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The Meseta.


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Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#3
A memorable spot in Castrojerez - Case del Camping. We stayed in a camping cabin with some other pilgrims - a 2 br cabin that we reserved ahead - but the memorable part was dinner - grilled lamb shanks that were amazing. You'll need some friends because no one could eat this on their own.
Is it possible to rent some friends ?? :)
 

Bala

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Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Oct 2015, SJPdP-Burgos)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Santiago 2018)
#4
Bernie, I'm on the meseta right now and it is so spectacularly beautiful in full spring colors that it's dinner conversation almost every night -- as in, how come everybody says this is boring and unattractive?

I've stayed in some excellent albergues. I'll post names and places as soon as I gather the information. I hope your walk is as beautiful as mine. Buen Camino!
 

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Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#6
Bernie, I'm on the meseta right now and it is so spectacularly beautiful in full spring colors that it's dinner conversation almost every night -- as in, how come everybody says this is boring and unattractive?

I've stayed in some excellent albergues. I'll post names and places as soon as I gather the information. I hope your walk is as beautiful as mine. Buen Camino!
Ah the perfect pre travel info guide,thank you :)
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Muxia - Finisterre 2014
StJPdP to Burgos 2015
Primitivo 2015
Porto -SDC 2016
Portuguese Senda Litoral 2016
Ingles 2016
#7
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
Bernie,
You probably already know this, however, I shall, at the risk of ridicule say,,,,,,,,, go with the flow bro,,,,,,,,,,,,, there may never be enough favourite Albergues to make everyone happy,,,,, probably never enough to miss,,,,,,,, and probably never enough not to miss.

Buen (finding what you need ) Camino
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#8
Bernie,
You probably already know this, however, I shall, at the risk of ridicule say,,,,,,,,, go with the flow bro,,,,,,,,,,,,, there may never be enough favourite Albergues to make everyone happy,,,,, probably never enough to miss,,,,,,,, and probably never enough not to miss.

Buen (finding what you need ) Camino
As long as there is enough :)
 

julia-t

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-Puente la Reina (September 2015) and on to Navarrete (April/May 2016)
Navarrete to Carrion de los Condes (October 2016). Astorga to Sarria March 2017, Sarria to SdeC April 2017
#9
Loved Liberanos Dominee (SP?) a private albergue in Rabe de las Calzadas run by the wonderful Clementina. Clean, fabulous food, and the option of glorious vespers at the convent nearby. And then the next night Santa Brigida in Hontanas.
Those were pretty much the best two albergues I stayed in. I had other memorable nights, but that was more due to other factors than the albergue itself.
 

trecile

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Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
#10
La Finca in Población de Campos. Possibly the nicest albergue on the Camino. All the "bunks" are like tiny rooms, especially the uppers which are accessed by mini staircases. And the restaurant there is very good with a great pilgrim meal. When I I was there last year they even let you use the washing machine for free!
albergue-la-finca-5.jpg albergue-la-finca-6.jpg
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#11
La Finca in Población de Campos. Possibly the nicest albergue on the Camino. All the "bunks" are like tiny rooms, especially the uppers which are accessed by mini staircases. And the restaurant there is very good with a great pilgrim meal. When I I was there last year they even let you use the washing machine for free!
View attachment 41887 View attachment 41888
Like the look of that.
 

Bala

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Oct 2015, SJPdP-Burgos)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Santiago 2018)
#13
La Finca in Población de Campos. Possibly the nicest albergue on the Camino. All the "bunks" are like tiny rooms, especially the uppers which are accessed by mini staircases. And the restaurant there is very good with a great pilgrim meal. When I I was there last year they even let you use the washing machine for free!
View attachment 41887 View attachment 41888
The washing machine is still free. And the detergent, too!
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#15
how come everybody says this is boring and unattractive?
The Meseta is sublime. Pure heaven.

Loved Liberanos Dominee (SP?) a private albergue in Rabe de las Calzadas run by the wonderful Clementina. Clean, fabulous food, and the option of glorious vespers at the convent nearby. And then the next night Santa Brigida in Hontanas.
Julia beat me to it, recommending Liberanos Domine.
Also...
Not the 5-star kind, but soooooooo special: San Anton. (I have never stayed there, wrong timing. But this is by word of mouth)
The nuns at Santa Maria in Carrion de los Condes
 

Bala

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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Oct 2015, SJPdP-Burgos)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Santiago 2018)
#16
Oh, some reasons why...
La Fabrics, cool building, only 4 per room, towels and soap provided (seriously!), great restaurant. And wait til you check out the showers with the jets....

Santa Brigida, so well set up. They've thought of everything. Don't miss the homemade paella communal meal.

La Finca, what Trecile said.

Santa Maria, the sisters are so warm and welcoming, how can you not like them? The evening songs and pilgrim blessings are very special.

La Morena, spacious dorms, lovely garden, outstanding food. This was from tonight's menu peregrino. 20180424_195322.jpg 20180424_195322.jpg
 

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tomnorth

Active Member
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); March/April (2019)
#17
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
Definitely Santa Brigida in Hontanas. One of the best albergues on my trip.
 

Irish Bernie

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Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#18
Oh, some reasons why...
La Fabrics, cool building, only 4 per room, towels and soap provided (seriously!), great restaurant. And wait til you check out the showers with the jets....

Santa Brigida, so well set up. They've thought of everything. Don't miss the homemade paella communal meal.

La Finca, what Trecile said.

Santa Maria, the sisters are so warm and welcoming, how can you not like them? The evening songs and pilgrim blessings are very special.

La Morena, spacious dorms, lovely garden, outstanding food. This was from tonight's menu peregrino. View attachment 41890 View attachment 41890
Not sure i could eat those flowers :O!!!
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#19
Some great options there,now is it best to book in advance ?.Something I never do generally,I will be walking from Burgos May 22nd.
 
#23
I met a Canadian friend top of Pyrenees Sept 2013,she's not cheap either,but hopefully bit cheaper after we marry in Oct :)
Awww, that is sweet, Bernie!!! Well, you know I have Irish roots, from North Tipperary, Borrisokane and Terryglass. I was the first member of my Family to return (2 years ago), since 1832.

And, if I can swing it, I hope to visit again on my way back from Santiago near the end of June.
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#24
Awww, that is sweet, Bernie!!! Well, you know I have Irish roots, from North Tipperary, Borrisokane and Terryglass. I was the first member of my Family to return (2 years ago), since 1832.

And, if I can swing it, I hope to visit again on my way back from Santiago near the end of June.
I'm glad the banished are finally allowed home lol :)
 
#25
I'm glad the banished are finally allowed home lol :)
Well, in 1832, that was before the Famine. My 3 X Great Grandfather must have got a good penny for the land he sold just before leaving Ireland. When I get back and meet with the present owner, that will be my opening offer to purchase it back, a good penny.

If I need to up my bid, I will offer a pretty penny, my friend Penny is pretty. Just need to work on a good reason for Penny to move to Ireland, hmmmm. Sounds like a, "Meseta thought," to be ruminated. (Let me know if I get off topic). BTW, Penny may also have some, "friend value", to offer.
 

Tim Floyd

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago 2017
#27
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
One of my favorite meseta towns was Hornillos. Stayed in a great little plave called De Sol a Sol. The guy running the place was great. Had landry wash services which were nice. Hornillos is a one-street town, but has great places to eat. One of my favorite Meseta stops.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#28
Why are there so many threads concerning the meseta part of the Camino Frances and whether to walk it or not? It is neither easier nor more difficult than other parts. It's just different. Low rolling hills and flat agricultural fields.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#29
Why are there so many threads concerning the meseta part of the Camino Frances and whether to walk it or not? It is neither easier nor more difficult than other parts. It's just different. Low rolling hills and flat agricultural fields.
I cannot answer for other people but I can say for myself that it feels very different. Very empty and bare. Little shade and little to interrupt the rhythm of walking. In summer that can make it physically challenging: heat and thirst are greater potential problems than in most other sections of the CF. But the physical challenges are probably not the most important difference. Perhaps more significant is the psychological effect of walking day after day through a landscape which varies very little. It can be quite hypnotic. Those who walk in company may not experience it but as a solo walker I find that I become very introspective on the meseta. My body switches into autopilot and my mind goes off in some rather odd directions!
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#30
I cannot answer for other people but I can say for myself that it feels very different. Very empty and bare. Little shade and little to interrupt the rhythm of walking. In summer that can make it physically challenging: heat and thirst are greater potential problems than in most other sections of the CF. But the physical challenges are probably not the most important difference. Perhaps more significant is the psychological effect of walking day after day through a landscape which varies very little. It can be quite hypnotic. Those who walk in company may not experience it but as a solo walker I find that I become very introspective on the meseta. My body switches into autopilot and my mind goes off in some rather odd directions!
The only stretch I found to have less water was that bit out of Carrion, but otherwise plenty of water available and it was no hotter than anyplace else on the Frances, and I wore a brimmed hat anyway so shade wasn't an issue.
I remember the first time I walked the Frances a fellow pilgrim asked me if I was going to skip the meseta and I said no, why would I? She said she heard it was a desert and quite difficult to do. Huh? I thought Spain's deserts were to the south. :D I then looked it up in a guidebook and saw it was indeed not a desert, but quite the opposite, farmland.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#31
I would never suggest that anyone skip the meseta. For me the greatest strength of the CF is its diversity. When it comes to walking I am a traditionalist. My personal rule for any pilgrimage is to walk all the way from my starting point to my destination without using transport or skipping sections. The distance covered is not the point - it doesn't matter if the walk is 10km, 100km or 1000km. Cherry-picking sections of a route feels like a mockery of the concept of pilgrimage. Pick a spot, start walking, stop when you reach the end!
 

Tim Floyd

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago 2017
#33
Why are there so many threads concerning the meseta part of the Camino Frances and whether to walk it or not? It is neither easier nor more difficult than other parts. It's just different. Low rolling hills and flat agricultural fields.
I agree. I hear so many avoid it, and for me it was among the most enjoyable. The way the light hits the countryside in the morning is just wonderful. I tell people do at least three or four days just to experience it. My opinion.
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#34
I cannot answer for other people but I can say for myself that it feels very different. Very empty and bare. !
It just depends on the time of year that you are walking whether it’s stark, beautiful, difficult, easy, muddy, dry, windy...
 

Colette Zaharie

Happy Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Fisterre-Muxia March 2017
Slovakia Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017
El Norte March 1 2018
#35
I cannot answer for other people but I can say for myself that it feels very different. Very empty and bare. Little shade and little to interrupt the rhythm of walking. In summer that can make it physically challenging: heat and thirst are greater potential problems than in most other sections of the CF. But the physical challenges are probably not the most important difference. Perhaps more significant is the psychological effect of walking day after day through a landscape which varies very little. It can be quite hypnotic. Those who walk in company may not experience it but as a solo walker I find that I become very introspective on the meseta. My body switches into autopilot and my mind goes off in some rather odd directions!
Totally agree. I loved the Meseta and had my first Camino spiritual experience there, second was climbing O’Cebreio. Re the solitude, I just returned from walking the entire El Norte alone, many days long distances in pouring rain.....same effect, mind detaches from the body and I’d find that I’d walked 10-15k without even realizing it. I wouldn’t miss the Meseta or the chance to “pilgrimage” solo.
 

DebR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting 15 April 2013 St Jean Pied de Port
#37
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
To those already recommended, I add Via Trajana in Calzadilla de Los Hermanillos, on the Roman road route after Sahagun. It’s a little oasis, family run, very friendly and with great food. And this alternative route is a splendid part of tge meseta, one which many folks seem to miss....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September/October (2017)
Camino Finisterre October 2017
Chemin St Jacques (2018)
#38
In Hospital de Obigo we stayed at Albergue Verde. It was a warm communal experience, -- great vegetarian supper, free yoga -- and the highlight for me was in an after-supper soliloquy, the yogi talked about the 3 phases of the Camino, the physical, mental and spiritual. The Meseta is contemplative and rewarding.
 

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Dale R Cohen

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (March-April 2018)
#39
I walked the Meseta in March of this year and experienced a wind-driven, hailing thunderstorm complete with lightning. The hail hurt like hell (like being shot with a thousand pellets from an air rifle); however, it was still one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen. The ground was covered in white ice pellets as far as the eye could see. I felt so alive! Then the next day when I left Castrojeriz, I was the first to walk on the freshly fallen snow that had blanketed the Way for the first four hours of my walk. It was the epitome of serenity. I wouldn’t have missed those two days for the world!!!
 

Colette Zaharie

Happy Pilgrim
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Fisterre-Muxia March 2017
Slovakia Camino Kosiče-Levoča Oct 2017
El Norte March 1 2018
#40
I walked the Meseta in March of this year and experienced a wind-driven, hailing thunderstorm complete with lightning. The hail hurt like hell (like being shot with a thousand pellets from an air rifle); however, it was still one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen. The ground was covered in white ice pellets as far as the eye could see. I felt so alive! Then the next day when I left Castrojeriz, I was the first to walk on the freshly fallen snow that had blanketed the Way for the first four hours of my walk. It was the epitome of serenity. I wouldn’t have missed those two days for the world!!!
I was walking that day on El Norte between Ribadesella and El Pito......the rain was something but the frickin hail and wind was out of this world. But obviously we both made it and are thus truly anointed authentic pilgrims
 

Rosiejb

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked the Camino Frances May/June 2017
Portuguese next .....dates not certain
#41
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
I loved en el Camino albergue in Boadilla . Great communal evening meal. Lovely accommodation and they forwarded my sun hat to the next town when I forgot it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep/Oct 2015
Planning Camino Primitivo for Oct 2016
#42
Bernie, I'm on the meseta right now and it is so spectacularly beautiful in full spring colors that it's dinner conversation almost every night -- as in, how come everybody says this is boring and unattractive?

I've stayed in some excellent albergues. I'll post names and places as soon as I gather the information. I hope your walk is as beautiful as mine. Buen Camino!
Lucky You! And your enjoyment is palpable! Although I walked it in late September it was spectacular. Memories for life. En El Camino, Boadilla is a must. Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2017
CF 2018
#43
I'd wanted to stay there so badly after having heard similarly great reviews, but alas the day I arrived they were full. Maybe I'll have better luck with this year's Camino!

La Finca in Población de Campos. Possibly the nicest albergue on the Camino. All the "bunks" are like tiny rooms, especially the uppers which are accessed by mini staircases. And the restaurant there is very good with a great pilgrim meal. When I I was there last year they even let you use the washing machine for free!
View attachment 41887 View attachment 41888
 

trecile

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Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
#46
I'd wanted to stay there so badly after having heard similarly great reviews, but alas the day I arrived they were full. Maybe I'll have better luck with this year's Camino!
I had made a note of La Finca after reading about it here on the forum, and when I was having lunch in Boadilla I realized that it would be a good place to spend that night. I wanted to make sure that I got a bed there, so I asked the guy at the albergue in Boadilla to call them for me to make a reservation. It wasn't necessary, as there were only three other pilgrims there that night.
 

Vivello

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, September/October 2014; Portugues, October 2015; Frances planned June 2018
#47
Loved Liberanos Dominee (SP?) a private albergue in Rabe de las Calzadas run by the wonderful Clementina. Clean, fabulous food, and the option of glorious vespers at the convent nearby. And then the next night Santa Brigida in Hontanas.
Those were pretty much the best two albergues I stayed in. I had other memorable nights, but that was more due to other factors than the albergue itself.
Another vote for Clementina's place. I loved it so much I wrote a story about it:
http://www.edibleaustin.com/index.php/travel-2/beyond-texas/1674-food-for-the-journey

Also, don't miss the pilgrim's mass in Carrion de los Condes. (I also stayed at Hotel la Corte, very happily.) It was a top experience of my Camino, and others have said the same.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
#48
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
San Bol. Primitive and isolated but a great experience
 
#49
Why are there so many threads concerning the meseta part of the Camino Frances and whether to walk it or not? It is neither easier nor more difficult than other parts. It's just different. Low rolling hills and flat agricultural fields.
For myself, I found the Meseta to be much harder than other parts of the Camino Frances. All that flat walking was murder on my feet. My plantar facitis flaired up like no other place on the route. So I skipped some of it and took a rest in Leon. Mentally, it is also a challenge. Like you say - flat fields and rolling hills - not a lot of variety, even when it's green and there are flowers - after a while it can drive a person mad.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#50
after a while it can drive a person mad.
Hmmm, okay.
Personally, I loved every step of it. I really liked that ascent up that hill that overlooks Hornillos, and the descent down. That was so cool, and I stopped in a bar there and got a cold beer. Filled up with water at that fountain with cockerel on top. Visited their small and old church. Also cool was Hontanas. It sort of just appears suddenly and you descend down into the town. Loved it. No way would I miss those towns.
A few stretches on it I was quite alone in my walking, even in the busy season. Sometimes you'd see other pilgrims way in the distance, or way behind you. Another cool aspect along with lovely fields of sunflowers when in season.
The meseta reminds me of some other places I have been in the world. Rolling hills and flat farm fields. It is familiar and different at the same time.
 

K3EL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#51
San Bol - simplicity and community.

If you need a contrast to San Bol, try the hotel in the monastery of San Zoilo in Carrión.

Via Trajana - recommend this albergue on the alternative route.

Dave
 

athiker93

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2013
#52
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
Im glad you decided to do this part of the Camino. Depending on the time of year you are going ...its beautiful desolation. You can go long distances...and it builds your stamina for the hills in Galicia. There are quite a few wonderful ALbergues - dont miss the Hosel in Sanbol. Its a primitive Albergue, and the towns people bring dinner up to feed the pilgrims. Another one is in Hontanas. That city appears like Brigadoon out of the Mesita. You see ads for the hostel and city, but cant see it on the horizon until you descend into it a km away! Hospital Obrigado at the end of the Mesita is a wonderful stop as well.
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#54
Albergue San Anton de Castrojeriz,
Alberge San Nicolas de Puente Fitero.
Rustic, small places that will give you a taste of what the camino was like before the hotel professionals took over the albergue business.
Exactly what I'm after,thank you.
 

Bala

Active Member
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Oct 2015, SJPdP-Burgos)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Santiago 2018)
#55
Ok, Bernie, I've got another one.

Sahagun, the Hospedria de la Santa Cruz Benedictinas.

The albergue has only been open about 4-5 weeks and is run by the now-residemt community of Marist Fathers. When I was there a few days ago, there were four of them, three Spaniards and one Italian, and all have walked the Camino, some of them multiple times or routes.

The feeling was less like an albergue than it was a sense of being welcomed into their community -- to share conversation, prayer, a meal of simple but abundant food. And of course, that's exactly what was happening. They live and work there, and we are welcomed guests. It was a unique and special experience.

Sleeping is four to a dorm, with each room having a private bath. There's a pleasant courtyard, a large library/living room where the community gathers for coffee, cookies, and wide-ranging conversation each afternoon. The big dining room at the end of the hall is the spot for the evening's communal meal and coffee, toast, fruit, and the like in the morning.

For those interested in the spiritual aspect of the Camino, the fathers celebrate mass nightly for the neighboring Benedictine sisters (but open to public and all pilgrims) in a spectacularly beautiful chapel around the corner. There is a pilgrim blessing ceremony afterwards.

And those who wish can stay to listen to the sisters sing Vespers, before heading back to the monastery to join the fathers in a bountiful meal and lively conversation.

Highly recommended.
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#56
Ok, Bernie, I've got another one.

Sahagun, the Hospedria de la Santa Cruz Benedictinas.

The albergue has only been open about 4-5 weeks and is run by the now-residemt community of Marist Fathers. When I was there a few days ago, there were four of them, three Spaniards and one Italian, and all have walked the Camino, some of them multiple times or routes.

The feeling was less like an albergue than it was a sense of being welcomed into their community -- to share conversation, prayer, a meal of simple but abundant food. And of course, that's exactly what was happening. They live and work there, and we are welcomed guests. It was a unique and special experience.

Sleeping is four to a dorm, with each room having a private bath. There's a pleasant courtyard, a large library/living room where the community gathers for coffee, cookies, and wide-ranging conversation each afternoon. The big dining room at the end of the hall is the spot for the evening's communal meal and coffee, toast, fruit, and the like in the morning.

For those interested in the spiritual aspect of the Camino, the fathers celebrate mass nightly for the neighboring Benedictine sisters (but open to public and all pilgrims) in a spectacularly beautiful chapel around the corner. There is a pilgrim blessing ceremony afterwards.

And those who wish can stay to listen to the sisters sing Vespers, before heading back to the monastery to join the fathers in a bountiful meal and lively conversation.

Highly recommen
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF011, CF012, CP013, CF014, CA015, S.Anton015, CF015, CI015
Ditch Pig016, CF017, CP017, CdN(018)
#58
Albergue San Anton de Castrojeriz,
Alberge San Nicolas de Puente Fitero.
Rustic, small places that will give you a taste of what the camino was like before the hotel professionals took over the albergue business.
Quite right, but I think Peaceable Kingdom in Moratinos deserves a mention as well as Bodega el Castillo. Bernie, you might enjoy a night of conversation with the distinguished British newspaper editor who resides there.
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#59
Quite right, but I think Peaceable Kingdom in Moratinos deserves a mention as well as Bodega el Castillo. Bernie, you might enjoy a night of conversation with the distinguished British newspaper editor who resides there.
As an Irish person i trust no British newspaper and even less so the editors ;)
 

MickMac

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Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013
Frances 2016
Frances 2017
Frances July 2018 - Meseta
#63
Any recommendations for bercianos del real camino ?
 
Camino(s) past & future
September2016
#64
Bernie, I'm on the meseta right now and it is so spectacularly beautiful in full spring colors that it's dinner conversation almost every night -- as in, how come everybody says this is boring and unattractive?

I've stayed in some excellent albergues. I'll post names and places as soon as I gather the information. I hope your walk is as beautiful as mine. Buen Camino!
When I think of the Camino, I always visualize the Meseta. It was my favorite part of my Camino.
 

Lleslie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Via Podiensis (2018)
#66
En el Camino in Boadilla was definitely my favourite, an oasis in the 'desert'. In Bercianos we stayed at 'Santa Clara' alberque which was excellent. We had a private room upstairs in the main house. Breakfast was excellent and the owners very welcoming and helpful. Coming from Adelaide in South Australia we thought the Meseta would be like walking the Hay Plains so we were pleasently surprised to find it wasn't flat at all but quite undulating and we enjoyed this section.
 

Boog237

New Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2013 SJPP to Santiago
May 2018 Porto to Santiago
August 2018 SJPP to Santiago
#67
I highly recommend En El Camino. Calle Francos, 1, 34468 Boadilla del Camino, Palencia, Spain. You have choices of a modern (very affordable) hotel or albergue style. Great ppl and food.
I walked into En el Camino to get a coffee my last run down the CF and was very impressed - I booked there for my third Camino this August! Very nice place!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF011, CF012, CP013, CF014, CA015, S.Anton015, CF015, CI015
Ditch Pig016, CF017, CP017, CdN(018)
#72
more info on this as far as costs would be great - this sounds intriguing to me!
As far as I know it is donativo. I have always passed there too early in the day to stop, I don't think they open their doors until sometime between 2 and 4. There are usually back packs lined at the door and pilgrims go down to the river to cool off waiting for it to open. There is an ancient ritual of the priests washing the feet of pilgrims.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF011, CF012, CP013, CF014, CA015, S.Anton015, CF015, CI015
Ditch Pig016, CF017, CP017, CdN(018)
#73
I walked into En el Camino to get a coffee my last run down the CF and was very impressed - I booked there for my third Camino this August! Very nice place!
Eduardo is such a charm. The grounds are so well cared for. I stopped see him last year and when I was on the Pig Dig a few years ago dropped in with his brother Michael, the Wise Pilgrim.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#74
more info on this as far as costs would be great - this sounds intriguing to me!
It is Donativo for bed, Dinner and Breakfast. Only 12 beds, but I got the the eleventh at 4:30 PM. There is a Foot washing ceremony by the volunteers ( In Knights Templar cloaks), quite touching. Lots of character in this Albergue, but accommodations are basic.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#75
“If going with the flow” means without reservations I would like to add a caution! Going without a reservation can create a problem at times. We entered Carrion del los Condes coming from Fromista (abt20km) with (thankfully) a reservation in March of 2018. This distance is our daily limit. Turns out, that weekend there was a medical conference in town and there was not a room available in town!! There were not many pilgrims walking but a few were forced to look elsewhere and there were not places close to this town... My suggestion, especially, if you planning to walk at busy times such as June or Sept. is to at least look a day or two ahead to see if there is availability at your possible destinations. Otherwise you may be pushing on or taking a cab.... Each of us has to know what works for us.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walking, Astorga-Sarria 2011, StJPdP -Longrono 2012, Logrono- Burgos 2013, StJPdP - SdComp 2014, Valenca do Minho - Santiago ,Easter 2015, Seville- Santiago by roadbike, Sept 2015. Burgos to Leon, walking, May 2016
#78
My favorite Albergue on the Meseta, if not the complete camino Frances is Santa Brigida in Hontannas. Uncluttered clean rooms, excellent shower facilities, very good communal meal and friendly hosts. I also enjoy the Meseta. There is an allure to it, the open areas, and the quaint towns along the way.
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#80
Any recommendations for bercianos del real camino ?
Is this the one where the house is over 400 years old, parochial, and night prayer follows a wonderful communal meal, and the table has a card saying that your donation today pays for the meal for tomorrow’s pilgrims? If so, although it was maybe 12 or 13 years ago _ yes, lovely! Spirit of the camino.
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#82
Quite right, but I think Peaceable Kingdom in Moratinos deserves a mention as well as Bodega el Castillo. Bernie, you might enjoy a night of conversation with the distinguished British newspaper editor who resides there.
Peaceable Kingdom is on my wish list.
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#83
Eduardo is such a charm. The grounds are so well cared for. I stopped see him last year and when I was on the Pig Dig a few years ago dropped in with his brother Michael, the Wise Pilgrim.
I remember that charm very well! And the mother... a quite wonderful oasis on the camino
 

TomAptos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Camino Portugues 2017, Via St Francis (Italy) 2018
#84
I have decided to finally do the Mesta next month after bypassing it many times,does anyone have fave Alberques along that route that I should not miss,and why,thank you.
In Castrojeriz - Ultreia. Nice hosts, good food, included an underground tour of wine cellar/escape routes to castle.
 

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#85
Any stores near near main alberque in Burgos where I can buy a walking stick ?
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#86

Irish Bernie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2013-2014-2015,16 and June 2017
#87
Thing is I may not stay there as I get into Burgos about 18:00,but I guess there is no harm in asking,leaving a donation ;)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#88
Thing is I may not stay there as I get into Burgos about 18:00,but I guess there is no harm in asking,leaving a donation ;)
There is an excellent outdoors shop called Base about a 10 minute walk south of the cathedral, just outside the old city centre. Put "Base deportivo Burgos" into Google Maps and it should come up. Screenshot_20180502-151806.png
 
Last edited:

kjpyle

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2017
#90
En el Camino in Boadilla was definitely my favourite, an oasis in the 'desert'. In Bercianos we stayed at 'Santa Clara' alberque which was excellent. We had a private room upstairs in the main house. Breakfast was excellent and the owners very welcoming and helpful. Coming from Adelaide in South Australia we thought the Meseta would be like walking the Hay Plains so we were pleasently surprised to find it wasn't flat at all but quite undulating and we enjoyed this section.
I need help with remembering the 'Santa Clara' in Bercianos del Real Camino. My wife and I stayed there on 01 Oct 2017, even had a private room, and it's the only place out of our 46 day trek from SJPP to Santiago that if don't have recollections or pictures to help me. If anyone has some pictures to share, we would appreciate any help in jarring our memories.
We, too, found the Meseta absolutely magical & I can't fathom why anyone would suggest bypassing it.
Another great albergue was 'La Franca' at Poblacion de Campos. The public areas were as private as you can get without getting a private room.
 

Lleslie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Via Podiensis (2018)
#91
I need help with remembering the 'Santa Clara' in Bercianos del Real Camino. My wife and I stayed there on 01 Oct 2017, even had a private room, and it's the only place out of our 46 day trek from SJPP to Santiago that if don't have recollections or pictures to help me. If anyone has some pictures to share, we would appreciate any help in jarring our memories.
We, too, found the Meseta absolutely magical & I can't fathom why anyone would suggest bypassing it.
Another great albergue was 'La Franca' at Poblacion de Campos. The public areas were as private as you can get without getting a private room.
If you stayed upstairs at Santa Clara you would have seen the stair railing which i think was a metal sculpture of the world. They had a lovely courtyard with outdoor lounge chairs and a dog (i think a dalmation?) called Linda - I remember this as that is my name too! There was a separate dormitory area and pilgram kitchen where we cooked our dinner but breakfast was downstairs in the main house and was very good. Hope this helps
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#92
The very small town after Fromista, Poblacion de Campos has a very nice place, Amanecer en Campos. It has mostly double private rooms. We were there in the middle of March and not much was open. To our surprise there was a room with bunk beds for those wishing it. The place is beautiful which is in contrast to what many most of the town appears like from the outside. The proprietors are two sisters who welcome you like family! Gave us a free drink and tapas when we arrived. This town has limited services. It has a cafe, but quite honestly it was dirty when we arrived. May have just been a bad time?
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016
#93
Some great options there,now is it best to book in advance ?.Something I never do generally,I will be walking from Burgos May 22nd.
One day ahead of me; I will arrive in Burgos with my wife on May 22 and start the next day. Walking to Leon, part I did not do in 2016 when I walked from Pamplona to Santiago - Muxia - Finistere...
 

kjpyle

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2017
#94
If you stayed upstairs at Santa Clara you would have seen the stair railing which i think was a metal sculpture of the world. They had a lovely courtyard with outdoor lounge chairs and a dog (i think a dalmation?) called Linda - I remember this as that is my name too! There was a separate dormitory area and pilgram kitchen where we cooked our dinner but breakfast was downstairs in the main house and was very good. Hope this helps
Wow, still drawing a blank. Was the 'office' just inside the entry and to the right? An open air affair?
 

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