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Too old?

Camino(s) past & future
CF; Le Puy; El Norte; Monastery Santo Toribio; Monasteries Yuso and Suso
#1
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
 

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twh

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from SJPdP May/June, 2018
#3
Hi Konnie, based on your experience of 3+ Camino walks already and knowing better than anyone else what your current health and abilities are (and if they have changed significantly in the last 5 years since your last Camino) you are truly the expert when it comes to answering your own question. I'd say give it a try and see how you do. Skip the tarmac where possible if you find it too difficult. Shorten your days or distance if necessary. Ride an electric bike (I saw many this year on the CF)...then you'll like the tarmac. You are only limited by your imagination.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#4
Konnie, pack your things and go!
I'm younger than you, and soooo many times I was the snail of the day. I will never forget an 85 year old lady that overtook me on an uphill and yelled "they told me there is a bar with cold beer ahead!". I wanna be like her one day!

I did the Portuguese Camino last year, and although there is some tarmac, it is not that much. There are more cobblestones, but then the food, history, kindness and port wine are just so amazing that it becomes a minor thing. Just take your time and walk as much as you feel like, rest when you feel like.
 

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martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
From Somport Jul-Sep 2018
#6
... I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream.....
I would say... if you are not rather ill, you can find a camino that fits to your needs. "In pretty good shape" should be more than enough if you do not overdo it.

Here is an old thread with many tips if someone is rather limited in walking:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ievability-of-camino-at-50-slow-walker.51501/

Here is an "oldest-pilgrim" thread:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...est-pilgrim-you-have-met-on-the-camino.49688/
 
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Anamiri

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#7
When we walked to Roncesvalles on the Napoleon route we met an 84 year old lady making good time. I think it depends entirely on your level of health and fitness more then your age,
My father is 80 and a full time farmer. He just stopped competitive cycling a few years ago. I hope I'm as fit as he is at that age. (hoping of course that I get to that age)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
#8
I've had to give up - very sadly - because of physical problems [breathing and can't walking over 10 kms]. But if you're fit enough - just go for it, or you will for ever regret not taking the opportunity.
I've walked the camino seven times: I would love to walk the Portuguese coastal next April, but think it very unlikely. I'm in my 80th year.
But God is good - we shall see how I am next year!!
Ultreia!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Fisterra-Muxia (Sept/Oct 2017)
#9
I met a quite a few Septuagenarians on Camino Frances last year (all solo travelers). One lady in particular was out pacing most everyone. She started in SJPdP and ended in Santiago, a day before her 75th. I have a video of her I took at an albergue one night asking her what advice did she have for other older folks who may want to do the Camino. She said “If you can put one foot in front of the other and you have a positive attitude then you can do the Camino!”.
 
#10
As has been said you have experience and you know your comparative fitness and health with regard to previous times. Why not the CF again? On the whole more opportunities for shorter days, transport if necessary, especially if concerned about more difficult days and more support available if needed (including pack transport). I am a mere chicken at 69. I realise I am not as fit as when I started a few years ago, but like you I have that past knowledge to help me in my decisions. I was recently ill on the Ingles but sensibly abandoned it and had a holiday instead. Would I have done that years ago? You have more years under your belt and I am sure you have gained some wisdom in them. If you want to go.... then just go.
 

Mack

Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2017 Sarria to Santiago de Compostela
#12
I'm 78 and walked this year from SJPP to Leon - no problem at all. I'm not the fittest older person. My plan was to go all the way but I got vertigo in Leon so had to cut short my walk. I plan to go back next year and do the remainder.

So, over 70 is no problem.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#13
Hi - I walked the CF 2 years ago at age 70, the CP last year at age 71. I am hoping to walk the Camino Primitivo next year at age 73. My plan is to break it into the shortest stages possible and go slowly. I also keep my backpack at under 5 kilos. For me, the key is don't try to keep up with other people and being realistic about what distances work for me. Good luck!
 
#14
The age is just a number. But of course those numbers do relate to reality, if you know what I mean. Nevertheless, if your heart says walk then do it and do it at your pace. I was 74 last October for my first Camino Francés and made it all the way. The Camino Primitivo is calling me next year, I think!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk with my husband June 2018
#15
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Just do it! Give yourself more time so you do not have to walk so far each day and Give yourself rest days!!! I promise there will be many older than you on the Camino as well!!!!The Camino Frances is so awesome! The weather might be better for you in September. Make sure you take the bare minimum in your pack, keep it VERY light and you will be fine. If you need something you did not bring you can buy something like it along the way. Use poles, they will come in handy on the tough ascents and descents. Ultreia!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#16
Seriously! You think you are too old at 74?

I did my first Camino at 60 and just finished my most recent at 65. Doing Camino helps keep me physically active. Being physically active keeps all my parts moving straight ahead. Staying vertical helps everything.

As long as you can walk on uneven surfaces and have reasonable balance / equilibrium, you can do it. All other details are just that, minutiae and details that can all be addressed in turn.

You should do it. Where there is a will, there is a way. I recall the oldest person I met who just finished a FULL Camino, from St. Jean Pied de Port, was 83 years old. I am beginning to think that 80 is the new 60, 70 the new 50, etc... So, at 65, I suppose I am now middle-aged?

Besides, it annoys younger folk to see a mature person so active, doing something that they cannot pry themselves away form their smart phones long enough to consider. Go ahead, annoy the heck out of them.:)

This reminds me of the old joke...How do you eat an elephant...one bite at a time. Paraphrasing that, you complete a Camino one step at a time...Ultreia!

Hope this helps.
 
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rappahannock_rev

Anglican Catholic Priest
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Burgos & SdeC 77 (by train); Frances 12, 15 & 17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes, Aragones 18
#17
I'm not 28 any more! (65 in Sept!) My May-June 2018 CA walk convinced me that a vigorous outdoor life has finally caught up with me. I simply can't, in the future, tote a mochilla. Period. Multiple compression fractures and arthritis won't permit it.... Or probably walk beyond more than about 15-20 k per day, for that matter.... Sigh!

But not returning to Spain is not a option!

Good news! There are inexpensive mochilla transport services available. And inexpensive bus services available on most sections of the Camino Frances -- for those days when the spirit says "Don't push your luck...." So returning to Spain again is not yet a day-dream for me, and need not be for you....

Even if we geezers just focus on sipping wine at the streetside cafes on the Plazas Mayores, on living in the moment, and on watching the young folks go by..... :)
 
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SteveC

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino (2017)
#19
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I walked my first Camino with my daughter, SJPP to Santiago, with a 22 pound pack when I was 72. We now plan to walk from Porto to Santiago then on to Finisterre and Muxia in May 2019 when I will turn 74. Same pack and pace. My advice is to just keep your pace, take some breaks and keep walking. We found that about 20-25 KM per day was a reasonable goal. Just for inspiration, we saw a gentleman last time that we were told was over 90 years old--still walking and carrying his pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May-June 2013; Chemin du Puy May-June 2015; Camino Frances Jul-Aug 2015;Camino del Norte Jul 2016 (?)
#20
I just returned from the Camino Del Norte a bit early due to a gallbladder attack and didn't want to be stranded in Spain due to the fact I do not speak any Spanish. I had just celebrated my 81st birthday that week. This is my 3rd Camino, having done my first at the age of 75 and celebrated the 76th on that Camino. My 2nd, at the age of 77 and turned 78, was from Le Puy to Santiago. I just tell people that this year I am 9 - I add the two numbers together (8+1) and let them figure out how old I am. I could be 45, 54, 63, 72 or 81! LOL! Of course once they see my picture or look at my face they know that 45 was long, long ago!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#21
You know your body and mind better than anybody. If you’re fit and have the spirit to walk, then you know what to do...walk! If length of stages is an issue, consider Camino Frances which has excellent infrastructure and good options for shorter etapas.

I met an older man in Foncebadón who must have been in his upper seventies. He comes back often to walk portions of the Frances. He had this infectious spirit. You could see that he was so alive on the Camino. He is an inspiration for me. I’ll be 61 when I walk my second Camino next year. I hope to walk ‘til I drop.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#22
My sister and I walked from Pamplona to Santiago this year in really miserable conditions...freezing cold, heavy winds (sometimes 75km headwinds) almost daily rain or snow, or sleet and/or hail! We went end of February.

Younger folks kept asking us how old my sister was? We did not see any other silver hairs till we got to Leon. We saw lots of it from Sarria on. The reason I mention it is because young men (only) kept asking my sister how old she was? It is considered rude in my culture to ask this question to a stranger. However she graciously answered each peregrino with pride that she was 77! She made it with flying colors to Santiago.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2016
Camino Portuguse Oct (2018)
#23
Go for it. I walked my first camino two years ago at the age of 69. We three took 40 wonderful days to complete the CF. We suffered no foot problems and no health issues. This year my best friend and two grammar school buddies will walk the Camino from Porto.

As said above you are only 74 years young

Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#24
Even when you can no longer walk, you can still contribute. Consider becoming a volunteer at the Pilgrim Office or a hospitalero /a at an albergue. I always get more out of working as a volunteer than I invest in the effort.

There is a thread called "Volunteering it the Pilgrim Office at Santiago" that contains everything you need to know. I know this because I wrote it... Here is the direct link...

http://www.caminodesantiago.me/comm...pilgrim-office-at-santiago.52794/#post-633293

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Depart Los Angeles on September 19, 2016
#25
Konnie, the answer is right in front of you. You've "been there, done that," so to speak. You know what it takes, physically and mentally. Unless you have a debilitating physical problem, I see no reason why you should deny yourself the experience of another Camino, after all, that is what you want, right? I am 75 years old and completed my first Camino (Francis) last year. I took my time, listened to my mind and body and "picked clover" so to spreak, along the way. It took six weeks and that was it, one of the best and most rewarding SOLO experiences in my life. I say, go for it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago, St Jean to Santuago, 2015
Camino Portuguese, 2018
#26
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Go! Have your backpack transferred and take a bus now and then if you need to! If some youngster tries to judge you, well.......
 

Cyfor

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camiño de Santiago (2018)
#27
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Hello, I’m 82 yo, and in training to walk my first half Camino. My younger wilfe and I will be trekking alomg with our 30 year-younger niece and nephew. Looking forward to a grand pilgrimage. Wish us good health and perseverance. Don
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#28
No, you are not to old. While walking we met many people in their 70's and into their 80's. As with any age I would say the same thing and that is go at your own pace, just one step after the other and let your body decide when and if you want to have a break. Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#29
In April I worked for 2 weeks as a volunteer in the Huiskamer at the first floor above the Pilgrimsoffice.
There was a couple from South Africa, he was 82 and the lady was a few years younger and they walked from SJPdP during a lot of bad weather in 34 day's .
Saying this, you are as old as you feel yourself.

Wish you well and just go for it, Peter.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
#30
A funny story: I walked the CF in 2016. In Puente La Reina I was making my bed in the Seminario albergue. Nearby a young guy (age 23) was doing likewise. We started to talk, and he said to me, shaking his head, "Man.. I just ran into this really old guy who said he's walking to Santiago. He is 70!!" The way he was talking was like "Bring out the wheelchairs!"

I shrugged my shoulders and said, "Well, I'm 67". He gaped and shut up.

As happens frequently on the Camino, we kept running into each other on the way to Santiago. This young guy liked partying during the evenings, and often I'd pass him during the day. He gave me the Camino name of Speedy Gonzales. And we celebrated together when we both arrived in Santiago the same day.

My point is, may we all break our stereotypes about age and ability. I will be walking my next Camino next year when I celebrate my 70th birthday. And I hope to walk many more.

May you walk with confidence. And a heartfelt Buen Camino!
 

Wazza

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
de Frances 2017. Finisterre 2017
#32
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Konnie, go for it!! My wife and I did the Frances then through to Finnisterre anti-clockwise last year (aged 69 and 68). Loved it. Met two gentlemen both aged 82 doing the Frances and they were having a ball. Don't wait!!....don't have regrets!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, Camino del Norte, and the Camino Portuguese (May, 2018)
#33
Hi Konnie, based on your experience of 3+ Camino walks already and knowing better than anyone else what your current health and abilities are (and if they have changed significantly in the last 5 years since your last Camino) you are truly the expert when it comes to answering your own question. I'd say give it a try and see how you do. Skip the tarmac where possible if you find it too difficult. Shorten your days or distance if necessary. Ride an electric bike (I saw many this year on the CF)...then you'll like the tarmac. You are only limited by your imagination.
Hi. I agree wholeheartedly. My husband and I just completed the Portuguese and with good shoes, we were not bothered by the tarmac, including the cobblestones. No blisters. We carried our packs but did keep them light. We had no compunctions about taking a cab or public transport if we needed to. ( We didn't). We have, like you, walked the Camino Francês twice, and cycled the Camino del Norte. We don't intend to stop- just adapt as we feel we need/wish to.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
#34
I will be 70 in a couple of weeks and walked the Camino de Invierno in May this year. Thought I had stopped doing caminos after doing a lot since 2005, but some forummembers made me interested in trying this camino out of the hords, and I did not regret trying. I did not find it very challenging either.
From some long caminos of one to two months I have continued taking some short ones, but that is mostly because I think I have stayed enough nights in albergues and rather stay in hostels, but I do not think my age wil be a hinder to me doing a longer walk.
If you care about your backpack, Correos will carry a bag for you to a low price, and when I first tried this autumn 2016, I was surprised to see that nearly everybody I met only had a small backpack and it seemed to me that they also sent their packs to albergues.
My deciding to quit the camino is mostly because of the crowds nowadays and not because of my age.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Levant from Avila 2013
Frances (2018 or 2019)
#35
3 of us "older" Aussies walked some of the Camino de Levante/Sureste from Avila to Santiago in 2013, one 85 one 78 and a young one at 76. A couple of bus trips to correct the odd "body crumble" and overcome larger climbs, but we covered the rest on foot. We had a great Camino and little rain (apart from in Galicia). We're all still going. I am currently planning to walk the Primitivo with a friend in 2019 after a new hip has settled. We will both be 82.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17 SJPdP - Santiago
(Portuguese: 09/18)
#36
@konnie sounds like you got it goin' on! I wish I had your experience, and language skill. You know the drill, been there, done that. Pack light ... someone already mentioned a transport service for your mochila. As far as the tarmac ... you might want to checkout some cushioning trail runners like the Hoka One Bondi 5. They might help absorb the impact on the tarmac. I am also a believer in trekking poles (increased circulation, balance, reduced stress on legs, joints, fatigue) ... just put some rubber tips on the end to eliminate the click clack on the tarmac.

¡Buena suerte, viejo peregrino!:oops::D:cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances-May/June (2016)
Primivito or Frances- dreaming
#37
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Oh never, my friend 75 is currently mid air on his way to do his 4th camino, Portuguese this time from lisbon. Does around 600-700km every year...keep walking
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#38
I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream
I was 74 when I started from Le Puy and almost 76 when I arrived at Santaiago de Compostela. And I'll be close to 77 when walking in north-eastern France later this year.

For me the key is regular long distance (also including elevation gain) traning walks with all my gear (including a tent this year)

@konnie , kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

Traa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I want to walk Camino in Sept/Oct 2017
#39
I walked from SJPDP to Santiago last sept/oct. First morning i started i got talking to a 76yr old canadian man, super cool guy. He had walked it 4yrs prior to this. He smoked and was slow,I remember on that first day to Roncesvalles I passed him sitting on the side of the road and he looked tired but I just knew from my first conversation with him that he'd make it. I saw him on and off for the first 10or so days of my walk and then I didnt see him along the way any more. My pace was faster,I'm a 34yr old woman and quite fit. I thought about him for my journey and hoped he was ok but the fact that I didnt see him anymore made me wonder.
When I eventually got to Santiago, what blew me away wasnt the achievment of what I had done and the vision of the cathedral but it was the huge smile and hug I received upon arrival from that wonderful inspirational man who had arrived about an hr before me!! He really blew me away. You are never ever too old as long as u have health on your side,legs to carry you and a will to do it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#40
A funny story: I walked the CF in 2016. In Puente La Reina I was making my bed in the Seminario albergue. Nearby a young guy (age 23) was doing likewise. We started to talk, and he said to me, shaking his head, "Man.. I just ran into this really old guy who said he's walking to Santiago. He is 70!!" The way he was talking was like "Bring out the wheelchairs!"

I shrugged my shoulders and said, "Well, I'm 67". He gaped and shut up.

As happens frequently on the Camino, we kept running into each other on the way to Santiago. This young guy liked partying during the evenings, and often I'd pass him during the day. He gave me the Camino name of Speedy Gonzales. And we celebrated together when we both arrived in Santiago the same day.

My point is, may we all break our stereotypes about age and ability. I will be walking my next Camino next year when I celebrate my 70th birthday. And I hope to walk many more.

May you walk with confidence. And a heartfelt Buen Camino!
You are an inspiration!
 

kalavati

One more time!
Camino(s) past & future
May (2014), Camino Frances, SJPdP 28 April. to Muxia
May (2016)- Again,better rain gear
#41
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
"You are never too old! If you can walk you can do it! I'm a senior!, my 3rd camino! : )
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#43
I have vivid memories of a Dutch lady I met at Rabanal in 2002.
She'd walked all the way from Amsterdam and was going to walk all the way back again.
She was 83 - and she did it too.

You'll find a lot of changes have happened in 5 years - a lot more cafes and bars, a lot more hostales and albegues and a lot more people too.

You'll find not much has changed in 5 years - Roncesvales soon fills up, the views from Sierra de Perdon, O Cebreiro etc are still breathtaking, the trudge through the suburbs of Santiago still doesn't seem to end, people are still kind to you . . . .

Good luck on your Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#44
Having attained the ripe 'middle age' of 65, and having accomplished six Caminos, I have a observation concerning age and being a pilgrim.

I have observed, and experienced first-hand, that older pilgrims tend to get more out of the journey. I know this is a generalism. But, consider that, in your 20s or 30s, you have statistically much more of your life ahead of you. At 60, or 70, and beyond, perhaps less so. That light at the proverbial end of the tunnel is closer for me than for others.

Doing a Camino affects most all pilgrims profoundly, albeit in different ways. As an older, arguably, more mature pilgrim, I appreciate the historical continuity of more than a millennia of pilgrimage on the various routes to Santiago. Across history and through many periods of history, we pilgrims have persevered on the Camino de Santiago.

Millions have gone before, and millions will likely follow after. In that context, we are like grains of sand on a beach. Instead of the Camino being a punctuation point to my entire life, it is a part of my life's journey on the road to eternity. I consider that, on balance, as a fellow pilgrim, I am among good company, both in the here and now, and in the hereafter.

Does this make sense to anyone else?
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Depart Los Angeles on September 19, 2016
#45
t2andero . . . yes, it makes perfect sense. I never thought about my experience in that context but you're right. My Camino journey was a flicker in time . . . as you aptly said, a punctuation. I am 75, in good shape and enjoy the outdoors. Wanting a challenge, I soloed the Camino Francis 2 years ago. What was supposed to be nothing more than a long distance hike became a transformative journey that profoundly changed my life. Thanks for sharing your experience . . . Rover
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
#46
Wiil start my third Camino next year—mid 70’s and in decent shape. What I’ve learned from the first two will guide my third: Go slowly with gratitude and a spirit of wonder. Before, I put in the miles and rarely stopped to really soak in what was around me. This time I’m keeping mileage way down and taking side trips. No more 18-20 mile days and painful leg nights. Each Camino has been different but memorable. I can still see people and sections of trail in my minds eye but not as fully as I might have. Like a first love, my first Camino was life changing and amazing. The second was fun and at times deepl6 frustrating as I walked with my spouse who wasn’t into it. This time I will walk with ladies my age and we intend to laugh, eat and walk quietly with big sticks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018
#47
This June---and last---I celebrated my 75th and 76th birthdays on the Camino Frances. There were many seniors on the trail---some older than I. If you are healthy---and train---there is no reason to stay home.
My biggest concern was falling, and walking sticks helped me avoid that. Go for it! Just allow yourself enough time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#48
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
What can i add? Not advice. Perhaps this: for health reasons, I have a daily goal of 10,000 steps. For practical reasons, I do that, and more when I can, in daily tasks like going for the shopping and so it is along city footpaths, hence tarmac, concrete, cobbles. Perhaps that explains why the idea of those surfaces doesn’t alarm me. Writing this is prompting me to get out and take a train to another starting point and walk back home along a canal walk! The house cleaning can wait till I get back, and be done before Wimbledon starts on !
done and dusted. Now, a spot of tidying, and then, feet up, switch on, and watch the poor devils sweat it out on Centre Court...
IMG_2544.png
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2017
#49
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
On our Camino in 2017, there was a man from Australia walking to finish a celebration for his 80th birthday. He and his wife started in 2016, when he was 80, but knee problems curtailed his Camino. He was back in 2017, actually then 81, carrying a pack (not minimalist in my opinion), but he shortened the distance each day from the prior year. I'm sure we saw him on the meseta - he'd started out in Burgos the second go round, and he was nicely making way. I say, go and do it! Carpe diem!
 

cathn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed one 550 Miile and six partial caminos
#50
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I completed my second Camino at 74.
Just pace yourself, it is not a dream. Make it a reality.
 
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
#51
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
My husband and I are almost 80 and we just finished our Camino ....... when you are a little bit older you learn to appreciate being able to do something this special. You just need to listen to what your body is telling you and then you will be fine.
We walked lots but we also took a bus and a train ride at a couple of stretches when we needed a bit of a rest day.
Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - 2009
Portuguese Interior (2014)
Hadrian's Wall (2017)
Porto to SdC ( Sep 2018)
#52
At 70+ I'm looking forward to another pilgrimage either in the fall or next spring. I, too, am fairly healthy but finally will work with the doc to straighten out a heart out of rhythm. It doesn't keep me from plodding along and occasionally passing a younger crowd! Seriously, the enemy of most pilgrims is the fear of not completing what you can do! Buen Camino! or .... Bon Caminho!
 
Camino(s) past & future
September 2018
#53
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Wel, I am not 74, just close to 68. In Sept. My wife and I will go on our first journey. We walk every day and feel we are prepared,in I personally am in excellent health. We plan on enjoying the walk. Not trying to find myself or punish myself. Just enjoy the scenery, the people, the villages. If we walk only a few miles, so what? So, enjoy the trip. Love the experience. You don't' need to prove anything. Maybe we'll see on the trail...
 
#55
Too old? Daydream? 74!

Methinks and me hopes the 70+ crowd weighs in on this one.

Buen camino. Because, I am certain you will be convinced to go.
I will definitely weigh on this. I am going on my third Camino in September and I will be 72 in November. Chronological age has nothing to do with it. I know 40-year-olds who wouldn’t dream of going on this walk. I myself would never have dreamt of going on this walk when I was 40 or 50 or 60. Hiking is not something I enjoy at all.But I got inspired in a trite way, by the Martin Sheen movie, which showed me how I could spend six weeks in my own little solitude bubble, no matter how many people were on the walk around me. I started the Camino Francis In 2013 when I was nearly 67. I found myself on the Camino Del Norte in 2015 when I was nearly 69. And here I will be again. So you go for it. There are parts of the Portuguese that are on the coast on board walks and some parts on trails. Get yourself a good book. The newest John Brierley book, 2017 addition I think, follows four different pathways. Including to coastal ways.

Buen Camino!
 

Kenny T

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
french...Portuguese...Del norte.
#56
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Hi i am also 74 and going back for the fourth camino age just a number...go for it...
 

Breewaters

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk 2018 or 2019. Would like to meet up with other pilgrims to get started.
#57
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
 

Breewaters

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk 2018 or 2019. Would like to meet up with other pilgrims to get started.
#58
I’m 75 years and in I think better than average condition and I have never hiked the trail. I too am wondering if I have waited too long. Anxious to see the feedback you get.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#59
I’m 75 years and in I think better than average condition and I have never hiked the trail. I too am wondering if I have waited too long. Anxious to see the feedback you get.
Breewaters, are you going to stay wondering? If you are in better than average condition what is holding you back? Off you go!
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17 SJPdP - Santiago
(Portuguese: 09/18)
#60
@Breewaters there is still time! Camino Mike was 70 last year when I hiked over the Pyrenees with him. There were a lot older than him, but there were also a lot of pilgrims with disabilities that walked every day. All were an inspiration.

Tom: Have you ever walked the Camino, senora?

First albergue innkeeper: Never. When I was young, I was too busy. And now that I'm older, I'm too tired.

First albergue innkeeper: [as Tom silently nods and heads out the door] Buen camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Yes, I will initiate in August (2015), starting from Roncesvalles.
#61
My dear Konnie, we usually have only one dream in life to carry out what we like, do not give up, follow the cumin again, live the way, you will have a beautiful reward. Go ahead!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018
#62
As they say---it's your Camino! All or part. Compostela or no compostela. Bus or no bus.
The important thing is the entire journey---the decision, the planning and preparation, the training, the walk, and the memories. How ever much you do, you will have the experience of a lifetime---unlike any other.
As long as you listen to your body, the whole thing is good for you---not bad for you.
You will have an amazing experience, see beautiful sights, and meet very interesting people from all over the World. And then you will have a great feeling of accomplishment, and wonderful memories.
Isn't all of that worth the risk?
As Nike says, "Just do it!" You'll be glad you did. Just don't try to keep up with the book, or anyone else(who is doing their own Camino).
 
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018
#63
I’m 75 years and in I think better than average condition and I have never hiked the trail. I too am wondering if I have waited too long. Anxious to see the feedback you get.
I just celebrated my 76th birthday doing the entire Camino Frances(did it last year, too). I have never been a backpacker. I do walk and play tennis. I think the key is basic fitness---and then train, train, train. We aren't kids any more, so we need to prepare.
Also, pack light. One shirt to wear when you are washing the other. One pair of shorts(and underwear, and socks, etc.) to wear when you are washing the other. I wore the same thing---every day! Who cares? People would look at me and say, "That's not a very big pack." I would respond, "Nope."
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#64
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
No more tarmac on Portuguese ( from Porto) than Norte Konnie
Make the days short and enjoy , you know the rules and as my son says to us oldies
" use it or loose it dad "
Whichever way you choose have a great Camino
 
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Camino(s) past & future
walked Camino Frances 23 April- 23 May (2018), Camino Portuguese 2018/19
#65
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I travelled with a wonderful woman of 72 and a man of 78, both capable of walking 25k a day and carrying heavy packs (not recommended). We're all different but it shows it's possible. Do it! Anyway/ how you need to, don't regret that you didn't try again. The Portuguese?
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - Finisterre (2005) ; LePuy - Muxia (2007) ; Porto - SC. (2009) planning Lourdes- SC (2018)
#66
[Does this make sense to anyone else?[/QUOTE]
Absolutely! God bless.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: March 2013
Le Puy: July 2015
Portugues: April 2018
#67
Walked 800km of the Frances when I was 64, 750km of the Le Puy when I was 67, and just walked 420km of the Portugues at 69. At the start I wondered how I would do with a 420km trek...well, I did very well. My wife is now suggesting the 1000km Via de la Plata. I’m game...with maybe a 2 week stop over in Salamanca. Soo....the word is ...if your body says go...Go!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Yes, I will initiate in August (2015), starting from Roncesvalles.
#68
Walked 800km of the Frances when I was 64, 750km of the Le Puy when I was 67, and just walked 420km of the Portugues at 69. At the start I wondered how I would do with a 420km trek...well, I did very well. My wife is now suggesting the 1000km Via de la Plata. I’m game...with maybe a 2 week stop over in Salamanca. Soo....the word is ...if your body says go...Go!
Go ahead my friend, Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago, St Jean to Santuago, 2015
Camino Portuguese, 2018
#69
Hi Konnie, based on your experience of 3+ Camino walks already and knowing better than anyone else what your current health and abilities are (and if they have changed significantly in the last 5 years since your last Camino) you are truly the expert when it comes to answering your own question. I'd say give it a try and see how you do. Skip the tarmac where possible if you find it too difficult. Shorten your days or distance if necessary. Ride an electric bike (I saw many this year on the CF)...then you'll like the tarmac. You are only limited by your imagination.
I am 84. Just followed the Portuguese doing as suggested above. Was not interested in a Compostela so did not visit the office in SdC. Did have a credential from APOC and had it stamped for the beauty of the stamps. Timing was right to attend the noon mass with swinging of the Botafumeiro and appreciated that. Met lovely people and managed to enjoy even the pavement parts. It felt like a pilgrimage for me. I think that is what matters and hope there are others who agree.
 

Aishlyn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del norte(2008) 8 days
Camino frances full length (2014)
Camino podiensis (2018)
#70
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I walked it when I was almost 77 with a group , but every inch but always last but no blisters . Just take it steady. Now about to do camino Le Puy at 80 almost 81 and will take it even more steadily
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP - Finisterre (2005) ; LePuy - Muxia (2007) ; Porto - SC. (2009) planning Lourdes- SC (2018)
#72
Agree with Jane it is a pi,grimace and church services were very important to me. I hope this will help with my grieving over husband if 57 years who died in February . We first became a couple in 1955
I'm touched. Wishing you a beautiful Camino, with the memory of your husband in your heart. God bless.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018
#73
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
If you analyze the statistics, two things stand out---the increase in women and seniors. Why? Because women and seniors tried it and were successful. They went home and told their peers---who tried it and succeeded. So far in 2018, there have more compostelas awarded to the over 60 group than to the under 30 group. Go seniors!
 

Dinah Shaw

Volcano Climber
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
#74
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
You are never too old. That's BS I'm 73. Will be 74 in Nov with lots of physical problems and I am doing the San Salvador and Primitivo in September. I've got back problems and don't even carry a big backpack, and look what you carried. Where there is a will, there is a way. You can do it.
 

Traveler66

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2103-SJPD à SDdC; 2014 - Le Puis à SJPD. (2016 Liboa - SDdC)
#75
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Wow! Can Relate to your concern. My first Camino was 2013, too. On that Way, I one night shared the communal room with an 82 YO gent who used the handle, “Cimarron”. He’d already hiked most everywhere. He was slowing down by that time and we fellow hopefuls, had to remind him several times about lights out, last toilet time, lights back on...etc. The entire room was cool about his forgetfulness. We were all Pilgrims together. He was and remains an inspiration to me as I now travel & pack 300+ days every year; while I can still. So, you GO GRL!
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
#76
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Now 70; just finished my third.
 

Ppwmmc

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#77
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
My 83 year old Dad and I did the Camino from Sarria to Santiago in May. He did awesome. 12 to 20 kilometers per day.
 

dink56

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino santiago 2015
camino portugues 2018
#78
Hello there, I find reading all these post is very inspiring, I walked Camino Frances, my first ever Camino 4 years ago in my late 50's, I will head for the Portuguese Camino in September now early 60's, and I wonder what took me so long to get around to arranging the second Camino. I have no doubts about my fitness as I do a lot of multi day hiking and on many endeavors i have met folk much older than me. There will always be doubt about ones abilities and all the other aspects related to travel. I certainly have my own share. There are no barriers except those we create ourselves. Give it a go, you may regret it if you dont.
Good luck and perhaps our paths will cross somewhere in Portugal.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
#79
I was 73 when I walked the primitivo last september,and walked on to muxia,as I had the time. I had no problems and outlasted many younger walkers who quit because of various complaints. Next year I plan to walk theArgonne and Salvador ways. We put too much importance on our ages. They mean little. Go for your walk,what do you haverr to lose? BUEN CAMINO!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#81
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
your question: Too old? I am cleaning up my desktop and found this - I may have copied it from another thread! :
"what then? shall we sit idly down and say the night has come; it is no longer day? The night hath not yet come;...For age is opportunity no less than youth itself, though in another dress, and as the evening twilight fades away the sky is filled with stars, invisible by day." Longfellow, Morituri Salutamus

so, courage! buen camino...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Stages on both French and Northern routes. Plan to walk Tui to Santiago in June 2017
#82
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Age should never be a barrier to anything my friend because one mans 74 is another mans 64 or even 54. We all age differently and if you feel fit and well simply go for it. I met two Texans last year on the Portuguese camino who walked from Porto to SDC that would put the rest of us to shame. Lou was 87 and his friend Nick 73, a mere youngster. So dream big and follow that dream to where ever it may take you even to the ends of the earth, which just might be Finisterre! YDXJ0357.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
#83
@konnie sounds like you got it goin' on! I wish I had your experience, and language skill. You know the drill, been there, done that. Pack light ... someone already mentioned a transport service for your mochila. As far as the tarmac ... you might want to checkout some cushioning trail runners like the Hoka One Bondi 5. They might help absorb the impact on the tarmac. I am also a believer in trekking poles (increased circulation, balance, reduced stress on legs, joints, fatigue) ... just put some rubber tips on the end to eliminate the click clack on the tarmac.

¡Buena suerte, viejo peregrino!:oops::D:cool:
I absolutely agree on the Hoka shoes! And the trekking poles. But not the rubber tips, I would never trust poles with rubber tips either up or down. The pigs are to help you to a fast grip, the rubber never does. So if the sounds of clacking poles bother you put them away when you do not need them for climbing up or down.
If it bother other peregrinos they can slow down or speed up.
In the crowds on the camino these days the sound of poles is not the most disturbing noise.
 
#84
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I agree but you are too young for nursing home. I just turnrd 70 and so far this year i trekked from Bilbao to Santiago ans Lourdres France via somport pass to Abonas. Not finished yet. Get out there and trek step by step
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
#85
I will be 74 next month and plan to walk 2 short caminos next year. Age is only a number!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#86
Can’t resist showing off once more! At 70 I walked my first camino starting from home on the north coast of Brittany - along the coast all the way round Brittany, down the Atlantic coast to Irun, then the Norte via Ribadeo to Santiago and on to Cap de Finisterre - five months. At 73 I walked the Primitivo, at 74 one half of the VdlP, at 75 the other half, at 76 the Salvador, at 77 the Torres and next month at 78 - se Deus quiser - I will walk the littoral Portugues from Porto to Santiago with two daughters (in their fifties - they walked with me for a few days on each of my previous walks) and five of my grandchildren aged between 17 and 11. Trying to pass on the bug to the following generations!

So at 74 go for it! And buen camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (March 2017)
#89
Having attained the ripe 'middle age' of 65, and having accomplished six Caminos, I have a observation concerning age and being a pilgrim.

I have observed, and experienced first-hand, that older pilgrims tend to get more out of the journey. I know this is a generalism. But, consider that, in your 20s or 30s, you have statistically much more of your life ahead of you. At 60, or 70, and beyond, perhaps less so. That light at the proverbial end of the tunnel is closer for me than for others.

Doing a Camino affects most all pilgrims profoundly, albeit in different ways. As an older, arguably, more mature pilgrim, I appreciate the historical continuity of more than a millennia of pilgrimage on the various routes to Santiago. Across history and through many periods of history, we pilgrims have persevered on the Camino de Santiago.

Millions have gone before, and millions will likely follow after. In that context, we are like grains of sand on a beach. Instead of the Camino being a punctuation point to my entire life, it is a part of my life's journey on the road to eternity. I consider that, on balance, as a fellow pilgrim, I am among good company, both in the here and now, and in the hereafter.

Does this make sense to anyone else?
Thank you for perceptive words. I observed and felt the same on my 2017 CF, when I was 60. I am ready to go back and learn and listen more. We are of the ages, if we are open.
 

kalavati

One more time!
Camino(s) past & future
May (2014), Camino Frances, SJPdP 28 April. to Muxia
May (2016)- Again,better rain gear
#90
My additional 2 cents worth on walking/hiking poles. I'm 71, (yes the photo is recent, and I don't dye my hair). I use the rubber tips and they work fine, stability wise.(The clicking bothers me!) When a rough downhill comes, I just slip the tips in my pocket!

My other concern, was the buddy request, because I'm not your typical 71 yr. old! I'm small,(5'1") healthy and strong. I want a buddy who is also there! : ) Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2018
#91
Go for it! I'll be 73 and this is my first. Where's Jose? He wrote in a thread earlier when he was 75 and he did his first. Now, he serves others in albergues each year and wants to do another. He took 45 days. You can do it!
 

MICK1970

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planed walk
#92
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I walked the Camino Portugal and met a few Septu/Octoagenarians on the walk, who walked the same route as me and we're only a hour behind me at end of each day. There was also a fella doing it with/on a donkey. Go for it.
 

Janade

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(May 2018)
#93
I walked with a woman in her 70's on my Camino. I should say I "tried" to walk with that woman - she outpaced me!
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#95
During my times volunteering at a children's home in India, the children were always asking my age. My response was, "How old would you be if you didn't know how old you were?". We had much fun with it. They still don't know. The game continues. If it is in your heart to go, listen to your heart. I am happy to be in the company of the 80+ group on this very special forum. And, if all goes as I hope, I will volunteer at the Pilgrim Office next May, after another walk. Go for it.Pilgrims are ageless.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 5 Sept - 25 Oct/2017
Starting to feel the itch again...
#96
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
Go for it! You wanna die in a recliner or do what you love?
 

MaryLP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago - May 2014
St. Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona - Starting September 27, 2015
#98
I walked my last Camino in 2013. I carried a minimalist pack, less than 4 kilos. Now like many pillgrams, I long to return. I'm 74 years old, in pretty good shape, but wonder if it's just a day dream. I speak reasonable Spanish, and can mime my way with Italian and Portuguese. Looking at the ways in Portugal and Italy, but like just about everybody, don't like tarmac which seems from my readings, more prevalent on those caminos. Any advice most welcome.
I started hiking the Camino at 65. I’ve made several trips including hiking the Napoleon route at 69. I’m 71 and still have a bit to go. I found that hiking religiously four to five miles three times a week, including some steep uphill climbs, for about a month was adequate preparation. I diD use a knee brace and poles on steep portions. I rested and hydrated when necessary and sent my heavier luggage ahead. These trips and the anticipation of them are inspirational to me. Go for it.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#99
I absolutely agree on the Hoka shoes! And the trekking poles. But not the rubber tips, I would never trust poles with rubber tips either up or down. The pigs are to help you to a fast grip, the rubber never does. So if the sounds of clacking poles bother you put them away when you do not need them for climbing up or down.
If it bother other peregrinos they can slow down or speed up.
In the crowds on the camino these days the sound of poles is not the most disturbing noise.
Rubber tip covers that easily slip on and off mean that one can have the best of both worlds. The metal tips are more likely to slip when used on paved or concrete surfaces and on cobbles. The metal tips give a surer purchase when used on natural surfaces. I keep the rubber tip covers in a hip belt pocket so that I can quickly put them on or take them off as is appropriate.
 

backpack45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
You are definitely not too old--it just depends on your health, fitness, and level of determination. Ralph (82) and I (77) having been doing various Camino routes all but 3 years since the Frances in 2001. I wrote a book about walking the Norte and Primitivo, which we did in 2015-2016. We are sort of "purists" about it, so we carry our own packs and with a few minor exceptions, have walked the routes in their entirety. (Not judging, just saying what we do,) We are always looking forward to our next Camino explorations--might return to do more of the Vezelay, but undecided at this point. Meanwhile, we are enjoying doing a local challenge called the "Nifty Ninety Peaks" doing 90 high points/peaks/summits throughout the S.F. Bay Area. We find that it's super important for us to do "training" walks throughout the year.
 

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