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Ranking my top 10 foods from the Camino

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Time of past OR future Camino
Starting Jan. 25th from SJPDP
Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day including hostels, food, laundry, etc), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric
 
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The first time I walked the camino, it was winter of 1998, so there were not a lot of options anywhere. I always made sure to carry some pasta, an onion, some garlic, a little salt and pepper, a little olive oil, and a 'bric' of Don Simon, a sort of gut-rot wine that may no longer be available. I'm about to set out on another longish camino walk, and I'll be carrying the same things, although I might upgrade the wine a bit.
 
Looking at your original title, I should add that my top ten foods on my first camino were tortilla y pan x infinity! Honourable mention to pulpo a la gallega in Melide, sopa de ajos in various places, caldo gallego, again in various places, and various revueltos. Ooh, mustn't forget morcilla de Leon - the best black pudding in either France or Spain, imho. Also, every single tapa in Calle Laurel, in Logroño.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric
😮😮😮 Tortilla doesn’t feature 😮😮😮 ??
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Not on 35E per day and not from the same Camino but:

1. Burrata and Chuleton in Restaurante El Figón del Duque in Navaratte
2. Tomate tudela in Casa Carmen Estella
3. Baby Lamb at Asador Salamanca in Leon
4. Argentinian paradilla at 22 Al punto braseria Vigo
5. Pinchos at Bar Gaucho Pampalona
6. Mexican food and wicked Margaritas at Pico de Galo Santiago d C
7. Rice dishes and seafood at Os Cachivaches Lugo
8 I suppose everyone needs to do the Melide Pulpo once. Pulpería Ezequiel.
9. Chuletón at Casa Teodora in Arzua
10. Anything at cafe Iruña in Pampalona. For Hemingway. But Restaurante de Tagliatella across the square did great pasta.

Yum. Because you’re worth it.
 
I walked the Frances in 2018 and still pine for the pulpo and padron peppers. I ate them every time I could find them. I also really enjoyed a lentil soup and a wonderful grilled fish served as pilgrim meals (don't remember where.) The simple pleasures of good food and cheap wine are some of my best Camino memories!
 
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The first time I walked the camino, it was winter of 1998, so there were not a lot of options anywhere. I always made sure to carry some pasta, an onion, some garlic, a little salt and pepper, a little olive oil, and a 'bric' of Don Simon, a sort of gut-rot wine that may no longer be available. I'm about to set out on another longish camino walk, and I'll be carrying the same things, although I might upgrade the wine a bit.
The sense of peace having a box of pasta in the backpack was so lovely. I've never heard of Dom Simon - but the Camino also made me fall in love with wine. Best of luck on your next journey, buen Camino my friend!
 
Looking at your original title, I should add that my top ten foods on my first camino were tortilla y pan x infinity! Honourable mention to pulpo a la gallega in Melide, sopa de ajos in various places, caldo gallego, again in various places, and various revueltos. Ooh, mustn't forget morcilla de Leon - the best black pudding in either France or Spain, imho. Also, every single tapa in Calle Laurel, in Logroño.
I didn't try the pulpo - one huge regret of mine.
😮😮😮 Tortilla doesn’t feature 😮😮😮 ??
I guess the list was more of foods I carried and prepared myself, but tortilla would be #1 for restaurant foods :)
 
I walked the Frances in 2018 and still pine for the pulpo and padron peppers. I ate them every time I could find them. I also really enjoyed a lentil soup and a wonderful grilled fish served as pilgrim meals (don't remember where.) The simple pleasures of good food and cheap wine are some of my best Camino memories!
We had Padron Peppers only this weekend 😁

eaef5c45-a07a-409b-9ebf-0c98b4ebf98e.jpeg
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Don Simon 😱ok to cook with. Reminds me of the time we were sat with three French pelegrinos and the subject of “best cheese” came up. From the French came “ Camembert “d’accord! “ Vacherin” mais oui! And “Roquefort”,tres bon! Just to wind them up we suggested “Le Vache Qui Rie”. A few seconds later expressions of “ horreur”, then they finally got the joke.
my favourite is Brie de Meaux- Bon Appetit.
 
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We had Padron Peppers only this weekend 😁View attachment 162925

This lovely photograph reminded me of all the times I enjoyed pimientos de Padron on my own Camino a few years ago ... and the pain of paying ca. $15 U.S. when I saw them on a restaurant menu stateside a few weeks ago, only to receive less than a dozen small, undersalted pimientos on the plate (and nary a spicy one among them.) Give me these, a good tortilla, some bread, and an Aquarius or three every day and I can eat and drink contentedly on a Camino for months!
 
Reminds me of the time we were sat with three French pelegrinos and the subject of “best cheese” came up. From the French came “
Winter 1989/90. Small "English" tea room in Darjeeling. Overheard a 'dialogue of the deaf' between the waiter and a French couple about what type of cheese was in the 'cheese omelette '. "What sort of cheese?' 'Cheese!'. Went on for several minutes. Clearly the waiter had only ever encountered one variety of cheese - big blocks of Industrial cheddar. :cool:
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Winter 1989/90. Small "English" tea room in Darjeeling. Overheard a 'dialogue of the deaf' between the waiter and a French couple about what type of cheese was in the 'cheese omelette '. "What sort of cheese?' 'Cheese!'. Went on for several minutes. Clearly the waiter had only ever encountered one variety of cheese - big blocks of Industrial cheddar. :cool:
Way, way back in 1968 my parents and I visited France from our little island in the Caribbean. My father was anxious to try proper French cheese; he asked the shopkeeper to recommend the best the store had to offer. Imagine my father’s surprise when he was given what he found was no different from the one and only cheese available on our island. That cheese not only graced our table but was used locally to bait rat traps, and was affectionately referred to as ‘rat cheese.’ 😎
 
My top ten (in Spain - on a budget)

1. Tortilla (with potato) and some bread
2. Magdalenas (for first breakfast, until I find a place with tortilla)
3. Pasta and tomato sauce, maybe with cheese and / or chickpeas (cooked in albergue kitchen in the evening)
4. Bread+cheese (for days without Tortilla)
5. Dried nuts (there's a kind of mix I've only seen in spain so far, with corn in it, salted - great for eating while walking, or in the heat)
6. Olives
7. Fruit (oranges, banana)
8. Patatas bravas
9. Yogurt (for eating with the magdalenas, for breakfast)
10. Beer&wine for morale!

Top ten in France (on a budget):

1. bread & cheese
2. bread & cheese
3. French fries with mayonnaise
4. Cantaloupe melon
5. figs and fig confiture (to eat with bread and cheese)
6. Ratatouille from the can with bread
7. wine (rosé is nice in combination with the cantaloupe melon)
8. taboulé ready to eat from the supermarket
9. Carrot salad and celery salad ready to eat from the supermarket
10. Bread and cheese.

Now, this is not necessarily my favourite food ever, but my favourite to keep budget down on a Camino while still enjoying the food I eat.

Best is always a very good salad, one that is not only iceberg lettuce, tasteless tomato and cucumber... But one with different kinds of leafy greens, some fruit, some tasty stuff like olives or peperoni, seeds/nuts, some good cheese or boiled egg, and a tasty dressing. But often that is not available, too expensive, or too complicated to make in an albergue (too many different ingredients). But sometimes I'm lucky and it is available and not too expensive or we're several pilgrims who share a meal in the albergue and make a salad like that.

One of the best salads I had in Spain was in a tiny village before Villar de Mazarife. Slightly off route, but the way to the bar was clearly indicated with a giant yellow arrow and the word "BAR". Was definitely worth the little detour! I only wanted a beer but the salad was not expensive and turned out to be heavenly.

My baseline is, when you're hungry, everything is your favourite - even the week old fallen-out-of-the packaging peanuts in the base of your pack, crusted with sand; the slightly off cheese you've carried in your pack for days, or an overripe apple you found on the ground beneath a tree.

And also: Good company can make every meal wonderful, no matter what you eat 🙂.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
My top ten (in Spain - on a budget)

1. Tortilla (with potato) and some bread
2. Magdalenas (for first breakfast, until I find a place with tortilla)
3. Pasta and tomato sauce, maybe with cheese and / or chickpeas (cooked in albergue kitchen in the evening)
4. Bread+cheese (for days without Tortilla)
5. Dried nuts (there's a kind of mix I've only seen in spain so far, with corn in it, salted - great for eating while walking, or in the heat)
6. Olives
7. Fruit (oranges, banana)
8. Patatas bravas
9. Yogurt (for eating with the magdalenas, for breakfast)
10. Beer&wine for morale!

Top ten in France (on a budget):

1. bread & cheese
2. bread & cheese
3. French fries with mayonnaise
4. Cantaloupe melon
5. figs and fig confiture (to eat with bread and cheese)
6. Ratatouille from the can with bread
7. wine (rosé is nice in combination with the cantaloupe melon)
8. taboulé ready to eat from the supermarket
9. Carrot salad and celery salad ready to eat from the supermarket
10. Bread and cheese.

Now, this is not necessarily my favourite food ever, but my favourite to keep budget down on a Camino while still enjoying the food I eat.

Best is always a very good salad, one that is not only iceberg lettuce, tasteless tomato and cucumber... But one with different kinds of leafy greens, some fruit, some tasty stuff like olives or peperoni, seeds/nuts, some good cheese or boiled egg, and a tasty dressing. But often that is not available, too expensive, or too complicated to make in an albergue (too many different ingredients). But sometimes I'm lucky and it is available and not too expensive or we're several pilgrims who share a meal in the albergue and make a salad like that.

One of the best salads I had in Spain was in a tiny village before Villar de Mazarife. Slightly off route, but the way to the bar was clearly indicated with a giant yellow arrow and the word "BAR". Was definitely worth the little detour! I only wanted a beer but the salad was not expensive and turned out to be heavenly.

My baseline is, when you're hungry, everything is your favourite - even the week old fallen-out-of-the packaging peanuts in the base of your pack, crusted with sand; the slightly off cheese you've carried in your pack for days, or an overripe apple you found on the ground beneath a tree.

And also: Good company can make every meal wonderful, no matter what you eat 🙂.
This is amazing!! I would love to do the Via Francigena so I am taking notes on your France list. Bread and cheese? Noted :)
 
On the Portuguese coastal Camino I pledged to eat seafood every day. We’d order one seafood and a mixed salad (salads in Portugal were dead simple but impeccably fresh and perfectly dressed). My walking partner lives in Madrid so she was able to translate menus for me. There are so many different kinds and different words for different parts! It’s like the Inuit having so many words for snow. Anyway, they were all good, you can’t go wrong.
Somebody oughta put together a Camino menu guide. Maybe me.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
One of the best salads I had in Spain was in a tiny village before Villar de Mazarife. Slightly off route, but the way to the bar was clearly indicated with a giant yellow arrow and the word "BAR". Was definitely worth the little detour! I only wanted a beer but the salad was not expensive and turned out to be heavenly.

The best salad I ever had on Camino............
I had to go back three years later to have it again!!
Hospital de Orbigo. Hostal Don Suero de Quiñones

 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
This is amazing!! I would love to do the Via Francigena so I am taking notes on your France list. Bread and cheese? Noted :)
Oh no! I just realized that I forgot croissants and pastries for the France list! Maybe include that in "bread", but without cheese 😂 Definitely try the pastries with coffee for first breakfast, before the bread and cheese part, or at any time of the day if you have a sweet tooth! I don't really like sweet things usually, but sometimes even I couldn't resist...

a) in a tiny village at the loire, close to Roanne
b) from a bakery in Air sur l'Adour
c) lunch picnic at the river in St. jean pied de port

IMG20220611093141.jpgIMG20220716092340.jpgIMG20220718115744.jpg
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
My favorite Camino meal is so simple. It’s breakfast of toast with strawberry jam (fresa) and butter. The best I had was in Espinal on my third day and I chased that carbohydrate high every day for the rest of my Camino, and even years later during my second Camino on the Portuguese. It was the best bread I ever had.
 
I enjoyed carrying these cookies for a pick me up while walking and a nice treat to offer passersby as they slowed down for us to stroll together enjoying a bit of a chat. Then off they’d go. 👣😎
IMG_0907.jpeg
What I looked forward to the most was that morning cup of coffee con leche with a chocolate napoleon then later on down the path fresh squeezed OJ with tortilla.
 
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No matter why the initial post/thread was created, for whatever intentions...

It is always fun to share thoughts about food (we all love to eat, or at least most of us, I assume) and for newby pilgrims on a budget maybe there's some inspiration to be found.

And for the others, food can be a perfect way to remember things: a certain day, a certain feeling...

Marcel Proust wrote about that, in an amazing way, how a madeleine and some tea can catapult you back in time to a certain memory...

"A la recherche du temps perdu".

People are sharing positive things in this thread, good food memories. Nothing wrong with that.

Personally, I won't watch that 30min+ video on YouTube, but I still enjoy this thread.
 
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You see Russian salad on menus all the time, but I ordered it for the 1st time in O Pedruzo on my last day of the CF in May. It was so delicious, I wondered why I had never ordered it before, though it may have just been this cafe.
Pasta salad in Ribadiso was fabulous.
Have had Pulpo a few times, and though the 1st time was delicious, the other times not so much and after watching "my friend the Octopus" on Netflix, I don't want to eat it anymore.

Have had wonderful meals in lots of albergues - Casa las Almas in Espinosa is #1 for dinner and for a yummy German breakfast, followed by dinner at Casa Susi, dinner at Borda, dinner and breakfast at Posada el Camino in Lintzoain, dinner at Zabaldika, dinner in Sansol at Albergue Karma, dinner at Albergue Bideluze in Castildelgado, dinner at Albergue Santa Fe in Cardenuela Riopico, dinner and breakfast in Astorga at So Por Hoje, dinner and breakfast at Rosalia in Castrojeriz, unique Celtic dinner at Reboliera in Fonfria and some of the best cheese in Spain for snack or breakfast. Had a great burger in Ponferrada, but forgot the name of the restaurant, but it is right down the street from Albergue Guiana, dinner at Albergue la Escuala de la Lauguna was pretty darn good too though it was more of a restuarant.

I can graze all day long on Choc. croissants and other fresh baked goods, but a good dinner at an albergue is special and am lucky to have had so many good ones. Hats off to those owners who are also great cooks or have great cooks working for them.
 
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You see Russian salad on menus all the time, but I ordered it for the 1st time in O Pedruzo on my last day of the CF in May. It was so delicious, I wondered why I had never ordered it before, though it may have just been this cafe.
Pasta salad in Ribadiso was fabulous.
Have had Pulpo a few times, and though the 1st time was delicious, the other times not so much and after watching "my friend the Octopus" on Netflix, I don't want to eat it anymore.

Have had wonderful meals in lots of albergues - Casa las Almas in Espinosa is #1 for dinner and for a yummy German breakfast, followed by dinner at Casa Susi, dinner at Borda, dinner and breakfast at Posada el Camino in Lintzoain, dinner at Zabaldika, dinner in Sansol at Albergue Karma, dinner at Albergue Bideluze in Castildelgado, dinner at Albergue Santa Fe in Cardenuela Riopico, dinner and breakfast in Astorga at So Por Hoje, dinner and breakfast at Rosalia in Castrojeriz, unique Celtic dinner at Reboliera in Fonfria and some of the best cheese in Spain for snack or breakfast. Had a great burger in Ponferrada, but forgot the name of the restaurant, but it is right down the street from Albergue Guiana, dinner at Albergue la Escuala de la Lauguna was pretty darn good too though it was more of a restuarant.

I can graze all day long on Choc. croissants and other fresh baked goods, but a good dinner at an albergue is special and am lucky to have had so many good ones. Hats off to those owners who are also great cooks or have great cooks working for them.
Amazing. You just brought back a memory for me! One morning I was talking to a friend I had made from Denmark. I was making my usual breakfast (eggs and toast) and he asked if that's what my favorite breakfast was. I responded yes for the most part, but that actually when I was in Iceland I had this amazing breakfast with a little bit of everything - yogurt, meat, cheese, eggs, salad, fruit, etc etc etc.

That night I stumbled upon Casa las Almas. Not only were the hosts there just amazing, but that morning they brought out that "Icelandic-style" breakfast I had described. I felt like my prayers had been answered.
 
Oh no! I just realized that I forgot croissants and pastries for the France list! Maybe include that in "bread", but without cheese 😂 Definitely try the pastries with coffee for first breakfast, before the bread and cheese part, or at any time of the day if you have a sweet tooth! I don't really like sweet things usually, but sometimes even I couldn't resist...

a) in a tiny village at the loire, close to Roanne
b) from a bakery in Air sur l'Adour
c) lunch picnic at the river in St. jean pied de port

View attachment 163051View attachment 163052View attachment 163053
Yes, you mustn't forget the heavenly croissants, chaussons aux pommes, and tarte aux poireaux! (Also not a fan of sweet things, but those apple thingies are absolutely scrumptious early morning rocket fuel for a good, long walk!)
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The first ten to come to mind, in no particular order: Tortilla (also in a bocadillo), Gazpacho, Queso, Empanada, Pan con Tomate, Cafe con Leche, Sangria/Tinto de Verano, Pulpo a Feria, Pimientos de Padron, Ensalada Mixta.
Order very much depends on the time of day. Very different at breakfast time than snack time or main meal time or bar-hopping time.
 
I enjoyed carrying these cookies for a pick me up while walking and a nice treat to offer passersby as they slowed down for us to stroll together enjoying a bit of a chat. Then off they’d go. 👣😎
View attachment 163068
What I looked forward to the most was that morning cup of coffee con leche with a chocolate napoleon then later on down the path fresh squeezed OJ with tortilla.

Completely forgot about these until seeing this post but now I fondly recall that there was almost always a half-full, slightly melted packet of Principe biscuits lurking in my mochila somewhere to save me from hunger pangs and/or low trail energy. Thanks for the good memory!
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
To this list of the simple and the delicious, I’ll add white asparagus. (Is that a spear atop Robo’s salad?)
Even from a tin can, the iconic white asparagus is SO good. Cheap to buy, easy to carry. If an Albergue has condiments on hand, you can also blend mayo & ketchup blend for a quick dip – fun to share with others as a “tapa” :)
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Another goodie to share with fellow pilgrims. I love that the cookie is inside the chocolate. 😋
View attachment 163092
I forgot to mention eggs with bacon. The heavens open up with song. ❤️
View attachment 163093
And next I’m going to tell you I’m a pilgrim without telling you I’m a pilgrim. 🤣
View attachment 163094


Milka original Swiss is now all over Europe. Happens of course when the company is taken over by Kraft foods.
The earlier mentioned Principe Chocolate cookies ( Prinskoekjes ) are from Belgian manufacturer LU.
 
Milka original Swiss is now all over Europe. Happens of course when the company is taken over by Kraft foods.
The earlier mentioned Principe Chocolate cookies ( Prinskoekjes ) are from Belgian manufacturer LU.
Yes, Milka is now available here in my city in the US 😁 I didn’t know that about the cookies, thanks. I discovered them on my first Camino. The picture here is on my second. I was on the hunt, finding them in Zubiri. 😅
 
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To this list of the simple and the delicious, I’ll add white asparagus.
Oh, funny. Perception, I mean. Because my eye zoomed in on that spear of asparagus on Robo's salad and the mind went 😝. Yuck, for me, massive yuck.
It just goes to show how subjective taste is. Lalaone and I aren't on either side of a debate - we're both right. So @lalaone , if we ever meet on a camino, you can have all my tinned aasparagus. Dibs on the fresh kind, though.

Tortilla and pimento de padron get my vote for the things I could eat endlessly on a camino. Plus a simple breakfast of toast, zuma, and cafe. Ambrosia.
 
My first Spanish tortilla and cafe con leche in Burguete, with many more to come along the way. My introduction to a Spanish hamburger in Zubiri, wasn't to sure how to go about eating it. All in all a great 2nd day on the Camino, also with many more to come.
 

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Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day including hostels, food, laundry, etc), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric
I found it dificult to get meals with vegetables. Food was rarely great and
Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day including hostels, food, laundry, etc), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric

from time to time I filled up on Kabod.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day including hostels, food, laundry, etc), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric
Don’t forget Tarta de Santiago!
 
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This lovely photograph reminded me of all the times I enjoyed pimientos de Padron on my own Camino a few years ago ... and the pain of paying ca. $15 U.S. when I saw them on a restaurant menu stateside a few weeks ago, only to receive less than a dozen small, undersalted pimientos on the plate (and nary a spicy one among them.) Give me these, a good tortilla, some bread, and an Aquarius or three every day and I can eat and drink contentedly on a Camino for months!
Padron seeds are available in the US- can easily be grown in pots or planters. Since I am from an area with a shorter growing season I start mine early- my current crop has just gotten their first true leaves- and keep them in pots so they start to ripen earlier. I have yet to learn how to overwinter them, but I'll keep trying! :) 🥾 🌶️🍷
 
The top two items I ate while hiking the camino were
Tortilla for Breakfast
Jamon Sandwhich (ham) during the day
Both of those items were readily available at the cafes
along the route.
At night I ate the pilgrims meal.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
For those who say the food isn't great, you need to try to stay in albergues where they are cooking and serving a communal meal. Have had so many absolutely delicious meals on my Caminos, that I wonder where people are staying that they always say the food is so poor? If you read my earlier post, I list many of the places I stayed last year that had fantastic meals.
 
Hi all!

One year ago I started the Camino Frances. It was my first time backpacking and my two biggest concerns were "where do I sleep" and "what do I eat." So I wanted to talk about my experiences with the food I relied on based on budget-friendliness (35ish Euros/day including hostels, food, laundry, etc), nutrition, and "the Camino spirit."

10. Ham
9. Cheese
8. Olive Oil
7. Soup
6. Pasta
5. Chocolate
4. Eggs
3. Cacaolat
2. Bread
1. Clementines

As you can tell, very basic foods that I would pick up from a store pretty much daily. I talked about my reasoning more in-depth here and hope to share more of my experiences with my Camino - it has been such an impactful part of my life!

Buen camino,

Eric
Lentils, tuna salad and 1906 beer at restaurants
 
The top two items I ate while hiking the camino were
Tortilla for Breakfast
Jamon Sandwhich (ham) during the day
Both of those items were readily available at the cafes
along the route.
At night I ate the pilgrims meal.
I also feasted on many of those, like you say ready available
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I have to admit that during my first 3 Camino's, up to April 2023 I ate most of the high carb foods mentioned here and enjoyed them all, especially whatever was on the menu del dia.
However, last summer, I found out how unhealthy these foods are and started the Carnivore Diet. Last autumn I walked the Camino Portuguese and found it incredibly difficult to find any healthy food that didn't come with a huge serving of carbs alongside. I had to find villages with a shop and an albergue with a kitchen. Not very easy! Luckily, I can eat cheese on this way of eating so I pretty much survived on cheese, dried sausages and scrambled eggs. There's not a large variety of cheeses in Portugal and Spain but the ones there are, are delicious, especially with the sausage. I also learnt that a carton of cream mixed in with the scrambled eggs tastes delicious.
 
When I got to Santiago it was time to feast. I was there 3 nights and no matter what I had to eat that day I always took 2 pastel de nata back to my hotel room at the end of the day. Can't wait to get back there this year.
 

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I have to admit that during my first 3 Camino's, up to April 2023 I ate most of the high carb foods mentioned here and enjoyed them all, especially whatever was on the menu del dia.
However, last summer, I found out how unhealthy these foods are and started the Carnivore Diet. Last autumn I walked the Camino Portuguese and found it incredibly difficult to find any healthy food that didn't come with a huge serving of carbs alongside. I had to find villages with a shop and an albergue with a kitchen. Not very easy! Luckily, I can eat cheese on this way of eating so I pretty much survived on cheese, dried sausages and scrambled eggs. There's not a large variety of cheeses in Portugal and Spain but the ones there are, are delicious, especially with the sausage. I also learnt that a carton of cream mixed in with the scrambled eggs tastes delicious.
No matter how much protein I try to eat while walking I will not give up several visits to Bar La Tita in SDC for their tortilla!!! 😊 🥾 🍷
 
Prepare for your next Camino on California's Santa Catalina Island, Oct 27 to Nov 2
I enjoyed carrying these cookies for a pick me up while walking and a nice treat to offer passersby as they slowed down for us to stroll together enjoying a bit of a chat. Then off they’d go. 👣😎
View attachment 163068
What I looked forward to the most was that morning cup of coffee con leche with a chocolate napoleon then later on down the path fresh squeezed OJ with tortilla.
Those are the best cookies!!!
 
Since others are plugging their favorite restaurants, I will presume to plug mine.

My 2019 Frances was cut short at Leon. That last night I ate at La Taberna Aurea, across the Plaza del Grano from the Madres Benedictinas. The mood, the weather, the service, the food -- memorable! Scrambled eggs with aged cheese, ham and pine nuts. (And the good wine!)

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Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Not on 35E per day and not from the same Camino but:

1. Burrata and Chuleton in Restaurante El Figón del Duque in Navaratte
2. Tomate tudela in Casa Carmen Estella
3. Baby Lamb at Asador Salamanca in Leon
4. Argentinian paradilla at 22 Al punto braseria Vigo
5. Pinchos at Bar Gaucho Pampalona
6. Mexican food and wicked Margaritas at Pico de Galo Santiago d C
7. Rice dishes and seafood at Os Cachivaches Lugo
8 I suppose everyone needs to do the Melide Pulpo once. Pulpería Ezequiel.
9. Chuletón at Casa Teodora in Arzua
10. Anything at cafe Iruña in Pampalona. For Hemingway. But Restaurante de Tagliatella across the square did great pasta.

Yum. Because you’re worth it.english
Camino Francais, Astorga, May 2002. A English peregrina and myself sought dinner. A pilgrim friendly restaurant (sadly, I cannot recall the name) posted an opening time of 7:00pm. Asombre! So off we scurry, to be met by a warm owner/cook/server/manager. Just us. Spotless interior, sparkling table accountrements, seated by a window. Salad (I swear picked from a secret garden in back, it was that fresh). Hake and butter dimpled potatoes. Rice pudding, plump raisins, so good I want a bowl to meet me in Heaven. House wine. €12, maybe? Dining perfection. Throughout, our every need is anticipated and met. No English, we little Spanish. In 78 years and many restaurants throughout the world, not one ever quite matched this simple supper with a hilarious fellow pilgrim one cool May night in Astorga.
 
I am in a bit of a hurry.
Today, wandering into Lidl, I came across a box of four pasteles de nata.
Why?
Deepest, darkest, way off track Dublin.
Is nothing sacred to local spaces anymore?
Answers on the proverbial postcard
:cool:
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
When we walked the Invierno we had a horribly windy and wet Sunday walking to Lalin. After drying off and warming up we went looking for food (not holding much hope for anything decent) and saw a small restaurant near the church plaza with a chalk sign saying "hay cocido". After a short wait we sat down to the most amazing and delicious multi course meal of traditional cocido, plus Galician desserts, cheeses and orujo. Definitely one of the best meals I have ever had anywhere in the world. All because a little chalk sign caught our attention. The restaurant is "Casa Curras" and I dream of going back there.
 
No matter how much protein I try to eat while walking I will not give up several visits to Bar La Tita in SDC for their tortilla!!! 😊 🥾 🍷
food is a very individual choice and you can not generalized , also I may be bias to Spanish food but one thing I will said is that food in Spain is first class and very locally grown , you can not beat fresh, great locally grown produce . Even on a budget and eating ordinary convenience foods you are ahead of the game and if you want to try more sofisticated offerings those are also available . Spanish culture revolves around good eating , enjoy !
 
Not on 35E per day and not from the same Camino but:

1. Burrata and Chuleton in Restaurante El Figón del Duque in Navaratte
2. Tomate tudela in Casa Carmen Estella
3. Baby Lamb at Asador Salamanca in Leon
4. Argentinian paradilla at 22 Al punto braseria Vigo
5. Pinchos at Bar Gaucho Pampalona
6. Mexican food and wicked Margaritas at Pico de Galo Santiago d C
7. Rice dishes and seafood at Os Cachivaches Lugo
8 I suppose everyone needs to do the Melide Pulpo once. Pulpería Ezequiel.
9. Chuletón at Casa Teodora in Arzua
10. Anything at cafe Iruña in Pampalona. For Hemingway. But Restaurante de Tagliatella across the square did great pasta.

Yum. Because you’re worth it.

(10) Restaurant de Tagliatella in Pamplona is always a winner! Sometimes you need a
reservation, however. Whatever we order from the menu has been good…definitely not on €35 per day budget.

Once or twice Chuleton. Usually in Leon and Arzua.

Home cooked baked chicken at an albergue in Villafranca…best I’ve had.

Always fish in SDC… and once or twice on the way bacalao a la parrilla ( usually in Galicia) somewhere. Cod is very healthy and tasty and low in mercury if grilled properly.
Shrimp or oysters if they are fresh.

We rely often on store bought staples.
We eat lots of salads. We try and make them ourselves from fresh produce, or order salad that has fruit in it and we try and stay away from the pickled or bottle additives whenever possible.

Store bought supplies almost daily or as needed
red, yellow or green peppers, tomatoes, fresh salad greens, carrots, walnuts, zucchini, cucumbers, almonds, chocolate, bananas, oranges, olives, onions, garlic, canned kidney or whitebeans which we rinse before putting on salads or using in a dish we prepare). If in season, blueberries or strawberries. Olive oil, sour dough bread.

If we stay in a room with attached kitchen and I am not too tired, with no good restaurant options, I make a vegetarian spaghetti. Ingredients including a tasty olive oil, peppers, zucchini onions and garlic. We simply boil in salted water the spaghetti till it is abt two minutes from being cooked. Then throw into the spaghetti the chopped up in small pieces of zucchini (one pot meal).Then In two minutes drain. Add olive oil and finely chopped raw onion, peppers and garlic. Salt! If you have fresh parmesan cheese wonderful.
 
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Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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@Canche , although we may have different tastes in food, I love your country and hiking the Nariz del Indio on Lake Atitlan. So very cool and the towns on the lake are wonderful!!
 

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