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Pilgrim Statistics

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
#3
Hi Kathy,

I don't know of anything that has been published lately. All I know is that there was written an article on the http://www.consumer.es site recently with some numbers:

http://www.consumer.es/web/es/viajes/20 ... 144455.php
(Spanish)

This article includes some numbers that they got from speaking to a delegate from "las Peregrinaciones y Canónigo de la Catedral de Santiago", a person named Genaro Cebrián.

There is a lot of number in this article, not sure if all this is to be considered official, probably not. But it certainly indicates a trend. Walking the streets of Santiago these days confirms this trend, it is busy.

If anyone else knows of some more statistics, please let us know here :)

Greetings,
Ivar
 
#4
Kathy:
I doubt these very recent figures are available yet anywhere.

So why not extrapolate from the published figures for 2003 (2004 was an 'ano santo' so that year's figures cannot be extrapolated for 2005).
:

http://www.archicompostela.org/Peregrin ... eneral.htm

I think the numbers given there for each month represent only the 'official' pilgrims having finally reached Santiago during those months. Knowing and considering the duration of the Camino itself, the nationality mix and where the different Caminos merge into one on the way, one should be able to estimate the numbers passing through each location on each given day of a month in 2005 with some good accuracy.

Kerryman
 
#5
ivar said:
There is a lot of number in this article, not sure if all this is to be considered official, probably not.
Those will be 'official' numbers, though the article doesn't actually say what the YTD total is, only what they forecast for the whole year (which has gone up since the number reported in Voz de Galicia last month
http://www.lavozdegalicia.es/se_alsol/n ... TO=3930620
)

AIUI, the Pilgrim Office installed some new statistics software last year. In theory, that ought to make publishing the figures regularly on the web easy. Perhaps you should go and sort them out, Ivar :)
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Well, that's a good idea; maybe I should offer my help to the Pilgrim Office? :)

Actually, I am in talks with another IT company in Vigo regarding a possible job related to Norway and Galicia. If this, for some reason does no come through I might contact the Pilgrim Office. I will know more in a few months time.

Greetings from cloudy and windy Santiago,
Ivar
 
#9
Actual figures from SJPdP:

81 pilgrims through SJPdP on October 1, 2005.
55 on October 2.

And these are just those who went through SJPdP, more were joining at Roncevalles and at Puente la Reina.

Claus
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#10
In March 2009 the Tourist Office reports 1,808 pilgrims, down from 5,328 in 2008. Spaniards represented 1,106 of the total.

The drop from one year earlier is dramatic. January and February were comparable to 2008. It might be the weather; it might be the economy; it might be Easter week; or it might be that pilgrims are waiting until later in the year for a good-weather experience that avoids the expected 2010 crush of pilgrims. If the downward statistics persist, though, it will be a bad year for the merchants along the way.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#11
Falcon, this figure is not unusual. Holy week always impacts on the numbers.
In 2007 they celebrated Holy Week (Easter) during the month of April and in 2008 it was in March. That is why they received 5327 pilgrims during the month of March in 2008 compared with 1680 pilgrims received in March 2007.
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
#12
I talked to one of the brothers in Hostal Suso today (I might do their website), and he told me that they have noticed a lot less people this year. :? There was a lo of people in the streets during Easter, but I have a feeling the stats will show that things are "down" from last year.

Saludos,
Ivar
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#13
That'll be great Ivar - will we be able to bok rooms there through you?

Don't forget that April 2007 had extraordinary numbers of people - down in 2008: It all depends on when Holy Week falls.

2006 2007 2008
Jan 314 350 306
Feb 351 666 703
March 1.093 1.680 5.327
April 7.438 8.112 5.655
May 9.992 12.898 15.983
19.188 23.706 27.974
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#15
Arriving at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a certificate:

May 2009 - 16,439 compared to 15,988 in May 2008
June 2009 - 15,841 compared to 15,157 in June 2008

Economic conditions have not halted the increase in pilgrims yet.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#16
Thanks for the info. Falcon. I was starting to wonder why the Official Pilgrim's Office site had not yet published the statistics for May and June. (I had just checked the site only a few days ago). Let's see what July and August bring! Anne
 
#17
Sil usually posts the info from Rosina's bulletins - I think she is away at the moment so:

"These are some of the data about those Santiago pilgrims that received a Compostela during the six months from January 1 to June 30 of this year:

Total compostela recipients for the period: 48,970 (43,803 for the same period in 2008)

Female pilgrims: 19,345; males 29,625

Walked: 40,418; bicycled: 8,368; rode horses: 181; went by wheelchair: 3.

Under 15 years of age: 1,146;

between 15 and 35: 15,555;

36 to 65: 28,220;

over 65: 4,049.

Pilgrims with religious motives exclusively: 20,065

Religious/cultural: 24,727

Cultural only: 4,178

21,713 pilgrims hailed from Spain itself; the rest came from all over the world.

The largest number of foreign pilgrims, 7,309 came from Germany; 3,213 came from France; 3,121 from Italy; 2,578 from Portugal; 1,278 from Austria; 1,121 from the United States; 1,112 from Holland; 1,084 from Brasil; 964 from Ireland; 835 from Canada; 656 from Belgium; 579 from Finland; 494 from Mexico and the rest, in decreasing numbers, from another twenty or so countries.

37,939 of the pilgrims followed the French Camino; 4,539 the Portuguese; 2,669 the Via de la Plata; 2,341 the Northern Way; 856 the Primitive Way, and 499 the English. The rest followed several other routes.

11,508 of the pilgrims started out in Sarria; 6,220 in Saint Jean Pied de Port; 4,279 in Ponferrada (?); 3,427 in Roncesvalles; 3,182 in Leon; 2,836 in O Cebreiro; 1,892 in Sevilla (!!!!); 1,721 in Pamplona; 1,583 in Astprga; 1,128 in Le Puy; 1,04220in Tui and the rest commenced their pilgrimage at different points distanced from Santiago sufficiently to qualify the pilgrim for receipt of the Compostela.



Again, the above numbers reflect only those pilgrims who qualified for, and requested, the Composela. As has been mentioned several times, it is estimated that the total number of pilgrims in the various Caminos at any one time is about five times the number of those who do receive the Compostela.



Recently an “Anthropological Profile” of the 2008 Compostela recipients was made. These are some of the findings:

Over 50% of the pilgrims were between 36 and 65 years of age; the percentage of pilgrims between 16 and 35 years of age has increased to 40%.

56% of the pilgrims are male.

81% of the pilgrims are single (!)

56% of the pilgrims possess a college education.

95% of the pilgrims declare either an exclusively religious reason, or a religious/cultural reason for the pilgrimage.

87% of the pilgrims declared themselves to be believers; of these, 96% were Catholic, 2% non-Catholic Christians and 2% belonged to other religions. 59% of the believers stated that they are regular church-goers.

A very large number of the pilgrims, 66%, declared that they went to the Camino without prior preparation, physical or otherwise. Of those who prepared themselves beforehand 81% undertook physical training.

87% of the pilgrims went to the Camino in the company of someone else.

13% went alone (mostly by choice),

5
5% of the pilgrims declared that the most negative aspect of their experience was the difficulty of the Camino (tiredness, aches, blisters, etc). The climate bothered 46% of the pilgrims, and 31% complained about the albergues (no hot water and unfriendly hospitaleros).65% of the pilgrims were satisfied with the albergues (indeed, 18% were extremely satisfied), while 14% found the albergues deficient and 3% found them “very bad”.

On the positive side, 90% of the pilgrims pointed out the camaraderie, the friendship and the brotherly communication among the pilgrims. 41% found the spiritual and religious experience very meaningful and 21% were quite happily impressed by the contact with nature, the cultural aspects of the Camino and the opportunity to expand their physical and spiritual capabilities."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
#19
Thanks, Johnny, for that - very interesting reading. I am really surprised by how few the non-catholics and UK pilgrims are - the two are obviously linked. But the UK CSJ is such a strong organisation ? I suppose my perception is skewed by this being an english language forum?

And the enormous difference in the numbers between the Frances and the other routes!
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
#20
And I am wondering about the 81% who are single. Could be construed also to mean they came as single walkers rather than as folks who are not married or partnered?
 

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
#21
I believed 'single' means walking alone, not marital status.

Given the statistics from the past, I am more concern for the pilgrims planning to walk in 2010 (Holy Year). Any estimates? Is it going to break 250 thousand? And will the camino infrastructure be able to accommodate?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (1988)
#22
JohnnieWalker said:
Again, the above numbers reflect only those pilgrims who qualified for, and requested, the Composela. As has been mentioned several times, it is estimated that the total number of pilgrims in the various Caminos at any one time is about five times the number of those who do receive the Compostela.
"
By my count, based on this estimation, there are currently about 1 million pilgrims on the road to Santiago each year- this sounds comparable to the height of the pilgrimage in the Middle Ages. De acuerdo?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
#23
Does the five times more include the coach groups of teenagers who make a pilgrimage to the cathedral in Santiago, as part of confirmation courses and such like? Counting those types of pilgrims there could easily be a million!
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#24
I believe that the statistics are for persons who receive a Compostela or Completion Certificate at the Tourist Office in Santiago. It does not include those who don't want a (another) piece of paper, or those who stop before Santiago. I seriously doubt that there are four more unidentified pilgrims for each one that gets a certificate. The head counts at albergues along the way do not support that assertion. Observation in the Plaza Obradoreiro shows a mix of pilgrims, tour groups, and tourists. The mix did not show me five times as many pilgrims as I had encountered along the pilgrimage.

Single is marital status, though the polling is from the Anthropological Study, not the questions asked for a Compostela. With the variety of languages that must have been used for the study, the question may have been too vague for a reliable end result.

Applications for a certificate of some sort in 2010 is expected to exceed 250,000. If it is true that there will be five times as many pilgrims as certificates, the number will be astonishing. Non-pilgrim visits to Santiago in 2010 are estimated at 5-10 million (normal is several million). It will be a busy place, so personal space will be at a minimum. It is hard to envision the lines to hug the St. James statue! Hours will be extended, I have read, and the lines will be hustled along by the attendants, who will be quite brusque after a few months of huggers that want just a little more time. If you want to see humanity at its best, 2010 may not be the right year for a walk to Santiago.
 
#25
Falcon is correct. The Pilgrims Office expects to recieve at least 250,000 pilgrims next year. The local councils along the routes are drawing up plans to cope - extra sleeping facilities in church halls, sports centres, schools etc.
 

MichaelB10398

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
#26
There was a recent post on the forum expressing problems with bus loads of "tourigringos" (I think that was the name they used - no packs, just a few days out) getting off and filling up albergues in the last 100 to 200 km of the Camino, which resulted in forcing pilgrims walking from SJPP, etc. to walk as much as 45 km to find beds. I have no problem with these types of pligrims being bussed out in large groups, but it does seem inappropriate when they take the space of those walking long distances, carrying a pack, etc. Is this being addressed? I would expect this could be a huge problem next year.

These touring groups should not be allowed to use the albergues reserved for pilgrims. I thought large groups were not supposed use them?
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#27
There was brief discussion about this at San Roque albergue a few days ago.
A pilgrim complained about the albergues filling up from Sarria with mainly small pack, few days walking, Spanish pilgrims.
A Spanish pilgrim responded by saying that there are too many foreigners walking the camino and that Spanish pilgrims who pay the taxes for basic services like water, roads, electricity etc and who want to earn a Compostela, have to compete with hoards of foreigners for beds on the way to Santiago.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#28
Is it true that only Spanish pilgrims pay for water and electricity?
Are those utilities financed by the Spanish taxes? If so... wow!

Or do all the pilgrims who pay to sleep there pay for these utilities?

I do understand how the Spanish pilgrim feels though... every time I see an out of state license plate in what was beautiful green and tree-ed Oregon less than 5 years ago, I have to tell myself not to be sad.
 

MichaelB10398

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
#29
Silly, that is going to start a rather circuitous argument without producing a solution. The first question obviously is what do think that tourist income does for the Spanish economy, for making those roads to drive your cars on, for producing jobs so that Spanish children can eat, and on and on. ...it is just not a productive use of time.

I thought albergues were not to take large groups; that there was an order to who they allowed to register. If this is being bypassed by large touring companies that are somehow able to circumvent the rules, then that is a problem. The touring companies need to arrange alternative sleeping arrangements or there needs to be some form of planning so they don't take up all the beds in miles of the Way in order that those walking are not left out in the cold. Does this make sense or is this a waste of time?
 
#30
You are correct. Albergues run by municipal authorities and Amigos groups and Confraternities shouldn't admit pilgrims who travel by motorised transport. Rather than being a sinister plot by the church, the new rule that everyone must carry a Pilgrim Passport from either their own country or the official pilgrim passport issued in Spain was introduced to try to stamp out Tourist Companies making (and selling) their own credencials.

But the problem continues. Last week two very large groups arrived in Santiago and made the queue at the pilgrims office much longer. The sellos on their credenciales were sparce. In some there was a gap of 100 kms between stamps. "How did you get from A - B?" one was asked. "On the bus" was the innocent reply. The decision not to issue compostelas was met with huge disappointment and lengthy discussions - making the queue even longer.

But the reality is the cheats will always be with us.
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#31
Thanks for the stats, John.
I can't help but wonder how many of those who gave "religious reasons only" would have preferred to put "spiritual reasons" had that been an option. From my conversations on previous caminos and now on this one ("live" from the Biblioteca in O Porriño - bless 'em) very few would consider their pilgrimage "religious", yet "cultural" is way too ambiguous....
But then we all know that I am this forum's Happy Heretic"!
John, hope to meet you in Santiago sometime the week of the 24th - 31st.

Tracy Saunders
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.com
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#32
July 2009: 26,195 pilgrims compared to 20,989 pilgrims in 2008, a 25% increase.
August 2009: 35,071 pilgrims compared to 29,747 pilgrims in 2008, an 18% increase.

And here comes the Jubilee Year!!

The peregrination to Santiago in AUGUST of 2009
Office of the Pilgrim

During the month of August of 2009 in the Office of Peregrinations 35,071 pilgrims were received; the previous year they were 29,747 pilgrims.

Of these pilgrims, they are men 20,471 and 14,600 women. On foot 28,582 have arrived, in bicycle 6,398, 76 to horse and wheelchair 15 pilgrims.

Age of the pilgrims
Minors of 18 years are 3,445 pilgrims; among 19 and 30 they are 4.328; among 31 and 45 they are 11.814; among 46 and 65 they are 7,966 and majors of 65 years are 518 pilgrims.

Motivation that expresses the pilgrims personally
Religious 15.700
Religious and others 15.915
Nonreligious 3.456

Nationalities of the pilgrims.
Spaniards: 23.257; the greater number of pilgrims comes from the communities of Valencia with 3.919; Catalonia with 3.835; Madrid, 3.616; Andalusia, 2.925; Euskadi, 1.487; Castile and Leon, 1.220; Castille-La Mancha, 1.138; Galicia, 1.1162; Murcia, 1.001; etc.
Foreigners: 11,814 pilgrims. The country that greater number of pilgrims contributes is Italy with 4,655 pilgrims; Germany, 1.749; France 977; Portugal, 848; Poland 364; The USA, 251 etc.

Professions of the pilgrims.
At professional level the most numerous group is the formed one by the employees with 8,758, later the students with 7,711, the technicians with 4,290 pilgrims, the professors with 3.922; the liberal professionals with 3,871 pilgrims; the workers with 1.907; the civil servants with the 1,282 and pensioners with 1.020; etc.

Place of departure.
Most of the pilgrims arrived in this month of August have initiated their way in Sarria, 7.336; Roncesvalles, 2.763; Cebreiro, 2.707; Saint Jean Pied de Port, 2.651; Ponferrada, 2.333; Leon, 2.318; Astorga, 1.241; Oviedo, 1.063; Tui, 1.055; Burgos, 898; Villafranca of the Bierzo, 763; Pamplona 746; Ferrol, 545; Oporto, 524; Triacastela, 501; Irun, 496 and Orense, 450; etc.

Route Followed.
The way that has followed the majority of the pilgrims is the French Way, with 26,960 pilgrims; followed by the Way of the North with 2.763; the Portuguese Way with 2,583 pilgrims; the Route of the Silver has been chosen by 1,154 pilgrims; the Primitive Way by 969 pilgrims, the English Way has completed it 583 pilgrims and 59 pilgrims have shown preference for other ways.

The peregrination to Santiago in 2009 July
Office of the Pilgrim

During the month of July of 2009 in the Office of Peregrinations 26,195 pilgrims were received; the previous year they were 20,989 pilgrims.

Of these pilgrims, they are men 14,828 and 11,366 women. On foot 22,164 have arrived, in bicycle 3974 and 56 to horse.

Age of the pilgrims
Minors of 18 years are 5,168 pilgrims; among 19 and 30 they are 6.855; among 31 and 45 they are 6.407; among 46 and 65 they are 7,011 and majors of 65 years are 753 pilgrims.

Motivation that expresses the pilgrims personally
Religious 11.788
Religious and others 12.048
Nonreligious 2.358

Nationalities of the pilgrims.
Spaniards: 17.269; the greater number of pilgrims comes from the communities of Madrid, 3.122; Andalusia, 2.925; Catalonia with 2.049; Valencia 1.959; Castile and Leon, 1.111; Euskadi, 1.033; Castille-La Mancha, 993; Extremadura, 852; Galicia, 769 etc.
Foreigners: 8,926 pilgrims. The country that greater number of pilgrims contributes is Germany with 1,652 pilgrims; Italy, 1.302; France with 995 pilgrims; The USA, 476; Portugal, 465; Poland 352; The United Kingdom, 287; Holland, 277; Belgium, 268; Canada, 217; Austria, 205; etc.

Professions of the pilgrims.
At professional level the most numerous group is the formed one by the students with the 8,503 later employees with 4,656, the professors with 3.107; the liberal professionals with 2,422 pilgrims; the technicians with 2,321 pilgrims; the pensioners with 1.517; the civil servants with the 1,348 and workers with 661; etc.

Place of departure.
Most of the pilgrims arrived in this month of July have initiated their way in Sarria, 4.936; Saint Jean Pied de Port, 2.031; Cebreiro, 1.993; Ponferrada, 1.658; Roncesvalles, 1.632; Leon, 1.565; Astorga, 1.307; Tui, 927; Oviedo, 626; Villafranca del Bierzo, 603; Burgos, 553; Pamplona 544; Or Porto, 458; and Orense, 421; etc.

Route followed.
The way that has followed the majority of the pilgrims is the French Way, with 19,785 pilgrims; followed by the Way of the North with 2.295; the Portuguese Way with 2,104 pilgrims; the Route of the Silver has been chosen by 1,082 pilgrims; the Primitive Way by 494 pilgrims, the English Way has completed it 403 pilgrims and 31 pilgrims have shown preference for other ways.
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
#33
Bridget and Peter said:
Thanks, Johnny, for that - very interesting reading. I am really surprised by how few the non-catholics and UK pilgrims are - the two are obviously linked. But the UK CSJ is such a strong organisation ? I suppose my perception is skewed by this being an english language forum?

And the enormous difference in the numbers between the Frances and the other routes!
Yes I'd agree here - there are very few from the UK. On my first camino, they were as rare as hens teeth. It still seems to be the case.

I wonder if it is to do with the insularity of the British, and ignorance of things continental? They are pretty hostile to the idea of European unity, for example.
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
#34
sillydoll said:
There was brief discussion about this at San Roque albergue a few days ago.
A pilgrim complained about the albergues filling up from Sarria with mainly small pack, few days walking, Spanish pilgrims.
A Spanish pilgrim responded by saying that there are too many foreigners walking the camino and that Spanish pilgrims who pay the taxes for basic services like water, roads, electricity etc and who want to earn a Compostela, have to compete with hoards of foreigners for beds on the way to Santiago.
There's always one nationalist...tho' he should remember that the Camino is presented by the Spanish authorities as the 'Camino de Europa'.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#35
POR MESES

MES 2006 2007 2008 2009
ENERO 314 350 306 520
FEBRERO 351 666 703 681
MARZO 1093 1680 5328 1808
ABRIL 7438 8112 5655 10245
MAYO 9992 12898 15988 16446
JUNIO 12946 15157 15860 19316
JULIO 18560 20108 20989 26212
AGOSTO 25968 27140 29747 35098
SEPTIEMBRE 13451 15189 17298 20465
OCTUBRE 7661 9434 9881 11727
NOVIEMBRE 1755 2496 2301 2354
DICIEMBRE 848 796 1085 1005
TOTAL 100377 114026 125141 145877
 

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grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#37
falcon269 said:
2009 Pilgrims by Country:
Interesting numbers. They fit pretty well with our experience on the Camino in March '09.
The majority of people we met were from Germany, followed by Spain (toward the end), France, Netherlands and Canada. We did see more than a few from Korea. There were many other countries as well....but in in small numbers.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#38
Thanks for the info.Falcon. When we walked in May/June of 2008, we noticed that there were loads of Germans (which also included some Austrians & Swiss). This last year, in September/October, there were many more French and... so many Koreans. We asked about this and were given the following reason:
Apparently there are several long distance trails/pilgrimages accross Korea and once they have completed these routes, the final recommendation is to do the Camino de Santiago.
I don't know if this is true or not and wonder if anyone can confirm this, or give another reason.
Anne
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#39
For those interested in which country has the most pilgrims per population, here is a spreadsheet that is sorted by the 2009 compostelas issued by the Pilgrim Office in Santiago de Compostela :


Ireland is ahead of Germany and France!!
 

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lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#40
I think this is the most interesting table of all - and a few surprises! Thanks for posting these stats Falcon.

lynne
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#41
For September:

Durante el mes de septiembre de 2011 en la Oficina de Peregrinaciones se recibieron 26.008 peregrinos; el anterior Año Santo en 2004 fueron 22.753. De estos peregrinos, 11.407 (43,86%) son mujeres y 14.601 (56,14%) hombres. A pie han llegado 21.569 (82,93%), en bicicleta 4.367 (16,79%), a caballo 68 (0,26%) y 4 (0,02%) en silla de ruedas.

Extranjeros: 13.456 (51,74%); el país que mayor número de peregrinos aporta es Alemania, con 3.089 (22,96%); Italia, con 1.518 (11,28%); Francia, con 1.426 (10,60%); Portugal, con 988 (7,34%); Irlanda, con 650 (4,83%); Reino Unido, con 501 (3,72%); Canadá, con 418 (3,11%); Estados Unidos, con 377 (2,80%); etc.

Los caminos que han seguido la mayoría de los peregrinos son Frances-Camino de con 19.113 (73,49%); Portugues-Camino con 3.083 (11,85%); Norte-Camino de con 1.742 (6,70%); Via de la Plata con 856 (3,29%); Primitivo-Camino con 785 (3,02%); etc.

La mayor parte de los peregrinos llegados en este año 2011 ha iniciado su camino en Sarria con 5.230 (20,11%); S. Jean P. Port con 2.701 (10,39%); León con 1.888 (7,26%); Cebreiro con 1.385 (5,33%); Roncesvalles con 1.294 (4,98%); Ponferrada con 1.265 (4,86%); Tui con 1.109 (4,26%); Oporto con 1.096 (4,21%); etc.
 
#42
Statistics and questions...

The total numberof pilgrims recieved in the Pilgrims Office during September is: 26,008

That makes the total to date: 161,925

I've posted the full analysis here:

http://johnniewalker-santiago.blogspot. ... mbers.html


Questions: Why do you think more artists than nuns and priests put together walk the Camino?

In terms of travel distances why is the UK so apparently under represented?

There is clearly a surge in pilgrims from the antipodes - why so?

Any views?
 
#44
It was rather the growth in pilgrim numbers from the antipodes to which I was referring. Ireland is a catholic country with a deeply embedded tradition of pilgrimage which stretch back for many centuries.

Just as well there are no available stats for the total number of artists in the world compared to priests and nuns!
 

andy.d

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#45
As a priest married to an artist, I'd say that parish clergy have to wait for a Sabbatical or for retirement if they are to walk for more than a couple of weeks, artists have a more flexible working life.

Andy
 

KiwiNomad06

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#46
Ireland is much closer to Santiago both in terms of religion and distance - most people here in the antipodes have never heard of the Camino. Also for many, a trip to Europe is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and many 'attractions' vie for their tourist time. Even amongst Catholics in New Zealand the Camino has been little known, though one of our bishops recently walked it, and others will have read of his experience.
There was a book published in Australia a few years back 'The Year we seized the Day' that seems to have been read by quite a few in Australia, so that might explain some of the increased numbers from this part of the world.
Margaret
 

jpflavin1

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#47
JW:

Eight of the top ten are western European countries. They account for 83% of the Pilgrims. This makes perfect sense too me. The outlier might be the large number of German participants. I have been told this is due primarily to a book written by a German comedian. The Canadian number is large based on the size of their population and the distance they travel. That said, Canadians are known for their travel. If we consider the next ten, the other number that jumps out at me is the Korean participation. Mainly because they have no European connection and live half way around the world. Brazil and Australia have a large representation based on the distance they travel to walk the Camino.

It would be interesting to see these numbers excluding those who walk from Sarria.

The numbers appear to be growing. It will be interesting to see if the movie "The way" will have any impact on American participation.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

tyrrek

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#48
Do priests and nuns necessarily identify that as their occupation? They may also be teachers, academics...artists etc.

As someone from the UK, I must admit I was surprised when doing the Frances this year how few British there were, even allowing for the relatively secular society here. I've got no idea why apart from a general lack of awareness.

Just out of interest. How are pilgrims' starting points recorded if they take motorised transport at some point, but still walk the last 100km and receive a Compostela? Might someone recorded as starting at O'Cebreiro/Sarria etc have actually walked much more of the Camino?
 
A

AJ

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#49
tyrrek said:
As someone from the UK, I must admit I was surprised when doing the Frances this year how few British there were, even allowing for the relatively secular society here. I've got no idea why apart from a general lack of awareness.
Could it have something to do with Britain being overwhelmingly Protestant?
 

tyrrek

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#50
I'm sure that's a large part of it, AJ. The figures suggest that Catholics make up a majority of pilgrims (although it would be interesting to see this fully adjusted to take into account the geographic proximity of Catholics). The Catholic populations of the UK and Ireland are broadly similar, as are the numbers of pilgrims from each country, which also supports that view.

However, I'm not convinced that's the whole story. The largest Protestant church in the UK (the Church of England) shares many traditions and practices with the Catholic church, and as far as I know there's no reason why pilgrimage shouldn't be one. Also, as a British Catholic (lapsed) I don't remember there being any tradition of pilgrimage in the way JonnieWalker describes the tradition in Ireland. There was Lourdes for the sick, but nothing that involved physical exercise!

I admit I haven't read up on the subject at all, but I think what's most interesting is that just 25 years ago hardly anybody of any nationality or denomination saw the need to make the pilgrimage to Santiago. Now they do. I think it's quite hard to pin that down to any single factor.
 

Debinq

Active Member
#51
Falcon
to flatter the figure even more, you could always try to work out how many of the antipodean pelegrinos have Irish roots and then add that to the Irish total! (and skite abt the rugby result if that makes you feel better!) :roll:

*yawn*

buen camino quand meme
Peter
 

Debinq

Active Member
#52
Johnny Walker
Why the recent surge in antipodean pelegrinos? Kiwinomad prolly already answered that - there've been several 'camino books' published in Oz in the last few years so there's increased awareness - quite a bit of media coverage too - Also as witnessed by the "Oz Camino" (San Salvado) start-up

buen camino (and happy trails too)
Peter
 

Tia Valeria

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#53
The walking pilgrimage seems to be have been lost in the UK. Partly due to lack/loss of long distance paths through past development of roads etc without making safe provision for walkers. Try crossing the A1 dual carriageway these days :!:
Another deterrent is the lack of reasonably spaced out and affordable accomodation along the routes that do exist. Our Youth Hostel organisation shrank years ago and anything else is Bed and Breakfast and very expensive.

There are some long distance walks and a renewed interest in creating new pilgrimage routes. Hopefully they will carry some infrastructure too, but it will take time. Then perhaps pilgrimage will become more common again. At present folk are more likely to go on 'retreat' than pilgrimage.

Perhaps this helps to explain the low UK numbers.
 
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#54
Re: Statistics and questions...

JohnnieWalker said:
The total numberof pilgrims recieved in the Pilgrims Office during September is: 26,008

That makes the total to date: 161,925


There is clearly a surge in pilgrims from the antipodes - why so?

Any views?
I'm not sure how you came to this conclusion. From the stats available from the pilgrim office, the overall combined contribution of Australian and New Zealanders from 2006-09 was on average 0.875%, but so far this year, Oceania has only contributed about 0.764%. Whether this is statistically significant is not clear, but I doubt one could call it a surge if our contribution to the overall numbers is declining.

Without access to the seasonal stats, which are not published by the pilgrim office, its not possible to see if this is consistent with previous years, or does indicate that the overall percentage contribution will fall.

Regards,
 

falcon269

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#55
Without access to the seasonal stats, which are not published by the pilgrim office,
You can get the statistics by month from the Pilgrim Office website, so seasonal information is available (though not by country breakdown after the first few countries, so you won't be able to track Australian pilgrims by month). Do you just want to know that more Oceania pilgrims go in the summer?
 

tyrrek

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#57
Denmark was the country that surprised me most in terms of its representation on my particular Camino. Not a Catholic country and about a tenth the size of the UK in overall population, but I met more Danes than British en route.

I know I'm drifting off topic a bit (and I'm genuinely interested rather than being rhetorical), but where does the idea that pilgrimage is a Catholic practice come from? Is it due to any actual doctrine, or the practicalities of Protestants travelling to the major pilgrimage sites in Catholic countries historically?

I'm also interested in Tia Valeria's post about a potential revival of pilgrim routes within the UK. I imagine these would be places such as Canterbury, Lindisfarne, Iona?
 

Tia Valeria

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#58
tyrrek said:
.........
I'm also interested in Tia Valeria's post about a potential revival of pilgrim routes within the UK. I imagine these would be places such as Canterbury, Lindisfarne, Iona?
The two pilgrim routes I had in mind are:-
Two Saints Way Chester to Lichfield
Pilgrims' Way, North Wales Holywell to Bardsey Island.
The CSJ also has a route in planning stages from Reading to Southampton or Portsmouth. Others are making plans for a route from Cornwall to Norfolk. This last has a pilot project from Brentor on Dartmoor to Glastonbury. There are notes about these in the latest CSJ Bulletin for September 2011
 
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#59
falcon269 said:
Without access to the seasonal stats, which are not published by the pilgrim office,
You can get the statistics by month from the Pilgrim Office website, so seasonal information is available (though not by country breakdown after the first few countries, so you won't be able to track Australian pilgrims by month). Do you just want to know that more Oceania pilgrims go in the summer?
No. What I was really interested in was the observation made earlier in the thread that there had been a surge in the numbers from down-under, when it appears that compared to the 2006-09 statistics, the numbers from Australia and New Zealand have fallen in relative terms. If the seasonal figures showed that it is normal for the AS/NZ figures to pick up late in the year, it might be possible that there is a surge. It seems a remote prospect to me, but without the facts at my fingertips, I was prepared to contemplate that it might have been possible - unlikely, but possible.

Regards,
 

tyrrek

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#60
Gracias Tia. To be honest I was not at all familiar with these pilgrim routes. As a Scot brought up in Northumberland, the sites I mentioned are much more familiar to me. Perhaps that illustrates the (potential) diversity of pilgrim routes around the GB/UK.
 

falcon269

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#61
For 2006 through 2009:
Australia 730 785 1022 1015
Nueva Zelanda 138 195 162 200
Dinamarca 801 835 986 1061
Irlanda 849 1090 1535 1722
Reino Unido 1541 1696 1559 1700
Corea 84 449 915 1079
Alemania 8097 13837 15746 14789
Estados Unidos 1909 2229 2214 2540
Canadá 1546 1850 1933 2194
 
#62
And 2010 for antipodean friends: 1162

I take back the word "surge" :oops: but clearly the pattern of growth is there!

I too am interested in seasonal trends as they impact on the stats - however analysing that may have to wait until winter I'm afraid.
 

KiwiNomad06

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#63
JohnnieWalker said:
And 2010 for antipodean friends: 1162
Now Johnnie my friend- please clarify what exactly you mean by antipodean? You surely don't just mean Australian??!!! In fact, Madrid and Wellington in NZ are the exact antipodes of each other, and I will be in Wellington next week. Now, if only I can make my shovel dig straight, I could be in Madrid for New Year....
Margaret
 
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#65
JohnnieWalker said:
Yikes - a minefield! I meant the Australian and New Zealand total. :oops:
Looking at the more generally accepted regional description of Oceania, which captures less than a handful of people form Vanuatu and Reunion, then the stats are:

Oceania
Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Number 868 982 1184 1218 1412
Percent 0.86% 0.86% 0.95% 0.83% 0.52%

In 2010, Spaniards comprised nearly 70% of the pilgrims compared to between 48 and 54% in the previous four years. Every other country's relative number had to decline in the face of that even if the absolute number increased.

The part year stats for 2011 that you so usefully provided indicate 1237 pilgrims out of 161,925 came from Australia and New Zealand or about 0.76%.

If the 2006-2009 trend in absolute numbers had continued, one might have expected about 1500 pilgrims from Oceania to complete a Camino this year. Similarly, if the relative contribution had remained around 0.875%, about 1416 pilgrims from Oceania would have completed the Camino by the end of September. While there has been an increase in the numbers of pilgrims from Oceania, it certainly has not been consistent with the general (non-holy year) growth overall nor with the trend for 2006-09.
 
A

AJ

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#67
tyrrek said:
I know I'm drifting off topic a bit (and I'm genuinely interested rather than being rhetorical), but where does the idea that pilgrimage is a Catholic practice come from?
If you visit the pilgrim museum in Santiago, you will learn that pilgrimage is a universal practice. The best known non-Christian pilgrimage probably being the Haj, the obligatory muslim pilgrimage to Mecca.

Now from where have I got the idea that Protestants don't do pilgrimage?
 

tyrrek

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#68
AJ, I'm not sure quite how to read your latest post, but I hope you didn't read mine as assuming you weren't aware of pilgrimages across religions and denominations. That wasn't my intention at all. However as I'm already aware of Haj and other pilgrimages you'll forgive me if I don't rush to the museum to 'learn'.

What I was trying to get at, is that if there's a perception (rightly or wrongly) that Catholics are more predisposed to pilgrimage than other denominations, that could affect the way in which the promotion of the Camino by the tourist agencies/regional govts etc. was targeted. This in turn could help explain why some countries are better represented in the statistics than others. Given that all nationalities started from virtually zero pilgrims 25 years ago, I'm sure marketing of the pilgrimage has not been insignificant in getting to the numbers we see today.

I'm sure there are many reasons why such a perception could exist, as some of the relatively modern pilgrimage sites such as Lourdes and Medjugorje do have a Catholic 'bias' for want of a better word.
 

Debinq

Active Member
#69
Great site Davroos - v interesting and was so pleased to see the stats for Oct 06 (when I 'arrived') and that with 3.29% the VdlP was still very much the road less traveled and that 8.22% gave cultural as their only motivation - what would really interest me though, is how many of the 'culturally motivated' ( s t s) are 'au fond' atheists or agnostics!

buen camino
Peter
 
#70
[quote="Tia Valeria] The CSJ also has a route in planning stages from Reading to Southampton or Portsmouth. Others are making plans for a route from Cornwall to Norfolk. This last has a pilot project from Brentor on Dartmoor to Glastonbury. There are notes about these in the latest CSJ Bulletin for September 2011[/quote]

Yes, based on walking notes from years earlier by Alison Raju I have now written a guide to the route from Reading to Southampton which we have called the St James Way. Peter Robins of this forum has produced a map of the route: http://pilgrim.peterrobins.co.uk/routes ... james.html

It is an easy walking and in stages extremely pastoral and beautiful route through many historic parts of England. For more information:

http://johnniewalker-santiago.blogspot. ... s-way.html
 
#71
There is also a slightly different route from Reading to the modern day pilgrim departure port of Portsmouth from Normandy or Santander. The route actually starts in Northampton. The guide is free and has a description of route , places to stay, and a full Ordinance survey like make to enable all who walk it to find the precise way. this guide is available free by sending me a private email.
We do however need postage for this as it is a good sized envelop.
 
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#72

sillydoll

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#73
Now from where have I got the idea that Protestants don't do pilgrimage?

Probably from history books on the Reformation! The veneration of saints, relics, indulgences, pilgrimage and all that went with it became dirty words from around 1517. Wars were fought over it and the 'protestors' (where the name protestant comes from) were prepared to die for the new order even those Protestants who moved to the New World calling themselves 'Pilgrims'.
 

falcon269

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#74
The summer rush seems finally to be fading; only 374 pilgrims today in Santiago after six to eight hundred each day for the beginning of October.
 

falcon269

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#75
pilgrimage to Santiago in november 2011

During the month of november 2011, 1.661 pilgrims were received at the Pilgrim's Office. The number of pilgrims in the past Holy Year, 2004, during the same period was 4.457. Of those pilgrims, 680 (40,94%) were women and 981 (59,06%) men. 1.517 (91,33%) pilgrims arrived on foot, 137 (8,25%) by bicicle, 7 (0,42%) on horseback, and 0 (0,00%) pilgrims on wheel-chair.

Pilgrims by sex
Men (59,06%)
Women (40,94%)

Pilgrims' Age:
489 pilgrims were younger than 30 years old (29,44%), 951 were between 30 and 60 years old (57,25%), and 221 were aged above 60 years old (13,31%).

Pilgrims' Motivation:
Religious: 605 (36,42%)
Religious and Cultural: 958 (57,68%)
Cultural: 98 (5,90%)

Pilgrims by age
30 - 60 (57,25%)
< 30 (29,44%)
> 60 (13,31%)

Pilgrims by motivation
Cultural (5,90%)
Religious (36,42%)
Religious and Cultural (57,68%)

Pilgrims' Nationality:
Spanish: 751 (45,21%); Most of the pilgrims came from Madrid: 141 (18,77%); Andalucía: 132 (17,58%); Galicia: 106 (14,11%); Cataluña: 91 (12,12%); Comunidad Valenciana: 69 (9,19%); Castilla León: 42 (5,59%); Asturias: 31 (4,13%); Pais Vasco: 28 (3,73%); etc.

Foreigners: 910 (54,79%); Most of the pilgrims come from the following countries: Alemania: 155 (17,03%); Francia: 72 (7,91%); Estados Unidos: 64 (7,03%); Belgica: 62 (6,81%); Corea: 52 (5,71%); Italia: 51 (5,60%); Brasil: 47 (5,16%); Portugal: 45 (4,95%); etc.

Spanish Pilgrims
Madrid (18,77%)
Andalucía (17,58%)
Galicia (14,11%)
Cataluña (12,12%)
Comunidad Valenciana (9,19%)
Castilla León (5,59%)
Asturias (4,13%)
Other regions

Foreigner Pilgrims
Alemania (17,03%)
Francia (7,91%)
Estados Unidos (7,03%)
Belgica (6,81%)
Corea (5,71%)
Italia (5,60%)
Brasil (5,16%)
Other countries

Pilgrims' Profession:
Regarding the professional fields, the majority of pilgrims are Empleados: 417 (25,11%); Estudiantes: 257 (15,47%); Tecnicos: 230 (13,85%); Liberales: 171 (10,30%); Jubilados: 169 (10,17%); Parados: 106 (6,38%); Funcionarios: 76 (4,58%); Profesores: 75 (4,52%); etc.

Starting Points:
Most of the pilgrims received in this period started their Way to Santiago in: Sarria: 373 (22,46%); S. Jean P. Port: 314 (18,90%); Ponferrada: 104 (6,26%); Cebreiro: 79 (4,76%); Roncesvalles: 74 (4,46%); León: 62 (3,73%); Tui: 59 (3,55%); Pamplona: 48 (2,89%); etc.

The Chosen Routes:
Most of the pilgrims chose Frances-Camino de: 1.323 (79,65%); Portugues-Camino: 130 (7,83%); Norte-Camino de: 79 (4,76%); Via de la Plata: 51 (3,07%); Primitivo-Camino: 46 (2,77%); etc.
 

falcon269

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#77
Pilgrimage to Santiago in 2011

Durante 2011, 179.919 pilgrims were received at the Pilgrim's Office. The number of pilgrims in the past Holy Year, 2004, during the same period was 179.944. Of those pilgrims, 76.204 (42,35%) were women and 103.715 (57,65%) men. 150.208 (83,49%) pilgrims arrived on foot, 29.188 (16,22%) by bicycle, 491 (0,27%) on horseback, and 32 (0,02%) pilgrims on wheel-chair.

Pilgrims by medium
Foot (83,49%)
Bicycle (16,22%)
Horseback (0,27%)
Wheel-chair (0,02%)

Pilgrims' Age:
51.255 pilgrims were younger than 30 years old (28,49%), 103.429 were between 30 and 60 years old (57,49%), and 25.235 were aged above 60 years old (14,03%).

Pilgrims' Motivation:
Religious: 78.585 (43,68%)
Religious and Cultural: 90.231 (50,15%)
Cultural: 11.103 (6,17%)

Pilgrims' Nationality:
Spanish: 95.728 (53,21%); Most of the pilgrims came from Madrid: 16.485 (17,22%); Andalucía: 15.543 (16,24%); Cataluña: 13.927 (14,55%); Comunidad Valenciana: 10.880 (11,37%); Castilla León: 6.436 (6,72%); Galicia: 6.415 (6,70%); Pais Vasco: 5.510 (5,76%); Castilla la Mancha: 4.485 (4,69%); etc.

Foreigners: 84.191 (46,79%); Most of the pilgrims come from the following countries: Alemania: 16.511 (19,61%); Italia: 12.047 (14,31%); Portugal: 8.513 (10,11%); Francia: 8.067 (9,58%); Estados Unidos: 3.708 (4,40%); Irlanda: 2.647 (3,14%); Reino Unido: 2.329 (2,77%); Holanda: 2.315 (2,75%); etc.

Pilgrims' Profession:
Regarding the professional fields, the majority of pilgrims are Empleados: 43.837 (24,36%); Estudiantes: 31.411 (17,46%); Tecnicos: 24.809 (13,79%); Jubilados: 20.161 (11,21%); Liberales: 17.933 (9,97%); Profesores: 13.567 (7,54%); Funcionarios: 9.214 (5,12%); Obreros: 6.012 (3,34%); etc.

Starting Points:
Most of the pilgrims received in this period started their Way to Santiago in: Sarria: 38.623 (21,47%); S. Jean P. Port: 18.935 (10,52%); León: 10.566 (5,87%); Cebreiro: 9.952 (5,53%); Roncesvalles: 9.223 (5,13%); Ponferrada: 7.984 (4,44%); Tui: 7.561 (4,20%); Oporto: 6.511 (3,62%); etc.

The Chosen Routes:
Most of the pilgrims chose Frances-Camino de: 130.403 (72,48%); Portugues-Camino: 21.646 (12,03%); Norte-Camino de: 11.889 (6,61%); Via de la Plata: 7.764 (4,32%); Primitivo-Camino: 4.985 (2,77%); etc.
 

falcon269

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#78
January 2012
Durante el mes de Enero de 2012 en la Oficina de Peregrinaciones se recibieron 512 peregrinos; el anterior Año Santo en 2010 fueron 1.169.

Peregrinos por sexos
Hombre (63,67%)
Mujer (36,33%)

Peregrinos por medios
Pie (92,97%)
Bicicleta (7,03%)
Caballo (0,00%)
Silla de Ruedas (0,00%)

Peregrinos por edades
30 - 60 (67,19%)
< 30 (26,95%)
> 60 (5,86%)

Peregrinos por motivación
Cultural (5,47%)
Religioso (43,95%)
Religioso/Cultural (50,59%)

Nacionalidades de los peregrinos.
Españoles: 258 (50,39%); el mayor número de peregrinos procede de las comunidades de Galicia, con 47 (18,22%); Madrid, con 45 (17,44%); Asturias, con 37 (14,34%); Cataluña, con 33 (12,79%); Andalucía, con 21 (8,14%); Comunidad Valenciana, con 18 (6,98%); Castilla León, con 15 (5,81%); Pais Vasco, con 11 (4,26%); etc.

Extranjeros: 254 (49,61%); el país que mayor número de peregrinos aporta es Corea, con 63 (24,80%); Italia, con 36 (14,17%); Estados Unidos, con 31 (12,20%); Alemania, con 16 (6,30%); Brasil, con 15 (5,91%); Portugal, con 12 (4,72%); México, con 10 (3,94%); Colombia, con 9 (3,54%); etc.

Profesiones de los peregrinos.
A nivel profesional el grupo más numeroso es el formado por los Estudiantes con 98 (19,14%); Empleados con 97 (18,95%); Liberales con 69 (13,48%); Tecnicos con 67 (13,09%); Profesores con 46 (8,98%); Funcionarios con 31 (6,05%); Obreros con 29 (5,66%); Parados con 26 (5,08%); etc.

Lugar de salida.
La mayor parte de los peregrinos llegados en este año 2012 ha iniciado su camino en Sarria con 75 (14,65%); León con 56 (10,94%); Cebreiro con 54 (10,55%); Oviedo - C.P. con 42 (8,20%); S. Jean P. Port con 41 (8,01%); Ponferrada con 34 (6,64%); Oporto con 25 (4,88%); Ferrol con 17 (3,32%); etc.

Camino seguido.
Los caminos que han seguido la mayoría de los peregrinos son Frances-Camino de con 349 (68,16%); Portugues-Camino con 65 (12,70%); Primitivo-Camino con 46 (8,98%); Ingles-Camino con 17 (3,32%); Via de la Plata con 17 (3,32%); etc.
Koreans top the list of foreign pilgrims!!

#3,000
 
#79
For everyone:

The website from which Falcon assiduously cuts and pastes these statistics is to be found at:

http://www.peregrinossantiago.es/

The website is in development. At the moment you can access the database of statistics and over the next few weeks we will be changing and posting new content and I'll be asking for your feedback.

I've also recently been looking at those parts of the world where there has been growth in numbers. I'd be interest to know what you think might be the reasons. For example the young Koreans who arrive that the office say that people posting on Facebook has been a huge influence on the growth of pilgrim numbers.

Anyway....what do you think:

Country 2007 2008 2009 2010 (HY) 2011
Korea 423 830 1079 1472 1740
Japan 327 412 527 801 877
Taiwan 8 11 14 28 58
China 19 20 35 57 112


Country 2007 2008 2009 2010 (HY) 2011
Estonia 107 129 110 124 86
Slovakia 269 249 413 609 610
Romania 75 78 104 243 201
Lithuania 30 54 83 144 114
Russia 50 72 94 238 246


Country 2007 2008 2009 2010 (HY) 2011
Great Britain 1696 1559 1700 2028 2389
Ireland 1090 1535 1722 2306 2677
Australia 785 1022 1015 1162 1352
United States 2229 2214 2540 3311 3726
Canada 1850 1933 2194 1879 2362
South Africa 262 274 262 301 513
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#80
The website looks good Johnnie,good to have it flagged up for us. I hope you keep the link to the Portico de Gloria in the updated site. I presume it is still covered in scaffolding and will be for some time.
 
#81
Johnnie

Do you have the full statistics for 2011.

I have been keeping a record since 1989 but the Pilgrim Office figures for 2011 [todos] does not load for me and the statistics for country of origin age etc used to be available in a more detailed form than Falcon posts above.

Thanks

William
 

fraluchi

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
One every year since 2007
#84
JohnnieWalker said:
The website from which Falcon assiduously cuts and pastes these statistics is to be found at: http://www.peregrinossantiago.es/ The website is in development. At the moment you can access the database of statistics and over the next few weeks we will be changing and posting new content and I'll be asking for your feedback.
The site http://www.peregrinossantiago.es/esp/po ... tadisticas
has much monthly/yearly information, but it is difficult to extrapolate the number of pilgrims at a certain time at a certain place. Perhaps that by showing a daily number of arrivals, past records may become a bit more conclusive. However, as always, there are statistics and lies!
There has been a constant increase in walkers (pilgrims?) over the years, and facilities along the ways have also followed suit. There is enough accommodation along the classic routes (the Camino Francés being the main) to meet demand for some time to come.
One thing I noticed, is that for often identifiable reasons, pilgrims (walkers) move in waves. Local holidays, week-ends, weather forecasts, organized groups, method of traveling, etc. influence numbers starting from Leon, Astorga, Cebreiro, Sarria and other possible starting points within the 100 km range to SdC.
 
#85
Hola

We are currently changing the platform for the database in the Pilgrims' Office and I have been unable to simply cut and paste the statistics as usual. We are working on a solution.

Some stats to keep you going!

The total number of pilgrims who have arrived in the period 1 Jan 2012 - 29 Feb 2012 is 2172

The soothsayers in the Office are predicting another bumper year based on the following:

First two months of the year:

2012 - 2172 pilgrims arrived

2011 - 1556 pilgrims arrived

2010 - (Holy Year) 2832 pilgrims arrived

2009 - 1258 pilgrims arrived

2008 - 1009 pilgrims arrived

I'll post more on the list of countries etc as the technical issues are resolved.

And as William reported earlier the full reports on the stats for preceding years is available here:

http://peregrinossantiago.es/esp/post-p ... adisticos/

Best wishes

John
 

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