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Backpack is 2 kg too heavy TwT

anowo

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
17/04/2024
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I would have one set of clothes for day and one for evening. You have a lot of clothes. Remember that you may be wearing some of the jackets, etc. so I wouldn't necessarily count them in the weight. I would take only a few Band-Aids. I wouldn't take the iodine and I would take only a couple of ibuprofen and/or Tylenol and/or antihistamines in a small pocket pill container. Maybe get a couple of handwipes in a individual packages and leave the pack. They may give you some on the plane. Take one towel. I use safety pins instead of clothes pins

edit: you can do it!
 
Oh I saw that it should weigh around 10% of my body weight, I weigh 54kg and the pack is seven kilos
 
Oh I saw that it should weigh around 10% of my body weight, I weigh 54kg and the pack is seven kilos
Ach, forget the “should”

The key is whether you can carry your pack day after day with a level of comfort. Of course you don’t want to be carrying stuff you really don’t need, but there’s no ‘rule’
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
It's easy to overpack when you have shorts for under your pants, plus zip off pants, plus light pants for nighttime, plus t-shirts, plus a tshirt for nighttime.

The long-sleeve night-time tshirt can become a base layer against the cold or a long-sleeve tshirt to protect your skin against the sun. You don't need 3 separate t-shirts. Use merino wool... It smells a bit , hmm, earthy when it's soaked through but it doesn't trap odors and you can get a lot of wear from it before it needs a wash.

I don't think you are carrying too much. The plasters and medicine can probably be reduced and you can buy as needed. Instead of a box of plasters, maybe take 6 plasters .

The best way to effectively reduce weight is an expensive sleeping bag (or no sleeping bag but you won't have as much flexibility with where you stay), and a lightweight backpack (expensive, not as durable, not as many features/compartments)
 
There is no “supposed to weigh” weight! Somebody banish that 10% rule!!!!!! The ideal weight is simply what’s right for your ability, but lighter is always easier.

The way you list out your items is incredibly confusing and is likely the root of your problem. Stop thinking of all these clothing items independently as day clothes, night clothes, cold clothes and the rest are simply “clothes” and basically interchangeable. If you’d like help with your list, post ALL of the items you are taking in a simplified way: “X underwear, X socks, X pants, etc”. Plus I don’t see any items listed for electronics or guidebooks - these tend to be quite heavy!

In general, to shed weight, look at a lighter sleeping bag, less clothes, and less medical items (those are available in every village in Spain).
 
I can echo the others here. No rules, as long as you are comfortable with your pack it's fine. But if I were you, I would leave some clothes home. If I count well (all together, including what you are wearing):

- 2 towels
- 4 T-shirts
- 1 longsleeve
- 1 fleece
- 1 wind jacket
- 1 poncho
- 2 sports bras
- 5 pairs of underwear
- 3 pairs of merino socks
- 2 walking shorts
- 1 sleeping pants
- 3 (zip-off) pants

IMHO you could leave home: 1 towel, 2 T-shirts, 1 wind jacket (combo fleece and poncho will do), 2 pairs of underwear, a couple of pants (I don't quite understand what you are bringing exactly). And I assume you could actually walk in those walking shorts instead of only wearing them underneath other pants? So why bring zip-off pants then?
 
Last edited:
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
The way you list out your items is incredibly confusing and is likely the root of your problem. Stop thinking of all these clothing items independently as day clothes, night clothes, cold clothes and the rest are simply “clothes” and basically interchangeable. If you’d like help with your list, post ALL of the items you are taking in a simplified way: “X underwear, X socks, X pants, etc”. Plus I don’t see any items listed for electronics or guidebooks - these tend to be quite heavy!
And this. For example: I will take 2 pairs of shorts. When I arrive at the albergue in number 1, I shower, wash, get into number 2, wash number 1, sleep in number 2, walk the next day in number 2, arrive, shower, get into number 1, wash number 2, etc.

Most of your clothes double that way: the longsleeve when you get sunburned, the fleece when you are cold at night, etc.

Edit: and Buen Camino of course! You will be fine. :)
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Whew, that makes more sense. I thought it was an oddly random reference to Tactical Warfare Training.

3 pair of zip-off pants and 2 pair of shorts: That's excessive, IMHO (in my humble opinion). You could get by with 2 pair of zip-off pants or, maybe better, a pair of the zip-offs and a pair of shorts.

I'm also curious about your sleeping bag. You might consider whether it is of a weight that is necessary for the conditions. I have encountered pilgrims carrying bags on the CdF in June that were fit for the Arctic tundra. Something rated for 40 degrees F would likely be sufficient. Many get by with no bag at all, although I personally don't care for thin albergue blankets on chilly nights.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I get so frustrated when I hear about this 10% theory, who came up with something so crazy and totally wrong?

If an untrained, overweight 120kg person "should" carry 12kg, and a top-fit 50kg person gets away with 5, the world is pretty unfair. This has nothing to do with body weight, just how fit a person is for that particular activity.
 
Whew, that makes more sense. I thought it was an oddly random reference to Tactical Warfare Training.

3 pair of zip-off pants and 2 pair of shorts: That's excessive, IMHO (in my humble opinion). You could get by with 2 pair of zip-off pants or, maybe better, a pair of the zip-offs and a pair of shorts.

I think op is wearing tighter shorts to prevent chaffing.. but the point stands, view tops (tees/shirts/nightwear) and bottoms (shorts/nightwear/trousers) as a category each.. 5 of each is too much. I like my light merino base layers that double as pj's, sun protectors, long sleeve base T or insulation. No need for 4 items.

I get so frustrated when I hear about this 10% theory, who came up with something so crazy and totally wrong?

If an untrained, overweight 120kg person "should" carry 12kg, and a top-fit 50kg person gets away with 5, the world is pretty unfair. This has nothing to do with body weight, just how fit a person is for that particular activity.

So the 10% theory is for relatively fit people.
And it's fair.
I weigh, i don't know usually between 75 and 80kg. My bag is 8kg. When i add a lot of food or water, i feel it with every step. I could actually ditch some items and be more comfortable
I met a guy who was 5'0. His clothes are smaller. His bag is smaller - mines M-L, his is a solid S. He eats less.. he needs less. He picked up my bag and said "wow, well, you're taller"

So it's a good rule, imo.

Superfit people with a low bodyweight can carry more than 10%.
Fat people with low muscle definition should not aim for 10% without risking injury and exhaustion.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
three t-shirts
Why 3? How would you ever need 3 at the same time?
5 of each is too much
For tops, I take 5 in warmer months:
  • Merino tank top as undershirt
  • Buttoned sun shirt
  • Lightweight long sleeved merino shirt
  • Merino zip cardigan
  • Rain jacket
In cooler months (I'd include April on northern routes) I add a 6th layer - sleeveless down vest.
 
I walked the Portuguese this time last year. It was my first Camino. I carried a light weight sleeping bag liner.

Worked fine. I wore extra clothes in bed if chilly at night. So suggest leaving your sleeping bag behind.

If you don't have a sleeping bag liner you can buy one at the Decathlon store in Central Porto. Its close to one of the stations on the light rail line from the airport. Its where I bought my hiking poles last year.
 
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
What should it weigh?
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Oh I saw that it should weigh around 10% of my body weight, I weigh 54kg and the pack is seven kilos
You're feeling nervous just before you go, but if you've already got your pack down to 7kg, you're doing better than many of us.

The 10% guidance is unfair on smaller, lighter people! Nevertheless, whatever "the rules" may or may not say, lighter is always more comfortable.

As others have said, you don't need to think of your clothes as outfits, just as layers.
In the evening, I wear tomorrow's walking gear, plus something warmer (fleece, gilet or wind jacket, but I have only one) on top, because we generate less heat when we stop walking.
The clothes I've worn for walking today are drying on the line and if they're not dry, I pin them onto my pack in the morning.
Most people might take a 3rd pair of socks (because they dry more slowly). And spare underwear because they don't weigh much.
For weather protection, I pack a waterproof (for you, your poncho), sunglasses, buff/neckwarmer and hat.
For first aid, your iodine sounds heavy! I take five or six tablets each of ibuprofen, antihistamine and anti-inflamatories (they are mostly cheap and easy to find in Spain and Portugal), plus my daily prescription meds without the outer packaging, half a dozen plasters, two single-use medicated wipes (to clean any grazes) and one small sachet of blister treatment.
For the shower: one towel, shampoo, light sandals, toothbrush and paste.
For sleeping: the clothes I'll walk in tomorrow (which I've just spent the evening in), though I have a very light pair of pyjama trousers if my walking shorts are too grubby to go inside my sleeping bag.
Then, a charger with EU adapter for my phone, sunscreen, laundry soap, water bottle, passport, credential and bank cards; and summerweight sleeping bag ...
That adds up to about 5kg, including the rucksack, but not counting what I'm wearing to walk.
Then I add 1 kg of my own "luxuries". I prefer a physical guidebook, a small rechargeable electric razor and a bag of nuts and raisins. You might have other preferences!

My best advice is to immerse yourself in each moment, whether you are alone and quiet or chatting in a group, enjoying or enduring the walking, sheltering from rain or sweltering under sun. If you find you're carrying too much, give some of it away!
Buen Camino!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa

You're feeling nervous just before you go, but if you've already got your pack down to 7kg, you're doing better than many of us.

The 10% guidance is unfair on smaller, lighter people! Nevertheless, whatever "the rules" may or may not say, lighter is always more comfortable.

As others have said, you don't need to think of your clothes as outfits, just as layers.
In the evening, I wear tomorrow's walking gear, plus something warmer (fleece, gilet or wind jacket, but I have only one) on top, because we generate less heat when we stop walking.
The clothes I've worn for walking today are drying on the line and if they're not dry, I pin them onto my pack in the morning.
Most people might take a 3rd pair of socks (because they dry more slowly). And spare underwear because they don't weigh much.
For weather protection, I pack a waterproof (for you, your poncho), sunglasses, buff/neckwarmer and hat.
For first aid, your iodine sounds heavy! I take five or six tablets each of ibuprofen, antihistamine and anti-inflamatories (they are mostly cheap and easy to find in Spain and Portugal), plus my daily prescription meds without the outer packaging, half a dozen plasters, two single-use medicated wipes (to clean any grazes) and one small sachet of blister treatment.
For the shower: one towel, shampoo, light sandals, toothbrush and paste.
For sleeping: the clothes I'll walk in tomorrow (which I've just spent the evening in), though I have a very light pair of pyjama trousers if my walking shorts are too grubby to go inside my sleeping bag.
Then, a charger with EU adapter for my phone, sunscreen, laundry soap, water bottle, passport, credential and bank cards; and summerweight sleeping bag ...
That adds up to about 5kg, including the rucksack, but not counting what I'm wearing to walk.
Then I add 1 kg of my own "luxuries". I prefer a physical guidebook, a small rechargeable electric razor and a bag of nuts and raisins. You might have other preferences!

My best advice is to immerse yourself in each moment, whether you are alone and quiet or chatting in a group, enjoying or enduring the walking, sheltering from rain or sweltering under sun. If you find you're carrying too much, give some of it away!
Buen Camino!
As someone who suffers from chaffing and done many treks including in humid tropical areas, protection under walking pants is essential. Couple of options - quarter length silk stockings or thigh length tight hugging underwear. Both are much lighter options in your pack.
 
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
Less is more. Seriously. Two towels? Why? I bought three pairs of socks and wish I hadn’t …. Seriously, back to the beginning…. Less is more. That said, it’s your Camino- you do it your way…. It’s good to have advice etc - but you do you!!! To each their own :)
 
I get so frustrated when I hear about this 10% theory, who came up with something so crazy and totally wrong?

If an untrained, overweight 120kg person "should" carry 12kg, and a top-fit 50kg person gets away with 5, the world is pretty unfair. This has nothing to do with body weight, just how fit a person is for that particular activity.
Misuse of general guidance for *children* whose spines are still developing. About 20 years ago, when their backpacks started to be laden with heavy textbooks *every day* from a Calvinist notion that more homework was better for the lazy little turds, orthopedists fairly literally weighed in and said:

“Children have soft bones. At under age 18 they should not carry more than 10% of their body-weight because it will cause spine and other joint development problems.”

I’m sure that a search in the health reporting archives for something like the New York Times would give a sense of how it all played out.

I remember it because my kid was one of the ones who was lugging around stupidly heavy stuff on a very slight frame…

The guidance was never meant for adults and certainly not for through hiking.

That said: my arthritic spine and my feet prefer a lighter pack to a heavier one. I try to keep it under 12-14 pounds, including the pack.

I usually have 4 pounds of crap that I would rather not have, but without it I can’t go on camino at all. <<SHRUG>>
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
You can get a 400g cheapish down sleeping quilt from Aliexpress pretty cheaply. How much does your sleeping bags weigh?
 
I think op is wearing tighter shorts to prevent chaffing.. but the point stands, view tops (tees/shirts/nightwear) and bottoms (shorts/nightwear/trousers) as a category each.. 5 of each is too much. I like my light merino base layers that double as pj's, sun protectors, long sleeve base T or insulation. No need for 4 items.



So the 10% theory is for relatively fit people.
And it's fair.
I weigh, i don't know usually between 75 and 80kg. My bag is 8kg. When i add a lot of food or water, i feel it with every step. I could actually ditch some items and be more comfortable
I met a guy who was 5'0. His clothes are smaller. His bag is smaller - mines M-L, his is a solid S. He eats less.. he needs less. He picked up my bag and said "wow, well, you're taller"

So it's a good rule, imo.

Superfit people with a low bodyweight can carry more than 10%.
Fat people with low muscle definition should not aim for 10% without risking injury and exhaustion.
There is no science behind the 10% guide that is applicable to hiking adults. It’s from a recommendation years ago for the weight of kids school bags.
And it tends to be mentioned by people who have never done multi-day back country hiking outside mid-summer!
Athen OP should take the weight that works for them, that lets them bring the gear they really need and lets them walk enjoyably.
 
Iyou don’t have to wash your clothes every day either. My hiking gear is designed to be worn for several days without washing - wool t-shirts and nylon long-sleeved hiking shirt and long nylon hiking pants. These fabrics resist oil and don’t absorb sweat so don’t retain odour.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Oh I saw that it should weigh around 10% of my body weight, I weigh 54kg and the pack is seven kilos
It’s sooooo easy to get caught up in all of this. What if you were 100kg?? Bottom line is, people tend to over pack stuff as they forget that there are actually shops and things where you can buy stuff if you really need it and bins or recycling areas for the things that you realise that you don’t. Just do it, live it, breath it and just let yourself go. You WILL, 100 pc, enjoy the experience. Total freedom 😀 Buen Camino.
 
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
I tend to take very little extra when walking, as I normally camp, with a 45 litre sac. So camping equipment, sleeping bag, plus two sets of underwear, one extra t shirt and shorts, one set of rohan walking clothes, light weight rain jacket and bottoms, Tilley sunhat waterproofed. A very small first aid kit and small toothbrush and as a luxury a small bit of soap and sun tan lotion and deodorant.

You sleep in your spare underwear, and use your t shirt to dry after shower.

Some people say you just need 3 socks.
 
As ever, many different views. It goes without saying that lighter is better but the only rules worth following are these;

When you put it on, do you feel loaded or ready to roam? You want it to be the latter.
Once you're on the trail, how does it feel by lunch? Ready to stop for the day? If so, start ditching stuff or, since it's available, consider using a luggage service.

At the end of the day, it's only money, and I bet you'll never, ever regret paying a bit more for a wonderful trip. (For years and years that was anathema to me - carrying my gear was part of the thing. Until I did an organised trek in the Picos de Europa, with a baggage service. Trust me, walking with just a water bottle, camera and jacket is altogether different).
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
What should it weigh?
Whatever you’re comfortable carrying? But how many know what that is?

Participants on here range from lightweight fanatic racing-snakes through to those who are entirely unaccustomed to even one day’s long walk with a sack and the 10% ‘rule’ is obviously complete rubbish.

I’m not a betting man, but I suspect anyone’s second Camino involves a lighter load than their first.
 
Whatever you’re comfortable carrying? But how many know what that is?

Participants on here range from lightweight fanatic racing-snakes through to those who are entirely unaccustomed to even one day’s long walk with a sack and the 10% ‘rule’ is obviously complete rubbish.

I’m not a betting man, but I suspect anyone’s second Camino involves a lighter load than their first.
Don't take that bet with me, you'll lose. 😁

I agree, people's fitness / health, and level of obesity, all play a roll. The 10% idea is complete nonsense.
 
This is an interesting dialog. I thought how best to contribute. I decided to make a list. I part, it duplicates some of the comments above from other veteran pilgrims - thank you.

Here are some observations from long-experience - for fair weather Caminos. Winter requires more stuff:

1. Less is more
2. An oversized rucksack will suck stuff into it as you progress. It's a law of Camino physics. The optimum volume is from 30 - 40 liters (+/-). Anything large and you either have too much stuff, or the Camino Law of Physics will cause you to increase weight as you walk.
3. You can buy anything you need along the way, as needed.
4. One towel is enough - take a medium to large size. I prefer one that will wrap around my prodigious self.
5. One pair of shorts and one pair of long pants is enough. Better if the long pants zip off to be shorts.
6. MAXIMUM three changes of socks and underwear. Wear one set and carry two - in ziplock bags. You will do hand wash each evening. Many pilgrims wear one and carry one set. I opt for the third set in case a rainy day intervenes and I cannot get my hand-wash dried. Personal choice.
7. Two outer shirts should be enough. Wash one each evening. Opting for long-sleeve "fishing shirts," with roll up sleeves and high UV protection is good. I use either Ex-Officio or Columbia branded shirts.
8. A merino wool pullover or lightweight fleece jacket is best for wear as an inner layer, or for sleeping. Mos people do not know that micro-fleece comes in three weights. Authentic, Polar Tech branded fleece is marketed as 100, 200 and 300 level fleece. Higher number is thicker and warmer. Level 100 is enough for summer use. I try to use level 200 year round. Decathlon fleece is generally level 100. I prefer a zip up front to a pullover. Personal choice.
9. You can mail anything determined to be surplus down the road to Casa Ivar. It will be waiting for you.
10. I have invested and disposed of two water bladder systems over the years. I keep returning to two 0.5 liter water bottles. They come new with water in them, can be rinsed and refilled as needed. When done, they can be properly recycled.

There you have it. A concise 10-point list of suggestions. I have avoided discussing things like gadgets, electronics or medications, as they are very personal to each person. For example, my medications and supplements usually weigh over a kilo for two weeks. But, that is unique to me. No use boring the lot of you.

Hope this helps.

Tom
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
What does your pack actually weigh? My suggestion is take the lot then dump what you find you don’t need. Somebody will be grateful for it.
 
Oh! I also have a 2lt water bladder but that one is kinda essential ahah

Only fill the bladder to what you think you need, not necessarily to the top. I carry a small 500 ml collapsible soft bottle as a reserve should I accidentally run out of bladder water. Just fill the soft bottle and then reduce the amount of water you would normally fill the bladder to by that 500ml in your bottle.,

The bottle is used with a quick connect kit so that I can fill or top off the water bladder without the need to take off the backpack or remove the reservoir.

As to the weight of your backpack, the comfort level of carrying a specific weight is sort of an individual assessment so the general advice is to go as light as you can. Keep in mind that if you are uncertain and decide to drop an item, then it turns out you DO need it, you are on a Camino going village to village and can always purchase it.




Collapsible Water Bottle


1713386965766.png
 
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Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I’m not a betting man, but I suspect anyone’s second Camino involves a lighter load than their first.

Don't take that bet with me, you'll lose. 😁
Ditto. For precisely the reason you gave, @henrythedog : "Whatever you’re comfortable carrying ".

For my second camino I carried more than I did on my first, because I realized that I would rather have one or two comfort items that I had missed on my first. Were they necessary - no. Did I benefit from having them - yes.

My third and fourth walks were identical to my second. But for the next I'm actually going to add a couple of small items. But they are unique to where I'm walking. So for example I will be carrying my Sawyer squeeze water filter. (85g). I'm fed up with carrying two or three liters of water on days with no 'potable' water source in between stops, when I am passing perfectly good streams. So my base weight will rise in order that my carried weight can decrease!
 
I’m not a betting man, but I suspect anyone’s second Camino involves a lighter load than their first.
I'm also in the bring more next time club. This time a big towel, a dress for both sleeping/wear doing not walking things and I am actually considering my I-pad. Not comfort, but it looks like I'll have to do some online work some evenings and can't stand phone-sized screen.

Peter, I use micropur tablets :)
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Well, I’m surprised - but happy to be corrected!
To be fair, I suspect that with many pilgrims you’d be 100% correct - but some like myself have a moderate amount of pre-Camino experience; others on here have used many resources to get their weight down pre - Camino. Like, for example, this self-same forum, and it’s helpful inhabitants!
 
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
Ditch the sleeping bag. Take a liner only
I've walked Frances, Portugese and Sanabres in autumn and going on winter and never needed (or carried) a sleeping bag. Most Albergues have blankets or are heated, and day clothes double as night clothes, especially if it is a little bit chilly.
Reduce your clothing list.

Most of all

Buen Camino
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
Remember to add weight of water.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Weight is weight. A pair of socks, bottle of water, or an extra 10lbs of belly fat... Our feet and legs don't know the difference and it puts stress on them all the same.
Yes, but we're specifically talking about base weight. Which never includes all of the variables you've just mentioned. For the very simple reason that they are variables. Eg: Some of us carry half a litre of water, others two litres.

Which is why experienced hiker's always talk about their base weight vs their loaded weight.

I agree completely that your feet and your knees will benefit considerably if you can lose a few kilos before starting - whether it be from your Pack or your waistline.

I'm not here to body shame people - I myself could stand to lose a couple of kilos. But if I or any other forum member can help somebody reduce their Pack weight, then we are happy to do so.
 
Yes, but we're specifically talking about base weight. Which never includes all of the variables you've just mentioned. For the very simple reason that they are variables. Eg: Some of us carry half a litre of water, others two litres.

Which is why experienced hiker's always talk about their base weight vs their loaded weight.

I agree completely that your feet and your knees will benefit considerably if you can lose a few kilos before starting - whether it be from your Pack or your waistline.

I'm not here to body shame people - I myself could stand to lose a couple of kilos. But if I or any other forum member can help somebody reduce their Pack weight, then we are happy to do so.
Sorry, I missed the beae weight part.

Feel free to body shame me. I leave for my next Camino in just over a week, and I'm still 8 lbs overweight. From Christmas festivities. 🥳
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I understand it's not the base weight but you will be carrying it. We carry two 2 liter bottles of water while we walk. What is a known daily weight we figure into the packs weight.
That is logical.

The purpose of measuring base weight vs total weight is to compare items that are similar in performance but will have differences in weight when added to tour equipment. So the base weight of your pack can be compared with, say, one sleeping bag vs another sleeping bag.

Consumables are so variable in weight, and decrease hour by hour. So the most consistent way of controlling the TOTAL weight of a backpack is to focus on picking the lightest of the durable gear that will go into your pack, , , based on one's budget, of course.

For example, on Camino my pack base weight is around 7 pounds or so, but reaches around 9.5 pounds total weight with snacks and water.. When backpacking it is around 12 pounds base weight , total weight with food and other consumables like fuel, reaching as much as 18 pounds for a 5 day duration between resupply points. By day 5, my backpack weight is back at about its base weight.

I like Snickers Bars to nibble on every 20 minutes to keep up with the expended stuff being burned by muscles. Along with a bit of cheese, it does a great job for me. I defend my overzealous addition of the weight of several Snickers in my side pocket, mentally justifying the indulgence by my ever faithful attendance to decreasing their weight before too much time goes by.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I get so frustrated when I hear about this 10% theory, who came up with something so crazy and totally wrong?

If an untrained, overweight 120kg person "should" carry 12kg, and a top-fit 50kg person gets away with 5, the world is pretty unfair. This has nothing to do with body weight, just how fit a person is for that particular activity.
I heard it was the IDF from research into the ideal weight carried by a soldier on foot patrol in the Negev . . . mind you that was from a fighter pilot in the IDF and everything he carried sat behind the ejection seat of an F15!
 
Don’t take the 10%-rule too serious. I am 1,60 m and 62 kg. I have walked two camino’s with a backpack weight of 7 kg with no problem. Every hour I take the backpack off for a few minutes.
 
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
Slightly surprised that you only weighed the pack the day before you travelled 😮.
They have shops in Europe ( energy bars??!)
Don't forget water comes in at 1kg per litre.
Would cull clothing down somewhat as you pretty much have the option of doing laundry every day.
The last (positive) point is that if you've been doing training walks with your 'Camino- Weight' backpack and it's been OK, then you'll be fine.
Despite the guidance available for backpack weights, it's only important to pack as ight as you can, and make sure that whatever that weight comes out at works for you.
Have a great Camino!
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Weight is weight though . . . 😉

The purpose of measuring base weight vs total weight is to compare items that are similar in performance but will have differences in weight when added to tour equipment. So the base weight of your pack can be compared with, say, one sleeping bag vs another sleeping bag.

Consumables are so variable in weight, and decrease hour by hour. So the most consistent way of controlling the TOTAL weight of a backpack is to focus on picking the lightest of the durable gear that will go into your pack, , , based on one's budget, of course.

For example, on Camino my pack base weight is around 7 pounds or so, but reaches around 9.5 pounds total weight with snacks and water.. When backpacking it is around 12 pounds base weight , total weight with food and other consumables like fuel, reaching as much as 18 pounds for a 5 day duration between resupply points. By day 5, my backpack weight is back at about its base weight.
 
Maybe this packing lists or the thought behind it helps someone, however it is unproven yet as the start of my Caminho is yet to come (May from Porto). I may also optimize it a little more.
List includes Items that I'll allready wear when flying.

3 x Longsleves + 1 x Shirt
1 x Light Rain-Jacket (to not have to put on the Poncho every time a light rain comes by or if it gets windy)
1 x Rain-Poncho => Basically a one way festival poncho.
2 x Trousers and 1x pair of shorts.
3 x pair of socks
4 x times underwear
1 x inlay sleeping liner
1 x Bath supplies ( Soap, Toothbrush, suncream, tooth paste, desinfection gel)
1 x Sun Hat
1x micro-fiber towl.
1x Pair of Sunglasses
1x first aid stuff (Bandages, Painkillers, other medical supplies)
1x Knee Bandage
1x pair of Flip Flops
1x Powerbank
1x Loading Kable with charger
1x small sports bag
1x Headphones
1x pocket knife (less of a pocket knife but a foldable fork-knife-spoon thing)
1x mini tube of washing paste.
1x all word plug adapter => but i just saw that i will not need that.

ah and 2 packages of blister plaster.

this is 7,4kg including the bagpack and 0,75 Liter of Water. 11% of my body weight right now. I think i excluded 1 x long sleeve, 1 x pair of underware and 1x pair of trousers when weighing as I will wear those.

to be added food/maybe more water.

on my maybe list:
- something that can be used as a plate (eating)
- walking tights => Allows to use the shorts on colder weather and can be added as a layer to the trousers.
- bed-bug spray

Just realized forgotten and would probably be a nice addition
- a pyjama/Sleeping shirt.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Hi!
I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be!
Should I get rid of some stuff or should I just soldier on? This is my first Camino so I'm sure I've overpacked ahaha



So this is what I'm bringing:

-first aid kit: ibuprofen, paracetamol, antihistamines, lots of plasters, a bottle of iodine, and needle with string

-bathroom bag: two microfiber towels, one big and a small one, dry toothpaste and toothbrush, solid shampoo and body wash, and a piece of soap to wash clothes

-everyday bag: three t-shirts, four pair of underwear, a sports bra, two walking shorts (I have to walk with these guys under normal pants or I chafe), two pair of merino sock

-night bag: long-sleeved shirt and lightweight pants as a pajama

-cold weather bag: fleece and one pair of zip pants (to make them shorts if needed) and poncho

a sleeping bag (it's probably the heaviest thing in here sigh)

For myself I have a pair of pants, t-shirt, light wind jacket, hat, sunglasses, merino socks, Topo shoes, walking pants, underwear, sport bra and a small fanny pack thing for cash and documents.

At random in different pockets of the pack I have tissues, plastic shoes for the shower, a headlamp, wet wipes, snack bars, my earbuds, sunscreen, a journal and some clothespins.

This is a very messy list lol sorry friends, anyway thanks for the help!

PS. I'm so excited this is so scary aaaa
What on earth is TwT?
 
@NicoO , that's not a bad list, and if you are comfortable with it go for it.

I personally would delete a couple of items, while still remaining in the 'having a spare' camp. For example in addition to what I am wearing ( shorts, t shirt, long sleeve etc) I would carry just 1 pair of trousers, 1 short sleeve shirt, a lightweight fleece and two pairs of socks and underpants. I'd also get rid of most of the first aid kit - unless you truly know how to use it - and most of your blister plasters. But then I carry hiker's wool. Each to their own.

Many go further and just have what they're wearing and one change, however I have had too many occasions where I've arrived soaked and things haven't dried overnight. So I personally strongly value having spare socks and undies.

I'd also change the rain jacket and festival poncho for one decent poncho. Those festival ones generally rip when it's windy, and if it's only light rain you're often so warm that you don't want anything more - presumably your shirts are Merino anyway so they will still be warm, and they will dry quickly once the shower stops.
I sleep in my next days t-shirt and underwear, some have a dedicated pair of boxers or similar to sleep in.

Bed bug spray - please no. If you're staying in an Albergue and start spraying that around people are not going to be appreciative. You could potentially even cause respiratory issues for some.

Plate is up to you but personally I wouldn't bother.

If you do a little research you will find that many of our lists are very similar, there are hundreds of lists on here. Happy reading and Bom Caminho!
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
@NicoO , that's not a bad list, and if you are comfortable with it go for it.

I personally would delete a couple of items, while still remaining in the 'having a spare' camp. For example in addition to what I am wearing ( shorts, t shirt, long sleeve etc) I would carry just 1 pair of trousers, 1 short sleeve shirt, a lightweight fleece and two pairs of socks and underpants. I'd also get rid of most of the first aid kit - unless you truly know how to use it - and most of your blister plasters. But then I carry hiker's wool. Each to their own.

Many go further and just have what they're wearing and one change, however I have had too many occasions where I've arrived soaked and things haven't dried overnight. So I personally strongly value having spare socks and undies.

I'd also change the rain jacket and festival poncho for one decent poncho. Those festival ones generally rip when it's windy, and if it's only light rain you're often so warm that you don't want anything more - presumably your shirts are Merino anyway so they will still be warm, and they will dry quickly once the shower stops.
I sleep in my next days t-shirt and underwear, some have a dedicated pair of boxers or similar to sleep in.

Bed bug spray - please no. If you're staying in an Albergue and start spraying that around people are not going to be appreciative. You could potentially even cause respiratory issues for some.

Plate is up to you but personally I wouldn't bother.

If you do a little research you will find that many of our lists are very similar, there are hundreds of lists on here. Happy reading and Bom Caminho!
Thanks for the feedback.
Based on this Thread I will probably cut down my clothing a little bit.

Medical stuff sounds more extensive than it is: Plasters, my meds, something for the stomage and painkillers basically.

from what i found on the internet it sounded like bed-bug spray is kind of a necessity. Would be glad to hear more experiences on that?
 
bed-bug spray is kind of a necessity
Yes, you may come across bed bugs.

There are a huge number of posts on here from long-term pilgrims that have walked multiple caminos and never had an issue. Equally, there are posts from people that have come across them on their very first Camino.

Sprays (Pyrethrin) are used prior to going on Camino to treat your gear. It takes time to work. (Hours). There are no magic sprays that will get rid of a bed bug infestation. Using a chemical to get rid of bed bugs will not work unless you clean and launder everything, seal off hiding places, and follow other, non-chemical steps to control them. In some situations they use steam cleaners. (Heat)
Not something you are going to be able to do.
If you click on the magnifying glass (top right) and use the advanced search function you will find a massive number of posts on this subject.
 
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Just a little encouragement on a Saturday night for those of you who are despairing that you are carrying too much: the sport of Rucking is very popular and growing here (yes, google it if interested). The benefits of carrying heavy and long distances are highlighted by doctors, physiotherapists and fitness gurus as extremely good and gentle strength and balance training. You simply train your whole body! So, it is the best gift you can give yourself. Don't be afraid to carry heavy, the heavier the better. Your body (and mind now I think, because of the "I did" etc..) will thank you in the long run. And doing something positive for your health AND experiencing Spain and all that we value = a super bonus.
Rucking is not something you want to do on a Camino if you haven't done it before.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Just a little encouragement on a Saturday night for those of you who are despairing that you are carrying too much: the sport of Rucking is very popular and growing here (yes, google it if interested). The benefits of carrying heavy and long distances are highlighted by doctors, physiotherapists and fitness gurus as extremely good and gentle strength and balance training. You simply train your whole body! So, it is the best gift you can give yourself. Don't be afraid to carry heavy, the heavier the better. Your body (and mind now I think, because of the "I did" etc..) will thank you in the long run. And doing something positive for your health AND experiencing Spain and all that we value = a super bonus.
Interesting Sport ! And I see what you mean about the benefits however all of the info I read also warned that you shouldn't walk consecutive days at the beginning. For example "For someone new to rucking, we recommend rucking for for 15-30 minutes 2-3 times per week.
Start out with a distance between 2-4 miles, carrying 15-25lbs of weight."

I also saw multiple examples of possible risks, eg increased overuse injuries.

"rucking too far, too often, or carrying a load that's too heavy for your current ability level may cause lower body, lower back, shoulder, or neck pain"

So another words fine if you've trained for it but potentially harmful if you haven't.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Why is everything I say taken in the worst sense? I never said that anyone should start with this. It was just to say that carrying is not only a negative thing.
It's not, far from it. I for one value the contributions you have made to other posts. And you've raised an interesting topic.

It's just that I try and ensure that a balanced view is presented. Whilst there a hundreds of regulars and thousands of experienced pilgrims /hikers on the forum, many that come to the forum for advice have zero experience. Therefore I feel it's important to present both the positives and the negatives.
For example, I started my response with " I see what you mean about the benefits..". I just then presented some of the negatives for consideration.
I would hate for a newbie to read the first post, think that therefore carrying 5 extra kgs was fine and start off without any training. It sounds silly, but somebody would probably do it.

You did tell us to research it! 😅
 
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It's not, far from it. I for one value the contributions you have made to other posts. And you've raised an interesting topic.

It's just that I for one try and ensure that a balanced view is presented. Whilst there a hundreds of regulars and thousands of experienced pilgrims /hikers on the forum, many that come to the forum for advice have zero experience. Therefore I feel it's important to present both the positives and the negatives.
For example, I started my response with " I see what you mean about the benefits..". I just then presented some of the negatives for consideration.
I would hate for a newbie to read the first post, think that therefore carrying 5 extra kgs was fine and start off without any training. It sounds silly, but somebody would probably do it.

You did tell us to research it! 😅
I understand, you are absolutely right.

Another thing that might be useful to know something about in relation to carrying and potential injuries. Probably been talked about before, but in any case it is worth repeating.
Most people I think know (theoretically or intuitively) that one should lift heavy objects close to the body, not hold the object at a distance. This is important to remember when taking the bag on and off. During a Camino we do it hundreds of times. And if the technique you use is to "throw it on" in a jerking movement, you can strain the body in the wrong way, use muscles around one hip unilaterally, and you do it again and again and again..
Therefore, a useful routine is to lift it straight up to the body and holding it in front close to the chest before calmly and controlled moving around with both hands. Feel free to pretend it is heavier than it is. I don't know if one use the right technique intuitively, but I have observed people who "throw it on".

And the sad truth is that when we are not as young as before, the muscles weaken, and one therefore become more vulnerable to injuries. Something to think about.
 
Valuable point.
I always try and alternate which side I lift it, hadn’t actually considered how I lift, although it’s probably instinctual given my background. I must check.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I get so frustrated when I hear about this 10% theory, who came up with something so crazy and totally wrong?

If an untrained, overweight 120kg person "should" carry 12kg, and a top-fit 50kg person gets away with 5, the world is pretty unfair. This has nothing to do with body weight, just how fit a person is for that particular activity.
I wonder what expertise you have to make such a profound rejection of this rule of thumb? I ask, because it appears to me that you don't understand that the guidance is for healthy individuals. Someone who is overweight would need to make adjustments to make the simple statement relevant, eg by calculating their healthy weight.

So if your 120 kg person is overweight, their BMI would be over 25, but less than 30. This would give a height range between 2.0 m and 2.19 m. At the lower end of this range, the 'maximum' healthy weight in BMI terms would be 100 kg, and their target pack base weight would be 10 kg.

There are many reasons to adjust the guidance. My own view is that it is a reasonable guide for healthy people walking in summer in Spain, but only for summer. One might expect to have to carry more in autumn, winter and spring. Resilience is another factor that isn't considered, which might nor might not encompass your concern about fitness. And @davebugg has hinted at another, and that is whether one can afford the lightweight or ultra-lightweight gear that would make it easier to pack lighter.
 
I wonder what expertise you have to make such a profound rejection of this rule of thumb? I ask, because it appears to me that you don't understand that the guidance is for healthy individuals. Someone who is overweight would need to make adjustments to make the simple statement relevant, eg by calculating their healthy weight.

So if your 120 kg person is overweight, their BMI would be over 25, but less than 30. This would give a height range between 2.0 m and 2.19 m. At the lower end of this range, the 'maximum' healthy weight in BMI terms would be 100 kg, and their target pack base weight would be 10 kg.

There are many reasons to adjust the guidance. My own view is that it is a reasonable guide for healthy people walking in summer in Spain, but only for summer. One might expect to have to carry more in autumn, winter and spring. Resilience is another factor that isn't considered, which might nor might not encompass your concern about fitness. And @davebugg has hinted at another, and that is whether one can afford the lightweight or ultra-lightweight gear that would make it easier to pack lighter.
You point to some very important factors! The reason for my statement was because in the post it seems that someone has been told that 10% is some kind of magic max limit. Of course it's a good guideline, I just meant that one don't need to look blindly at it.

How the rucksack is constructed and to what extent it is adapted to the person is also an important consideration that I think is written about too little. I think this may be more important than the weight of the bag. I hope people don't choose a bag based solely on its weight, but primarily think about how it fits the individual. If the person has never felt how a really good rucksack behaves comfortably on the back for many hours, one does not know what one is missing.
 
I walked the Portuguese this time last year. It was my first Camino. I carried a light weight sleeping bag liner.

Worked fine. I wore extra clothes in bed if chilly at night. So suggest leaving your sleeping bag behind.

If you don't have a sleeping bag liner you can buy one at the Decathlon store in Central Porto. Its close to one of the stations on the light rail line from the airport. Its where I bought my hiking poles last year.
This was good to hear Dennis. I start walking 29 April from Lisbon and have decided not to take my sleeping bag this time, just a silk liner, hoping most albergues have blankets, otherwise I’ll be wearing all my clothes to bed !!
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Oh I saw that it should weigh around 10% of my body weight, I weigh 54kg and the pack is seven kilos
That is a rough guide line but in my opinion doesn’t work for us 50kg people.. my pack will be around 8-9 kg with water and a snack. It depends on you. This might be too heavy for some, I am fine carrying this. Just the first few days are hard on the shoulders and hips.
 
Just so you know, I am on the Camino right now in Burgos. I brought one pair of walking pants that I wore on the plane and one Macabi skirt. I brought three short sleeve T-shirts and one long sleeve T-shirt, merino wool. I have not touched the Macabee skirt. I have worn the walking pants every single day And I only wash them out. I’ve worn the same two T-shirts so I could’ve left one short sleeve T-shirt, and the Macabee shirt at home. I brought several pair of underwear and I’ve worn one and washed one every night so I could’ve left a lot of underwear at home too, and I’m an experienced pilgrim , but I thought I might need some of these clothes for six weeks on the trail. I guess I forgot that I don’t need to change clothes into clean every single day. Nobody cares except you.

If you really feel like you need to dump something, I would dump some of those clothes, and I might also look into getting an inexpensive lightweight blanket from Amazon instead of a heavy sleeping bag
 

Most read last week in this forum

I have just boarded an Iberia flight to Madrid, and so far have seen two people come on with collapsed poles attached to their backpacks. The topic that never dies……
I typically wash my clothes by hand with a bar of Lagarto soap. It’s non-chemical and is the soap I was introduced to back in Spain in the 70s. When you wash clothes by hand, you typically rub...
So, whatcha all buying? The sale and coupons are burning a hole in my pocket but I can’t decide what I want/need.
I’ll begin my Camino in July (Portuguese route), so it’s time to get shoes and break them in. I have seen posts about walking shoes and which ones people prefer, and I’ve read various articles...
Hi, I'm off to CDN tomorrow but this is in my mind. I got the baggage transfer from from Correos and I will going to walk from Irun to Llanes this time, so my plan is to carry a 22lts day pack and...
I have an iPhone 14 and got an eSIM one month contract with Orange when I arrived in Spain a month ago. Right away there were problems. It did most basic things, but I couldn’t use most WiFi...

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