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Luggage Transfer Correos

Do you keep your passport on your person at all times?

0 Euro Camino Bank Note

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
In a 4.5X7 LOKSAK along with my credentials and cash in a hidden zippered pocket in my Mountain Khakis Granite Creek pants or shorts.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route.
Yes, but realize if you rent a private room in a hotel, hostel, or albergue, they may ask for (and keep overnight) your passport.
It is usual and fine to surrender it.
They return it upon checkout.

Otherwise, it never leaves my body
 

RobertS26

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
My money, pilgrim's passport, US passport, and wallet never left my possession. I carried them in a plastic zip lock baggie that was either in a pants pocket, under my pillow (with my head on top) or in my hand.
 

fernandezr

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
How do you suggest carrying your passport?
They sell a wallet at REI that hangs around your neck and can be inside your shirt; not only is it the best way to avoid being pick-pocketed when in the cities but it also has a place where a passport fits perfectly. It also has secure, zippered places for money, credit cards, ID, etc. I have found it also expedient to wear a light nylon pouch that has an elastic band that goes around the waist and is worn under your clothing; in this pouch, enclosed in a waterproof Ziplock bag, I usually carry a photocopy of the main page of my passport, a certified copy of my birth certificate, my return flight tickets, a copy of my health insurance coverage that would serve in Spain, a list of important phone numbers, a Visa card and several hundred dollars in cash. This is just another level of security that would provide a safety net should one be robbed or lose one's wallet.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Cordura nylon wallet made just for carrying passport. I think there are a few different brands out there. Also held all my money and my credit cards. Never left my body (well, except for showering of course), and I had a zip-lock bag I could put it in if it looked like rain. I also made a photocopy of my passport page.
I worked overseas for several years and co-workers occasionally lost (or had them stolen) passports. It's is quite inconvenient as you have to find your way to your home country's embassy/consulate and get a new one issued.
 
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DurhamParish

Un Cerveza, Por Favor
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Portuguese 2012 & 2018
Camino Frances 2014, 2015, 2015, 2017, 2018
I also use the pouch that hangs around my neck. Also have a pouch that has a loop that my belt goes through and then the pouch hangs inside my pants. They never leave my person, except when they are watching me take a shower. Also carry copy of my passport page and a couple of copies of my tickets.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Nah. I gave it to a bartender in Castrojeriz to get a pilgrims stamp in it and had to collect it the next morning. Alcohol might have been involved.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Nah. I gave it to a bartender in Castrojeriz to get a pilgrims stamp in it and had to collect it the next morning. Alcohol might have been involved.
Your passport i.e. issued by your country's government? Or just your pilgrims credential? I've never heard of anyone getting their passport stamped other than at country entry and exit passport control.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Do you drive your car without your driver's license? Hopefully, not. You are in a foreign country where carrying an ID is probably even more important for you safety and security in case of an accident.
Several times on this site I have related the story of the guy I met who told me someone had cut the "neck purse" off him overnight in Cizur Menor, I sleep in shorts with my valuable tucked into the pockets. God forbid what I might do to the bugger who tries to rob me!
 
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DurhamParish

Un Cerveza, Por Favor
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Portuguese 2012 & 2018
Camino Frances 2014, 2015, 2015, 2017, 2018
Do you drive your car without your driver's license? Hopefully, note. You are in a foreign country where carrying an ID is probably even more important for you safety and security in case of an accident.
Several times on this site I have related the story of the guy I met who told me someone had cut the "neck purse" off him overnight in Cizur Menor, I sleep in shorts with my valuable tucked into the pockets. God forbid what I might do to the bugger who tries to rob me!
Thanks. I sleep in shorts too, and I'll take the same precautions. Not sure what I'd do to a bugger trying to rob me since I'm not much of a tough guy, but he'd certainly know he'd been spoken-to very unkindly. :)
 

xin loi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked May 14, 2014 from St Jean France

starting to walk again August 25, 2016 --SJPDP to Finisterre
Kanga--- I've never heard of anyone getting their passport stamped other than at country entry and exit passport control

People do get their passports stamped at various places of interest--E.G. The Machu Pichu and Huayna Picchu gate guards stamp lots of passports for tourists.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
All:
I know it has come up before on this forum, but a suggestion on the "photocopy" of passports and key documents. Those papers need to be just as secure as your passport, so it has been suggested before to scan your passport, credit cards, health insurance card, etc. and put them all in one file that you can encrypt and email to yourself at the email account you will be checking on the Camino. This way you will have access to the documents if anything happens, from any web-enabled device that can be used to log into your email (albuerge, hospital, embassy, etc.). The encryption will keep them safe (just don't forget the password!!!).
Plus you don't have the extra pages of paper to worry with protecting from weather or thieves.

Rambler
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Your passport i.e. issued by your country's government? Or just your pilgrims credential? I've never heard of anyone getting their passport stamped other than at country entry and exit passport control.
Yeah, that one. I wouldn't suggest getting too many of those because immigration people have no sense of humor. My passport was pretty busy at the time (over 40 entries to Singapore, Indonesian work visas etc so they blended in pretty well.

passport.JPG
 
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Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Yeah, that one. I wouldn't suggest getting too many of those because immigration people have no sense of humor. My passport was pretty busy at the time (over 40 entries to Singapore, Indonesian work visas etc so they blended in pretty well.
This reminds me of a story my priest told. When he did the camino, he had his wallet stolen and called back to the US to have a new drivers license issued so he could drive in Spain. Our state department of transportation, in their total ignorance told him that he had to go to a "USA approved" physician and get a physical and eye test to prove he could drive before they would issue the replacement. When he inquired, what USA approved meant, they could not answer him, so they emailed him a form and said he had to go to a state office and have it validated. Given it was Sunday and nowhere in Spain would be open that day, he had the hospitalero stamp a sello on the form and he sent it back. Got his new license in a day...
;)
Rambler
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I love it. Wondering what other documents we could get endorsed.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
When we walked the Tours route, after weeks of rain, Sir decided he'd had enough and he wanted to hire a car. As we'd not planned on doing so neither of us had our licences. After reading what law I could find on the internet it was my view that we did not need to have the licence on us, as long as we actually had a valid licence at home, and some kind of copy on us. We got our daughter to scan our licences to an email and printed out the copy. The car hire company was fine with that and luckily we never had to show it to anyone else.
 
How do you suggest carrying your passport?
When traveling, I carry my passport, debit/credit cards and money on my person at all times. I have both a neck-style wallet and a security belt-style wallet (both Rick Steves, but they are very similar to the ones that REI carries) for my passport, debit/credit cards and the bulk of my cash in this concealed wallet. I keep a much smaller amount of cash in a coin purse (also Rick Steves). I do keep a copy of my documents in a pouch in the bottom of my suitcase (will be the bottom of my pack for the Camino). I bring my wallet, phone, and camera with me to the restroom or shower if I am in an unsecure area -- basically, anything that I wouldn't want to lose (yes, pictures are important to me) and I would consider any place I travel to be an unsecure area. The only other thing I wouldn't want to lose would be my journal, but who would want that as it only has value to me! If your things are in a zip-lock or more preferably a water-proof pouch, they would be fine coming with you to the shower. I personally cannot envision any circumstance where I would think that my things would be safe if I left them unattended. As with traveling to Bolivia, Kenya, or Uganda, I do not plan to travel to Spain with anything that I wouldn't be prepared to lose, but take precautions to safe-guard the more important things (passport, money, electronics).
 

fernandezr

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
All:
I know it has come up before on this forum, but a suggestion on the "photocopy" of passports and key documents. Those papers need to be just as secure as your passport, so it has been suggested before to scan your passport, credit cards, health insurance card, etc. and put them all in one file that you can encrypt and email to yourself at the email account you will be checking on the Camino. This way you will have access to the documents if anything happens, from any web-enabled device that can be used to log into your email (albuerge, hospital, embassy, etc.). The encryption will keep them safe (just don't forget the password!!!).
Plus you don't have the extra pages of paper to worry with protecting from weather or thieves.

Rambler
Rambler: Being an old-timer and not so technologically oriented I hadn't considered your idea. To scan those important documents and send them to yourself via email would work. I may do that as an additional level of safety net!
Thanks..
 

jirit

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
Your passport i.e. issued by your country's government? Or just your pilgrims credential? I've never heard of anyone getting their passport stamped other than at country entry and exit passport control.
My wife and I traveled around the world many years ago and at one backpacker we stayed at, we had them stamp our regular passports with their logo. Needless to say after nearly a year of traveling we had collected numerous official entry and exit stamps of all the countries we have visited.

The only customs folks that spotted the backpacker stamp were the Americans. They were not too impressed but they let us in.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Life is going to be a whole lot easier when everything will be by biometric identification. Then we won't need passports, credit cards or other documents.
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
This reminds me of a story my priest told. When he did the camino, he had his wallet stolen and called back to the US to have a new drivers license issued so he could drive in Spain. Our state department of transportation, in their total ignorance told him that he had to go to a "USA approved" physician and get a physical and eye test to prove he could drive before they would issue the replacement. When he inquired, what USA approved meant, they could not answer him, so they emailed him a form and said he had to go to a state office and have it validated. Given it was Sunday and nowhere in Spain would be open that day, he had the hospitalero stamp a sello on the form and he sent it back. Got his new license in a day...
;)
Rambler
I bet if you ask the US consulate in Spain they have a list of doctors that do physicals for visa etc.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
I bet if you ask the US consulate in Spain they have a list of doctors that do physicals for visa etc.
Yes, but it seems a bit ridiculous to ask that of a person traveling that has just been robbed for a replacement license. Also that they did not even know to suggest what you just did shows a bureaucratic process more focused on itself than on serving the public.

Rambler
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Yes, but it seems a bit ridiculous to ask that of a person traveling that has just been robbed for a replacement license. Also that they did not even know to suggest what you just did shows a bureaucratic process more focused on itself than on serving the public.

Rambler
It's a great story. Added much amusement to my day.
 

obinjatoo@yahoo.com

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
Riveted to my belly.... But seriously, all the above mentioned never, ever left me. Except at accommodations, I surrendered my passport and it came back just fine. I slept with my around the neck type passport pouch, my blood pressure meds, headlamp, extra stash of earplugs. But wait... I slept with more than that. Damp socks between my long johns and my skin to dry by morning, damp tee shirt under the sleeping bag also dry by morning, my bra (can't stand sleeping in them) thrown haphazardly down by my feet somewhere to keep it warm, the next days socks to keep them warm down by my feet and let's see what else did I sleep with. It was busy in my sleeping bag (get your minds out of the gutter) but I never lost anything. WOW, That was way more info than anybody wanted I'm sure!
 

seajaycjw

New Member
Riveted to my belly.... But seriously, all the above mentioned never, ever left me. Except at accommodations, I surrendered my passport and it came back just fine. I slept with my around the neck type passport pouch, my blood pressure meds, headlamp, extra stash of earplugs. But wait... I slept with more than that. Damp socks between my long johns and my skin to dry by morning, damp tee shirt under the sleeping bag also dry by morning, my bra (can't stand sleeping in them) thrown haphazardly down by my feet somewhere to keep it warm, the next days socks to keep them warm down by my feet and let's see what else did I sleep with. It was busy in my sleeping bag (get your minds out of the gutter) but I never lost anything. WOW, That was way more info than anybody wanted I'm sure!
Very funny! Made my day!
 

seajaycjw

New Member
All:
I know it has come up before on this forum, but a suggestion on the "photocopy" of passports and key documents. Those papers need to be just as secure as your passport, so it has been suggested before to scan your passport, credit cards, health insurance card, etc. and put them all in one file that you can encrypt and email to yourself at the email account you will be checking on the Camino. This way you will have access to the documents if anything happens, from any web-enabled device that can be used to log into your email (albuerge, hospital, embassy, etc.). The encryption will keep them safe (just don't forget the password!!!).
Plus you don't have the extra pages of paper to worry with protecting from weather or thieves.

Rambler
Great idea, but how do you encrypt them?
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Great idea, but how do you encrypt them?
Here's how with Windows XP:
  1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer.
  2. Locate the file that you want, right-click the file, and then click Properties.
  3. On the General tab, click Advanced.
  4. Under Compress or Encrypt attributes, select the Encrypt contents to secure data check box, and then click OK.
  5. Click OK. If the file is located in an unencrypted folder, you receive an Encryption Warning dialog box. Use one of the following steps:
    • If you want to encrypt only the file, click Encrypt the file only, and then click OK.
    • If you want to encrypt the file and the folder in which it is located, click Encrypt the file and the parent folder, and then click OK.
You can also use a program like Winzip to do it.
Not sure how to on the Apple iOS.

Rambler
 

Carol06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (May 2012)
Frances (May 2015) all going well and with my husband this time.
Last time I kept it in my moneybelt. This went everywhere with me. Uncomfortable though. next time I am taking a Scotti vest. This will also go everywhere with me and will be inside my sleeping bag at night.
 

rcamargo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, september/october 2014
My first Camino will be on sep 2014. I'm worried with all that care needed, i didn't imagine it was that way...

And what about when my camera, iphone and small tablet are charging, do i have to stay close until it finishes?
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Last time I kept it in my moneybelt. This went everywhere with me. Uncomfortable though. next time I am taking a Scotti vest. This will also go everywhere with me and will be inside my sleeping bag at night.
I’m with you 100% on the Scotti vest. I bought one for my Camino. It held my passport, credential, wallet, iPhone and sundry other items I wanted to keep safe and close at hand. My main money stash and extra bank cards I kept in my money belt which, along with my Scotti vest, came off only when I had a shower. The Scotti vest, with valuables zipped up inside, went in my sleep sack at night and I slept on top of it.

In addition to being wonderfully convenient for airport travel, it provided me with just the right amount of extra layering I wanted and, knowing my valuables were securely stashed inside, gave me great comfort the one time I found myself in a situation, post-Camino, where I felt I was at significant risk of having my pockets picked.
 

Packinglight

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
July-August 2019, Pamplona-Santiago
I've used the same very simple money belt since the 80's. Cash, cards, and passport go there. It's a light cotton zippered pouch on an elastic waistband. everything's inside plastic baggies because they can get sweaty. Once the passport has done its airport duty I visit the loo and zip it back into its baggie and money belt. Never, ever, ever, ever go into your money belt in any place other than a toilet or private hotel room. Never. Otherwise what is the point of having a money belt if you show the world what you've got, where, and its entire contents? Just DON'T. Better to carry a normal handbag/purse/whatever.
Other security-related things I have learned through being a broke single female traveler for a lot of years: The cash I carry in my wallet and money belt is separated by paper clips (organised by currency and amount) so I can see at a glance what I've got without counting every time. I remove the budgeted amount for the following day, put that in my pocket/purse/daybag, whatever I'm using on that type of trip, and the rest goes back into my money belt. If there is cash left over at the end of the day, it goes back into the budget pool, and I divide it by the number of days remaining, and therefore have more to spend on subsequent days. This system has worked for me on travel on 4 continents so far. I also tend to have money left over for fun stuff/shopping as I go and never have debts awaiting my return home. I haven't been robbed on the road but I have had great confidence that a thief would only get my day's allotment of cash and not the whole whack.
 

Sraaen

Steven Raaen
Camino(s) past & future
Via Podiensis (Le Puy - Pamplona) [2013]
Via Turonensis (Tours - SJPdP) [2013]
Camino Frances (SJPdP - SdC) [2013]
Via Tolosana (Montpellier - Pau) [2015]
Camino del Norte (Irun - SdC) [2015]
Do you drive your car without your driver's license? Hopefully, note. You are in a foreign country where carrying an ID is probably even more important for you safety and security in case of an accident.
Several times on this site I have related the story of the guy I met who told me someone had cut the "neck purse" off him overnight in Cizur Menor, I sleep in shorts with my valuable tucked into the pockets. God forbid what I might do to the bugger who tries to rob me!
Man, Cizur Menorca sounds like bad news. Literally half of the people I met who stayed there got robbed (granted it was all the same night and most of us stayed in Pamplona and loved it). It's not even charming - more of a modern sprawl of Pamplona.
 

meriPNG

Loving Life! :-)
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances through to Finisterre (May-June 2014)
I've used the same very simple money belt since the 80's. Cash, cards, and passport go there. It's a light cotton zippered pouch on an elastic waistband. everything's inside plastic baggies because they can get sweaty. Once the passport has done its airport duty I visit the loo and zip it back into its baggie and money belt. Never, ever, ever, ever go into your money belt in any place other than a toilet or private hotel room. Never. Otherwise what is the point of having a money belt if you show the world what you've got, where, and its entire contents? Just DON'T. Better to carry a normal handbag/purse/whatever.
Other security-related things I have learned through being a broke single female traveler for a lot of years: The cash I carry in my wallet and money belt is separated by paper clips (organised by currency and amount) so I can see at a glance what I've got without counting every time. I remove the budgeted amount for the following day, put that in my pocket/purse/daybag, whatever I'm using on that type of trip, and the rest goes back into my money belt. If there is cash left over at the end of the day, it goes back into the budget pool, and I divide it by the number of days remaining, and therefore have more to spend on subsequent days. This system has worked for me on travel on 4 continents so far. I also tend to have money left over for fun stuff/shopping as I go and never have debts awaiting my return home. I haven't been robbed on the road but I have had great confidence that a thief would only get my day's allotment of cash and not the whole whack.
Thank you for this Packinglight :) as a broke single female traveler, it's great to read this and feel assured that I can also travel smartly and safely.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I keep my country passport and pilgrim passport in a ziplock bag and secure in a zipped pocket of my shirt or cargo pocket of my pants and I never never surrender my passport overnight to anyone, I will allow them to photocopy if necessary but will not leave it. You are not oblighed to any more in Europe.
 

Stellere

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March 2014 - con mi padre
I always kept mine (along with cards and money) in a black zippered pouch that I wore cross-body. When walking through cities, the pouch was under my clothes, but for the most part I just wore it like a purse. In albergues or when leaving my backpack outside, I stuck my phone in there too, so that I always carried my valuables (what little I had!) with me.

I packed my bed in a dry sack, so once my blanket and sheet were on the bed, that sack became my shower pouch. My money pouch and dry clothes went in the sack, and the whole thing came with me to the shower.

Better safe than sorry! I've lost my passport and cards while overseas (theft in South Africa), and getting everything replaced is such a nightmare.
 

rcamargo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, september/october 2014
Well, i think i can use one or other of the solutions presented here and have my valuables always with me, but what about my boots? It would be a big problem, if someone take them. Do they took boots also?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Well, i think i can use one or other of the solutions presented here and have my valuables always with me, but what about my boots? It would be a big problem, if someone take them. Do they took boots also?
Only heard of it happening once - and that was by a very friendly nice dog. A fellow pilgrims left her walking sandals outside the dorm overnight and the dog could not resist. Chewed it to bits. She got new ones (paid for by the albergue owner).

The only thing I keep close are my passport, money and iPhone.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Well, i think i can use one or other of the solutions presented here and have my valuables always with me, but what about my boots? It would be a big problem, if someone take them. Do they took boots also?
Actually, boots sometimes go missing. The common thing now is albergues is to require boots to be left in entry area. They have been reported stolen and sometimes taken by mistake with another pair left behind.

I have often paired one my boots with someone I am walking with...laces tied together and the "pairs" not close to each other. Not attractive to thieves and pretty difficult to take by mistake.
Especially effective if gender or size mixed.

A simple way to be a little more secure.
 

Alyssa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2014)
Norte, Finisterre, Salvador, Primitivo (2015)
How about backpacks? Are they ever stolen from the albergues?
 

Sraaen

Steven Raaen
Camino(s) past & future
Via Podiensis (Le Puy - Pamplona) [2013]
Via Turonensis (Tours - SJPdP) [2013]
Camino Frances (SJPdP - SdC) [2013]
Via Tolosana (Montpellier - Pau) [2015]
Camino del Norte (Irun - SdC) [2015]
How do you suggest carrying your passport?
I always had my US passport, credential and 200e in the free plastic credential holder I got at the pilgrim office. Kept it in a side pocket at all times.
 

Alyssa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2014)
Norte, Finisterre, Salvador, Primitivo (2015)
I'm going to walk completely naked,that way i won't lose boots,pack,poles,or passport,i'll just pick stuff up from Sarria onwards,has anyone else thought of this :p
No, that's a great idea! I'm sure you can get everything you need in the free boxes! (And you'll be very recognizable, at least for the first few days.)
 

Perejil

New Member
Is it common for people to ask to see your passport or drivers licence while walking the Cameno?
I was planning on leaving mine in Galicia with relatives while I walk. Maybe I'd just carry a drives licence on me.
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Is it common for people to ask to see your passport or drivers licence while walking the Cameno?
I was planning on leaving mine in Galicia with relatives while I walk. Maybe I'd just carry a drives licence on me.
Not sure where you are from.
Ask yourself this, if there were some emergency while on the Camino that required you to leave the country immediately, how easy would it be to fly out if your passport were with relatives in Galicia?

It's common for them to ask for your passport.
 

Perejil

New Member
I'm Australian and have relatives in Spain who we visit often. Usually we leave my passports at their house for safe keeping while we travel around for safe keeping. Getting there or contacting them in an emergency would be a simple phone call.
Unless the Alberges or someone specific needs to see my Australian passport I'd rather store it until I need it again for the return flight home.
Photo copies or a scan copies would be easier to carry.
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
If you had a family emergency in Australia and had to fly out right away, it would be a hassle to scramble back to your relatives in Galicia to retrieve your passports.

Most Albergues do ask to see your passport along with your credential.
 

Breugel

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not yet.
Is it common for people to ask to see your passport or drivers licence while walking the Cameno?
I was planning on leaving mine in Galicia with relatives while I walk. Maybe I'd just carry a drives licence on me.
Hi - in the EU so also in Spain you must be able to provide ID by means of a passport or a drivers license ( if that provides proof of nationality). So make sure to keep it in e a safe place- but a good idea is to keep a copy in your backpack where you can reach it easily and show (or on your phone).
Also make a couple of small cards in Spanish and English with all your details in case of an emergency and laminate. Put one in your wallet, on your body, in backpack etc where they can easily be found.
I hope this helps ?

Buen camino
 

burritobear9

Member
Camino(s) past & future
june (2013)
Wore a money belt with passport, cash and credit/bank cards at all times.
Buen Camino

Cheryl


Sent from my iPad using Camino de Santiago Forum mobile app
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
You really do need to have your passport with you. All the albergues I stayed in this year asked for it and took details from it.
 

WildPlace

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2013, 2015
Via de la Plata (2020)
How about backpacks? Are they ever stolen from the albergues?
Some of the days i almost wished someone WOULD run off with my backpack. I don't think they would have run very far with it :-D

I kept my passport in a zipped up pocket until the rainy day from hell when it got soaking wet and half of my stamps/visas have run or disappeared and my photo has a tide mark across it! After that I kept it in a ziplock bag which is where my credential was, safe and dry.

I too take out enough cash for my daily needs from my stash and put it in a small coin purse.

Anything I don't particularly want to have lost or stolen I keep with me at all times, including in the shower and I put in my sleeping bag with me (this included my camera, phone, credential, passport, money). If an item was charging I wouldn't leave it, i warned my family that if i couldn't charge my phone they wouldn't hear from me, telling them that i had better things to do than sit and watch a phone charging! Mostly I charged things up when my friend and i had a hotel or private room (around once a week).
 

wisepilgrim

Guidebook Author
Camino(s) past & future
Many
Chiming in on the 'do you need your passport' side of this topic, dougfitz has the right idea. Having spent a few months as a hospitalero west of Burgos I can tell you that the Guardia Civil has made it tremendously difficult for albergue owners; they are obligated to keep and submit daily a log of all guests. I cannot say for certain what the rest of the camino is like, but any place under the jurisdiction of the Fromista police will certainly request your passport to make a record of your visit.

I asked the Guardia once what they did with the information and their claim was that it is used to actively track ne'er–do–well's as well as support investigations of missing pilgrims (which happens surprisingly often).

It is important for North Americans to remember that carrying papers IS a part of European life, made much easier by the EU, but still a requirement.

My tactic lines up with most: TWO zip lock bags, one inside the other (by the end of 30 days of pilgrimage they become wholly holy). They must be large enough to hold all of the things I would not like to lose: both passports, credit card, phone, and camera. The camera only gets added when I shower and when I do everything is zipped up and placed on the shower floor UNDERNEATH THE SHOWER HEAD where they are out of reach. Put it by the shower door and you might not see it disappear. Definitely don't leave it in your pocket while draped over the door or hung on a peg.

It stays in a zipped pocket at all other times, doing its best not to get nicked.
At night, like most, it is in my sleeping bag.

I have seen some devious theft along the camino, things like fake bicigrinos wandering the albergue in the early morning, but I have never seen anything grabbed from a person's body. Might happen, but certainly quite rare along the camino itself.

Bagging is a simple strategy that allows me to keep my focus elsewhere.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
For a small amount of extra weight I prefer the Sea to Summit accessory pouches. They are very sturdy and truly watertight. Quite expensive but averaged out over many caminos the cost is justified. ImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1400000899.818951.jpg
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
I have used Lifeventure pouches as well. They had one just the right size for a passport that could be attached to a belt when walking without a pack, eg when travelling or wandering around at the end of the day. It would go into my pack when walking.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Yes, but realize if you rent a private room in a hotel, hostel, or albergue, they may ask for (and keep overnight) your passport.
It is usual and fine to surrender it.
They return it upon checkout.

Otherwise, it never leaves my body
Ditto; take it, money, credit cards with me to the shower ... you’d be more than a little put out if it went missing
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
Life is going to be a whole lot easier when everything will be by biometric identification. Then we won't need passports, credit cards or other documents.
That has a whole lot of other very serious problems. I won't get into the argument here but as an IT professional I genuinely fear the widespread use of facial recognition.
 

pjacobi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
I've seen reports that a stolen US passport is worth about $2000 on the black market, which makes it your most valuable possession. Protect it, or you will have to spend a day or two of your valuable time at a US embassy waiting for a replacement.


-Paul
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
Hey! I had a 'day wallet' that i carried a couple of cards and a small amount of cash in. I then had a waterproof bag that I kept my passports, remaining cash, etc. in. These both stayed with me at all times. I elaborate on this page of my packing list as to exactly what I used.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
That has a whole lot of other very serious problems. I won't get into the argument here but as an IT professional I genuinely fear the widespread use of facial recognition.
Gosh, my post was written in 2014. Many changes since then.

Interesting how some of these old threads get resurrected.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
All:
I know it has come up before on this forum, but a suggestion on the "photocopy" of passports and key documents. Those papers need to be just as secure as your passport, so it has been suggested before to scan your passport, credit cards, health insurance card, etc. and put them all in one file that you can encrypt and email to yourself at the email account you will be checking on the Camino. This way you will have access to the documents if anything happens, from any web-enabled device that can be used to log into your email (albuerge, hospital, embassy, etc.). The encryption will keep them safe (just don't forget the password!!!).
Plus you don't have the extra pages of paper to worry with protecting from weather or thieves.

Rambler
Brilliant idea. I agree much safer and secure.thanjd 👍
 

Ciaran3434

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (sept 2017)
In a plastic bag to protect it from sweat and rain, and in a fastened pants pocket.
Same for me. I keep it on me at all times while in albergue! If my bag is taken, I want to be able to replace my gear or get home without having any issues.

After a few days it became a habit for me to do the check of my phone, wallet and passports.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
How do you suggest carrying your passport?
I’m on the Camino now. While I have a long way to go, it didn’t take me long to realize I hated wearing that black pouch around my neck. I have a waist pack that stays with me all the time. Inside I have a ziplock bag with my passport and credential.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
it didn’t take me long to realize I hated wearing that black pouch around my neck.
I agree that this would be annoying. I wear the pouch as a cross-body item that does not drag so much on the neck. When I am walking, I hook it with a carabiner to the front of my backpack (for example on the hip belt somewhere), so that the weight is not on my neck or shoulders and it does not bounce. I can take off my backpack without removing the pouch, which does not leave my body except for the shower.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I agree that this would be annoying. I wear the pouch as a cross-body item that does not drag so much on the neck. When I am walking, I hook it with a carabiner to the front of my backpack (for example on the hip belt somewhere), so that the weight is not on my neck or shoulders and it does not bounce. I can take off my backpack without removing the pouch, which does not leave my body except for the shower.
Good idea, thanks!
 

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