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What to do with extra time?

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
When booking my round trip flights from the American Northwest to Paris so I can walk Camino del Norte July/August, I gave myself way too much time. I've heard del Norte is difficult this is why the extra time. However, I walked CF in 34 days so I'm now confident I can walk del Norte in 5 weeks as well. This leaves me with a little over two weeks extra time.

I am on a serious pilgrims budget and can only stay in Europe if I am walking. I have thought about flying to Italy and walking part of the Via Francigena. Hmmm, yay or nay?

I've considered volunteering but have read you need to give them a 15 day window and that cuts things close as I'm not sure of the exact dates arriving in Santiago.

Any suggestions and advice as to what I can do on a pilgrims budget in two weeks is much appreciated.
 

lt56ny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
I think the Norte is more difficult than the CF. It is also a little longer. It will probably take you a little longer than walking the CF. You can always walk to Finisterre and to Muxia. That could take you for or more days. I have also heard that the Camino Ingles is really pretty. I have never walked that one but I have heard it is really pretty. It is about 120K so you have that choice too. If you have the time as Trecile mentioned doing the Portuguese Camino from Porto. That is really nice. You have a choice of an inland route or the coastal route. The biggest issue on the Portuguese route is the road walking. I have never walked the coastal route but I think there is a lot less road walking on that one. There are a lot of nice towns and walking along the coast of the Norte is beautiful. You could just take your time and enjoy the tranquility and beauty that the Norte gives us.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I would not write off the volunteering prospects. If you are interested in doing it, let those albergue/refugio you are interested in working know that you are available during July/August. There are alway volunteers canceling on them at the last minute and in the worst case it might mean you make a major change in your route and have to take a bus to fill in for someone.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
First; walk the del Norte more slowly. Shoot for 20km days. If you're in albergues, always offer to help out-- it's a good habit. They may even ask you to stay for a day or two. Then, as others suggest, walk to Muxia-- there's a few more days. And, rather than pay plane fare to Italy, take the bus to La Coruna and walk the Inglese. Another option is to find a room in a small seacoast town for a week and enjoy Spanish life, eating in the local manner (Spaniards are careful about their expenditures)-- if you're careful, it will certainly be less expensive than flying to Italy.

But as you go along, you may find that the remoter albergues may need a volunteer. It can't hurt to keep your eyes open.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
First; walk the del Norte more slowly. Shoot for 20km days. If you're in albergues, always offer to help out-- it's a good habit. They may even ask you to stay for a day or two. Then, as others suggest, walk to Muxia-- there's a few more days. And, rather than pay plane fare to Italy, take the bus to La Coruna and walk the Inglese. Another option is to find a room in a small seacoast town for a week and enjoy Spanish life, eating in the local manner (Spaniards are careful about their expenditures)-- if you're careful, it will certainly be less expensive than flying to Italy.

But as you go along, you may find that the remoter albergues may need a volunteer. It can't hurt to keep your eyes open.
I like your way of thinking. Take my time, volunteer along the way and walk to Fisterra and Muxia. I visited them during 2013 but didn't walk it. I'm pretty sure this is my last Camino in Spain, might as well do it right. This year I may just do that (walk to the end of the world) and if time still allows I may recoup in a small coastal villa in a private room for a few days. I can do this with the flight money to Italy. 🆒 YAY!!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
I like your way of thinking. Take my time, volunteer along the way and walk to Fisterra and Muxia. I visited them during 2013 but didn't walk it. I'm pretty sure this is my last Camino in Spain, might as well do it right. This year I may just do that and if time still allows I may recoup in a small coastal villa in a private room for a few days. I can do this with the flight money to Italy. 🆒 YAY!!
There are really nice beaches on the Norte. Just stop and enjoy the scenery. And, I think it is much harder than the CF.
 

Jim

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006- Camino Portuguese
2008- Camino Frances
2009- Sanabres extension of the VDLP
2010- Camino Frances
2011- Camino Potuguese
2014- Camino Frances
2017- Camino Finisterre
Having walked part of the Via Francigena in Italy— I wouldn’t consider it if needing to be in a strict budget. It’s a lively walk but much more expensive to do than any of the routes in Spain. I would vote for a slower walk each day on the Norte and if time left over, you could be the judge of how many more days you would need to walk and arrange a start point on the Portuguese or Ingles routes accordingly (Porto, Valenca do Minho, Pontevedra and Padron are particularly nice towns with things of cultural/spiritual interest to see). If you had not gone out to BOTH Finisterre and Muxia, that’s another worthwhile option as several others have said.
 

Dave

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 2002; most recent: Via Podiensis 2015
Detour onto the Camino Lebaniego after Serdio! There's a full albergue system in place and Santo Toribio is a major pilgrimage site.

I would also recommend exploring a walk from San Andrés de Teixido back to Santiago, or perhaps the opposite--following Santiago to Ferrol on the Inglés in reverse and then proceeding onward to Teixido as a final pilgrimage. You'd have albergues up through Neda and then have to pay a bit more, but it's a great spot.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
There are really nice beaches on the Norte. Just stop and enjoy the scenery. And, I think it is much harder than the CF.
I do love the beach. I grew up in SoCal where the beach was my backyard. Sounds so lovely.

Harder? In what way? Now my old bones are really nervous. LOL
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
Remember the walk between St Jean and Orisson? The first week of the Norte it's like doing that every day - more than once. 😊
I sure do YIKES!! :eek: Good thing I have some great places to train once we dry up. Table Rock is a good one because it's pretty steep but there are more to help get me in some sort of condition. Trails are too muddy right now. February sure put a wrench in my outdoor activities. Rain Rain Go Away!!

 
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FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
I don't disagree with any of the suggestions, but if you want to extend your walking, there are some great coastal alternatives. For example, instead of walking Santander to Santillana on the road, as the camino takes you, you could take the long way around along the coast, which is beautiful. It would be easy to add a day this way. Other coastal options here:
Thank you peregrina2000, I have seen your list and am so excited to go these coastal routes. Thank you so much for putting it together. I just hope I can figure it out while I'm out there. Anything to keep me off of the asphalt as much as possible. Thank you! :)
 

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPP - SDC (2013)
CP Porto - Finisterre (Coastal & Spiritual Variant) 2016
Norte Irun-Muxia 2018
Perhaps the answer to the question is another question. Is the objective to get from point A to B or is it the journey that get you to B? If the journey is at least as important as the end point and you have the time why not take that privilege to explore the villages, towns and cities, museums, churches, natural wonders you will walk through. Lots of trekkers just don't have the time to stop and really take in these places. As others
have stated, try to use the coastal alternatives, they are spectacular and yes the Norte first two weeks is like the first day of the France' over and over.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
If you had not gone out to BOTH Finisterre and Muxia, that’s another worthwhile option as several others have said.
Thanks Jim! I have decided to not look any further into going to Italy at least during this trip. I won't go to Portugal either. I will remain in Spain and relish in all she has to offer while saving on transportation costs. I have been to Finisterre and Muxia in 2013 via bus. I didn't go in 2016. The plan is to walk it this time, God willing of course. Thanks again! :)
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
As an extra you could travel from Oviedo to Leon and then walk back to Oviedo on the very beautifull Camino Salvador. It would take you 5 or 6 days.
Hi Antonius, thanks for the suggestion, I'm sure it is a lovely walk however I shy away from motorized transportation while on the Camino. 👣 :)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Via Tolosana
Thanks Jim! I have decided to not look any further into going to Italy at least during this trip. I won't go to Portugal either. I will remain in Spain and relish in all she has to offer while saving on transportation costs. I have been to Finisterre and Muxia in 2013 via bus. I didn't go in 2016. The plan is to walk it this time, God willing of course. Thanks again! :)
I agree doing a bit of the Via Francigena would not be a good idea this time round.
As well as Finisterre and Muxía, consider walking the camino inglés, it looks like you’ll have time for both.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I was offered multiple times to stay at an Albergue for volunteering. Lovely idea. You could do the walk then from Santiago in reverse toward the south coast or take the Portugués. I found Portugal less expensive the pan Spain.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Thanks Jim! I have decided to not look any further into going to Italy at least during this trip. I won't go to Portugal either. I will remain in Spain and relish in all she has to offer while saving on transportation costs. I have been to Finisterre and Muxia in 2013 via bus. I didn't go in 2016. The plan is to walk it this time, God willing of course. Thanks again! :)
On my first Camino I walked to Finisterre in 3 days, despite having the worst cold that I had had in decades. On my second Camino I had plenty of time, so I walked to Muxia in 4 days, and then split the walk from Muxia to Finisterre into two days, spending the night in Lires, where there is a beautiful beach - so that's 6 days right there. And you can walk back to Santiago if you like too.
 
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino Vasco interior
Another proposal as a contrast to the Norte.

Leave the Camino del Norte for four days and walk the Camino Lebaniego/Vadiniense to the Monastery Santo Toribio, a National Monument, and may be one day further to Fuente De in the Picos de Europa.

The Lebaniego/Vadiniense separates in Serdio, ca. 8km behind San Vicente de Barquera, from the Norte and leads through breathtaking landscapes.It´s from Serdio to Fuente De around 85km.

For the way back, I would ask for a bus from Fuente De/Espinama back to the coast.

It could be a welcome change for you, and, as you have enough time, you would miss something really special - the fantastic way and the monastery. Think about it ;)
 

brian560

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, VdlP 2016, Fishermans Walk, Sultan's Trail (2017), Portugese and el Norte (2018)
When booking my round trip flights from the American Northwest to Paris so I can walk Camino del Norte July/August, I gave myself way too much time. I've heard del Norte is difficult this is why the extra time. However, I walked CF in 34 days so I'm now confident I can walk del Norte in 5 weeks as well. This leaves me with a little over two weeks extra time.

I am on a serious pilgrims budget and can only stay in Europe if I am walking. I have thought about flying to Italy and walking part of the Via Francigena. Hmmm, yay or nay?

I've considered volunteering but have read you need to give them a 15 day window and that cuts things close as I'm not sure of the exact dates arriving in Santiago.

Any suggestions and advice as to what I can do on a pilgrims budget in two weeks is much appreciated.
Walk the Portugesr Coastal camino. nice scenery, good food, no hills.
 

Chrisp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2014
EPW: 2015
Portuguese Camino: 2016
TMB: 2016
Rota Vicentina: 2017
VF: 2018
Having walked part of the Via Francigena in Italy— I wouldn’t consider it if needing to be in a strict budget. It’s a lively walk but much more expensive to do than any of the routes in Spain. I would vote for a slower walk each day on the Norte and if time left over, you could be the judge of how many more days you would need to walk and arrange a start point on the Portuguese or Ingles routes accordingly (Porto, Valenca do Minho, Pontevedra and Padron are particularly nice towns with things of cultural/spiritual interest to see). If you had not gone out to BOTH Finisterre and Muxia, that’s another worthwhile option as several others have said.
You
Having walked part of the Via Francigena in Italy— I wouldn’t consider it if needing to be in a strict budget. It’s a lively walk but much more expensive to do than any of the routes in Spain. I would vote for a slower walk each day on the Norte and if time left over, you could be the judge of how many more days you would need to walk and arrange a start point on the Portuguese or Ingles routes accordingly (Porto, Valenca do Minho, Pontevedra and Padron are particularly nice towns with things of cultural/spiritual interest to see). If you had not gone out to BOTH Finisterre and Muxia, that’s another worthwhile option as several others have said.
You took the words right out of my mouth 😊
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
On my first Camino I walked to Finisterre in 3 days, despite having the worst cold that I had had in decades. On my second Camino I had plenty of time, so I walked to Muxia in 4 days, and then split the walk from Muxia to Finisterre into two days, spending the night in Lires, where there is a beautiful beach - so that's 6 days right there. And you can walk back to Santiago if you like too.
Yes, so many options. I am truly blessed. 😊
 
Camino(s) past & future
I am walking in March and April of 2019.
When booking my round trip flights from the American Northwest to Paris so I can walk Camino del Norte July/August, I gave myself way too much time. I've heard del Norte is difficult this is why the extra time. However, I walked CF in 34 days so I'm now confident I can walk del Norte in 5 weeks as well. This leaves me with a little over two weeks extra time.

I am on a serious pilgrims budget and can only stay in Europe if I am walking. I have thought about flying to Italy and walking part of the Via Francigena. Hmmm, yay or nay?

I've considered volunteering but have read you need to give them a 15 day window and that cuts things close as I'm not sure of the exact dates arriving in Santiago.

Any suggestions and advice as to what I can do on a pilgrims budget in two weeks is much appreciated
U can check helpx, it's a great site for volunteer positions all over the world. You can find something for a shorter time.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
U can check helpx, it's a great site for volunteer positions all over the world. You can find something for a shorter time.
Thanks you! I will surely look into it. Have a blessed day. :)👣
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
Perhaps the answer to the question is another question. Is the objective to get from point A to B or is it the journey that get you to B? If the journey is at least as important as the end point and you have the time why not take that privilege to explore the villages, towns and cities, museums, churches, natural wonders you will walk through. Lots of trekkers just don't have the time to stop and really take in these places. As others
have stated, try to use the coastal alternatives, they are spectacular and yes the Norte first two weeks is like the first day of the France' over and over.
Of course I love the journey however, I tend to put my head down and focus on the goal. I am not competitive by nature and will try hard to not do the "race for a bed" since I have plenty of time but I am on a budget so staying in anything other then an alburgue regularly could be a strain on my funds. I always want to go out and explore but I don't speak Spanish. I don't venture off too far unless I have someone to explore with. The CF provides you with a Camino family, I've read it's a little different on del Norte. Have you found this to be true?

Now I am super nervous about the first week or so, you say two weeks? YIKES!! The good news, I still have plenty of time to train just so long as we dry up and I can get on our many trails.

Thanks for your motivation. :)👣
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
The CF provides you with a Camino family, I've read it's a little different on del Norte. Have you found this to be true?
Although there are no where near the same number of pilgrims on the Norte, there are enough that people form groups or "families". Of course that depends on your personality - and theirs. I was part of several different groups on the Norte, as people came and went. In July/August you will have to plan your accommodations a lot more then on the Frances. I didn't want to end up on an albergue floor, so I ended up staying in private rooms more than I would have liked, because I didn't want to stress about a bed at the end of the day.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
Although there are no where near the same number of pilgrims on the Norte, there are enough that people form groups or "families". Of course that depends on your personality - and theirs. I was part of several different groups on the Norte, as people came and went. In July/August you will have to plan your accommodations a lot more then on the Frances. I didn't want to end up on an albergue floor, so I ended up staying in private rooms more than I would have liked, because I didn't want to stress about a bed at the end of the day.
I am praying for the right pilgrims for me to come along. Although I love to walk the trail alone at the end of the day I will surely want the company of others. My first Camino provided that naturally, my second I wasn't so fortunate. It was a struggle for me.

I don't mind sleeping on the floor (hopefully with a mattress) in an alburgue, for me that is part of the experience. I might change my mind after the first few days, YIKES!!. ;)👣 I will continue to believe the Camino will provide. Thanks so much!!
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
I echo many of the statements above.
  1. - Norte is longer.
  2. - Norte (without question) is more physically difficult.
  3. - Norte is more expensive.
  4. - Norte has fewer Pilrgrims.
Take your time, plot out your daily kilometers (miles), volunteer at several albergues/hostels and use them as your rest days to recuperate from the numerous hills/mountains you will be encountering along your trip.
Just my experience and opinion.
Buen camino!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I don't mind sleeping on the floor (hopefully with a mattress) in an alburgue
Not on a mattress. I never saw anyone who had to use a sleeping pad on the floor of an albergue on the Frances, but did several times on the Norte. That's why it's more important to plan to arrive early at some of the towns with limited albergues. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen. I'm not trying to make you nervous, but you do need to be a little more prepared on the Norte. From my recollection, some towns with small/limited albergues were Lezama, Castro Urdiales, and Comillas. Ribadesella is a large town, and has no pilgrim albergues. There is a youth hostel, but in the summer it also serves as a surf school, so is usually fully booked. 5.27 km past Ribadesella is an albergue in San Esteban de Leces. I walked almost 30 km in the rain to Ribadesella, so I didn't push on.
Although I love to walk the trail alone at the end of the day I will surely want the company of others.
Other than a couple of times that I stayed in a private room in a larger town away from other pilgrims, I always had someone to hang out and have dinner with at the end of the day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 5, 2013
CF June 5, 2015
CF June 3, 2017
Remember the walk between St Jean and Orisson? The first week of the Norte it's like doing that every day - more than once. 😊
Oh my. I can walk 40k on relatively flat or even downhill but the climb out of SJPP kicked my butt. Uphill is my nemesis and I'm planning del Norte for June. I better start training for hills asap. Ugh.
 

Redvespablur

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo April/May 2016
Voie Littorale May 2020
You might consider starting in France and walking The Voie Litoralle (coastal route) from Soulac sur Mer to Irun.

Please do and write about it as we are doing this route then on to Bilbao spring 2020 as a partial encore to our 2016 Norte/Primitivo.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
You might consider starting in France and walking The Voie Litoralle (coastal route) from Soulac sur Mer to Irun.

Please do and write about it as we are doing this route then on to Bilbao spring 2020 as a partial encore to our 2016 Norte/Primitivo.
I had thought about starting in France but wasn’t sure where that would equal about 7 days walking before Irun. I’ll look into this. Thanks!!
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
When booking my round trip flights from the American Northwest to Paris so I can walk Camino del Norte July/August, I gave myself way too much time. I've heard del Norte is difficult this is why the extra time. However, I walked CF in 34 days so I'm now confident I can walk del Norte in 5 weeks as well. This leaves me with a little over two weeks extra time.

I am on a serious pilgrims budget and can only stay in Europe if I am walking. I have thought about flying to Italy and walking part of the Via Francigena. Hmmm, yay or nay?

I've considered volunteering but have read you need to give them a 15 day window and that cuts things close as I'm not sure of the exact dates arriving in Santiago.

Any suggestions and advice as to what I can do on a pilgrims budget in two weeks is much appreciated.
Many great options have been suggested. We walked the Norte/Primativo in April/May 2017 and while the first part was steep at times the scenery is so spectacular it’s worth it (I was 73 at the time). I wish we had taken the time to go to San Toribio, someone we walked with did and loved it. Outside of Ribadesella there are the Cuevas de Tito Bustillo. Unbelievable cave paintings. You have to make a reservation so we ended up staying in Villaviciosa a couple of days and busing back to them. Also just outside Ribadesella are dinosaur footprints down on the ocean. It’s a great couple of hour walk up to the right of the Camino just across the bridge. There are more further on too, as well as the Dinosaur Museum. So maybe spend an extra 52140day around there. Also La Playa des Catedrales. DONT miss it even if you have to wait around for low tide. From there we walked east along the coast for about 15 miles or so. Mainly flat and really pretty. We were on the Camino for parts I think. We backtracked along part of the Norte after doing the Portugues this past fall to go there. Another bit we did was the Camino dos Faros which goes from Laxe to Camarinas. Beautiful scenery, lodging was a bit hard to find, but we always did. So take your time and see where you go. Sorry this is so long - Cherry
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
@cherrys Everything sounds so good. I definitely want to do the Cathedrals.....WOW!! Can’t wait. Thanks for all your suggestions. :D👣
 

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPP - SDC (2013)
CP Porto - Finisterre (Coastal & Spiritual Variant) 2016
Norte Irun-Muxia 2018
Of course I love the journey however, I tend to put my head down and focus on the goal. I am not competitive by nature and will try hard to not do the "race for a bed" since I have plenty of time but I am on a budget so staying in anything other then an alburgue regularly could be a strain on my funds. I always want to go out and explore but I don't speak Spanish. I don't venture off too far unless I have someone to explore with. The CF provides you with a Camino family, I've read it's a little different on del Norte. Have you found this to be true?

Now I am super nervous about the first week or so, you say two weeks? YIKES!! The good news, I still have plenty of time to train just so long as we dry up and I can get on our many trails.

Thanks for your motivation. :)👣
In my experience last fall there was certainly Camino family around. Even in those large cities when there was no specfiic pilgrim albergue I would see other pilgrims staying in the same hostels or pensiones. You may just be spread out more than the other Caminos but at rest, coffee, wine/beer stops you will certainly see other pilgrims. It gave everyone the space to experience their own Camino during the day and the comfort of friends in the evenings, I really liked that aspect compared to the more crowded trails. I found pilgrims a bit more reserved on the Norte. I think this is so because for most it was not their first Camino so there is not as much greeting activity going on and they are more inward looking in the experience. I don't speak Spanish other than enough to be polite and order the necessities but don't let that keep you from getting on a bus or taxi to see some sights if you inclined. The people are very helpful and you will get by, Just point on your map or show them an address. Enjoy the journey, it's a great Camino and will be a great accomplishment that will stay with you forever.
 

Rondimc

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future (2017)
When booking my round trip flights from the American Northwest to Paris so I can walk Camino del Norte July/August, I gave myself way too much time. I've heard del Norte is difficult this is why the extra time. However, I walked CF in 34 days so I'm now confident I can walk del Norte in 5 weeks as well. This leaves me with a little over two weeks extra time.

I am on a serious pilgrims budget and can only stay in Europe if I am walking. I have thought about flying to Italy and walking part of the Via Francigena. Hmmm, yay or nay?

I've considered volunteering but have read you need to give them a 15 day window and that cuts things close as I'm not sure of the exact dates arriving in Santiago.

Any suggestions and advice as to what I can do on a pilgrims budget in two weeks is much appreciated.
Take all the time you can on the Norte! Our biggest regret when we walked it (42 days) was that we did not take the time to savour the areas we loved. We pushed on and regretted the fact we did not take longer to walk some areas. What's the rush really, if you have an extra two weeks? The Picos of Europe would be a spot to spend a few extra days.
 

FourSeasons

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Sept/Oct 2013
CF April/May 2016
del Norte (July/August 2019)
Take all the time you can on the Norte! Our biggest regret when we walked it (42 days) was that we did not take the time to savour the areas we loved. We pushed on and regretted the fact we did not take longer to walk some areas. What's the rush really, if you have an extra two weeks? The Picos of Europe would be a spot to spend a few extra days.
Wow! The Picos of Europe are spectacular. Is it directly off the Camino? I’m hoping to stay away from modern transportation as much as possible while walking. I’m still on pilgrimage, I really don’t want to turn into a tourist.
 

Rondimc

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future (2017)
Wow! The Picos of Europe are spectacular. Is it directly off the Camino? I’m hoping to stay away from modern transportation as much as possible while walking. I’m still on pilgrimage, I really don’t want to turn into a tourist.
The easiest place on the Norte to access the Picos I'd from Llanes. Great town with a nice Albergue. I think most people take a short bus ride from Llanes to get to the area. There are some accomadations there, but not sure of quality or price. Friends of ours did the side trip for a few days and raved about it.
 
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