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Live - Camino Ingles Snoring in albergue!

Robey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles Sept 2017
#1
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
 

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Camino(s) past & future
camino Frances ( 2007) Seville to Salamanca 2016 ....Salamanca to Santiago 2017 .
#2
Robey.......Ah the age old problem of snoring . I always take ear-plugs , you know, the cheap yellow foam ones which work to a certain extent , but before i leave on my next pilgrimage ( March next year ) i will be investing in a pair of more expensive silicone ones as i have heard from a couple of other people that they work better .

As to answering your question .......only once have i had to "disturb " a snorer but it was only a short term solution as he soon started snoring again .

I did find that i slept better the further along the camino i got , due to tiredness i suppose . As you say last night was your first nights sleep , or lack of it , so i hope you will sleep better from now on . I always drink decaff coffee from noon onwards and i have a sleeping bag with a hood which when pulled round my head also helps attenuate the sound of snoring . There is very little can be done to stop some people snoring so the only alternative is to try and make sure the sound does not get past your ears .

Regards.....John
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#3
My husband snores. I wear earplugs. Don't wake the pilgrim. He will just go back to snoring anyway. This is why everyone tells pilgrims to carry ear plugs. You'll get used to it. If not, stay at a pension or avoid this particular guy and stay at a different albergue.
Buen Camino.
 

hotelmedicis

Commercial Interests
Camino(s) past & future
CF: 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 (part), 2017
Finisterre: 2017
VDLP: 2012, 2018
#4
Sorry to hear this. It can be very difficult. Quality silicone earplugs will help but only to a point. I also met a couple women who took sleeping pills but I never have. Depending on the person you could wake him or her up but I have found this to be useless in the long run because she or he will simply start again once back to sleep. I have had the best success by sleeping somewhere else, in other words, putting some distance between myself and the offending sleeper, either bringing my mattress with me, sleeping on a couch in another room or using my lightweight inflatable camping mattress which I always travel with for just such occasions. It only weighs 350g and I can sleep anywhere: hallways, kitchens, living rooms and even outside. Good luck!
 

Peter Fransiscus

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#5
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
Hi Robey , the problem of try to wake snorers is , there is a chance that in a reaction of waking up they can hit you .

Wish you a " snore free " Camino .;)
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept 2017
#6
Robey.......Ah the age old problem of snoring . I always take ear-plugs , you know, the cheap yellow foam ones which work to a certain extent , but before i leave on my next pilgrimage ( March next year ) i will be investing in a pair of more expensive silicone ones as i have heard from a couple of other people that they work better .

As to answering your question .......only once have i had to "disturb " a snorer but it was only a short term solution as he soon started snoring again .

I did find that i slept better the further along the camino i got , due to tiredness i suppose . As you say last night was your first nights sleep , or lack of it , so i hope you will sleep better from now on . I always drink decaff coffee from noon onwards and i have a sleeping bag with a hood which when pulled round my head also helps attenuate the sound of snoring . There is very little can be done to stop some people snoring so the only alternative is to try and make sure the sound does not get past your ears .

Regards.....John
I stayed in a small hotel in A Coruna about 20 years ago. The only divider between our room and the one next door was a concertina door. The old man on the other side of the plastic divider snored so loudly that at about 3 am, having not slept a wink, we just started laughing...deliriously...at the sheer volume that one human can produce whilst blissfully unaware of the impact it is having on others. it was the only way to cope with the situation and make it through the night/morning. Honestly, he would've slept through a bomb blast.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#7
Hi Robey , the problem of try to wake snorers is , there is a chance that in a reaction of waking up they can hit you;)
In France, they whistle at the snorer. They keep it up until the snorer awakens. Of course, by then, the whistling has awoken everyone! Then the snorer falls asleep to snore again.

Snoring is in the category of things you cannot control. What you can control is your reaction to it. Accept it. Use earplugs. Get a private room. Get a tent and sleep outdoors. I am not sure there is a fifth choice.:)
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#9
To me, waking up somebody is a big "no-no"; it seems frankly rude. It is useless, anyway; in the process, you wake also everybody in the room, and the snoring will return after some minutes of silence.
Shared dorms come with snorers. It is a fact of life. Use earplugs, get used to the idea or choose a hotel.
Actually, when I return home, for a couple of days I wake in the middle of the night, very startled. There is too much silence...:rolleyes:
 

J F Gregory

Preparing for the Norte
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
March-April,2016 finished
October- November 2018 to walk the Del Norte.
#13
I have sleep apnea and snoring for years has effected my wife's sleep. After on night in an albergue my wife said she wouldn't complain because a lady kept me awake with her snoring and my wife said, my snoring was like a kitten purring comparatively. Good ear plugs are the best. Beware ! Our next Camino is October 2018. Bring your ear plugs.
 

Scottlovelace87

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 -Ponferrada to Santiago
2016 - SJPP to Burgos
2017 - Burgos to Ponferrada
#14
I know I sometimes snore, especially when I am tired, which is probably every night on the Camino. For my second Camino I started trying to book private rooms in Pensions and hostels, and to avoid the "Bed Race" I would book many of these options months ahead of time. It is more expensive, but for me, you can't put a value on a good night's sleep and I don't want to be "that guy" that is snoring, who prevents others from getting a good night's sleep. ;)
 

Patch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago (June 2014)
St Jean to Leon (Sept 2015)
Burgos to Santiago (June 2016)
Porto to Finisterre (June 2017)
#15
I think you have two choices:
1. Buy some earplugs
2. Buy a private room in a hostal/hotel

Living in close proximity with lots of people you do not know does call for some patience and understanding. All part of the pilgrims lot :)
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
#16
:rolleyes::rolleyes:
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
Hi Robey,

A change of perspective may help.

Perhaps you could fall asleep to the sound of snoring imagining what you hear is whisper of the wind through trees.:rolleyes:

Or, get some ear plugs?

Buen (sleep-filled) Camino
 
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jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
#17
We spent a night in an Albergue shared with just two other Gents. We should have known something bad was about to happen when we noticed they picked beds that were as far away from each others as was possible. The only silver lining came in the morning when we saw they were shipping their packs ahead. Ignoring any ounce of politeness we marched right over and read the Albergue they were sending their bags too and guess where we didn't spend the next night......! Not so fun at the time but good memories looking back now :)
 

JulieandPeter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (April/May 2015)
Frances (May/June 2017)
Planning Le Puy to SJPDP (August/September 2018)
#19
I have lived with a snorer for 30 years (we try to stay in private rooms to avoid disturbing others). I do not use ear plugs, but I have learned not to focus on the snoring. Let it go, accept it, and think about something else. It helps to have a list of something to try to recite in your head - I use constitutional amendments, but memorizing all of the villages along the Camino and how to pronounce their names is another way to distract your mind from focusing on the noise. Good luck and Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Part walked / part cycled September 2014 SJPdP to SdC
Walked SJPdP to SdC summer 2017
#21
I've got to say, I don't think I'm quite as charitable or understanding as most on here.

I know I snore - reasonably gently but I snore nonetheless - when I lie on my back. Throughout my Caminos I made a conscious effort NOT to do so even though it's by far the most comfortable sleeping position for me (I have arthritic hips - I'm 'only' 45 but that's another story').

IMO there are plenty of snorers who don't make quite the same effort to avoid sleeping in positions in which they know they snore and who could reduce the occurrences if they tried a little harder.

(I'll await my direct lightning strike for suggesting such a thing... :eek:).
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#22
IMO there are plenty of snorers who don't make quite the same effort to avoid sleeping in positions in which they know they snore and who could reduce the occurrences if they tried a little harder.
This is probably true, but we all need to exercise some care in judgment when it comes to applying our own experiences to other people's. My ex*-wife once spent much of a night alternating between schemes of homicide and suicide while I relentlessly snored like a chainsaw, face-down into a pillow.

The only thing that stopped my snoring was my gently purring CPAP machine, which arrived after the marriage and after a diagnosis of sleep apnea.

____
* Snoring was not the reason for "ex-". But it really didn't help matters. o_O
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#23
We have discussed this previously (can you believe it?).

A few items that others have mentioned:

1. Put a tennis ball in a bum bag you wear around your waist, with tennis ball on back. When you roll onto your bag, a major snoring position, the tennis ball will alert you to get back on your side!

2. Accept the sound. Instead of reacting with anger, make practice out of it. Focus on it. Count the snores like you count sheep (snoring sheep?).

3. Don't be THAT person who tries to sanitize the albergue experience into 50 trim 20-year-olds who never snore. You are living in a community of snoring, farting, coughing, giggling people. This is the dance of life! It's part of why albergues are very inexpensive. Want privacy? Pay for it.

4. Earplugs! wine! Go to sleep earlier than everyone!

And, of course, as has been mentioned, if you have an olympic snoring machine, do try to figure out where he or she is sleeping, and steer clear. Gossiping about, and leaving snorers out of meals and happy times, is a meanness that has no place on Camino. Be kind, and remember: he who criticizes snorers probably snores himself! (or herself).

Good luck--- and get some sleep!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Part walked / part cycled September 2014 SJPdP to SdC
Walked SJPdP to SdC summer 2017
#24
My ex*-wife once spent much of a night alternating between schemes of homicide and suicide while I relentlessly snored like a chainsaw, face-down into a pillow.
I can imagine! Such are my introvert ways, my reactions never really got much further than a roll of the eyes... in the dark... and posting on this forum!!

The only thing that stopped my snoring was my gently purring CPAP machine, which arrived after the marriage and after a diagnosis of sleep apnea.
I discovered the sleep-promoting, gentle purring of CPAP machines in Pamplona. Every albergue should have one whether people need them or not! The positive effect was slightly nullified, however, when the wearer managed to drop his phone charger from the top bunk, in the middle of the night.... twice... I think I might've got as far as tutting quietly on the second occasion...
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#25
I have lived with a snorer for 30 years (we try to stay in private rooms to avoid disturbing others). I do not use ear plugs, but I have learned not to focus on the snoring. Let it go, accept it, and think about something else. It helps to have a list of something to try to recite in your head - I use constitutional amendments, but memorizing all of the villages along the Camino and how to pronounce their names is another way to distract your mind from focusing on the noise. Good luck and Buen Camino.
I too am a snorer although in last years on less walked Caminos people didn't really complain about it. But I do have a technique of my own how to fall asleep (I'm the last one to go to bed usually as I don't need much sleep, I sleep like a log):

1) When I get to bed I usually giggle for about 15 minutes to this cacophony of snoring (and other sounds I don't want to mention here ;)). When I think it's really time for sleep I pick up one snorer, usually the loudest and most constant, and get into rhythm with his/her snoring. Then I pick another one. And the third one. And so on... and try to get them into something like a mathematics scheme. And this become very rhythmical to which I adapt my breathing. Usually I'm asleep within minutes.

2.) Sleeping after you finished the daily distance doesn't help much either to your nights sleep. You get possibly one third of the needed sleep so you can't count on that part during the night. You are already partly rested.

3.) Some albergues have more rooms or even snorers rooms. I always report myself to hospitalero/a that I'm a snorer but don't mind other snorers. Usually response was "That's not your problem, it's theirs!" but I do remember that I got separate room in Albergue Jesus (Vilar de Mazarife, CF), Albergue Francisco de Asis (Leon, CF), Albergue Roots & Boots (Santiago), Xunta Albergue (Olveiroa, Finisterre). Maybe even some more but those were the first that came to my mind.

4.) I warn neighboring pilgrims that I might snore and offered both my walking sticks to them to poke me in the night from both sides. It's completely OK with me that they do that because I myself allow them.

5.) Every morning I ask them how was the night and if it was kind of a rough on them then I pay a drink at the first stop or later if we again stop at the same albergue ;)

Hope that helps!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Zip
#26
I know I sometimes snore, especially when I am tired, which is probably every night on the Camino. For my second Camino I started trying to book private rooms in Pensions and hostels, and to avoid the "Bed Race" I would book many of these options months ahead of time. It is more expensive, but for me, you can't put a value on a good night's sleep and I don't want to be "that guy" that is snoring, who prevents others from getting a good night's sleep. ;)

I really really appreciate that you understand how hard snoring is for the others in the room. No one snores on purpose, but it's really hard for many of us to get back to sleep after a snorer awakens them. It's very kind of you to be pro-active on that.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I would like to walk some of the Camino this year in May
#27
Lol, I just got back from doing my Camino which I will update you guys on during the next week. But I was exhausted when I got home from lack of sleep/no sleep with people snoring. I did bring the ear plugs but they were useless! I did book into private rooms but the walls were so thin. I did drink some or lots of vino Tinto and that helped lol. But next time I go I am bringing a tent as I spent way too much staying in private accommodation :)
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#28
It is very, very hard not to blame the person who snores, as though it is a sign of being inconsiderate or that they should just "try harder" not to. I sometimes snore and I know it also bothers me when others do. That's the price you pay (save) when you sleep in a room full of bunk beds. Snoring is a health problem. Please don't hold it against them. I carry enough silicone earplugs for the whole trip (each pair lasts a few nights), even though they are heavier, because they work well. If someone near my doesn't have earplugs, I tell them I will leave an extra pair next to my bunk if I start snoring and they need them.
 
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VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#29
Snoring is in the category of things you cannot control. What you can control is your reaction to it. Accept it. Use earplugs. Get a private room. Get a tent and sleep outdoors. I am not sure there is a fifth choice.:)
The only time I've been kept awake by snorers is when I allowed annoyance about the noise to take over. There have been many other nights of noise, but good humor is the best sleep aid.

Good luck--- and get some sleep!
Deb you should put up this post as a resource. No kidding. Or make it a sticky.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#30
The only time I've been kept awake by snorers is when I allowed annoyance about the noise to take over. There have been many other nights of noise, but good humor is the best sleep aid.


Deb you should put up this post as a resource. No kidding. Or make it a sticky.
@VNwalking --few of the suggestions were originals! I was rather fascinated with the tennis ball in the bum bag idea, although honestly, I sometimes just "get a room!" so people don't have to hear me snore. My snoring is like that of a little gray kitten purring, according to me :)
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#31
I've told this story before. One of my travelling companions used to shine a little torch at the snorer. Didn't wake them up but usually made them turn over. One memorable night he tried this trick on a very large gent sleeping only in a tiny pair of undies. The gent did indeed roll oved baring a large expanse of his behind and letting out a massive fart in the process! So be careful what you wish for. :p
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#32
One of my travelling companions used to shine a little torch at the snorer. Didn't wake them up but usually made them turn over. One memorable night he tried this trick on a very large gent sleeping only in a tiny pair of undies. The gent did indeed roll oved baring a large expanse of his behind and letting out a massive fart in the process!
Hope the torch was the British not North American variety.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#33
......Gossiping about, and leaving snorers out of meals and happy times, is a meanness that has no place on Camino. Be kind.........
Thank you, @CaminoDebrita. These are the kindest words I've read in a long time. I snore, occasionally, whether I am on my back, front, side, and probably upside down, and I'm mortified at the thought of persons speaking about me behind my back.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#35
We have discussed this previously (can you believe it?).
A few items that others have mentioned:
1. Put a tennis ball in a bum bag you wear around your waist, with tennis ball on back. When you roll onto your bag, a major snoring position, the tennis ball will alert you to get back on your side!
2. Accept the sound. Instead of reacting with anger, make practice out of it. Focus on it. Count the snores like you count sheep (snoring sheep?).
3. Don't be THAT person who tries to sanitize the albergue experience into 50 trim 20-year-olds who never snore. You are living in a community of snoring, farting, coughing, giggling people. This is the dance of life! It's part of why albergues are very inexpensive. Want privacy? Pay for it.
4. Earplugs! wine! Go to sleep earlier than everyone!

And, of course, as has been mentioned, if you have an olympic snoring machine, do try to figure out where he or she is sleeping, and steer clear. Gossiping about, and leaving snorers out of meals and happy times, is a meanness that has no place on Camino. Be kind, and remember: he who criticizes snorers probably snores himself! (or herself).
Good luck--- and get some sleep!
Very good post! Most of us snore sometimes, and it is very difficult to stay put on one's side. For the camino I put a pocket in the back of my sleeping pants, mainly for money pouch at night, but I have also tried to keep something bulkier in it to encourage me to stay on my side. However, it probably doesn't always work.

Good point about not being mean to known snorers. I have seen that happen a couple of times. However, being open about it (like @KinkyOne ) can help ease tensions.
 

tomnorth

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); March/April (2019)
#36
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
Many have suggested earplugs, which might work for you. They don't work well for me. When I wear earplugs I hear my blood pulsing, which drives me to distraction. What works for me is wearing earbuds and playing white noise from my iPhone. I wear a buff to keep the earbuds in place. One night in Najera, this saved me from a night of no sleep from the freight train snoring away in the bed near me. The issue is that you've got to have enough power on your iPhone, or access to a power outlet, to make this work.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#37
Many have suggested earplugs, which might work for you. They don't work well for me. When I wear earplugs I hear my blood pulsing, which drives me to distraction. What works for me is wearing earbuds and playing white noise from my iPhone. I wear a buff to keep the earbuds in place. One night in Najera, this saved me from a night of no sleep from the freight train snoring away in the bed near me. The issue is that you've got to have enough power on your iPhone, or access to a power outlet, to make this work.
Reading your post got me to another way of reducing the impact of fellow pilgrims snoring. Try to feel your pulse on the wrist (the neck might work too) with the fingers of your other hand. Concentrating on it and breathing in the rhythm of your own heart pumping will surely get you to sleep very soon! Just enjoy your heartbeat, that's you, you know :)
 

Jopoke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September 2015
Lisbon to Santigo May 2016
Porto coastal route to Santiago Oct 2016
#38
Ear plugs and a buff over eyes and ears. Before you know it everyone has left in the morning and you can get up in peace lol. Wet toilet paper works well as it can be moulded to your ear. ;)
 

Blaster

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014, Sarria to Muxia 2015, Frances on to Muxia 2016
#39
I have sleep apnea and snoring for years has effected my wife's sleep. After on night in an albergue my wife said she wouldn't complain because a lady kept me awake with her snoring and my wife said, my snoring was like a kitten purring comparatively. Good ear plugs are the best. Beware ! Our next Camino is October 2018. Bring your ear plugs.
I have sleep apnea too and take a very small, portable CPAP machine (2.1 kg!) and it works a treat on me!
All the shared accommodation people seem to like it too - they say it is like "white noise" - rhythmically rising and falling like w3aves on the sea and it seems to mitigate the sounds of other snorers - oh, and it usually scores me the bottom bunk bed as it is better with a power point!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#40
Not sure about wet toilet roll, but foam earplugs and eye mask are always in my pack. Silicone ones don't work for me, they fall out but I can keep the foam ones in place.
Last Camino (Ingles) we just used private accommodation. Worst night ever on Camino (Frances after Primitivo) was in a hotel where the inconsiderate were still shouting to one another at 2.00am :(. Earplugs were used but eventually we banged on the wall!
 

Dave2525

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014
#41
If you are disturbed by someone snoring, it is your problem not theirs. I'm pretty sure they are not doing it on purpose.

As has already been suggested, wear earplugs, or if you recognize them, make sure your bed is as far away as possible.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Part walked / part cycled September 2014 SJPdP to SdC
Walked SJPdP to SdC summer 2017
#42
If you are disturbed by someone snoring, it is your problem not theirs. I'm pretty sure they are not doing it on purpose.

As has already been suggested, wear earplugs, or if you recognize them, make sure your bed is as far away as possible.
And if you get scared half to death by a cyclist whizzing past you on the Camino that is your problem not theirs... I'd like to see the reaction to someone suggesting that!! :)

Of course, in reality, and in both situations a little bit of understanding and effort by people on both 'sides' can go a long way. Those trying to sleep wearing ear plugs to reduce any impact snoring might have - thereby helping to reduce snorer 'stigma' - and snorers doing what they can (if they can) to reduce the likelihood of them snoring. It's a shame to think that anyone feels the need to sleep in a private room either because they can't sleep through snoring or because they think their snoring would keep others awake.

I agree that nobody snores on purpose but some people (I'm not saying all) can reduce the chances of it happening - on a nightly basis, I'm not talking lifestyle changes. That's pretty much all I would ask. If you can, do, if you can't, sweet dreams! :)
 

Maria Man

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Astorga-Santiago;2016 Le Puy-Najera ; 2017 Najera -Santiago-Finisterre-Muxia & Lisbon-Fatima
#43
I actually can sleep through people snoring but in my recent camino experience, I have heard other people try to stop someone from snoring by fake coughing or sneezing and they said it worked, another thing that I witnessed it worked is people did a series of sound like "Tac tac tac" using their tongues and suddenly the guys who were snoring stopped. I actually don't know if all these tactics is just the same to wake them up a little ? But it did work for those people.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2017, Camino Finisterre 2017
#44
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
There is a wonderful part in the film “Walking the Camino” where a young man demonstrates the noises made by those pilgrims who snore and he demonstrates it with a great joy. Snoring is “part and parcel” of the journey. You cannot have all the benefits of the wonderful conversations, pilgrim dinners and camaraderie that comes with communal living without the “other”.
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#45
I snore sometimes when I sleep on my back. I've asked my son who walks with me, to poke me and tell me to roll over if I snore. I don't think I'd ask a stranger to poke me though...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
#46
Have you heard of sleephones? They are super comfy. Made of a light fleece you wear it like a headband, and it has inbuilt earphones that lay flat against you head. They synchronise with your iPhone, and I use an app called Pzizz (a deep sleep app).

On the Camino, this not only drowns out the noise of fellow snorers, but also sends you off to a deep sleep and wakes you up gradually for a time that you have set. (Made by run phones and I would walk a Camino without them!)
 

hal_cpt

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Burgos to Santiago (Sep 2013)
Planning Porto to Santiago (Oct 2017)
#47
I snore. And my worst ever night on the Camino was when I was sharing a room with a German dude who felt that the appropriate response was to shout furiously whenever it bothered him. I eventually left, exhausted and miserable, at about 6am, and spent much of the rest of the trip paranoid and sleepless. (Funnily enough a few days later I made friends with another couple who had their own, quite different horror stories about the toxic German)

I'm about to start my second camino in a few weeks and have booked accommodation for about half the nights, so will be assured of some nights of not worrying about it and getting decent sleep. Booking private accommodation for every night is just financially impossible right now, but I'll be taking about 10 pairs of earplugs and donating them to anyone who seems bothered by the sound.

Fortunately I'm lucky enough to be married to someone who finds the sound of my snoring a relaxing background sound that helps them sleep. But when you throw a bunch of strangers in a room you are not always so lucky. One of the key characteristics of the Camino is the degree to which we freely and voluntarily surrender our usual autonomy, and our usual degree of control, and put ourselves into a relatively vulnerable, less controlled situation. You will get blisters. You will get hot and thirsty. Some stranger will snore. Some stranger will shout at you in the middle of the night.

How do you choose to respond?
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
#48
I snore. I snore like a freight train. Rattle the bunks. Shake the floor. Vibrate the walls sort of snoring. Because of this I took a travel C-Pap machine and people gladly allowed me to have access to a power outlet so I could use it every night. There are now 3 brands of which I am aware that make lightweight/compact/multi-volt travel C-Pap machines. I have the Z1. You are all welcome o_O

The Air Mini from ResMed => http://www.resmed.com/us/en/consumer/products/devices/airmini.html
The miniCPAP from Transcend => http://www.mytranscend.com
The Z1 from Human Design Medical => https://hdmusa.com
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#49
And if you get scared half to death by a cyclist whizzing past you on the Camino that is your problem not theirs... I'd like to see the reaction to someone suggesting that!! :)

Of course, in reality, and in both situations a little bit of understanding and effort by people on both 'sides' can go a long way. Those trying to sleep wearing ear plugs to reduce any impact snoring might have - thereby helping to reduce snorer 'stigma' - and snorers doing what they can (if they can) to reduce the likelihood of them snoring. It's a shame to think that anyone feels the need to sleep in a private room either because they can't sleep through snoring or because they think their snoring would keep others awake.

I agree that nobody snores on purpose but some people (I'm not saying all) can reduce the chances of it happening - on a nightly basis, I'm not talking lifestyle changes. That's pretty much all I would ask. If you can, do, if you can't, sweet dreams! :)
Comparing snorers to cyclists is a really bad analogy.
One has very little control over what they are doing, and the other has complete control over their actions.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata route, Seville-Santiago, and the Camino Francesa, summer 2013, via touring bicycle, solo. Planning Camino Francesa east-west, by mountain bike, 2014.
#50
Several years ago, a hospitalera in a Burgos albergue (an unforgetably-named Frenchwoman - 'Marie Noel', Merry Christmas - a charming woman :) ) limited each of us to two glasses of red wine during a communal dinner. She said that anything beyond that promoted heavy snoring. I believe, based on the testimony of my lady wife on those occasions when I've made serious study of local viticulture, that she may indeed be right. So - instead of more wine, perhaps less will alleviate the problem.
 

Colette Zaharie

Happy Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Fisterre-Muxia March 2017
Slovakia Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017
El Norte March 1 2018
#51
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
I survived many snorers on my Camino Frances this spring. I use wax earplugs such a good ear seal that sometimes I couldn't fall asleep because all I heard was my heart beat and breathing LOL. But.....we did have a retired gentleman who slept in Hontanas with us.....well 8/room, only he slept. One fellow in the room took his picture and when we arrived at subsequent albergues, he'd show the photo and ask if the guy had arrived, if not he'd warn thee hospitalero, if he was there before us we'd move on. He snored like a freight train.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walking 2017 August
#52
I have read this thread from the top to the bottom and had a good laugh all the way. I live with a snorer (yes usually when sleeping on his back, after some good wine...). My trick is to get to sleep before he does and then I don't hear it.
We are staring the Camino next Tuesday. All I can say is that I warned you!
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15 & 16 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo (Sept.)
#53
Rather than feeling sleep deprived and angry for a lot of your Camino, consider a private room that many albergues have available.
Yes, it is more expensive, but I guess it depends how much you value waking up each day refreshed, in a great frame of mind and with love in your heart for your fellow pilgrims.
My wife and I tried the shared bunk rooms and other than saving a little money, really can't understand why anyone would choose this option.
So when we hear other pilgrims groaning about the issues of shared bunk room experiences we don't have much to add to the conversation.
Our Camino experience became infinitely better once we used private rooms, pensions or modest hotels. We are also very early risers, so out of consideration for those that have mostly sleepless nights in shared bunk rooms, it is another reason we go with the private room option.
Any night we need to share a bunk room due no other available options, it invariably confirms fully why we pass on shared accommodation if possible.
 

David O

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked the camino in 2015
#54
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
Hi Robey, I walked the way of St James in 2015, I am a prolific snorer, I tried all sorts of devices to stop it too no avail, people used to wake me up and I would turn over, in some cases I moved to another area to let people get some sleep, however, I have to say I myself spent sleepless nights at the mercy of another snorer, I think it just goes with the camino. Have you tried ear plugs, a recommended piece of kit for your backpack. Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first Camino for September 2015
#55
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
Hi, I am a light sleeper and knew I could never sleep within earshot of a snorer. My solution was to invest in a pair of Bose Noise Cancelling Ear phones. They are brilliant, totally block out ALL sound, great on a plane (no engine drone) and you can listen to movies and music through them. The down side is they are quite expensive but to me they are worth every cent! Have used them a lot.
 
Camino(s) past & future
no
#57
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,
Robey
This is so interesting! We walked in May. Our fist
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#58
I have to say, probably the only thing I absolutely can't stand when I walk is the snoring. The worst is when, in the morning, the culprit wakes up all smiles after a great night's sleep, and I'm totally kaputt - usually, my walk that day is shot. If people know they snore, I think they have a responsibility to find some means not to bother others with it - and if they can't, then they ought to spend the money and find a hostal to sleep at (or bring a tent with them) - yeah, they may not intend to bother anyone, but most know they snore and most have to know that they bother others - I find snorers selfish, and won't make up any excuses for them. PS - I'm a light sleeper, and ear plugs don't help.
 

Gillean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven
#59
If snoring bothers you then I suggest you take countermeasures. I recommend "mighty plugs" http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/features/2012SeptLastPg.pdf . They work for me if I choose to use them. But mostly I don't. If I hear snoring in an albergue it gives a warm fuzzy feeling. It means my people are here and they are asleep! I snore, sometimes heavily. I usually give folks that are sleeping near me permission to give me a shake if I'm snoring and I will roll over into a more snoring unfriendly position. But it doesn't always work and not always for very long.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#60
Earplugs don’t work, but sorry, I go out of my way not to disturb others (even waiting until everyone is awake to start packing). If you know you snore - and particularly if you know you snore loudly - then you are imposing on others - the easy solution is for the snorer to pay a bit more and find a place where he or she won’t bother anyone, rather than for we nonsnorers to have to go out and do so.

PS - when I say ‘you, ‘ I don’t mean you in particular / I’m referring to snorers in general.

Again, sorry, but I find most snorers, even if most are otherwise nice persons, selfish if they are aware they are bothering others - and most are aware of it.


QUOTE="Gillean, post: 563991, member: 21981"]If snoring bothers you then I suggest you take countermeasures. I recommend "mighty plugs" http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/features/2012SeptLastPg.pdf . They work for me if I choose to use them. But mostly I don't. If I hear snoring in an albergue it gives a warm fuzzy feeling. It means my people are here and they are asleep! I snore, sometimes heavily. I usually give folks that are sleeping near me permission to give me a shake if I'm snoring and I will roll over into a more snoring unfriendly position. But it doesn't always work and not always for very long.[/QUOTE]
 
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Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#61
Earplugs don’t work, but sorry, I go out of my way not to disturb others (even waiting until everyone is awake to start packing). If you know you snore - and particularly if you know you snore loudly - then you are imposing on others - the easy solution is for the snorer to pay a bit more and find a place where he or she won’t bother anyone, rather than for us nonsnorersto gave to go out and do so.

PS - when I say ‘you, ‘ I don’t mean you in particular / I’m referring to snorers in general.

Again, sorry, but I find most snorers, even if most are otherwise nice persons, selfish if they are aware they are bothering others - and most are aware of it.
@lunna, I predict you are not going to win this one. On this forum the balance is seldom in favour of those who complain about the snorers. I will be going to bed shortly and will be turning on my snoring app. Sometimes I snore (and loudly) and sometimes I don't snore at all. I have no idea why I do sometimes, or why I don't.

But feel free to vent. :):):)
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#62
@lunna, I predict you are not going to win this one. On this forum the balance is seldom in favour of those who complain about the snorers. I will be going to bed shortly and will be turning on my snoring app. Sometimes I snore (and loudly) and sometimes I don't snore at all. I have no idea why I do sometimes, or why I don't.

But feel free to vent. :):):)
I don't expect to win on this one - but it is what it is, and I'm absolutely not alone in how I feel about this. In fact, in my experience, my views are more moderate than many other fellow sufferers; I've seen others literally almost get violent dealing with loud snorers - as if snorers are the only ones who have a right to a good night's sleep...
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#64
@lunna everyone snores sometimes. You too. There are some who have a real problem, but it is not their fault. It is a disability, like any other disability. Making someone feel bad about it is just mean.

As a very, very experienced hospitalero told me - snoring is normal in an albergue and if someone can't cope with snoring, then it is up to them to go find a private room.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#66
That also is an option for persons who cannot stand snorers!:)
Yep, and that is precisely what’s unfair - the knowing culprits come out on top. But then, whoever said life is fair (sigh).

Snorers and smokers are my only real betes noirs, though most smokers at least make the effort not to do so around those who don’t smoke.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#68
My point is not that the occasional snorer is a problem - my problem is with the snorer who knows he or she snores and will even admit it flat out, and then happily will keep others awake doing so. If a person knows he or she has this problem and takes the attitude, “too bad, just deal with it,” I find that person - not the person who can’t deal with it and loses a night’s sleep because of it - both selfish and (much less common, but sometimes) mean-spirited. That person can take steps to avoid bothering others but chooses not to. How’s it any different than an addicted smoker who pollutes the air by not going outside and smoking? An addict can’t help being addicted either, but can take steps to avoid disturbing others because of his or her addiction. I don’t buy the standard “it’s part of the Camino (or other hike), deal with it,” response, which places the blame on the poor person who wakes up half dead and has a rough day walking because of the snorer. That snorer consciously is bothering others, basta. It is the fact that he or she is aware of the problem and does nothing to mitigate it that is the problem, not the other way around.

PS - yeah, I know it’s coming - “it’s how you take it that is the problem and not the other person - except tell that to a physically shot body after a sleepless night.

@lunna everyone snores sometimes. You too. There are some who have a real problem, but it is not their fault. It is a disability, like any other disability. Making someone feel bad about it is just mean.

As a very, very experienced hospitalero told me - snoring is normal in an albergue and if someone can't cope with snoring, then it is up to them to go find a private room.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#69
My point is not that the occasional snorer is a problem - my problem is with the snorer who knows he or she snores
Yes, it is your problem, therefore you need to find a solution that you can implement. You cannot make me stop snoring or move to private accommodations. You can wear earplugs or move to private accommodations. You can do only those things you can do! :)

I am glad you can get the irritant off your chest here, but only a small fraction of the English speaking pilgrims read the Forum, and non-English speaking pilgrims are the vast majority of albergue occupants. I don't mean to be a pessimist, but you have zero chance of making your solution work on them.;)
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#73
By the way, I've taken an hospitalero course, but am worried how I will manage if I snore. Are there hospitaleros who snore?
They sleep in separate rooms! :)
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#74
Hope you had a good night’s sleep! :).
I did, thank you! But I believe at one point my snoring woke me. I suspect this because my app tells me round about the time I woke up my snoring was at 'epic.' The rest of the time I was sleeping soundlessly. :)
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#75
They sleep in separate rooms! :)
And that is a guarantee that those in adjacent rooms are not going to affected??!! Please let me disabuse you of that notion. (Unless they be soundproof rooms, which I doubt is the case.)
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#76
I did, thank you! But I believe at one point my snoring woke me. I suspect this because my app tells me round about the time I woke up my snoring was at 'epic.' The rest of the time I was sleeping soundlessly. :)
I recommend you don’t go anywhere near your neighbors this morning!
I did, thank you! But I believe at one point my snoring woke me. I suspect this because my app tells me round about the time I woke up my snoring was at 'epic.' The rest of the time I was sleeping soundlessly. :)
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#77
And that is a guarantee that those in adjacent rooms are not going to affected??!! Please let me disabuse you of that notion. (Unless they be soundproof rooms, which I doubt is the case.)
At least it’s mitigated!
 

Doogman

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
#79
I am not a medical person, but as far as I know from experience: (a) snoring is involuntary, (b) snoring is quite natural, and (c) snoring is quite common. Therefore, if one chooses to sleep in a communal setting, snoring should be expected. If one does not want to be bothered by it, I feel the onus is on that person to find alternative accommodation. Although I am a snorer myself, I would also say that listening to others is not a very pleasant experience. That is why I almost always stick to private rooms. That way I only have myself and my travelling companions to worry about.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#80
Totally selfish statement: I sleep like the dead; snoring bothers me not at all.
Snorers: snore on!
As a fellow NY’er, I totally disagree! But at least you - unlike I - can take advantage of the cheaper rents for apartments located right under the El!
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#81
I am not a medical person, but as far as I know from experience: (a) snoring is involuntary, (b) snoring is quite natural, and (c) snoring is quite common. Therefore, if one chooses to sleep in a communal setting, snoring should be expected. If one does not want to be bothered by it, I feel the onus is on that person to find alternative accommodation. Although I am a snorer myself, I would also say that listening to others is not a very pleasant experience. That is why I almost always stick to private rooms. That way I only have myself and my travelling companions to worry about.
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#82
lunna, have you ever checked to see if you snore? Many people who think that they don't snore do. As others have mentioned, you can get an app that an tell you if you snore.
 

jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
#83
as if snorers are the only ones who have a right to a good night's sleep...
Ahhh... I think I can finally see the crux of the problem... people who think paying 7 euros for accommodation gives them any 'rights' of any kind. Not only can you expect not to get a good nights sleep because of snoring but you can add to the list, poor mattresses, squeeky bunkbeds, no pillows, no sheets, no blankets, people talking loudly until late night/early morning, little or no heat/air conditioning, noxious gases emitted after too many tapas and wine, no hot water, no water, electricity, wifi, no toilet paper and the list can go on and on. This is a Pilgrimage and to think that people would even consider (just mentally, hopefully) violence against another Pilgrim because of something so mundane and trivial as snoring... well, that's just sad really.

Snore on, Snoreres... Snore on!!
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Sin Fin
#84
Good conversation. Here is the deal [from my side of the house]. I could not sleep well in those 5-10 Euros albergues, so, I went with the 35-40 Euros private rooms hoping for a good night of sleep [and still could NOT sleep well] . . . at the end I just went back to the 5-10 Euros albergues with the rest of my peregrino friends! Good luck y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#85
Ahhh... I think I can finally see the crux of the problem... people who think paying 7 euros for accommodation gives them any 'rights' of any kind. Not only can you expect not to get a good nights sleep because of snoring but you can add to the list, poor mattresses, squeeky bunkbeds, no pillows, no sheets, no blankets, people talking loudly until late night/early morning, little or no heat/air conditioning, noxious gases emitted after too many tapas and wine, no hot water, no water, electricity, wifi, no toilet paper and the list can go on and on. This is a Pilgrimage and to think that people would even consider (just mentally, hopefully) violence against another Pilgrim because of something so mundane and trivial as snoring... well, that's just sad really.

Snore on, Snoreres... Snore on!!
:D:D:D
 
#86
@lunna, I predict you are not going to win this one. On this forum the balance is seldom in favour of those who complain about the snorers. I will be going to bed shortly and will be turning on my snoring app. Sometimes I snore (and loudly) and sometimes I don't snore at all. I have no idea why I do sometimes, or why I don't.

But feel free to vent. :):):)
not very Christian making snorers go elsewhere! some times it's hard enough to find accommodation without having to undergo a medical to assess whether or not you snore! and where will it all end!? people who need to go to the loo during the night!
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#87
As a fellow NY’er, I totally disagree! But at least you - unlike I - can take advantage of the cheaper rents for apartments located right under the El!
Had to relocate to L.A. for elderly family.
But, if I move back I sure can look up apts near train.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#88
lunna, have you ever checked to see if you snore? Many people who think that they don't snore do. As others have mentioned, you can get an app that an tell you if yousnore.
Lol. I’ve been told on good authority by several folks that I almost never snore though when I have a stuffy nose I sniff shortly and quietly. No train I. And they’s the ones I’m talking about.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#89
not very Christian making snorers go elsewhere! some times it's hard enough to find accommodation without having to undergo a medical to assess whether or not you snore! and where will it all end!? people who need to go to the loo during the night!
Good conversation. Here is the deal [from my side of the house]. I could not sleep well in those 5-10 Euros albergues, so, I went with the 35-40 Euros private rooms hoping for a good night of sleep [and still could NOT sleep well] . . . at the end I just went back to the 5-10 Euros albergues with the rest of my peregrino friends! Good luck y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
Ive done the same, but I can’t afford the 30 euro rooms every night!
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#91
Totally selfish statement: I sleep like the dead; snoring bothers me not at all.
Snorers: snore on!
Me too. Sleep like the dead. Once I slept right through a massive argument between the young French woman from the bunk above mine and an Italian fellow who objected to her lengthy showering after 10 pm with her radio blaring. Apparently it was a humdinger of an argument complete with much gaelic and latin hand gestures, lots of passion, righteous indignation, and raised voices. I’m still sorry I missed it!
PS. My theory is we all contribute to the noises of the night in one way or another. I think it’s called communal living.
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Sin Fin
#92
Ive done the same, but I can’t afford the 30 euro rooms every night!
At the end of the day those 30+ Euro rooms did not make any difference, I was not able to sleep anyway! Thanks for reading, y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walking 2017 August
#93
Just imagine if we banned snorers from the Camino... there would be no-one walking! Or maybe just ban them from Albergues - the rooms would be empty. but of course how do we assess their 'right' to walk the Camino.
Then can we ban the clickety click of the walking sticks, people who talk with others when they walk (they should know that I like to walk in silence), bag rustlers at 5 am.
I don't think it rude or selfish of snorers, its just part of human life, men and women (worse after red wine of course but who would say no to the vino tinto!)

Lunna, you are entitled to your opinion but you won't win the argument. Snoring, bedbugs, farting, bag rustlers etc are all part of the Camino journey. There were some night I had trouble sleeping and because of this, and I made a decision every so often to find a private room and a good nights sleep.

Have to say we did have a funny experience. One night a couple of lads (old enough to know better) stayed out way beyond lock up time (like 2 am) and got very drunk. So one climbed up to the first floor landing (our room with 4 double bunks) and knocked very loudly on the door. No idea how he even reached the landing. Scared all of us... then one rushed through the room and downstairs to let his mate in. One woman in our room slept through the whole thing!
 

kirkie

Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#95
Hi all, this is my first Camino, and last night was my first night in an Albergue, (Presado) what is the form on people who snore?
The large chap in the bunk next to me was fair rattling the windows, kept me and others awake, does one attempt to wake said snorer up, or grit ones teeth?
Have many people been found smothered in albergues?
Please pass on your thoughts,
Yours sleepless,

Are you still there, Robey? Have you smothered anybody yet? What have you learned since you wrote this post? I look in at it from time to time. There are some hilarious stories there. My thoughts? In for a penny, in for a pound. Hope you had a good Camino in spite of your murderous feelings.
 

Maria11

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2008
#96
Snoring by itself is actually benign and harmless but it indicates several other disorders and can also annoy partners and other family members. It can sometimes be a sign of a serious health problem.

According to http://ohealthyeah.com/how-to-stop-snoring/ the main reasons for snoring are: the position of sleeping, drinking alcohol, extra tissue or sleep apnea so are definitely the first things to look at. To stop snoring, it’s necessary to first identify exactly how and why someone is snoring. It could be a sign of sleep apnea, a potentially life-threatening condition that requires medical attention. Sleep apnea is a breathing obstruction, causing the sleeper to keep waking up to begin breathing again.
So, if you know the snorer and you're familiar with the reason behind his/her snoring, you can help them find a cure fit for the reason.
 
Last edited:

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#97
According to http://ohealthyeah.com/how-to-stop-snoring/ the 3 main reasons for snoring are: being overweight, smoking and drinking alcohol
I am puzzled. The linked article didn't say that at all! It included those 3 possible causes, along with several others, and never said anything about which ones were more common causes than others.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#98
My thoughts? In for a penny, in for a pound. Hope you had a good Camino in spite of your murderous feelings.
:D
If one wants to be irritated, there is no shortage of things to be irritated about everywhere in life! Each of us can be as miserable as he chooses.:(
Triple like, @falcon269 !
Or as content. It is a choice.
 

Maria11

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2008
#99
I am puzzled. The linked article didn't say that at all! It included those 3 possible causes, along with several others, and never said anything about which ones were more common causes than others.
OMG, I was reading a few articles at the same time and copied the wrong one. (Edited the comment)
 

clearskies

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Here and there
I'm usually so tired that nothing can keep me awake, not even a cacophony of snorers!
I believe I snore as well..I've been told anyway.

Earplugs work wonders, but I never need them.
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!
 

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