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James gets a cleanup

ranthr

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
We will have to use antibach before touching next time
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
I must be pretty slow on the uptake because I puzzled over that first word for a while before finally realizing that "Nesta" in Gallego (?) is actually "En esta" in standard Spanish. Likewise it was an abnormally long time during my first visit before I realized that "O" in Galician placenames is actually "El" and "A" is "La." But with "hoxe" for "hoy" I'm beginning to think of Gallego not as a dialect but almost a separate language altogether, just like Portuguese. I wonder which version of the language is taught in Galician schools. Both? (And, yes, I confess to a special interest in languages -- we all have an inner nerd.)
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
I'm beginning to think of Gallego not as a dialect but almost a separate language altogether, just like Portuguese. I wonder which version of the language is taught in Galician schools. Both? (And, yes, I confess to a special interest in languages -- we all have an inner nerd.)

In Galician schools some subjects are studied in Galician , some in Spanish and some in English depending on the school.
The Galician language in schools is the normative by the RAG (Real Academia Galega da Lingua).
A Spanish speaker can understand some words in a conversation in Galician but not enough to follow it, especially if the speakers are from the rural.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
I must be pretty slow on the uptake because I puzzled over that first word for a while before finally realizing that "Nesta" in Gallego (?) is actually "En esta" in standard Spanish. Likewise it was an abnormally long time during my first visit before I realized that "O" in Galician placenames is actually "El" and "A" is "La." But with "hoxe" for "hoy" I'm beginning to think of Gallego not as a dialect but almost a separate language altogether, just like Portuguese. I wonder which version of the language is taught in Galician schools. Both? (And, yes, I confess to a special interest in languages -- we all have an inner nerd.)
I love languages
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I'm beginning to think of Gallego not as a dialect but almost a separate language altogether, just like Portuguese.
It is a separate language, just like Portuguese (and French, and Italian, and Catalan). Like those, it is related to Castilian ("Spanish") but it is actually more closely related to Portuguese than to Castilian, both descending from the medieval Galician-Portuguese language.
 

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