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First Aid Kit - Basic items to take?

TheLazyPilgrim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - September '2018'
Howdy folks!

I just wanted to run through my list of 12 items that I will be packing into a small First Aid Kit which I will be taking with me on the Camino Frances in September 2018. I understand that there are many pharmacies along the way and that keeping things light is a priority, but I believe that if there was an injury or an illness and I was between two pharmacies then I would like to have these 12 items on my person. What I wanted to know is if there is anything you think I wouldn't need, or anything I should add?
  1. Fabric Bandaids
  2. Gauze Patches
  3. Blister Protection (Compeed)
  4. Ibuprofen
  5. Immodium
  6. Scissors
  7. Tweezers
  8. Rolled Bandage
  9. Triangular Bandage
  10. Alcohol Cleansing Wipes
  11. Antiseptic Cream
  12. Tape
Obviously, ideally I could take a proper first aid kit, but I just wanted to make sure I had all of the basic injuries and illnesses covered. Please feel free to share your thoughts on the above - I'm keen for some of your sweet, sweet knowledge!

I will also be taking a sewing kit which will contain safety pins, and a fold up knife in case I need to amputate a finger, or cut up some chorizo.

Scott
 
Last edited:

La Brique Jaune

Official member of la confradia del pinza del oro
Camino(s) past & future
2017: SJPDP to Finisterre
(202?): I hope and need to
Hi,

Maybe This
12. Latex Glove for your protection if you help somebody.
13. I think it's call butterfly closure bandage

Last Year: I had two separates kits one for my blisters and another one for emergency.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
See signature. Too many to list here.
My first aid kit has shrunk every time I go back. There are many Pharmacies (and the people who work there wear white coats!) along the way so I just pick up what I need when I need it. In my opinion, and this is just my experience, the two most critical items on your list are a NSAID (I prefer Aleve or “norproxy sodio” rather than ibuprofen) and something for diarrhea. You should also learn to pronounce diarrhea if you run out of said pills.

I don’t bring any of the other stuff, but I don’t get blisters either so that might be a game changer.

Funny story: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...tip-how-to-pronounce-diarrhea-in-spain.37387/
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
I never travel without NyQuil gelcaps. At the first hint of sore throat or feeling a cold coming on....I go to bed early after taking two gelcaps. Wipes it out.
I've walked two Camino's and both times many pilgrims caught cold (Camino cough). Several had to go to doctor to get meds. NyQuil gelcaps, my little secret.
Also my ibuprofen is Advil regular and PM. PM for those nights of aches and pains plus it knocks me out for a good nights sleep. Wake up ready to conquer those clicks.

Buen Camino!! :)
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Howdy folks!
I just wanted to run through my list of 12 items that I will be packing into a small First Aid Kit which I will be taking with me on the Camino Frances in September 2018. I understand that there are many pharmacies along the way and that keeping things light is a priority, but I believe that if there was an injury or an illness and I was between two pharmacies then I would like to have these 12 items on my person. What I wanted to know is if there is anything you think I wouldn't need, or anything I should add?
  1. Fabric Bandaids
  2. Gauze Patches
  3. Blister Protection (Compeed)
  4. Ibuprofen
  5. Immodium
  6. Scissors
  7. Tweezers
  8. Rolled Bandage
  9. Triangular Bandage
  10. Alcohol Cleansing Wipes
  11. Antiseptic Cream
  12. Tape
Scott
The list looks good. I don't take the rolled bandage (maybe I could fashion something temporary out of tape if necessary) or the triangular (I have a scarf that could be a sling). I take all-purpose paper tape and Omnifix Stretch tape. I also carry a couple of Aspirins (for heart attacks), and 2 or 3 Gravol and antihistamine pills.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I think that you could probably get by with two bandaids, some antibiotic ointment and a couple of alcohol cleansing wipes. Anything else that you need can be purchased at a farmacia.
 

Oravasaari

Helsinki, Finland
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
Mine looks similar to yours except I don't take scissors (I always carry my pack as hand luggage on flights), neither do I take antiseptic cream (heavy/can be bought if needed), no trangular bandage either (neck scarf/bandana I use would suffice).
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Mine looks similar to yours except I don't take scissors (I always carry my pack as hand luggage on flights), neither do I take antiseptic cream (heavy/can be bought if needed), no trangular bandage either (neck scarf/bandana I use would suffice).
I take a small pair of blunt ended scissors that can go into hand luggage to cut my beloved Omnifix tape.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Trecile's 'blunt-edged' scissors are also called kiddie scissors. I buy mine in the local supermarket. Ironically, they ARE airline cabin legal.

I include mine in my carry-on bag so I can more easily open the protein powder packets I must carry with me. Of course, they can do any number of other tasks, as well and potentially as harmfully, as any other pair of scissors. But, they allow them. I carry them. This addresses my en-route needs.

In 15-years traveling with the small round-tipped scissors, I have never had a problem. At the same time, I have had several tiny multi-tools confiscated for a varied of inane reasons. These tiny tools do NOT have a knife blade or cutting edge. However, because they are considered 'tools,' some countries do not allow them past security screening. The US / TSA DOES allow them, always, but Spain did not - twice.

I have given up trying to educate various security officers about the difference between a standard sized pair of pliers or a scissor, and the otherwise legal itsy-bitsy pocket tool. Now, I just check everything EXCEPT my kiddie scissors.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
Howdy folks!

I just wanted to run through my list of 12 items that I will be packing into a small First Aid Kit which I will be taking with me on the Camino Frances in September 2018. I understand that there are many pharmacies along the way and that keeping things light is a priority, but I believe that if there was an injury or an illness and I was between two pharmacies then I would like to have these 12 items on my person. What I wanted to know is if there is anything you think I wouldn't need, or anything I should add?
  1. Fabric Bandaids
  2. Gauze Patches
  3. Blister Protection (Compeed)
  4. Ibuprofen
  5. Immodium
  6. Scissors
  7. Tweezers
  8. Rolled Bandage
  9. Triangular Bandage
  10. Alcohol Cleansing Wipes
  11. Antiseptic Cream
  12. Tape
Obviously, ideally I could take a proper first aid kit, but I just wanted to make sure I had all of the basic injuries and illnesses covered. Please feel free to share your thoughts on the above - I'm keen for some of your sweet, sweet knowledge!

I will also be taking a sewing kit which will contain safety pins, and a fold up knife in case I need to amputate a finger, or cut up some chorizo.

Scott
You can get most of that stuff on the Camino. Lots of pharmacies on the way.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
As a Wilderness First Responder, two points to add.
First: you do not need antiseptic cream/antibiotic ointment. Just irrigate the wound thoroughly with water clean enough to drink (that is, squirt an entire water bottle onto the wound) (you cannot over-irrigate). Alcohol prep pads are for cleaning metal instruments, not wounds, so if all you have is scissors, you don't need alcohol prep pads either.
Second: walking elsewhere than the C Frances, there are many fewer towns, many more closing days (especially France) so you will want to carry supplies for a wider range of eventualities.
 

maggiec

Member
Howdy folks!

I just wanted to run through my list of 12 items that I will be packing into a small First Aid Kit which I will be taking with me on the Camino Frances in September 2018. I understand that there are many pharmacies along the way and that keeping things light is a priority, but I believe that if there was an injury or an illness and I was between two pharmacies then I would like to have these 12 items on my person. What I wanted to know is if there is anything you think I wouldn't need, or anything I should add?
  1. Fabric Bandaids
  2. Gauze Patches
  3. Blister Protection (Compeed)
  4. Ibuprofen
  5. Immodium
  6. Scissors
  7. Tweezers
  8. Rolled Bandage
  9. Triangular Bandage
  10. Alcohol Cleansing Wipes
  11. Antiseptic Cream
  12. Tape
Obviously, ideally I could take a proper first aid kit, but I just wanted to make sure I had all of the basic injuries and illnesses covered. Please feel free to share your thoughts on the above - I'm keen for some of your sweet, sweet knowledge!

I will also be taking a sewing kit which will contain safety pins, and a fold up knife in case I need to amputate a finger, or cut up some chorizo.

Scott
Pharmacies everywhere. I take nail scissors, band aids, Betadine, toe gels and scalpel blades to pop blisters
Howdy folks!

I just wanted to run through my list of 12 items that I will be packing into a small First Aid Kit which I will be taking with me on the Camino Frances in September 2018. I understand that there are many pharmacies along the way and that keeping things light is a priority, but I believe that if there was an injury or an illness and I was between two pharmacies then I would like to have these 12 items on my person. What I wanted to know is if there is anything you think I wouldn't need, or anything I should add?
  1. Fabric Bandaids
  2. Gauze Patches
  3. Blister Protection (Compeed)
  4. Ibuprofen
  5. Immodium
  6. Scissors
  7. Tweezers
  8. Rolled Bandage
  9. Triangular Bandage
  10. Alcohol Cleansing Wipes
  11. Antiseptic Cream
  12. Tape
Obviously, ideally I could take a proper first aid kit, but I just wanted to make sure I had all of the basic injuries and illnesses covered. Please feel free to share your thoughts on the above - I'm keen for some of your sweet, sweet knowledge!

I will also be taking a sewing kit which will contain safety pins, and a fold up knife in case I need to amputate a finger, or cut up some chorizo.

Scott
pharmacies everywhere! I take Betadine, bandaids, toe gels, scalpel blades (already sterilised) and alcohol wipes for blisters, anti diarrhoea and nausea tabs. That’s it. You can buy anything else there
 

Esauro57

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
St.Jean Pied du Port - Santiago 23-29/7/2010 23-30/7/2014
Porto-Santiago&MuxiaFinestere2018
i don't take compeed...on a blister it doubles its size ...even though you can walk and no pain is felt...but once you remove your socks...you will get a shock in noticing how your blister has grown to the full size of the compeed... and to make things worse ...you will have to say good bye to your new socks:-Compeed.. makes a mess which is almost impossible to clean especially using your simple pilgrim soap bar... soiling and stiffening them so they become a sandpaper in the shape of a sock :)
do not take scissors ... or cork screws ...i use a Swiss army Knife Victorinox Climber #1.3703 that has both...do not take it as hand luggage or worse...do not have it on you! or it will not pass the controls...pay for luggage and put your folding poles& swiss army, in your backpack... in this way you will have no control problems...
...needles, cotton thread, and Betadine Gel 30g (Iodine based disinfectant) for blisters...a few gauze swabs and Sensitive skin "cloth" adhesive roll:- the type you can cut without sissors as its "paper like" and so lets the blister wounds dry faster ...after the needle work is done :) take a small amount of anti-inflammatory like Voltaren 50 mg ( Diclorofenac potassic) use it only wth a full stomach ...after dinner and only if you have problems!
Go get a check up:- vist your dentist / doctor as a precaution a month before the cammino a tell him you are going to do this "mad" thing;-) he will get shocked and prescibe you a stronger form of pain killers / anti-inflammatory things... just in case you need them. (You probably will not use them ...but it's like having a Linux Blanket with you... and the do not cost much anyway ...and are light ).
 
D

Deleted member 32363

Guest
I take allergy/anti-histamine pills: drowsy and non. Also antiseptic ointment, bandaids, tape,Tylenol w/codeine. As per others, there are always someone else/pharmacy around for other items. I also take my precious elastic knee braces for the mountains descent!
 

TheLazyPilgrim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - September '2018'
Thank you to everyone who has replied - I have reviewed my list and I'm going to drop it down to 10 items - removing the alcohol cleansing wipes and the antiseptic cream.

La Brique: I have done first aid and combat first aid courses and as my instructors have told me - latex gloves aren't always going to be available, but that shouldn't stop me from at least attempting to help someone. Obviously if I have any open wounds myself I'll have to improvise somehow. As for the butterfly bandage, I can improvise with the safety pins in my sewing kit.

Damien: I loved reading your post - I have made damn sure I know how to pronounce spitty bum now. That said, I am taking ibuprofen and immodium for my aches and pains, and my potential bathroom incidents. I have found immodium has helped me when I was travelling through South East Asia so I'm comfortable with that!

To everyone who told me not to worry about the triangle/rolled bandages - I won't be taking a scarf and these are relatively small and light so if I am smack bang between two pharmacies and come across someone needing one of these, or if I need one myself, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'm also taking scissors because I'm checking everything when I fly over so they shouldn't get confiscated, and my knife isn't so much a pocket tool as a knife used for many tasks...but cutting tape safely probably isn't one of them.

Chris Gi - I touched on that in my original post. I'm well aware that you can get these things in pharmarcies in Spain, but I'd hate to come across someone who needed even just a little help and have to turn away because I didn't have the necessary items to help them there and then. "I'll be back in an hour, I think I saw a pharmacy 5km's back down the road. Try not to bleed out" isn't going to help anyone.

Kitsambler: Point taken! I'll ditch the anti-septic creams and the alcohol wipes. I'll just make sure my whisky flask is always half full!

Esauro: Thanks for the advice on the compeed! I'll look for an alternative for blister control.

Kalavati: I won't be taking anti-histamine medication because I don't have any allergies, but good idea for those that do!

Again, thanks for everyone for replying!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Thank you to everyone who has replied - I have reviewed my list and I'm going to drop it down to 10 items - removing the alcohol cleansing wipes and the antiseptic cream.

La Brique: I have done first aid and combat first aid courses and as my instructors have told me - latex gloves aren't always going to be available, but that shouldn't stop me from at least attempting to help someone. Obviously if I have any open wounds myself I'll have to improvise somehow. As for the butterfly bandage, I can improvise with the safety pins in my sewing kit.

Damien: I loved reading your post - I have made damn sure I know how to pronounce spitty bum now. That said, I am taking ibuprofen and immodium for my aches and pains, and my potential bathroom incidents. I have found immodium has helped me when I was travelling through South East Asia so I'm comfortable with that!

To everyone who told me not to worry about the triangle/rolled bandages - I won't be taking a scarf and these are relatively small and light so if I am smack bang between two pharmacies and come across someone needing one of these, or if I need one myself, I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'm also taking scissors because I'm checking everything when I fly over so they shouldn't get confiscated, and my knife isn't so much a pocket tool as a knife used for many tasks...but cutting tape safely probably isn't one of them.

Chris Gi - I touched on that in my original post. I'm well aware that you can get these things in pharmarcies in Spain, but I'd hate to come across someone who needed even just a little help and have to turn away because I didn't have the necessary items to help them there and then. "I'll be back in an hour, I think I saw a pharmacy 5km's back down the road. Try not to bleed out" isn't going to help anyone.

Kitsambler: Point taken! I'll ditch the anti-septic creams and the alcohol wipes. I'll just make sure my whisky flask is always half full!

Esauro: Thanks for the advice on the compeed! I'll look for an alternative for blister control.

Kalavati: I won't be taking anti-histamine medication because I don't have any allergies, but good idea for those that do!

Again, thanks for everyone for replying!

@TheLazyPilgrim
About the allergy medication, I have carried a few tablets of Novo-Pheniram (chlorpheniramine maleate, 4 mg.) on my three caminos. I can only remember using them once, when a young Korean pilgrim who had been bitten by bedbugs had a severe allergic reaction and had his face and throat covered by welts. I gave him two tablets, which he swallowed down gratefully. As far as I know, anti-histamines are safe to share and can provide relief to someone who has none available and no immediate access to a pharmacy. You might consider taking a few for this reason.
 

tillyjones

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances June 2015
VDLP May 2017
del Norte Sept 2018
I can't see much need for the triangular bandage. Its a relatively heavy item. I think you can achieve most things you would need it for with something else especially in a true emergency situation. And other people will pitch in to sort you out.
 

Leigh Lorayne

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino del Norte Irun to Ribadasella (2016)
Camino Primitivo Oviedo to Santiago (2016)
I second the Omnifix tape! Whenever I felt a hotspot I applied and never got any blisters on two Caminos. I also used Leukotape or Kinesiology tape. Even a few pieces can support an injured joint until resupplying at a pharmacy ( they do sell in Spain).
Buen Camino!
 

Gareth Griffith

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
Leukotape has been recommended previously and I'd second that recomendation (2 rolls). Tape your feet up in the morning wear two pairs of socks, one thin wicking pair under a pair of thick merino wool and you won't need any other blister protection.
Voltarol or ibuprofen gel is something that I did carry but never used. I did however let a few pilgrims have the use of it FOC.
On a lighter note I'd not bother with any medication as it appears everybody else will be carrying a full set of kit!
 
D

Deleted member 29041

Guest
I carry what I always carry in my left thigh pocket, everywhere I go:
  • A personal IDF dressing - add a pebble or small stick, and it can become a pressure bandage. 36 gram
  • A small package of quick-clot. 2 gram
  • A few band aids. 2 gram
  • Two disinfecting (alcohol) wet wipes. 4 gram each
Supplemented with what I have in my bag:
  • Two more wipes
  • A few Paracatamol tablets
  • Two magnyl tablets
  • A blister kit (Compeed)
  • Forsvarets hudsavle (universal skin care and lip balm and .. , google it). 13 gram
Some would count my basic repair kit (a few safety pins, two sewing needles, a bit of thread and a length of gorilla tape), as well as my buff and my belt, as part of the first aid kit.
 

TheLazyPilgrim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - September '2018'
Leukotape has been recommended previously and I'd second that recomendation (2 rolls). Tape your feet up in the morning wear two pairs of socks, one thin wicking pair under a pair of thick merino wool and you won't need any other blister protection.
Voltarol or ibuprofen gel is something that I did carry but never used. I did however let a few pilgrims have the use of it FOC.
On a lighter note I'd not bother with any medication as it appears everybody else will be carrying a full set of kit!

I think I'm going to stick with Moleskin for the time being because I have gone for many a long walk with my boots already and I haven't had even an inkling of a hot spot coming on. If I do, I'll head straight to the nearest pharmacy and follow your above advice!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I brought Leukotape on my first Camino, and didn't use it much. It's very sticky, and leaves a lot of residue on your feet and socks. Last year, my friend had brought moleskin, and was putting it on her feet every day. When she ran out we tried to find some more at a farmacia. The pharmacist recommended Ominfix instead. It's fantastic. Thin, flexible and not a lot of sticky residue.
 

TheLazyPilgrim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - September '2018'
I've put them in my First Aid kit and it weights less than 100grams and takes up less space than my John Brierley guide so I think they'll stay!
 

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