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Niggling hates (dislikes) on Camino

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St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
They either don't hear you coming so they don't move off the track to let you pass and frequently ignore a friendly Buen Camino as presumably they can't hear the comment.
I guess that, deep down, it is my perception that they are missing so much of the sounds of nature around them (or even the quiet) that they feel they must listen to music to get them through the day although they may be listening to something more religious or a message from home. My problem, not theirs - it doesn't spoil my day! Each to their own.
Depending on the music one listens to, it can completely enhance a beautiful experience. I will certainly be taking mine with me and with earbuds, you are aware of your surroundings.
 
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Me too re spring! Have been keeping my eye on the long range weather forecast, wondering, as we have had such a mild, warm, wet, windy winter over here if I could actually go earlier than April 10th ... but ... opened my curtains this morning to see this! but! - Hang on! it is March now!!
(Note: Australians - this is called snow and is made in the sky out of water droplets)

View attachment 165341
You call that snow, phessh tosh! This is snow.....like in Canada.

snow.jpeg
 
Privados normally have more than one person running the place, and they generally work shifts. Public pilgrim albergues, whether fixed charge or donativo, municipal or parochial, are run either by very poorly paid council workers or, more often, volunteers who basically work from when they get up to when they go to bed. For nothing. Between finishing the cleaning and opening up is the only rest and respite they get. Please do not begrudge them this.

I admire volunteer hospitalera/os and the work they do. If it wasn't for them the Camino would be impossible for less well-heeled pilgrims. I don't know anywhere else in the world where people freely give voluntary service to strangers. They are representatives of a sacred tradition that goes back thousands of years. The places they run have an atmosphere of loving kindness that refreshes the spirit. Many times I've seen young pilgrims quietly astonished to see caritas in action for the first time in their lives. To these refugees from atheist consumer capitalism they are exemplars of a better way of life.

I know how hard they work and that they pay their own fares and could be on Camino themselves, having travelled far to be there. To me all this is wonderful. But here's the niggle. If I'm in bed while their work is going on and then I get up at 9 am and scuttle off, in what way does this impede their work or deny them repose? And if they leave the door open so I can wander around the town free of gear until 11 or so, then nip in, pick up the pack and head off, as I do in privados, how is this a problem? Check-in Leon and Luz de Fromista are big places run by one man, super hostels both. For much if the year Puente de Fitero is run by 3-person teams, at others by one very nice guy who spends his time hanging out with the pilgrims shooting the breeze. Same with the extraordinary San Anton. It's a mystery to me how places with 3-person teams generate the kind of workload which many volunteer hospis clearly do, and which I admire them very much for doing, and without which the spiritual life of the Camino would be very much diminished. Just saying.
 
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I admire volunteer hospitalera/os and the work they do. If it wasn't for them the Camino would be impossible for less well-heeled pilgrims. I don't know anywhere else in the world where people freely give voluntary service to strangers. They are representatives of a sacred tradition that goes back thousands of years. The places they run have an atmosphere of loving kindness that refreshes the spirit. Many times I've seen young pilgrims quietly astonished to see caritas in action for the first time in their lives. To these refugees from atheist consumer capitalism they are exemplars of a better way of life.

I know how hard they work and that they pay their own fares and could be on Camino themselves, having travelled far to be there. To me all this is wonderful. But here's the niggle. If I'm in bed while their work is going on and then I get up at 9 am and scuttle off, in what way does this impede their work or deny them repose? And if they leave the door open so I can wander around the town free of gear until 11 or so, then nip in, pick up the pack and head off, as I do in privados, how is this a problem? Check-in Leon and Luz de Fromista are big places run by one man, super hostels both. For much if the year Puente de Fitero is run by 3-person teams, at others by one very nice guy who spends his time hanging out with the pilgrims shooting the breeze. Same with the extraordinary San Anton. It's a mystery to me how places with 3-person teams generate the kind of workload which many volunteer hospis clearly do, and which I admire them very much for doing, and without which the spiritual life of the Camino would be very much diminished. Just saying.
I get up every day at 5:30 to make your pilgrim breakfast, clean the albergue, do the shopping and clean the albergue before the next pilgrims arrive. I check people in, make them feel welcome and prepare your evening meal. Feel free to stay where the exit time is different if the schedule does not meet yours.
 
Your work is deeply appreciated. So is the freedom you extend to stay after 8, the witching hour at which most munis and parrochials drive the hungry and sleepless pilgrim from their doors. All I'm asking for is more Mary, less Martha.
 
I think what annoys me most are people who are very easily annoyed and expect the world and all others around them to adjust to that.

But thankfully there seem not to be many people like that on the Camino, quite the opposite.

What's amazing is that so many varied types of people who would be at daggers drawn get along so smoothly on the Camino. It is on fact magical.

Yes. It truly is amazing, and it's only possible with people being tolerant and open minded.

I am sure I am guilty of annoying others, sometimes. Maybe even often. Some of you would probably hate having me in the same albergue. I try to be considerate, but it is simply impossible to always please everyone.

I think when you meet so many different people with so many different backgrounds, characters, needs, preferences, daily moods, travelling in a foreign country with a different culture, ect., it is almost impossible not to be annoying at least to some, sometimes.

Even when you try your best, sometimes your existance alone is enough to trigger someone else and annoy them.

Add to that being very exhausted or having a bad day, and it happens quite easily!

If I get annoyed I know that the Camino is giving me a lesson in tolerance and patience which I need to learn.

Sums it up well.

It happens. We all fail sometimes - we make mistakes, we annoy others, we do get annoyed by people, things and circumstances. That's life. What's important is how you handle it when it happens, in my opinion.

Sometimes it can even be good to be annoyed - if you use it as incentive to change a situation to the better.

For example when you're annoyed by the litter on the trail, bring a garbage bag and pick up a few items instead of complaining...
 
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Well, when I started this post I expected merely a few comic 'niggles' responses but the depth and breadth of the responses has surprised me, warmed me. As has the banter and humour.
What it seems to show, to me, is that there are very few real niggles and is this not astounding?

Where else could this happen, except on Camino? Hundreds of thousands of strangers from all over the world, with very different cultures and ages - and in the main we all jolly along, all pilgrims - for whatever reason we are there and however we are doing it - and the infrastructure! countless low paid or volunteer helpers at refugios along the way, forgiving much, welcoming all - no matter how tired, starting each day as if it is their first day; the hundreds of miles of waymarker signage, good clean water from taps and fountains, the bars and cafes and small shops, only there because we are there. They support us and we support them.

And pilgrims, pilgrims all - have you noticed how almost overwhelmingly each is willing to help others? To share a table with strangers and talk and laugh and encourage, offer help to those in need ... of course there are some selfish pilgrims, arrogant pilgrims, noisy pilgrims - but that is humanity and maybe, just maybe, the experience over weeks of mixing with the mobile pilgrim peer group alters them for the better ..

I just wanted to say - so very few niggles, and so much that is wonderful - marvellous. - And thank you, moderators, for watching this thread and allowing it to go where it may - we pilgrims, pilgrims all. ❤️
 
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St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
I admire volunteer hospitalera/os and the work they do. If it wasn't for them the Camino would be impossible for less well-heeled pilgrims. I don't know anywhere else in the world where people freely give voluntary service to strangers. They are representatives of a sacred tradition that goes back thousands of years. The places they run have an atmosphere of loving kindness that refreshes the spirit. Many times I've seen young pilgrims quietly astonished to see caritas in action for the first time in their lives. To these refugees from atheist consumer capitalism they are exemplars of a better way of life.

I know how hard they work and that they pay their own fares and could be on Camino themselves, having travelled far to be there. To me all this is wonderful. But here's the niggle. If I'm in bed while their work is going on and then I get up at 9 am and scuttle off, in what way does this impede their work or deny them repose? And if they leave the door open so I can wander around the town free of gear until 11 or so, then nip in, pick up the pack and head off, as I do in privados, how is this a problem? Check-in Leon and Luz de Fromista are big places run by one man, super hostels both. For much if the year Puente de Fitero is run by 3-person teams, at others by one very nice guy who spends his time hanging out with the pilgrims shooting the breeze. Same with the extraordinary San Anton. It's a mystery to me how places with 3-person teams generate the kind of workload which many volunteer hospis clearly do, and which I admire them very much for doing, and without which the spiritual life of the Camino would be very much diminished. Just saying.
Your work is deeply appreciated. So is the freedom you extend to stay after 8, the witching hour at which most munis and parrochials drive the hungry and sleepless pilgrim from their doors. All I'm asking for is more Mary, less Martha.
You could always become a volunteer Hospitalero yourself. CSJ and FICS are always looking for volunteers and they train on site.
 
I am not sure how welcoming they are for new pilgrims who might be reading and looking for kind advice though.
I’m a newbie going on my first Camino in May. There is plenty of kind advice around. You don’t always get this type of information. Where else would I learn I should bring my own tea? And for the people snubbing the tea complaints, turn it around and imagine bad coffee. Neither tea nor coffee are a requirement to enjoy an experience, but boy do they enhance it! Buen Camino!
 
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I walked behind 2 well dressed Spanish women after Cruz di Ferro. One of them got out a tissue, blew her nose and simply dropped it on the trail. It isn't always the guests in Spain doing the littering.
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
New guy to the forum... Planning a walk but I'm not there yet. It has always amazed me that while backpacking in the Colorado Rockies, 20+ miles from the nearest road, and at altitude, I find cigarette butts. Why do people go to beautiful places only to leave their trash behind?! Didn't their parents teach them anything? I summited Ben Nevis (Scotland) last spring and was dismayed at how so many are loving the mountains to death and leaving their trash behind. I hope this isn't the case on my Camino but will also try to always extend space and grace to those around me. I am third... God, others, and me. :)
 
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Confraternity of St James and Fraternity International of the Camino de Santiago. One in the UK and the other in Spain with volunteers coordinated by @Rebekah Scott .

HOSVOL also accepts volunteers, but you must complete a training course which is offered in the US by American Pilgrims on the Camino.
 
Confraternity of St James and Fraternity International of the Camino de Santiago. One in the UK and the other in Spain with volunteers coordinated by @Rebekah Scott .

HOSVOL also accepts volunteers, but you must complete a training course which is offered in the US by American Pilgrims on the Camino.
Thank you so much. I’ve looked into the American Pilgrims on the Camino however the training schedules never seem to line up for me.

So, I could go to Spain to train in an albergue then after training immediately start volunteering?
 
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Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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+1 for litter of any type, and on a similar theme people who have little respect for the path or people of whose country they are lucky enough to be walking through.
Hi, I love the Camino, especially where it throngs with pilgrims, I like the evening tribalness of it all and the close interaction, balanced with long periods of solitude of course, but! - there are a few things that niggle at me, not really hates as I don't do hate ... but ... well...

That trail of pure white toilet tissues left by female pilgrims all the way along by clumps of trees and bushes (unless it is just one poor woman with a serious bladder problem who goes Camino every year).
Missing sink plugs.
Whatever that incredibly thin unidentifiable fried meat is in most pilgrim meals.
The Spanish (God bless them) way of making tea! (tepid water in a thick small cup with a disastrously weak tea bag).
Missing clothes pegs - who takes them? (I have often bought a pack of clothes pegs to 'feed' the washing line at a refugio and usually half are missing the next morning).

Yours ....... ???
I'm an early riser each morning and I like to get to bed earlier than most as well when on the camino. As much as people hate it when people make noise early in the morning, I don't like when people come in the albergue right at the last possible moment each night and make so much noise for all of us that are already sleeping. I guess it goes both ways.
 
I walked behind 2 well dressed Spanish women after Cruz di Ferro. One of them got out a tissue, blew her nose and simply dropped it on the trail. It isn't always the guests in Spain doing the littering.
No, as someone who has moved here to Spain for the last couple of years, I can say that it is one of my least favorite things living here. People throw trash everywhere and the cities are not exactly proactive in cleaning up.
 
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Thank you so much. I’ve looked into the American Pilgrims on the Camino however the training schedules never seem to line up for me.

So, I could go to Spain to train in an albergue then after training immediately start volunteering?
Hosvol does provide approved training classes in Spain for their albergues as well as in other countries. Here is the link to the schedule for this year. At the bottom are the classes scheduled for this year. Hosvol has a lot of albergues to staff each year. In recent years they ask that you go through the contact in your country where you did training for assignments to volunteer.

For training with CSJ you would need to contact them to arrange training and volunteer experiences. I dont know as much about their program.I believe they have 2 albergues.

For FICS you can contact @Rebekah Scott for more information. FICS has 3 albergues total. They will train on site if needed.
 
Hi, I love the Camino, especially where it throngs with pilgrims, I like the evening tribalness of it all and the close interaction, balanced with long periods of solitude of course, but! - there are a few things that niggle at me, not really hates as I don't do hate ... but ... well...

That trail of pure white toilet tissues left by female pilgrims all the way along by clumps of trees and bushes (unless it is just one poor woman with a serious bladder problem who goes Camino every year).
Missing sink plugs.
Whatever that incredibly thin unidentifiable fried meat is in most pilgrim meals.
The Spanish (God bless them) way of making tea! (tepid water in a thick small cup with a disastrously weak tea bag).
Missing clothes pegs - who takes them? (I have often bought a pack of clothes pegs to 'feed' the washing line at a refugio and usually half are missing the next morning).

Yours ....... ???
The toilet paper and graffitti are a sad sight. Other than than, I feel blessed to be on the Camino and accept everything I encounter with a positive mind. You go to Spain for coffee, not tea. 🙂 I would recommend never buying pilgrim meals, the menu of the day is better. I like to find places where the locals eat in larger towns, and order local dishes. The food in Spain is incredible.
 
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It isn't just ladies. There are often brown tissues. 🤢💩
Fortunately, I have never been in the situation, but it actually happens that you have to, as far as I know it is quite natural. I pray everyone knows the child's lesson that you have to dig it deep in order not to attract animals? (And today, when we obviously use the obvious places, that others step in it??) I have seriously read that it was one of the functions of the pilgrim's shell. (NOT that I would, I see that as some kind of "holy thing". But, when I think about it, it's only to dig in clean soil)..
And, women AND men, carry a bag for what you need to dry yourself with.
 
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Would like to point out, re tea, real tea, that all those who drink fruit and perfume infusions they 'call' tea are Marxists. I know this as I once read that Marx said on a number of occasions that "Proper tea was theft".
... errmm .. or something like that ... ;)

That was truly dreadful!!! 😂😂😂
 
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Take a photo of the code, screenshot it, then you can copy and paste it!
When I read this I thought "what? you can't copy text from a photo." But I tried it and it works on my Samsung phone. Thanks for the tip!

It even works for handwritten text.

I copied from this picture of my chalkboard grocery list.

20240302_172037.jpg

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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I get really annoyed with people who seem to still think that Camino should be like they imagine it should be especially after they’ve spent far too much time on this forum researching what it could be.

Oh, and people who think I snore out of spite
Wearing earplugs really does solve the snoring problem. Most people snore a little at some point,too. They probably just don't realize it
 
When I read this I thought "what? you can't copy text from a photo." But I tried it and it works on my Samsung phone. Thanks for the tip!

It even works for handwritten text.

I copied from this picture of my chalkboard grocery list.

View attachment 165586

APPLES SPOON-SIZE SHRED WHY
Thank you! Yes I was playing around with my phone once (I phone - older version) and got it to work. Don’t even know why I tried as it sounds so counter - intuitive!!

I had this one yesterday!!

USERNAME - Normandie
PASSWORD - 25#12@Qa%zS

I am rubbish on 0 and O too!
 
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Agree and those that play music with ear pods!

I crossed paths with an older man last year who berated me for daring to listen to music, saying that I should be listening to the birds. I just smiled sweetly and bid him adieu, shaking my head. My camino routine is: birds and quiet in the morning till lunch, music/podcasts in the afternoon to help push me to the albergue.

I'm always struck by some people's entitlement. In that particular moment it was more about him thinking it was his job to emphatically tell me what I should or should not be doing, when I never asked for his opinion.

Tip: women love this (insert sarcasm).
 
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Honestly for me, it's almost anything after Sarria. We had people switching on the main light at 5 am because they decided to leave and wanted to pack. Would try to help someone (as normal on the camino) and instead of just simply refusing it or thank me for it, they looked at me like I was crazy and disgusting for even speaking to them. People rushing, sometimes even running on the camino (and not trail runners, those are fine and kudos to them for being able to do that, but people pushing in front of others to get to a bar first, or to get to a place first). So many things...
 
True, but back in 2015, the technology did not allow that!!

(Or if it did, I was ignorant 🙄)
Ooh I have no idea. I am ‘middle of the road’ when it comes to technology, certainly not an ‘early adopter’ but not at the back of the queue either. I guess I am a big fan of a password that is ‘123456789’!
 
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Honestly for me, it's almost anything after Sarria. We had people switching on the main light at 5 am because they decided to leave and wanted to pack. Would try to help someone (as normal on the camino) and instead of just simply refusing it or thank me for it, they looked at me like I was crazy and disgusting for even speaking to them. People rushing, sometimes even running on the camino (and not trail runners, those are fine and kudos to them for being able to do that, but people pushing in front of others to get to a bar first, or to get to a place first). So many things...

Same here.
 
Honestly for me, it's almost anything after Sarria. We had people switching on the main light at 5 am because they decided to leave and wanted to pack. Would try to help someone (as normal on the camino) and instead of just simply refusing it or thank me for it, they looked at me like I was crazy and disgusting for even speaking to them. People rushing, sometimes even running on the camino (and not trail runners, those are fine and kudos to them for being able to do that, but people pushing in front of others to get to a bar first, or to get to a place first). So many things...

Is this really so? My last time passing through Sarria was 2005 and was normal Camino then, I didn't notice any difference.
As this is a niggles post - those who have passed through Sarria onwards in the last few years - is it all bad now? Or is it that there are just a few who haven't learnt the pilgrim ways? Is it really overcrowded (as in frequently no beds, etc) - surely there are positives? Pilgrim throngs and all that?
 
@David Numbers on the Caminos overall are now more than four times greater than in 2005. The proportion of pilgrims choosing a long-distance Camino was still much larger then and so the change in character at Sarria would be far less evident. I passed through there in 2002 and was not really aware of it myself.

The largest concentration of the huge increase in pilgrim numbers is on the stretch from Sarria to Santiago. About 220,000 covered that stage of the Camino Frances last year according to the pilgrim office figures. There are times when it is quiet. I walked in January last year and numbers felt lower than in the previous 600+km as people were better spread out. But at peak periods it can be extremely busy. There can be upwards of 1,500 people arriving in Santiago from the Camino Frances on the busiest days of the year and 1,000 is quite normal in the summer months.
 
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@David Numbers on the Caminos overall are now more than four times greater than in 2005. The proportion of pilgrims choosing a long-distance Camino was still much larger then and so the change in character at Sarria would be far less evident. I passed through there in 2002 and was not really aware of it myself.

The largest concentration of the huge increase in pilgrim numbers is on the stretch from Sarria to Santiago. About 220,000 covered that stage of the Camino Frances last year according to the pilgrim office figures. There are times when it is quiet. I walked in January last year and numbers felt lower than in the previous 600+km as people were better spread out. But at peak periods it can be extremely busy. There can be upwards of 1,500 people arriving in Santiago from the Camino Frances on the busiest days of the year and 1,000 is quite normal in the summer months.
I walked the Sarria to Santiago twice in the last year. It was very busy in the mornings heading out of the usual Stage towns, but quiet if you didn't stay in one of those. None of the places we stayed were full in either the summer or winter. Yes cafes were busy in summer so we just walked on to the next one each time which was less crowded than the first open stop of the day. I did not experience pushing or any of that kind of behavior.

Winter was entirely different and with little open between towns. More rain, etc.
 
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As this is a niggles post - those who have passed through Sarria onwards in the last few years - is it all bad now? Or is it that there are just a few who haven't learnt the pilgrim ways? Is it really overcrowded (as in frequently no beds, etc) - surely there are positives? Pilgrim throngs and all that?
I walked mid September. The first part out of Sarria was the worst area, a flood of people. Tried waiting on the side of the trail several times to let people pass, but they just kept pouring on. Mostly school youth groups with, what looked like their own priests. Most of the cafes were crowded, but not all.
Managed to get accommodation all the way except Portomarin. All the smaller places there were full, so I had to take a very expensive hotel room. In some memoriable places I didn't get a stamp because I simply couldn't bear to stand in the queue. And I regret that a little. I found the last sections to be very tiring.
BUT, I must say, I met a lot of people who didn't care, just liked that it was social and had the best time ever.
I think its sad there are so few opportunities to reach SDC via other paths.
 
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I crossed paths with an older man last year who berated me for daring to listen to music, saying that I should be listening to the birds. I just smiled sweetly at him and bid adieu, shaking my head. My camino routine is: birds and quiet in the morning till lunch, music/podcasts in the afternoon to help push me to the albergue).

I'm always struck by some people's entitlement. In that particular moment it was more about him thinking it was his job to emphatically tell me what I should or should not be doing, when I never asked for his opinion.

Tip: women love this (insert sarcasm).

Is this a form of ‘mansplaining’?
😇
 
Is this really so? My last time passing through Sarria was 2005 and was normal Camino then, I didn't notice any difference.
As this is a niggles post - those who have passed through Sarria onwards in the last few years - is it all bad now? Or is it that there are just a few who haven't learnt the pilgrim ways? Is it really overcrowded (as in frequently no beds, etc) - surely there are positives? Pilgrim throngs and all that?
My first Sarria - SdC was in 2013 in August, so peak season. Tons of people, many of them with organized tours so they would just carry a water bottle and nothing else and a bus would transport their suitcases to the next destination. Most "normal" stops were fully packed if you didn't leave early enough, because these bus tours would reserve the places in albergues for their people. Lots of boy/girlscout groups as well (it was a boyscout group who decided to switch on the light at the albergue even though there were 3 other people in the room who didn't belong to their group and wanted to sleep). I saw quite a few long-distance hikers (you get to know their faces after a while) having to go to pensions because many albergues were full with groups. One day we actually ended up walking 42 kms because we arrived in... I think Portomarin and it was fully booked, so we kept walking, but that was full as well, and then the next one, and finally the third albergue after Portomarin had some space.

In 2019, I walked this section in late April, so not so busy yet. It was easier to find a place to sleep. There were still some groups. I felt like cafes were a bit busier in a way, because by this time you had to get 2 stamps to get the papers in SdC (in 2013, you didn't need it if you were walking more than 100km, so long hikers didn't need to bother with it) so people would stop more to get the stamps.
 
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Pet peeves and dislikes on the Camino?
No particular order:
1. Graffiti.....immature, selfish, destructive, illegal and based on the quotes just plain boring. I feel quite sorry for anyone who would get inspired by such banal scribble.
2. Pilgrims who put their packs on beds and on chairs in the sleeping quarters of albergues.
3. Pilgrims who inventory and pack their stuff up in the backpacks at zero dark thirty in the albergue sleeping area when there's a common area just the other side of the door. Rudeness aside, it's just plain not efficient.
4. Pilgrims who dump out all the contents of their packs on the floor of the sleeping quarters of the albergue and just leave them there for everyone to have walk around and through. Another one that makes me wonder.
5. Pilgrims who take long showers and or wash their clothes in the shower whilst there's others waiting to use one. Again, rude and ignorant thing to do.
6. Pilgrims who take a long time to wash their clothes while others are waiting. Do it quickly or go use a machine.
7. Pilgrims who make reservations at albergue and then are no shows. That's bad for the albergue and bad for fellow pilgrims who may have been turned away.
8. Bicycles or any motorized vehicles including silly a** drones on the walking path. I'm just going to leave it there.
9. Pilgrims who play their music externally on a speaker while walking, sometimes quite loudly. Rude and childish.
 
Is this a form of ‘mansplaining’?
😇

Oh yes...On another camino, I had just ascended the steep climb out of Conques and as I reached the top, the guy in front of me turned around and proceeded to tell me my shoes weren't the correct ones. No preamble, no "hey, how are those shoes working out for you?" Just "you have the wrong shoes". 🤯

Those particular shoes happen to be my favorite pair ever (made by Vasque, unfortunately discontinued) carrying me from Le Puy all the way to Santiago. No blisters, no sore feet, super comfy.
 
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I try not to be judgmental about the baggage transport, but I have no problem denouncing the drones and selfie sticks. My tolerance is further tested by pilgrims who monopolise limited cooking and washing facilities in albergues.
I agree re the kitchen monopolists especially in swarms who don't just eat and leave .... they must see it as their private booking and gabble on loudly even after their food is finished...
 
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For those who want to avoid those Sarria crowds, stay in other towns. Barbadelo, Morgade, Ventas di Naron, Airexe, Portos, etc. etc. You start in the morning and by lunch, some of the crowds may have caught up but they are really thinned out.
 
I ride a bike, I have a bell but I don't use it much. The reason is that on rough trails with walkers you need to keep your head up and your attention forward, and it's too quiet to be noticed if the walkers are talking.

I use loud music instead. This is because it helps with the rhythm of cycling and distracts one from the pain of the bumps and hills. It also keeps my mind from wandering into unpleasant places.

The most important reason is that while a bell is ignored, Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I ride a bike, I have a bell but I don't use it much. The reason is that on rough trails with walkers you need to keep your head up and your attention forward, and it's too quiet to be noticed if the walkers are talking.

I use loud music instead. This is because it helps with the rhythm of cycling and distracts one from the pain of the bumps and hills. It also keeps my mind from wandering into unpleasant places.

The most important reason is that while a bell is ignored, Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
Add some AC/DC to the mix and I'm a happy pilgrim ;)

I found cyclists to be dangerous at times, but for the most part I heard them and stepped aside.
 
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If I'm in bed while their work is going on and then I get up at 9 am and scuttle off, in what way does this impede their work or deny them repose?
Hospitaleros are trained to be "on" when pilgrims are around: hospitable, ready to answer questions, respond to needs, etc. Some may do better at this; some may do worse. But that's the expectation, at least as expressed in the course I recently took. The time when they don't have to be "on" is when no pilgrims are around. That might be how your presence impedes their work or denies their repose. Sure, you may be as invisible or silent as a ghost, not preventing them from cleaning the room you are in or the bed in which you sleep, not asking any questions. But how do they know that you will be one of these rather than one of the more noticeable pilgrims? Surely you can see how much easier it is not to have to make these judgements in advance and potentially get them wrong and just have the albergue to themselves when they need to do their chores.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hospitaleros are trained to be "on" when pilgrims are around: hospitable, ready to answer questions, respond to needs, etc. Some may do better at this; some may do worse. But that's the expectation, at least as expressed in the course I recently took. The time when they don't have to be "on" is when no pilgrims are around. That might be how your presence impedes their work or denies their repose. Sure, you may be as invisible or silent as a ghost, not preventing them from cleaning the room you are in or the bed in which you sleep, not asking any questions. But how do they know that you will be one of these rather than one of the more noticeable pilgrims? Surely you can see how much easier it is not to have to make these judgements in advance and potentially get them wrong and just have the albergue to themselves when they need to do their chores.
There is at least one albergue on the CF where there is really no "check in or check out" time. That is at San Juan de Bautista in Grañón. Some people arrived very early while we were still cleaning and we did not make people leave in the dark in the winter. In fact, it was always kind of good for people to see you doing all the cleaning and bed bug checking, etc. It does make it difficult when you are trying to clean the bathroom, sweep or mop when pilgrims have their things about or are trying to shower, etc. Also this albergue was never locked, even when we were out shopping or away at Mass. You're leaving your things at your own risk.

Phil usually draws a line at being responsible for pilgrim belongings or bags so he won't usually allow them to leave their bags until they have signed in and they need to take their things with them when they leave in the morning even if they are hanging around town a bit. One of the only arguments we have ever had is when I allowed someone to leave their bag to attend Mass one morning. I had to stay at the albergue while he went out and did the day's shopping and errands so the man could return to retrieve it later. He feels it puts us at risk as volunteers if something turns up missing
 
I ride a bike, I have a bell but I don't use it much. The reason is that on rough trails with walkers you need to keep your head up and your attention forward, and it's too quiet to be noticed if the walkers are talking.

I use loud music instead. This is because it helps with the rhythm of cycling and distracts one from the pain of the bumps and hills. It also keeps my mind from wandering into unpleasant places.

The most important reason is that while a bell is ignored, Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
One of the many benefits of having walking poles is that you can wave one out to the side on the trail so bicyclists like you have to either veer off the path or, maybe even worse for the bicyclist, have to slow down or even stop while passing pedestrians.
 
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3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
In the US on multi-use paths, bicyclists often just call out "On your left!" when they approach walkers. That works.
But "on your left" isn't universal. I imagine that in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand that cyclists pass on the right instead of the left.
 
Other than allow people to vent, threads like this really serve no good purpose. Those of us who don't know better than to litter the trail with trash and TP, to click-clack along the Camino without rubber tips on their poles, or to deface signs and mojones won't be reading here anyway.

As far as things a like proper cup of tea, if you want all the comforts of home then why go on Camino?
For many people here, their niggling dislike is people who talk about their niggling dislikes. Some of us get a kick from threads like this, where we can laugh about some annoying little shared experiences. I see it as mostly for fun. Others don't have to read them (except you, trecile, since you're a moderator!) Now about the unforgiveable fashion faux pas that is the Macabi skirt.... I'm KIDDING! (It's sick, I know, but I LIKE to be a little annoyed sometimes. It's better than being outraged).
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
But "on your left" isn't universal. I imagine that in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand that cyclists pass on the right instead of the left.
Then you say "On your right!" When I'm riding a bike, I usually say "I am on your left (or right). That way, walkers aren't as likely to get confused and step in the direction the person is calling out. Especially those who are in the square dancing community. :D
 
One of the many benefits of having walking poles is that you wave one out to the side on the trail so bicyclists like you either crash or, maybe even worse for the bicyclist, have to slow down or even stop while passing pedestrians.

Assault a fellow pilgrim? What happened to the Camino spirit? Santiago would not be amused 👹
 
Then you say "On your right!" When I'm riding a bike, I usually say "I am on your left (or right). That way, walkers aren't as likely to get confused and step in the direction the person is calling out. Especially those who are in the square dancing community. :D
But if you are accustomed to having bikes pass on your left, and someone calls out "on your right" you might instinctively move to your right.
 
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But if you are accustomed to having bikes pass on your left, and someone calls out "on your right" you might instinctively move to your right.
True. But bicyclists might pass on either side, and that's why I call out "I AM on your right." Certainly it's better than not warning them of your approach at all. And also bicyclists should slow down when they approach walkers, especially on narrow roads and trails.
 
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Assault a fellow pilgrim? What happened to the Camino spirit? Santiago would not be amused 👹
I'm sorry. I shouldn't joke about that, I know. I DO actually hold my poles a little farther out to the side occasionally on a narrow road or path to avoid being startled by an unexpected speeding bike whipping by me and causing me to get hit by a car or run into a tree. I do it to make them slow down or tell me that they are coming.

I edited my earlier post to say "veer off the path" instead of "crash." Less violent.

And this being said, I met a lot of wonderful people riding bikes on the Camino. Especially Italians who often sing the whole way. And to Santiago: "Perdóname, Señor, porque he pecado."
 
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I enjoy all my bad habits.
I'm pretty sure I snore, sometimes, but I'm never awake to enjoy it. I thought of this while I was semi-asleep on the train today, and noticed a gentle, soft purring sound, almost musical in quality, which sadly abated with a sort of "oink" whenever I stirred.

Anyway, something I don't like. The ridiculously short light switch timers in albergue showers and WCs.
 
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Please do not misunderstand me. I freely recognise that people may use any service which is legally available to them. They do not need my permission or my approval for their choices and I will not criticise any individual who decides to use the services which exist. But that doesn't mean that I personally have to pretend to like the status quo.
Newbie here: what do you dislike about the luggage service? Just trying to understand how it might affect others since I'm considering using one for my first camino.
 
Newbie here: what do you dislike about the luggage service?
I think I would probably fall foul of the moderators if I were to give a full explanation of my thinking on that. I feel that the advent of luggage services has probably done more to change the way the Caminos are perceived and the attitudes of many of those who walk them than any other single development apart perhaps from the rise of the internet. A marked rise in entitled behaviour and a growing tendency to trade cash for personal effort.
 
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Newbie here: what do you dislike about the luggage service? Just trying to understand how it might affect others since I'm considering using one for my first camino.
I think it really limits where you can stay. If you are carrying your own pack and walking on your own, you can stay anywhere you want. I like to stay at the traditional places that don't accept luggage service. Last summer we had to transfer my husband's bag due to some health issues for a few days at the end of the Camino and we had to stay only at places that would accept his pack transfer. He could not help it and it wasn't his fault, but It reduces your ability to be flexible. I get nervous when my pack is not in my control. It holds everything that I have in the whole country while I am there and I like to have it with me.
 
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Newbie here: what do you dislike about the luggage service? Just trying to understand how it might affect others since I'm considering using one for my first camino.

Welcome to the forum!

I’d just like to add that there’s nothing quite like the freedom of carrying everything you need on your back … health permitting, of course.
It encourages you to pack as light as possible too.
One of the joys of walking a Camino is realising how little we really need to get by.

I wish you a wonderful walk ..
Buen Camino!
 
I have occasionally seen vending machines that were set up in various rather strategic locations on a few of the Caminos I have walked.They have usually been inside rustic little three walled "huts", sometimes with a table and a few chairs inside. I don't mind them at all and have used them a few times myself when nothing else was around.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
By participating in a community like the Camnio we are given a lot. How we value it is of course individual, but here, as in all other "communities", there are both rights and obligations. It's not my Camino, it's ours. What can we give in return to the communinity? Make the experience as good as possible for our fellow pilgrims. Less me and more more us, or something "simple" like altruism perhaps.
 
I fear things may get worse.

I've encountered someone who is simply going from albergues to albergues entirely focussed on running his internet language teaching business.

I now only want to avoid meeting him again.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
By participating in a community like the Camnio we are given a lot. How we value it is of course individual, but here, as in all other "communities", there are both rights and obligations. It's not my Camino, it's ours. What can we give in return to the communinity? Make the experience as good as possible for our fellow pilgrims. Less me and more more us, or something "simple" like altruism perhaps.
Yes, I guess there is a "Camino community". The Camino is also an individual, personal experience and no one can dictate what that should be. At least not to me.
 
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I've met two people (one American, one British), on two separate Caminos, who have driven between towns in a rental car while Instagramming / YouTubing their "authentic Camino experience". Anything for the views, I guess ....
 
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+1 for the TP trail and horrible tea. I'll add bag rustlers at silly o'clock, head torches in the dorm, rabid non drinkers. Non judgemental non drinkers are fine. I try to sit next to them.
Now for some likes to balance. People who yomp past without comment on my slow pace.
The feeling of relief when I can sit down and have a good view as an excuse, as opposed to having to sit down at a bus stop because I'm knackered. Sunshine on my shoulders. That first beer on arrival. Everyone who has ever walked me back to the track after getting lost. Probably another thousand or so things that don't occur to me at the moment.
Toilet paper 🤯 Drip dry like the guys if you need a pee outside. Gross? Maybe. Otherwise take it with you in a small bag. My two cents.
 
Toilet paper 🤯 Drip dry like the guys if you need a pee outside. Gross? Maybe. Otherwise take it with you in a small bag. My two cents.
Or just wear a mini-pad for the day.🤷
A past forum member who is a nurse (apparently in gynecology) mentioned that women's "parts" are not all identical, which I never knew. She mentioned that some gals drip dry much quicker or slower than others.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Okay, I'll say it out loud. Before I relieve myself, I find a smooth rock to use for wiping. Then I throw it far away. No reason for paper.
If stones could talk, what Camino tales of tails they could tell! Tall stories perhaps, as tall as Cruz de Ferro?
 
Is this really so? My last time passing through Sarria was 2005 and was normal Camino then, I didn't notice any difference.
As this is a niggles post - those who have passed through Sarria onwards in the last few years - is it all bad now? Or is it that there are just a few who haven't learnt the pilgrim ways? Is it really overcrowded (as in frequently no beds, etc) - surely there are positives? Pilgrim throngs and all that?
Yes. It's gross. Silly, bucket-list people. (May 2023.) I doubt I would ever do Sarria-Santiago again.
 
Pet peeves and dislikes on the Camino?
No particular order:
1. Graffiti.....immature, selfish, destructive, illegal and based on the quotes just plain boring. I feel quite sorry for anyone who would get inspired by such banal scribble.
2. Pilgrims who put their packs on beds and on chairs in the sleeping quarters of albergues.
3. Pilgrims who inventory and pack their stuff up in the backpacks at zero dark thirty in the albergue sleeping area when there's a common area just the other side of the door. Rudeness aside, it's just plain not efficient.
4. Pilgrims who dump out all the contents of their packs on the floor of the sleeping quarters of the albergue and just leave them there for everyone to have walk around and through. Another one that makes me wonder.
5. Pilgrims who take long showers and or wash their clothes in the shower whilst there's others waiting to use one. Again, rude and ignorant thing to do.
6. Pilgrims who take a long time to wash their clothes while others are waiting. Do it quickly or go use a machine.
7. Pilgrims who make reservations at albergue and then are no shows. That's bad for the albergue and bad for fellow pilgrims who may have been turned away.
8. Bicycles or any motorized vehicles including silly a** drones on the walking path. I'm just going to leave it there.
9. Pilgrims who play their music externally on a speaker while walking, sometimes quite loudly. Rude and childish.
All of the above, but especially the reserving and no-shows. Rude not just to other pilgrims (who might be turned away), but to the very people who are helping us walk our camino.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I ride a bike, I have a bell but I don't use it much. The reason is that on rough trails with walkers you need to keep your head up and your attention forward, and it's too quiet to be noticed if the walkers are talking.

I use loud music instead. This is because it helps with the rhythm of cycling and distracts one from the pain of the bumps and hills. It also keeps my mind from wandering into unpleasant places.

The most important reason is that while a bell is ignored, Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
Ew.
 
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I ride a bike, I have a bell but I don't use it much. The reason is that on rough trails with walkers you need to keep your head up and your attention forward, and it's too quiet to be noticed if the walkers are talking.

I use loud music instead. This is because it helps with the rhythm of cycling and distracts one from the pain of the bumps and hills. It also keeps my mind from wandering into unpleasant places.

The most important reason is that while a bell is ignored, Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
One thing is certain, you will not make many friends with your behavior.😞😞
 
Led Zepplin works fine in letting the walkers know I'm behind them. Inconsiderate? Perhaps. But I'm gone in seconds leaving behind the silence, birdsong and the pleasure of justified annoyance, amplified by being often shared. ☘️
Hmm. When my last child left home some twenty years ago, I consoled myself with the thought that I'd never have to suffer Led Zeppelin again...
 
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A lot of people, and I am one of them, think it is incredibly anti-social to travel across the countryside blasting out loud rock music, so I just hope your post is ironic, or tongue in cheek or some kind of joke.

I'm sorry to disappoint you, but I'm not joking. Most of the time the countryside is empty. When there are walkers the music is audible to them for a very short time only. 2 minutes of interruption before the silence and birdsong resume, even more highly appreciated. And as I said, cycling hurts and requires concentration and music helps. I do regret the upset sometimes caused, but other walkers ... Not all younger ones ... actually like the songs as they trudge along, wrestling with their thoughts. Sorry again, but I'm not going to stop.
 
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