordeaux (we English name it Claret) is 12% strength and Rioja tends to be 13.5 or 14% - quite a difference!!!

My first visit to St Jean I went to a restaurant in the evening - rare for me - that seemed to make under-cooked pizzas with eggs on (well, mine was). They had a wine list .. when I read through it I saw a local wine from a tiny vineyard that had been producing wine since the Middle Ages. I couldn't resist it and chose that. Was the worst wine I had ever tasted!!
 

rossmckay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016
As check in luggage? What happens wrt Customs?

As Peregrina2000 pointed out, just declare it. We've done this a half a dozen times and I have colleagues who bring in 5-6 dozen a couple of times a year (albeit they fly first class which has a rather lax overweight luggage policy). I keep a list of the wine and how much I paid for it and give that to the nice lady who then writes me a bill which I pay. No problem at all, they're used to it.

Perfectly legal and straight forward. my days of lawlessness are way, way behind me.
 

LakeMcD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15' Portuguese 16' GR10/Norte/Primitivo 17' Chemin LePuy 18' Salvador/Prim/Kerry Way 19'
Had an organic Mencia from Bierzo that was out of this world!!
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
One of the many good reasons for walking the Camino del Vasco Interior is that the last big town (21km) before it joins the CF at Santo Domingo, is Haro. This place styles itself as the wine capital of Spain. You enter the town walking past a host of wineries - both posh and industrial - and their associated smells. Up in the old quarter there are many bars that lay on wine tastings and they are quite proud of the gastronomic accompaniments too.
The only downside is that the route back to the albergue is quite long and complicated, and you need to retain a fair degree of sobriety to reach it....
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I was just looking through my notes, as I get ready to "write up" my Caminos Catalan and Invierno from this summer, and I saw a note that reminded me of a big upcoming wine festival. On the first weekend of August every year, the bodegas near Barco de Valdeorras (huge wine center) in Villamartin are open for visiting and tasting. One of the women working in my pension in Barco told me all about the fiesta, which requires you to buy a bracelet, 12 euros, and with that you can visit as many of the 45 bodegas as possible. Wine and pinchos all included in the price. She told me that it is not to be missed, but it did sound like things sometimes get pretty crazy.

http://www.paxinasgalegas.es/fiestas/xix-festa-das-covas-vilamartín-de-valdeorras-3652.html
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I was just looking through my notes, as I get ready to "write up" my Caminos Catalan and Invierno from this summer, and I saw a note that reminded me of a big upcoming wine festival. On the first weekend of August every year, the bodegas near Barco de Valdeorras (huge wine center) in Villamartin are open for visiting and tasting. One of the women working in my pension in Barco told me all about the fiesta, which requires you to buy a bracelet, 12 euros, and with that you can visit as many of the 45 bodegas as possible. Wine and pinchos all included in the price. She told me that it is not to be missed, but it did sound like things sometimes get pretty crazy.

http://www.paxinasgalegas.es/fiestas/xix-festa-das-covas-vilamartín-de-valdeorras-3652.html

This sounds remarkable. I think it was Rebekah who mentioned to me that Camino Invierno would be a great journey for a wine lover; in fact, I think the detour for that Camino looks fairly doable, albeit a bit longer as it veers southward from the CF. It does occur to me that while it would remove the pilgrim from the Sarria freeway, that could be a nonissue for one who plans to walk into SDC in early November, right?

I may stick to the "missionary route" this time and get more adventurous next year. It may be an earlier start for me next year---perhaps either Spring or just a tad earlier in September.

Deb
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This sounds remarkable. I think it was Rebekah who mentioned to me that Camino Invierno would be a great journey for a wine lover; in fact, I think the detour for that Camino looks fairly doable, albeit a bit longer as it veers southward from the CF. It does occur to me that while it would remove the pilgrim from the Sarria freeway, that could be a nonissue for one who plans to walk into SDC in early November, right?

I may stick to the "missionary route" this time and get more adventurous next year. It may be an earlier start for me next year---perhaps either Spring or just a tad earlier in September.

Deb
Hi, Deb,
You're right that you won't have any issue with crowds from Sarria onwards that late. Though I'm sure you'd be fine, I think the Invierno is one that is better enjoyed by pilgrims with a few caminos' worth of experience under their belts. It is still extremely solitary -- other than Rebekah and LT, the people I was walking with at different times, I met only one other pilgrim. Everyone in the towns along the way say that the numbers are increasing, but even if the numbers double every year for the next ten years, we'll still be at pretty small totals.

It is definitely a wine lovers' camino, because it also goes through the Ribeira Sacra region, along the Minho River. Oh so beautiful, buen camino, Laurie
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Those like me who enjoy a glass or two but feel ať a loss for the appropriate adjectives to describe wine's taste may now relax. Bianca Bosker In this current New Yorker article suggests that over the top winespeak hype may at last have become toast.
 
Last edited:

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Those like me who enjoy a glass or two but feel ať a loss for the appropriate adjectives to describe wine's taste may now relax. Bianca Bosker In this current New Yorker article suggests that over the top winespeak hype may at last have become toast.
I am SO glad to hear this, because the last 35 euro bottle of special wine that I bought for a friend was described in some wine review as having tastes of "tobacco" and "smoky minerals." I can't imagine how that can be a good thing.
 

jayree

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC 2012
Irun to Fisterra 2013
Shikoku 2015
CP 2016
Those like me who enjoy a glass or two but feel ať a loss for the appropriate adjectives to describe wine's taste may now relax.

In the 1970's the Chicago Reader had a great article about wine tasting subtitled "How to one-up a wine snob: a brief lesson in fighting dirty." It listed 50 things to say when tasting a wine. Among my favorites :

"It knows the steps but doesn't quite dance."
"It's managed to vault the obstinacy of its environment into respectability."
"It makes a grand entrance but a tedious soliloquy."
"It's a question posing as a statement."
"Fancy little upstart, eh?"
"The facade is brash but the character is cowardly."
"It's like a Noel Coward lyric. It has nothing to say but it says nothing rather deftly."

Ever since, I still hear some of these statements in my head when reading wine tasting notes.
 

Advertisement

Booking.com

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 56 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 200 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 329 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 381 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top