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My draft winter Camino Frances packing list

Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#1
After researching what people here carried on similar trips, what is available in my area and what I have found so far useful, this is my current packing list. I plan to start walking sometime in January from Pamplona and plan to reach Santiago within 30 days, so any feedback will be greatly appreciated. I will also fly in and want to keep all my gear as a carry-on, so I'm limited by volume and weight.

I'll carry items marked with * on my back. Underlined stuff is something I need to get.

30L Backpack*
Rain cover for the backpack

Footwear:
1* pair of my favorite Gore-Tex approach shoes (the most comfortable shoes I've ever owned)
1 pair or sandals flipflops
1 pair of microspikes (if there is space in the backpack)
1 pair of gaiters

2+1* pairs of walking socks
1 pair of sleeping socks
1 pair of thicker socks (if there is space in the backpack)

Clothes (most fit in a 10L stuff sack)
1+1* fast-drying t-shirts
1 fast-drying t-shirt for sleeping
1+1* runner's long-sleeve shirt (can go on top of the t-shirt)
1* sweatshirt-type layer that I've been using for years and is awesome
1* winter rainjacket (both warm and protects from rain)
2+1* pairs of underwear
1* hiking pants
1 water-resistant pants (can go on top of the hiking pants for added warmt)
1 balaklava
1 gloves
1 rain poncho? (how strong is the rain on the trail in January?)
ADDED: 1 pair of running thights
ADDED: 1 fleece or down shirt
ADDED: 1 light hat

Sleeping Stuff
1 Ultralight sleeping down bag rated for 0C/32F
1 bag liner
Something against bed bugs?? (I guess I was just too scared)

Electronics (in a ziplock bag)
1* phone
1 phone charger with cable
1 headlight
1 set of extra batteries for headlight
1 power bank for charging the phone with its cable
ADDED: 1 Tiny (probably <0.25oz) red blinking light for the backpack when walking on road at night

First Aid and Hygiene (in a ziplock bag)
1 toothbrush
1 travel size toothpaste
1 soap
1 dental floss
1 very light microfiber towel
A handful of ibuprofen
Lip balm
Some vaseline or something similar
Bandaid
Needle
Lighter
Emergency blanket
ADDED: 1 small, travel-size deodorant
ADDED: Some earplugs
ADDED: Cord
ADDED: A handful of safety pins
ADDED: A nailclipper
ADDED: Small Bic lighter

Ziplock bags for the Camino credentials, ets.
ADDED: 1 40L plastic bag
ADDED: Extra stuff sack

ADDED: The little rock to give away my burdens at Cruz de Ferro

TOTAL WEIGHT (without underlined items): 5kg/11.5lb

Any feedback will be appreciated! Let me know if I miss something!
 
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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
#2
I wouldn't take:
1 pair of microspikes (if there is space in the backpack)
1 pair of gaiters (oh, maybe)
1 pair of sleeping socks
1 pair of thicker socks (if there is space in the backpack)
1 fast-drying t-shirt for sleeping
Something against bed bugs??
1 headlight
1 set of extra batteries for headlight
1 power bank for charging the phone with its cable
Some vaseline or something similar

Someone will probably tell you to ditch some of your underwear and double-ups, but having just had trouble getting things dry in October, I can see the wisdom in having too many socks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Beginning 1 December in Pamplona
#3
I am packed for a dec 1 start. I have a slightly larger pack, but have done a lot of backpacking, and think you are missing a thin long underwear layer (wool or polypropylene) to go under your pants in dry cold weather; and you need two decent warm layers in addition to your rain layer. Maybe your awesome sweatshirt is a good first one, but it needs to be thin and non cotton; and you need a thin down layer like the Patagonia micro puff. Do you need the poncho in addition to rain pants and jacket and pack cover? Enjoy!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés April 06, C. Fisterre May 06, C. Frances Oct 17, C. Portuguese Oct 18, C. Inglese Nov 18
#4
Don't take that sweatshirt if it is cotton! Take fleece or a puffy.
Suggest merino instead of fast drying t-shirts if they are synthetic.
I'd take an extra pair of regular socks in lieu of the thick socks.
You could spray your pack and sleeping bag against bedbugs before you leave.
I would actually take some microspikes if I was waking at this time but only the very very lightest version.
By sandals I imagine you mean something like crocs or filpflops.
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#5
I am packed for a dec 1 start. I have a slightly larger pack, but have done a lot of backpacking, and think you are missing a thin long underwear layer (wool or polypropylene) to go under your pants in dry cold weather; and you need two decent warm layers in addition to your rain layer. Maybe your awesome sweatshirt is a good first one, but it needs to be thin and non cotton; and you need a thin down layer like the Patagonia micro puff. Do you need the poncho in addition to rain pants and jacket and pack cover? Enjoy!!
Thanks! Running thights seem light and compact, so I can definitely throw one in.

My planned method of layering is t-shirt, followed by long-sleeved t-shirt, followed by the sweatshirt (it's 100% polyester, I'm fairly certain it's this model https://www.ebay.com/itm/SWISSTECH-Mens-Jacket-Size-3XL-XXXL-Swiss-Tech-Pre-Owned-EUC-/372433860590), followed by the rein/winter jacket. Everything is synthetic. If it was too cold, I was going to throw another long-sleeved shirt on top of the first. I know t-shirt+long-sleved shirt+sweatshirt combo alone works fine to around 0C/32F, but the top jacket is new so I need to test it when it finally gets cold here.

As for the poncho, I don't really know if I need it. I've never been in Spain and I don't know how strong or frequent the rain is in January and February. The snow doesn't bother me, the rain does.

Don't take that sweatshirt if it is cotton! Take fleece or a puffy.
Suggest merino instead of fast drying t-shirts if they are synthetic.
I'd take an extra pair of regular socks in lieu of the thick socks.
You could spray your pack and sleeping bag against bedbugs before you leave.
I would actually take some microspikes if I was waking at this time but only the very very lightest version.
By sandals I imagine you mean something like crocs or filpflops.
Thanks! I'm not sure how cold it actually gets on the Camino, but I'll probably add a fleece shirt. As for the socks, I'm in a weird situation with them as I need compression socks during daytime, but can't use them for sleeping. 3 pairs of walking socks will probably be fine, though throwing in extras would be great.

I was kinda scared about the bed bug situation, but if the danger is minimal and I can only get away with spraying the sleeping bag and the pack, that would be awesome!

The microspikes I thought about weight only 5oz/0.15kg and are cheap enough that I can ditch or donate them somewhere. I just don't know how slippery the trail can be. And yes, I meant something like flipflops.

I wouldn't take:
...
Someone will probably tell you to ditch some of your underwear and double-ups, but having just had trouble getting things dry in October, I can see the wisdom in having too many socks.
Thanks! I like the headlight as both emergency, walking aid early morning or in the evening, and while going to the bathroom at night, though I probably don't need to take extra batteries for it (I assume there's plenty of places selling them on the way). My phone will be my GPS, map and camera and the power drain might be stronger during winter, so I feel a compact power bank is important.

As usual, thank you for all the great feedback!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#6
Besides the balaklava a warm knitted "beanie" hat which covers yours ears can be handy; on really cold nights you may even wear it to bunk/bed in an unheated albergue!! Those microspikes can be be useful since a snow covered path can hide "black" ice. ...Whatever you take remember that in winter you want a set of dry warm clothes to put on after you come in from the cold outdoors .
Most of us who walk in late autumn and winter wear and carry lightweight but warm layers which can easily be added or removed while walking. Each pilgrim develops a favorite combo. Scan the Forum's Equipment topichttp://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/forums/equipment-questions.30/
to see a multitude of varied approaches. Here's mine
http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/kit-and-tips.html

Stay safe, keep warm and Buen camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis SJPP
April 2016, August 2017, May 2018
Camino PortuGUESE
May 2019
#7
Thanks! Running thights seem light and compact, so I can definitely throw one in.

My planned method of layering is t-shirt, followed by long-sleeved t-shirt, followed by the sweatshirt (it's 100% polyester, I'm fairly certain it's this model https://www.ebay.com/itm/SWISSTECH-Mens-Jacket-Size-3XL-XXXL-Swiss-Tech-Pre-Owned-EUC-/372433860590), followed by the rein/winter jacket. Everything is synthetic. If it was too cold, I was going to throw another long-sleeved shirt on top of the first. I know t-shirt+long-sleved shirt+sweatshirt combo alone works fine to around 0C/32F, but the top jacket is new so I need to test it when it finally gets cold here.

As for the poncho, I don't really know if I need it. I've never been in Spain and I don't know how strong or frequent the rain is in January and February. The snow doesn't bother me, the rain does.



Thanks! I'm not sure how cold it actually gets on the Camino, but I'll probably add a fleece shirt. As for the socks, I'm in a weird situation with them as I need compression socks during daytime, but can't use them for sleeping. 3 pairs of walking socks will probably be fine, though throwing in extras would be great.

I was kinda scared about the bed bug situation, but if the danger is minimal and I can only get away with spraying the sleeping bag and the pack, that would be awesome!

The microspikes I thought about weight only 5oz/0.15kg and are cheap enough that I can ditch or donate them somewhere. I just don't know how slippery the trail can be. And yes, I meant something like flipflops.



Thanks! I like the headlight as both emergency, walking aid early morning or in the evening, and while going to the bathroom at night, though I probably don't need to take extra batteries for it (I assume there's plenty of places selling them on the way). My phone will be my GPS, map and camera and the power drain might be stronger during winter, so I feel a compact power bank is important.

As usual, thank you for all the great feedback!
?Deodorant?
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#8
Besides the balaklava a warm knitted "beanie" hat which covers yours ears can be handy; on really cold nights you may even wear it to bunk/bed in an unheated albergue!!
Thanks! I thought a hat and a balaklava might be redundant. How cold was the coldest you experienced on the Camino? Also, I was looking at your equipment list while I was creating my list :)

Good point! A small, travel size deodorant will come in handy when stopping at bars, cafes, etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Cycling Pamplona to SdC 2014, Camino Frances (May, 2017)
#9
After researching what people here carried on similar trips, what is available in my area and what I have found so far useful, this is my current packing list. I plan to start walking sometime in January from Pamplona and plan to reach Santiago within 30 days, so any feedback will be greatly appreciated. I will also fly in and want to keep all my gear as a carry-on, so I'm limited by volume and weight.

I'll carry items marked with * on my back.

30L Backpack*
Rain cover for the backpack

Footwear:
1* pair of my favorite Gore-Tex approach shoes (the most comfortable shoes I've ever owned)
1 pair or sandals flipflops
1 pair of microspikes (if there is space in the backpack)
1 pair of gaiters
2+1* pairs of walking socks
1 pair of sleeping socks
1 pair of thicker socks (if there is space in the backpack)

Clothes (most fit in a 10L stuff sack)
1+1* fast-drying t-shirts
1 fast-drying t-shirt for sleeping
1+1* runner's long-sleeve shirt (can go on top of the t-shirt)
1* sweatshirt-type layer that I've been using for years and is awesome
1* winter rainjacket (both warm and protects from rain)
2+1* pairs of underwear
1* hiking pants
1 water-resistant pants (can go on top of the hiking pants for added warmt)
1 balaklava
1 gloves
1 rain poncho? (how strong is the rain on the trail in January?)
ADDED: 1 pair of running thights
ADDED: 1 fleece shirt
ADDED: 1 light hat

Sleeping Stuff
1 Ultralight sleeping down bag rated for 0C/32F
1 bag liner
Something against bed bugs?? (I guess I was just too scared)

Electronics (in a ziplock bag)
1* phone
1 phone charger with cable
1 headlight
1 set of extra batteries for headlight
1 power bank for charging the phone with its cable

First Aid and Hygiene (in a ziplock bag)
1 toothbrush
1 travel size toothpaste
1 soap
1 dental floss
1 very light microfiber towel
A handful of ibuprofen
Lip balm
Some vaseline or something similar
Bandaid
Needle
Lighter
Emergency blanket
ADDED: 1 small, travel-size deodorant
ADDED: Some earplugs

Ziplock bags for the Camino credentials, ets.

Any feedback will be appreciated! Let me know if I miss something!
I would be interested to know how much all this weighs?????
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#11
Thanks! I thought a hat and a balaklava might be redundant. How cold was the coldest you experienced on the Camino? Also, I was looking at your equipment list while I was creating my list :)
Twice during winter caminos I have sat out true blizzards; in Villafranca Montes de Oca, February 25, 26, 2006 and Foncebadón, March 5,6, 2009. Even late November 2012 the climb up to O Cebreiro was packed with snow. You can see the snow and read my blog accounts of these three memorable storms here. http://mermore.blogspot.fr/p/memories.html
Luckily open albergues offered welcoming shelter, heat and companionship.

Over the past 10 years the coldest I have ever slept inside on the camino was late February 2006 in the then unheated Hornillos del Camino municipal albergue. Breath hung white in the frigid interior air and ice formed in the toilet bowl!! Nevertheless dressed in runners tights and long sleeved shirt, loose socks and a wooly hat I was snug in my sleeping bag and liner.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#12
I would be interested to know how much all this weighs?????
I haven't weighted it all together because I've yet to get some of the stuff. I aim to fit all of it in a 30L backpack and DEFINITELY stay under 8kg/18lb for the backpack and everything in it (excluding what I wear on my back, snacks and water - though my hiking experience and the availability of cafes on the route suggest that I need a maximum of 1L of water and less than 0.25kg/0.5lb of snacks at any one time). Of course, I aim it to be as light as possible.

All the clothing is very lightweight and super compact. I managed to fit most of it in a 10L sack that seems to work nicely as a pillow. The 2 heaviest items are the sleeping bag (about 9L in volume when packed) and the backpack itself, both at around 1kg. If I end up going over 8kg or can't fit everything in the backpack, I will cut down on the list.
 

Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
#13
Would imagine that bedbugs are not too much of an issue in winter ( except maybe in small hotels with plenty of heating? ). A winter camino is something I'd like to try too! Have fun!
 
#14
After researching what people here carried on similar trips, what is available in my area and what I have found so far useful, this is my current packing list. I plan to start walking sometime in January from Pamplona and plan to reach Santiago within 30 days, so any feedback will be greatly appreciated. I will also fly in and want to keep all my gear as a carry-on, so I'm limited by volume and weight.

I'll carry items marked with * on my back.

30L Backpack*
Rain cover for the backpack

Footwear:
1* pair of my favorite Gore-Tex approach shoes (the most comfortable shoes I've ever owned)
1 pair or sandals flipflops
1 pair of microspikes (if there is space in the backpack)
1 pair of gaiters
2+1* pairs of walking socks
1 pair of sleeping socks
1 pair of thicker socks (if there is space in the backpack)

Clothes (most fit in a 10L stuff sack)
1+1* fast-drying t-shirts
1 fast-drying t-shirt for sleeping
1+1* runner's long-sleeve shirt (can go on top of the t-shirt)
1* sweatshirt-type layer that I've been using for years and is awesome
1* winter rainjacket (both warm and protects from rain)
2+1* pairs of underwear
1* hiking pants
1 water-resistant pants (can go on top of the hiking pants for added warmt)
1 balaklava
1 gloves
1 rain poncho? (how strong is the rain on the trail in January?)
ADDED: 1 pair of running thights
ADDED: 1 fleece shirt
ADDED: 1 light hat

Sleeping Stuff
1 Ultralight sleeping down bag rated for 0C/32F
1 bag liner
Something against bed bugs?? (I guess I was just too scared)

Electronics (in a ziplock bag)
1* phone
1 phone charger with cable
1 headlight
1 set of extra batteries for headlight
1 power bank for charging the phone with its cable

First Aid and Hygiene (in a ziplock bag)
1 toothbrush
1 travel size toothpaste
1 soap
1 dental floss
1 very light microfiber towel
A handful of ibuprofen
Lip balm
Some vaseline or something similar
Bandaid
Needle
Lighter
Emergency blanket
ADDED: 1 small, travel-size deodorant
ADDED: Some earplugs

Ziplock bags for the Camino credentials, ets.

Any feedback will be appreciated! Let me know if I miss something!
Hola Samarkand

Your list looks fine and the final small things can be decided before you leave.

The one major thing that I am concerned about is the 30 L backpack.
I take it that you are a somewhat petit person?
A winter camino requires heavier and more clothing than in the other three seasons.
To fit all that into a rather small space can be a challenge.
But I am also in the group of pilgrims that rather want a little to big backpack and extra space, than the smalles possible.
Anyhow, there are no rights or wrong with this. It all depends on the individual and if it suits you then it is fine.

I'd take the head lamp for sure. You will have limited daylight and when I did a winter camino years ago, we often got up predawn if we had a long day ahead of us.

• 3-4 meters of cord for hanging washing cloth.

• Safety pins x 20 (10 to give away as gifts)

• Some kind of waste belt or arond the neck pouch for passport, money, etc etc.

• If you bring Ibuprofen then also bring Paracetamol and take 1 or 2 pills of each medicin to have an increesed synergetic effect.

• Small rock for the Cruz de Ferro - that is if you have any burden in you life that you would like to unburden yourself of...

• Handkerchief x 2

• Small smiple knife - like the swiss ones - the simple ones..

• Small purse/bag for coins.

• Reflective vest - reflective bands to wear around ankles.

• High quality / low weight shopping bag - like Sea to Summit Ultra Sil - for..shopping, sitting on outside when it is wet, use for your belongings whan going to the bathroom/shower, ...

• Extra toilet paper.

• Small bicycle flashing light thing - the red one, to put on your backpack while walking on the roads.

• You may want to add some sunglasses depending on how the weather prognosis turns out -
The sun can be very fierce even in january and you will under all ciurcumstances arrive in Santiago with a sunburned left hand side face... (alternativly you can just buy som cheaper ones in Spain - eyewear is inexpensive in Sapin compared with many other countries).

• Anything wool is good as it has an insulating quality even when wet. Therefor I would suggest wool gloves and waterproof mitten over them. Waterproof mitten can be expensive, but it all comes down to the most imprtant on a winter camino: stay DRY.
Therefor it is also good to have jackets with zippers/openings under the armpits for ventilation.
Your body will generate a lot of heat and has to be either deposited in wool or ventilated out.


Finally. Some advice about sleepingbags I wrote in another thread some years ago:


• Use an inner silk or fleece liner/bag.
A silk liner adds about 5° degree celsius to the bag and a fleece 8°.
On winter camping/trekking two liners are often used as the effect adds up and the liners are light weight.

• The sleeping bag does not make you warm.
It function as a thermo and isolate you.
This mean that it contains the warmth/heat you put in, so make some gymnastic before you enter and you will sleep warmer.
Think of the difference of poring cold or hot water into a thermo.

• Wear a beanie, scarf, long johns, gloves, cloth while sleeping.

• Unpack your sleeping bag early before going to sleep as the down/synthetic needs to unfold to provide maximum insulation.

• Ventilate you sleeping bag in the morning to get rid of sweat before packing it up.

• Do use a sleeping bag that matches your size. A to large result in to much air that needs to be heated and a to small result in to little air to provide best insulation.

• Put some hot water in your 0.5 L water bottle and bring it into the sleeping bag.

• Never go hungry to bed. Energy equals heat.

• Remember to go to bathroom and pee off before going to bed.
The body uses a huge amount of energy if you are in a state that needs to go to the bathroom.

Buen Camino
Lettinggo
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#15
I haven't done a winter camino but have walked up to early December and started in early March, so I go prepared for anything! I carry a 31L pack (Osprey Talon in the S-M size). It is quite full, but I have everything I need inside.

Winter rain jacket - It might be heavier than you need. You'll have more versatility with a lightweight rain shell over the thin layers that you already have. Wearing a light rain jacket and pants over your regular walking clothes provides good protection against cold and wind as well as rain. Much of the time, you will not need the winter jacket while you are walking on mild days. If you wear it, you will likely have several spare layers taking up space and weight inside your backpack. The winter jacket would be harder to cram into your 30L pack when you don't need it.
Flip flops - Better to have a slip-on version so that you can comfortably wear with socks. Find the slimmest ones you can (not full Crocs since they will be quite bulky for a 30L pack). I sometimes put them under the outside mesh of my pack, so they are handy to use when I walk dripping in the door of any albergue.

Fleece shirt - What is this for? You have several light layers already. I would take a puffy down vest, instead. I wear it almost every evening, often to bed, and it is available if you encounter an unusual cold spell in the day. A very cold spell would likely be dry, so you wouldn't run the risk of getting it wet while walking. (You always need to keep one complete layer dry for the evenings.)
Thicker socks - What are they for? Be sure some of your socks are merino wool, to help stay warm when you are wet.
Balaclava - You might consider a merino wool buff and a hat, instead of the balaclava, for more flexibility. Another thing I need is some sort of visor (visor, baseball cap or brimmed sun hat all work) to wear under my rain hood, to keep the miserable rain off my glasses and face.
Sweatshirt type layer - Is this top and pants? If it includes pants, see my comment below. The hood is redundant if you have a hat and buff (which give more versatility).
Runners tights - If these are for additional insulation or sleeping, you can probably get a lighter weight long-underwear version. If the "sweatshirt type layer" includes pants, you can use them instead.
Gloves - Take wool, so they'll be warmer when wet.

You didn't mention poles. I wouldn't walk any Camino without them, but I use them at home only when I walk where there might be icy patches, so they might be more useful that the microspikes. I can pull my sleeves down to cover my hands even when using poles, but I have thought about getting cheap kitchen rubber gloves to wear when using my poles in the rain. They would be cheap and readily available on the Camino. You could even cut them off short at the wrist, and discard them if they don't serve well.

I'd recommend taking a dry bag or 2 (or 3) although I admit that they take up some precious space. I have one that is large enough so I can put my whole backpack in at night, to protect against bedbugs. Then I have another to hold my night clothes/sleeping bag the next day until I am more confident that no bedbugs have bitten me (the reaction can be delayed). Besides, I really like to organize my things inside my backpack.

Have fun with this!
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#16
Your list looks fine and the final small things can be decided before you leave.

The one major thing that I am concerned about is the 30 L backpack.
I take it that you are a somewhat petit person?
A winter camino requires heavier and more clothing than in the other three seasons.
To fit all that into a rather small space can be a challenge.
But I am also in the group of pilgrims that rather want a little to big backpack and extra space, than the smalles possible.
Thank you for the awesome and detailed response!

I'll try to fit it all in 30L. I think I can make it, mostly due to how compact the sleeping bag can get. I'm not against having stuff dangling from the backpack or even stored in my jacket pockets if there's need for it (things like the headlamp, balaklava, gloves, lip balm, snacks can stay in the pockets). I feel that if I get a bigger backpack I'll be tempted to toss stuff I'll never use.

A cord for drying stuff seems good (plus, it's always good to have a rope) and it can be stored outside the pack. I'll add some safety pins to get the wet socks dangling from the backpack.

I plan to carry a small wallet since my pants have zippered pockets. The sleeping bag has a little inside pocket for when I'm sleeping too.

I never thought of adding the rock in the packing list, but I'll definitely have it with me until I can toss it away forever.

As for the shopping bag, I think I'll just use a regular shopping bag from my first going to the store in Pamplona and reuse it over and over again.

Knife, toilet paper, random small stuff I can buy on the spot in Spain. I generally find having scissors over a knife more useful, but neither will go through airport security.
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#17
I haven't done a winter camino but have walked up to early December and started in early March, so I go prepared for anything! I carry a 31L pack (Osprey Talon in the S-M size). It is quite full, but I have everything I need inside.

Winter rain jacket
Flip flops
Fleece shirt
- What is this for? You have several light layers already. I would take a puffy down vest, instead.
Thicker socks
Balaclava
- You might consider a merino wool buff and a hat, instead of the balaclava, for more flexibility. Another thing I need is some sort of visor (visor, baseball cap or brimmed sun hat all work) to wear under my rain hood, to keep the miserable rain off my glasses and face.
Sweatshirt type layer - Is this top and pants? If it includes pants, see my comment below. The hood is redundant if you have a hat and buff (which give more versatility).
Runners tights - If these are for additional insulation or sleeping, you can probably get a lighter weight long-underwear version. If the "sweatshirt type layer" includes pants, you can use them instead.
Gloves - Take wool, so they'll be warmer when wet.

You didn't mention poles. I wouldn't walk any Camino without them, but I use them at home only when I walk where there might be icy patches, so they might be more useful that the microspikes. I can pull my sleeves down to cover my hands even when using poles, but I have thought about getting cheap kitchen rubber gloves to wear when using my poles in the rain. They would be cheap and readily available on the Camino.

I'd recommend taking a dry bag or 2 (or 3) although I admit that they take up some precious space.
Thanks for the many great tips!

The winter rain jacket isn't as thick as my regular winter jackets. It provides warmth, but it's not too heavy. It does take space if I try to cram it in the pack, but I might be able to rig it hanging from the pack when not in use.

The "flip flops" will be something I can wear under the shower or around the albergue with socks. I don't have it yet, but it will be something super light and probably cheap.

I don't know how cold it gets on the Camino in January. All the weather information gives me relatively mild minimum temperatures (around 0C), which will be warm for my t-shirt + 2x long-sleeve top shirt + sweatshirt + jacket. I don't know if I really need another layer and it's not cold enough over here to test. Any feedback is greatly appreciated!

I thought the thicker socks to be for the albergue and as an extra sock on top of my usual walking socks in case my feet are super cold. I can't wear 2 pairs of my walking socks because they are compression socks.

The sweatshirt layer is actually more like a jacket, but I couldn't find a proper word for it. It doesn't have a hood or pants and it's this model (but much smaller size) https://www.ebay.com/itm/SWISSTECH-Mens-Jacket-Size-3XL-XXXL-Swiss-Tech-Pre-Owned-EUC-/372433860590

The runner tights are mostly a placeholder for a long underwear I can use for sleeping or it gets so cold my hiking pants and rain pants can't handle. Though again I have no realistic idea of how cold it can get.

I've thought long about taking trekking poles, but there is no way for me to get them through the airport security. I'll probably get a cheap pair from Pamplona or a walking stick to be like the real pilgrims.

The idea about the dry bags sounds really good. They don't really take that much space cause they can be rolled and stored in the mesh side pockets. They can also work as extra rain covers.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
#18
I have walked a winter Camino the Frances route through 14 days of snow and the rest were rain, sleet and hail, only 6 days of sunshine. I use a 38 liter pack and the average weight including water and snacks about 12 lbs. I wear a set of clothes and pack one. I use smart wool socks with a silk liner and never a blister. 1 light weight fleece, 2 smart wool pull overs 1 long sleeve and 1 short, 1 quick dry button shirt for simulated dress up for nice restaurants if I need it, only wore it 2x my wife insisted. A light rain jacket and thrown in rain pants, only wore them 2x got too warm. 2 quick dry pants. anything you need or forget you can purchase there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#19
I have walked a winter Camino the Frances route through 14 days of snow and the rest were rain, sleet and hail, only 6 days of sunshine. I use a 38 liter pack and the average weight including water and snacks about 12 lbs. I wear a set of clothes and pack one. I use smart wool socks with a silk liner and never a blister. 1 light weight fleece, 2 smart wool pull overs 1 long sleeve and 1 short, 1 quick dry button shirt for simulated dress up for nice restaurants if I need it, only wore it 2x my wife insisted. A light rain jacket and thrown in rain pants, only wore them 2x got too warm. 2 quick dry pants. anything you need or forget you can purchase there.
Thanks! I might be packing too much clothes and layers. I'll start light and, as you said, I can always buy more there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés April 06, C. Fisterre May 06, C. Frances Oct 17, C. Portuguese Oct 18, C. Inglese Nov 18
#20
Thanks for the many great tips!

The winter rain jacket isn't as thick as my regular winter jackets. It provides warmth, but it's not too heavy. It does take space if I try to cram it in the pack, but I might be able to rig it hanging from the pack when not in use.

The "flip flops" will be something I can wear under the shower or around the albergue with socks. I don't have it yet, but it will be something super light and probably cheap.

I don't know how cold it gets on the Camino in January. All the weather information gives me relatively mild minimum temperatures (around 0C), which will be warm for my t-shirt + 2x long-sleeve top shirt + sweatshirt + jacket. I don't know if I really need another layer and it's not cold enough over here to test. Any feedback is greatly appreciated!

I thought the thicker socks to be for the albergue and as an extra sock on top of my usual walking socks in case my feet are super cold. I can't wear 2 pairs of my walking socks because they are compression socks.

The sweatshirt layer is actually more like a jacket, but I couldn't find a proper word for it. It doesn't have a hood or pants and it's this model (but much smaller size) https://www.ebay.com/itm/SWISSTECH-Mens-Jacket-Size-3XL-XXXL-Swiss-Tech-Pre-Owned-EUC-/372433860590

The runner tights are mostly a placeholder for a long underwear I can use for sleeping or it gets so cold my hiking pants and rain pants can't handle. Though again I have no realistic idea of how cold it can get.

I've thought long about taking trekking poles, but there is no way for me to get them through the airport security. I'll probably get a cheap pair from Pamplona or a walking stick to be like the real pilgrims.

The idea about the dry bags sounds really good. They don't really take that much space cause they can be rolled and stored in the mesh side pockets. They can also work as extra rain covers.
Strongly suggest that you don't hang anything off your pack if you are short of space! It will be cumbersome, get wet, possibly freeze and be at risk for being lost en route. If it doesn't fit inside you need a bigger pack.
 
#21
You have a list....that's very impressive. I keep looking at it and scratching my head.

I am re-starting in Burgos on Thursday and should get to Santiago and be home in time for Christmas dinner.

There's not a thing to add or take away from your inventory, well I always take ziplock poly bags and keep small stuff in them -like phone, wallet, passport.

The Camino Frances in winter is amazing where the true spirit of the Pilgrimage can still be found.

Solvitur ambulando
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2016) ; 1st Camino Frances September 2016-November 2016 ; Camino Frances August 2017-October 2017
#22
After researching what people here carried on similar trips, what is available in my area and what I have found so far useful, this is my current packing list. I plan to start walking sometime in January from Pamplona and plan to reach Santiago within 30 days, so any feedback will be greatly appreciated. I will also fly in and want to keep all my gear as a carry-on, so I'm limited by volume and weight.

I'll carry items marked with * on my back.

30L Backpack*
Rain cover for the backpack

Footwear:
1* pair of my favorite Gore-Tex approach shoes (the most comfortable shoes I've ever owned)
1 pair or sandals flipflops
1 pair of microspikes (if there is space in the backpack)
1 pair of gaiters
2+1* pairs of walking socks
1 pair of sleeping socks
1 pair of thicker socks (if there is space in the backpack)

Clothes (most fit in a 10L stuff sack)
1+1* fast-drying t-shirts
1 fast-drying t-shirt for sleeping
1+1* runner's long-sleeve shirt (can go on top of the t-shirt)
1* sweatshirt-type layer that I've been using for years and is awesome
1* winter rainjacket (both warm and protects from rain)
2+1* pairs of underwear
1* hiking pants
1 water-resistant pants (can go on top of the hiking pants for added warmt)
1 balaklava
1 gloves
1 rain poncho? (how strong is the rain on the trail in January?)
ADDED: 1 pair of running thights (if there is space in the bag)
ADDED: 1 fleece shirt (I don't think I really need it)
ADDED: 1 light hat

Sleeping Stuff
1 Ultralight sleeping down bag rated for 0C/32F
1 bag liner
Something against bed bugs?? (I guess I was just too scared)

Electronics (in a ziplock bag)
1* phone
1 phone charger with cable
1 headlight
1 set of extra batteries for headlight
1 power bank for charging the phone with its cable

First Aid and Hygiene (in a ziplock bag)
1 toothbrush
1 travel size toothpaste
1 soap
1 dental floss
1 very light microfiber towel
A handful of ibuprofen
Lip balm
Some vaseline or something similar
Bandaid
Needle
Lighter
Emergency blanket
ADDED: 1 small, travel-size deodorant
ADDED: Some earplugs
ADDED: Cord
ADDED: A handful of safety pins
ADDED: A nailclipper
ADDED: Small Bic lighter

Ziplock bags for the Camino credentials, ets.
ADDED: 1 40L plastic bag
ADDED: Extra stuff sack

ADDED: The little rock to give away my burdens at Cruz de Ferro

Any feedback will be appreciated! Let me know if I miss something!

You pack mule is going to die carrying all that .... lol Put everything in your pack then take half of it out ... now you're ready. Two Camino de Frances in 11 months, wife and I left a lot of articles, clothing and footwear along the Way. First Camino my pack was about 22kg ,second Camino 9kg :) BTW, we were minimalist backpackers whereby you need to carry everything in and out ... Frances you don't need to.

Buen Camino :)
 

4 Eyes

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17
#23
Just came back from the camino. Someone lost his sleeping bag dangling from his pack. There were plenty of fallen trees to snag stuff off packs. A bigger pack to hold everything in would be a good idea. Snow is not a big problem unless it's several feet deep and you have no snow shoes or skis. Yes it gets that deep. Your gaiters should be the kind with underboot straps to keep snow out of your pant legs and boots. Snow also covers waymarks and there are times when and spots where you will have no wi fi/satellite reception so your GPS won't help you. Cell phones also can die on you. You need to have a good sense of your route and a good sense of direction. A simple non-electronic compass may be a good idea. You are more likely to have sleet than rain. So yes trekking poles are good to have. Poncho ventilates better than a rain jacket. With a long enough poncho and long gaiters you wont need rain pants.
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#24
You pack mule is going to die carrying all that .... lol Put everything in your pack then take half of it out ... now you're ready. Two Camino de Frances in 11 months, wife and I left a lot of articles, clothing and footwear along the Way. First Camino my pack was about 22kg ,second Camino 9kg :) BTW, we were minimalist backpackers whereby you need to carry everything in and out ... Frances you don't need to.

Buen Camino :)
Thanks! That packing list has to be and it will be under 8kg because I intend to have it all as carry-on on the flight. It's really lightweight. The 2 heaviest items (the backpack and the sleeping bag) are just under 1kg each. I haven't weighted it all together yet, but if it goes above 8kg i'll cut until it's back down.

Just came back from the camino. Someone lost his sleeping bag dangling from his pack. There were plenty of fallen trees to snag stuff off packs. A bigger pack to hold everything in would be a good idea. Snow is not a big problem unless it's several feet deep and you have no snow shoes or skis. Yes it gets that deep. Your gaiters should be the kind with underboot straps to keep snow out of your pant legs and boots. Snow also covers waymarks and there are times when and spots where you will have no wi fi/satellite reception so your GPS won't help you. Cell phones also can die on you. You need to have a good sense of your route and a good sense of direction. A simple non-electronic compass may be a good idea. You are more likely to have sleet than rain. So yes trekking poles are good to have. Poncho ventilates better than a rain jacket. With a long enough poncho and long gaiters you wont need rain pants.
Thanks! After collecting most stuff I'm fairly certain I can fill everything inside a pack now. Stuff that might be left dangling might be either stuff that needs to dry or things like the fliplops - stuff I'm not going to cry if I lose.

As for the GPS, I have several ways to make it as reliable as possible (and I need to write a thread about it). First, I use a map app called Locus Map and I've downloaded maps of the Camino on the phone itself. This means that I don't need data connection or cell service to access it. Since the phone GPS uses satelite data, it should be available in most places. I've yet to find a spot where it totally doesn't work. It might be slow and require restarting the app, but it's generally reliable. Cell service makes it faster as it uses the cell towers for triangulation, but it's useful even without it. Second, if the GPS fails, the map itself should still be available for orientation. Third, I'll be carrying a solid 10000mAh battery bank to recharge the phone if needed. Fourth, there's a village every 5km, so it's not complete wilderness. Obviously, I'll keep my eyes open for markers and waypoints in any way. I'll see if I can get a small compass as a backup.

Thanks again for the great feedback!

There's not a thing to add or take away from your inventory, well I always take ziplock poly bags and keep small stuff in them -like phone, wallet, passport.
Thanks! I plan to do that. The funny thing is where I am, ziplock bags are ridiculously hard to find. I was surprised, but I'm still hunting for bags in the proper size.
 

gml

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago, Sept/Oct 2012
Le Puy to Roncesvalles, Oct/Nov 2014
#25
I would add laundry soap and a universal sink stopper.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016
Kumano Kodo 2015
#27
>>
Knife, toilet paper, random small stuff I can buy on the spot in Spain. I generally find having scissors over a knife more useful, but neither will go through airport security.[/QUOTE]
>>
Scissors are most useful, especially for cutting the tape for foot blisters. We used this the most. Tweezers were next.
A small Swiss Army style penknife with scissors, tweezers, can opener, bottle opener, and a blade solves many problems.
R
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP to Burgos 2014. Burgos to SdC arriving 5/5/2015. C2C (2016) Le Puy to Moissac April (2018)
#28
I recommend Compeed-type blister cushions; you could buy them when you arrive in Spain.
Also, if your feet tend to be cold when you sleep, take a couple of very thin plastic bags, each large enough to fit over your foot. At bedtime put on a thin sock, then a plastic bag, then a heavy sock. This will prevent perspiration from cooling your feet. I've done some winter camping in the Rocky Mountains, and this works even when the temperature in my tent is below freezing.
Joe
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#29
I would be interested to know how much all this weighs?????
You pack mule is going to die carrying all that .... lol
I just packed the backpack and measured it together. Everything but the microspikes, gaiters and fliflops come to about 5kg/11.5lb. I can probably shave another 0.5lb if I do small things like cutting labels and straps or take off some covers.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2016) ; 1st Camino Frances September 2016-November 2016 ; Camino Frances August 2017-October 2017
#30
I just packed the backpack and measured it together. Everything but the microspikes, gaiters and fliflops come to about 5kg/11.5lb. I can probably shave another 0.5lb if I do small things like cutting labels and straps or take off some covers.
Don't forget you will be adding in the weight of water and water food items you'll need. We used Snicker Bars as a pick-me-up :)
 

Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
#31
Forgot to mention that I don't use a pack cover. I rely on a drybag inside the pack. A drybag also allows you to save space ( sit on it when packed to expel the air then roll up the closure ) .
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#32
just packed the backpack and measured it together. Everything but the microspikes, gaiters and fliflops come to about 5kg/11.5lb.
That sounds good.

You could leave the burden of your rock somewhere close to home and save a few more grams. (It isn't compulsory!)
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#33
Any feedback will be appreciated! Let me know if I miss something
I dont know if you missed something. Your list looks comprehensive. As you wish to keep everything to 8 kg, you may have a series of take or leave decisions in the near future.

My observation is quite different.

For the things you may/will need to access during the walking day, do you have external pockets they can be stuff into. The purpose is to minimise the number of times you have to open your pack, find what you want, repack and close. This can be time consuming and creates a window of opportunity to leave something behind.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#34
I dont know if you missed something. Your list looks comprehensive. As you wish to keep everything to 8 kg, you may have a series of take or leave decisions in the near future.

My observation is quite different.

For the things you may/will need to access during the walking day, do you have external pockets they can be stuff into. The purpose is to minimise the number of times you have to open your pack, find what you want, repack and close. This can be time consuming and creates a window of opportunity to leave something behind.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
Thanks! I got it down to about 5kg without water and snacks. I have the mesh pockets on the backpack, a pouch thingie on the pack's hip belt, and pockets on the jacket and pants. I shouldn't need to open the backpack unless I need to take out or put back a layer of clothing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vía de la Plata 2019
#36
@C clearly - your replies are allways of great use!
I just ran into the Osprey brand of backpack and noticed they all fit me like a glove.
Now I had to make a decision which type... And there you mention you have an Osprey 31 litre. May I ask how tall you are? I don’t know if I have to choose the S/M or the M/L, talon 33. I am 1.68 high.
Thanks for your thoughts again :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#37
@C clearly - your replies are allways of great use!
I just ran into the Osprey brand of backpack and noticed they all fit me like a glove.
Now I had to make a decision which type... And there you mention you have an Osprey 31 litre. May I ask how tall you are? I don’t know if I have to choose the S/M or the M/L, talon 33. I am 1.68 high.
Thanks for your thoughts again :)
You choose your backpack by your torso length, not your overall height. There are lots of sites that tell you how to measure your torso.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#38
I see needles listed so assume thread as well? :) Obviously not for piercing blisters!

Instead of a hat and/or balaclava consider a Polar Buff - a conventional Buff with a fleece extension - which, in various forms will act as both. On a cold day (I live by the English coast so that's often) I wear it as a double thick hat with the fleece section over my ears like a nordic ear warmer - toasty!

See the demo HERE
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vía de la Plata 2019
#39
You choose your backpack by your torso length, not your overall height. There are lots of sites that tell you how to measure your torso.
I know, thank you. Most of the osprey packs are, don’t know how you call that in English ... changable, adjustable. But I can imagine that the back of someone who measures 1.90m is different from someone who is 1.50m. While 1.70 and 1.65 not much will differ. That’s why I asked. The adjustability has a max ofcourse, and for the measurement I am at m. So do I need m/l or s/m ...
I have to order it on Amazon, no shop around to fit or give any advise.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#40
Adjustable is the perfect word!

Osprey have a table somewhere - you just need a friend with a tape measure or take a look at their PACK SIZING APP. Never used it myself but may be of some help.

Here's the CHART but I haven't found the instructions - something about measuring down from the C7 vertebrae in your neck to your hips.
 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#41
Adjustable is the perfect word!

Osprey have a table somewhere - you just need a friend with a tape measure or take a look at their PACK SIZING APP. Never used it myself but may be of some help.

Here's the CHART but I haven't found the instructions - something about measuring down from the C7 vertebrae in your neck to your hips.
Found it! Go to SIZING AND FITTING and scroll downwards.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#43
@C clearly - your replies are allways of great use!
I just ran into the Osprey brand of backpack and noticed they all fit me like a glove.
Now I had to make a decision which type... And there you mention you have an Osprey 31 litre. May I ask how tall you are? I don’t know if I have to choose the S/M or the M/L, talon 33. I am 1.68 high.
Thanks for your thoughts again :)
I thought I had posted this yesterday but now see it sitting here so I'll post it even though you have got good advice since...

As @trecile says, it is your torso length that matters. I am 162 cm and my torso is a bit short, so I need the S/M. However, both sizes should be adjustable to cover "Medium". I know someone who is about 168, who uses the M/L but the individual body structure does matter.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Beginning 1 December in Pamplona
#44
Karin: I have the Sirrus 36 and LOVE it! S/m size; I am 5 6”. Arguably my pack is on the heavy side, (10kgs ish) but I am on the trail now and have everything I need to keep clean and dry and warm! It has all the features I wanted.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vía de la Plata 2019
#45
Karin: I have the Sirrus 36 and LOVE it! S/m size; I am 5 6”. Arguably my pack is on the heavy side, (10kgs ish) but I am on the trail now and have everything I need to keep clean and dry and warm! It has all the features I wanted.
Thank you! I have no clue what 5 6” is in metric tbh 😳
I tried the (men’s) stratos 34 and I loved it too, fitter like a glove. But too heavy and big for me.
It’s 1.4kg so over 0,5kg more then the sirrus.
Because I can hardly carry any weight due to artrosis I have to be careful and stay at least around 5, max 6 kg. Its hard. D985005E-B7BE-4617-A891-AD933E931A4E.jpeg
 

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