A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

See the full Camino Forum Store here with many more camino products.

Which size rucksack?

pookiebear2002

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future not sure when, but want to walk it all probably alone as difficult getting someone to come
Can any one advise me which is the size ruck sack in liters do most people take walking the Camino?
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Camino Portuguese november 2019
Around 40 liters.

Please go to an outdoor store with a good reputation and try multiple bags and find the one comfortable for you!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
40 L to 35L, get it fitted by a professional and then cinch and re-cinch every morning making sure your hips are taking up a portion of the load, the use of poles will greatly reduce the feeling of the weight on your body.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
*** Paging Mr Bugg ***

(Could someone check if Dave is OK? Usually he’d be on this faster than a tramp on chips, as my late grandmother used to say)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
For me, 36 liters is perfect. I have used several backpacks ranging from 32 liters to 36 liters, which gives me enough room that I don't feel like I'm putting together a puzzle every time I load my pack.
 

FSP

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(13)
Portuguese & Finisterre(16)
Norte & Muxia(18)
Olvidado&Salvador&Primitivo(20??)
Never buy a pack and then figure out after what you are going to put in it. Gather what you honestly really need to be safe and comfortable eg. 2 shirts, 2 shorts, 2 socks, etc. Keep it minimal, you can always buy stuff along the way if there is something you really need. Now, put that stuff in a plastic sack and visit a good quality outdoor equipment store. Tell them what you are doing, the type of surface (mostly groomed trail if you are on the France route). They will advise you on your options, best size etc and then you can plunk your bag of stuff into a few packs and try them out. Best of luck and enjoy the journey when it comes.
Frank

PS. great name you picked.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
As @FSP says, put your stuff in a bag and go rucksack shopping. See what size you need to fit your stuff.
Above all, pick one that is comfortable.
Depending how much 'stuff' you plan on carrying, and the accommodation type you plan to use, you are likely to require a bag of 25-40 L.
 
Last edited:

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Can any one advise me which is the size ruck sack in liters do most people take walking the Camino?
I have developed some rules of thumb, but my first observation is that pack weight and capacity are loosely related. The bigger you are, the larger pack size you will need. My rule of thumb is that a suitable start point for looking at packs is to take your walking weight in kg, halve that and that is roughly the size of pack you will need in litres for a late spring to early autumn camino. For the average American male, that works out at around 45 li, for Britain, about 40 li. Averages for women are slightly less, so you could think about 40li and 35 li respectively.

Be honest though. Half of us are going to be over the average, and are likely to need something larger.

There are other factors that influence pack size, and you will find many resources on the web. The Complete Walker IV is my goto reference, but there are now many web-based resources. Remember these are providing advice for multi-day bushwalkers - hikers that will need things that you would normally be unlikely to need on the camino. But the principles are still valid. Some people will be more cold or heat tolerant, might be able to afford the high prices of really lightweighct gear, etc, and will have more or less weight to carry.

Further, not everyone walks in summer. The earlier you start or the later you plan to finish needs to be considered. Early spring and late autumn might require anything from 25% to 50% more as your weight allowance, and pack volume.

Once you have an idea about the size, confirm this by getting your gear together and weighing it. My rule of thumb is that you need about a litre of pack size for every 160-170 gm of gear for a summer camino load. If you need much more than you calculated with my first rule of thumb, you might want to rethink your packing list. There are plenty of people here who will willingly help you with that. If you are prepared to buy a really light pack, you can add a little, depending on how much you are prepared to spend on really light gear. Think about adding up to 15 gm/li, ie up to 185 gm/li for a summer load.

Now you are ready to visit an outdoors retailer with your gear in hand (or a big plastic bag!) and actually try out some packs. Don't be tempted to stuff everything in until it is so tight that you cannot easily get the next item into the pack. Amongst other things you will want to carry some food and water in addition to your bare load, which is what we have been discussing so far, so some space will be needed for that. I personally count on those items occupying around 3-4 litres of pack space at the beginning of the day if I am carrying two litres of water, and a food bag with snacks, bread, cheese, chorizo, etc. You can hang some of this on the outside of your pack, but I try and avoid that.

Good luck with your pack hunting.

Postscript: Remember that the items that you are walking in don't need to be packed. So if you follow @FSP's advice earlier, only one set of clothing needs to be packed. There is a trap here. I once met a pilgrim at the start of the CI with the most wonderfully small pack that he had carried on as cabin baggage. It looked as tight as a drum. But to achieve that he was wearing all his warm and wet-weather gear. Pretty clearly he had no room left inside the pack, and would have had to drape or hang these items outside the pack when he didn't need to wear them. I avoid that.
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I have developed some rules of thumb, but my first observation is that pack weight and capacity are loosely related. The bigger you are, the larger pack size you will need. My rule of thumb is that a suitable start point for looking at packs is to take your walking weight in kg, have that and that is roughly the size of pack you will need in litres for a late spring to early autumn camino. For the average American male, that works out at around 45 li, for Britain, about 40 li. Averages for women are slightly less, so you could think about 40li and 35 li respectively.

Be honest though. Half of us are going to be over the average, and are likely to need something larger.

There are other factors that influence pack size, and you will find many resources on the web. The Complete Walker IV is my goto reference, but there are now many web-based resources. Remember these are providing advice for multi-day bushwalkers - hikers that will need things that you would normally be unlikely to need on the camino. But the principles are still valid. Some people will be more cold or heat tolerant, might be able to afford the high prices of really lightweighct gear, etc, and will have more or less weight to carry.

Further, not everyone walks in summer. The earlier you start or the later you plan to finish needs to be considered. Early spring and late autumn might require anything from 25% to 50% more as your weight allowance, and pack volume.

Once you have an idea about the size, confirm this by getting your gear together and weighing it. My rule of thumb is that you need about a litre of pack size for every 160-170 gm of gear for a summer camino load. If you need much more than you calculated with my first rule of thumb, you might want to rethink your packing list. There are plenty of people here who will willingly help you with that. If you are prepared to buy a really light pack, you can add a little, depending on how much you are prepared to spend on really light gear. Think about adding up to 15 gm/li, it up to 185 gm/li for a summer load.

Now you are ready to visit an outdoors retailer with you gear in hand (or a big plastic bag!) and actually try out some packs. Don't be tempted to stuff everything in until it is so tight that you cannot easily get the next item into the pack. Amongst other things you will want to carry some food and water in addition to your bare load, which is what we have been discussing so far, so some space will be needed for that. I personally count on those items occupying around 3-4 litres of pack space at the beginning of the day if I am carrying two litres of water, and a food bag with snacks, bread, cheese, chorizo, etc. You can hang some of this on the outside of your pack, but I try and avoid that.

Good luck with your pack hunting.
Great informative post!
 

pookiebear2002

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future not sure when, but want to walk it all probably alone as difficult getting someone to come
Hey all fellow members,
Thanks very much for all your comments and advice which was brilliant and very much appreciated.
There is so much to plan when doing this, you can’t just throw a load of things in the back of a pack and off you go!
Once again thank you one and all
 

DonCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 CN
2015 + 2016 VdlP
2017 CF + CN
2018 CP from Lisbon
2019 Salvador+Primitivo
Hmmm, hy @pookiebear2002,

first of all i fully agree with @FSP and @dougfitz.

AND: i used my beloved 66 liters Gossamer Gear G4, the great great grandfather of all ultralight packs: ~385 grams plus ~75 additional grams for the hip belt, almost ~470 grams (can be loaded with ~15 kgs) for the last 6 years on my Spanish and Portugues caminos. For the planned 2020 Camino de Levante i bought another one, 49 liters+, 615 grams (Hyberg Attila X), but mostly for optical reasons (the GG G4 looks a bit like a sack / baggy) and less gear over the years. (To be clear, i talk about frameless ultra light packs. Look for light packs and perpaps don‘t let you sell a pack, let‘s say with 2 - 2.8 kgs but 1 to 2 kgs with a frame).

I love to have enough space in the pack to let my sleeping bags loft (don‘t press them so hard for 4 weeks but giving them enough space and so a longer live!, whether Apex or Down) and have additional space for a bottle of wine, gifts, ...). With a roll top the size doesn‘t matter!

As you can see, the pack is not only a question of space but the solution can also be the weight of the pack itself. But, as mentioned before, after having selected / collected all your gear.

(>> Don‘t pack your fears, don‘t pack what you COULD need but only what you really need.<<)

Always a Buen Camino / Bom Caminho

DonCamino

(176 cm, 68 kg, April to end of October trips)

(the pack in the middle of three is mine ;-) but i guess, perhaps it has the most possible liters)
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Antonius Vaessen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte (to Sobrado)
2019 Norte again
Perhaps a things to consider is that albergues will have some new rules in the post covidtime. This will have influence on what you need to take with you in your backpack. For instance : there will be no blankets, so you will have to take a sleeping bag. If you want to eat in the albergue, perhaps you will have to take along your own plate, knife and so ons. I read somewhere that you have to have some extra hygienic stuff like gel and so on. You don't have to fill a pack up to the maximum.
Comfort is more important than the number of liters I think. If you are tall, a small backpack is not ideal
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
When we have gone with packs only, we both have used Ospreys 35l.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Can any one advise me which is the size ruck sack in liters do most people take walking the Camino?
Hi pookiebear2002,
Your question or similar questions are asked quite often and are always tricky to answer. Tricky because there are thousands of permutations and on here thousands of different answers and permutations.😂

You'll get many answers, much advice and sincerely meant guidance in your replies, the folks on here are special. Please, allow me offer this to the replies you will get. It may help and is offered only to try and help you.

Sort out the gear you ABSOLUTELY MUST take on your Camino. That means the things WITHOUT WHICH YOU COULD NOT WALK DAILY, EAT, SLEEP, BREATHE OR FEEL SAFE. It doesn't mean the things you might need or would like to have "just in case".

Once sorted, take that same gear to your chosen rucksack supplier, tell them what you are planning to do and what your budget is.
Ask them to measure you for a rucksack and recommend models.
Try on the recommended rucksacks with your gear in the rucksack.
Ask them to show you how to adjust the rucksack.
Walk around the shop for 10-15 minutes with each rucksack recommended. Choose the one you feel is the most comfortable within your budget.
Before buying ask if there is a "return policy if you change your mind" and feel a different rucksack would be better. Purchase your rucksack.
Go home, empty the pack and start training, building the weight slowly over a period of time.

Buen (rucksack-finding) Camino
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
I also agree with Dougfitz and FSP. I think you have to break things down to 3 things. The first is easy and applies to new pilgrims and old. The proper fit is essential. The second and third are easy answers for veterans and hard ones for new Pilgrims. As stated earlier I believe a taller and bigger person will be more comfortable with a larger pack. My first Camino I got a 45 liter pack from REI that fit perfectly and as the salesperson said, there is no law that you have to fill it up. Easier said than done. Now that I have walked 5 times and always with this same pack, I am petrified to change it. ;) The hardest part is knowing and having the security to take only the bare minimum and knowing that you can buy whatever you need as you walk. On my last Camino (a winter one) my pack with a liter of water weighed 7.9 kilos. (I am 6'2'' 1.89 and weigh about 205. I think that is about 94 kilos) That included a sleeping bag, sometimes and a little throw pillow, always. I have learned that my little pillow is essential for me as the pillows in most hotels and albergues would leave me contorted in pain. Stuffing clothes in sacks are not any better. So I need lots of room and my pack looks full but that is because I have very bulky but very light items. But you know what you never will know what will be right for you until you do it. I think the best advice for new walkers is to check out what you are taking about 5 times and keep asking yourself what is absolutely essential. Then remove something. Once you start walking if you have too much weight get rid of things and if necessary add them later. But the odds are the things you leave behind you never really needed.
 

c0484

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
Can any one advise me which is the size ruck sack in liters do most people take walking the Camino?
It depends on the person. I only carry 17-20 lbs of stuff, but I carry a large pack so that I can travel on aircraft with the walking sticks packed inside. TSA has never questioned it.
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
Smaller than you absolutely believe that you nee; but a general feel I g is that anything bigger than 40L is too big. 5 Litres either side of 30 will be fine depending on how ruthless you are. Ultreïa!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I'm a 66 year old, 190 pound, 6 ft. I used a 40l and it was too big. Determine what you need and get smaller.
@RRat, thank you for your candour in providing this information. I think that it is much more informative to the discussion on pack size to know these things. It allows others to make better first order comparisons than just letting us know how big your pack was.

The other information I think is useful in this context is the season one walked in. So many forum members seem to walk in in or close to summer - late spring to early autumn. Clothing and equipment weights and volumes will increase if one is going to be walking earlier in spring or later in autumn, or at least that is so for most people.

My experience in Spain is walking in mid-spring through to early summer. I am about 176 cm tall and can generally get down to about 90 kg for a pilgrimage walk - still under-height for my weight! My pack for my last three camino walks has been a 45+10 li pack.

I also know that I make gear selections that will add to the minimum pack volume that I know that I can achieve. For example:
  • a use a semi-rectangular sleeping bag because I find it difficult to sleep in a mummy bag. I also carry a liner and an inflatable pillow - plus 400-500 gm and a bit under 2 li.
  • in spring I carry mid-weight rain gear including a thigh length rain jacket, in summer I use much lighter gear - plus about 700 gm or around 4 li.
  • I still carry a camera and handheld GPS seperate from my mobile phone - plus perhaps 600 gm.
  • I use a 2 li bladder and a reserve of 500-750 ml in a seperate bottle, and in addition some puritabs. Thats 2.5 - 2.8 li in volume
  • in 2016 I carried a travel CPAP. In its protective case, it is about 4.75 li, and the hose assembly perhaps another litre
  • if I cannot sent it forward to the end point, I will also have my aircraft sanity kit - noise cancelling headphones, eye mask, extra earplugs and spare batteries. About 330 gm and 1.25 li in a protective case.
  • a couple of my medications are quite bulky, and carried in their original packaging, as they generally need to be for international travel, will take up another 2 li or so.
  • I haven't measured the extra volume of my wet bag because I need to take care of my dentures, and not just carry toothbrush and toothpaste.
Before any readers get tempted to tell me how I could avoid these things, please accept that these are my choices, not yours! My point is how quickly quite ordinary things one needs and wants to include in one's packing add to the volume required. As others have correctly pointed out, be very careful when it comes to what are 'wants' rather than genuine 'needs'. You will carry the extra every day until you decide you really can do without them.

This doesn't mean than one should ignore the maxim that to travel far, travel light. But if you are a bit older, and a bit heavier than you should be, and have some age related medical issues, then accept those limitations and you can still walk.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
There are a number of recent threads on this forum discussing the possibility of camping along the caminos. The pandemic has made it possible that albergues may have gone out of business, not have adequate sleeping space (with required social distancing) even if still open, or just might not be comfortable spaces for some pilgrims. I am not recommending camping, but if you decide to do so, you will need basic camping equipment, which will need space in your backpack.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I think that a comfortable fit (back length, strap position), as well as durability and colour is probably more important than Litre size. If it's too small things can be strapped to the outside if its too big you can cinch it smaller with a few straps, if it's the wrong colour you'll hate no matter what.
Personally I prefer a bag that's too big. A couple of webbing straps will compress it down to a small day pack size and feel when not carrying much and I don't have to worry how I'm going to carry that watermelon or salami, baguette and bottle of wine I've just bought. I've used an 80-100L canvas pack for 40 years, using it to carry everything from 100lb loads with things strapped to the outside, to a day sac with little more than a few sandwiches in and also as a survival bivvy on occasion.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I think that a comfortable fit (back length, strap position), as well as durability and colour is probably more important than Litre size. If it's too small things can be strapped to the outside if its too big you can cinch it smaller with a few straps, if it's the wrong colour you'll hate no matter what.
Personally I prefer a bag that's too big. A couple of webbing straps will compress it down to a small day pack size and feel when not carrying much and I don't have to worry how I'm going to carry that watermelon or salami, baguette and bottle of wine I've just bought. I've used an 80-100L canvas pack for 40 years, using it to carry everything from 100lb loads with things strapped to the outside, to a day sac with little more than a few sandwiches in and also as a survival bivvy on occasion.
@Dromengro. I agree with your comment about getting a comfortable fit, and I have some sympathy with the view that taking a slightly larger pack can be worthwhile. I addressed the issue of carrying food and water in my earlier post, but I must admit I did not contemplate carrying a watermelon! More power to you if you do!

My concern is how far this might go. Using your own example of carrying an 80-100 li canvas pack, I made a quick estimate of the extra weight this might involve. Modern canvas packs seem to range in weight from about 33 gm/li to 40 gm/li. I used the higher number in this case given that I expect your pack isn't built with modern fabrics. If one only needed 45 litres, and carried an 85 litre pack, this would be an extra 1600 gm for a pack of equivalent construction. But using more modern materials one can get packs that are under 15 gm/li. Using a slightly more conservative 20 gm/li for the calculation, the weight saving would be a pretty massive 2500 gm.

So while I do think that including food and water in the calculation is essential, adding any significant volume allowance above that needs to be done with caution.

Of course, if one already has a pack, and the extra impost is not too great, then it might be unreasonable to go out and buy a new pack just to get the size exactly right. Otherwise, I would advise being cautious about this.

NB Edited to make the calculations consistent. I had originally done some of them on the basis of a particular pack, not on a specific weight to volume ratio.
 
Last edited:

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I made a quick estimate of the extra weight this might involve. Modern canvas packs seem to range in weight from about 33 gm/li to 40 gm/li.
@dougfitz It never ceases to amaze me the calculations some people do. :)
Obviously I wouldn't recommend going overly large, no one really needs a 80L+ but having a bit extra room comes in handy rather than having it so tightly packed that you've no room for extras. something around 5 to 10L extra is probably enough. And a 30 - 40L bag is probably around average.
My old bag weighs 2000gms. Strangely there was a period after the 80s when rucsacs started getting heavier as they started adding padding, pockets, straps, bells and whistles, so some of the older simpler large packs are not as heavy as you might think, usually around 1-1.5kg. I've often used old canvas east european ex-army bags that probably weigh less than most "lightweight" modern bags.
A larger bag doesn't necessarily mean that it's heavier either as there can be big differences between brands, or materials used. Most of the weight on modern bags is in the shoulder straps, padding, waist belt buckles, zips etc which is around the same no matter the size and a small strip of extra material to make it bigger probably doesn't weigh that much, e.g osprey levity45/830g, levity65/868g 38g heavier for 20Litres extra and the same price. Exped50/1584g, Exped70/1600g 16g for 20L extra.
Plus some bags sit better and can carry the load better than others and make the load feel lighter.
Anyway that's enough calculations for me, usually I just like the look of the bag first then decide what I'm going to fit in it after, which I'm sure is not the way to do it.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
I went to REI and after trying on couple of bags came up with Gregory Zulu 40l which felt most comfortable to me.
Reading and re-reading many threads here l decided to drop it down a notch so what I ultimately bought was same brand/model but 35l
This week I stuffed it to the hilt using things I plan to take on Camino and then just filled the rest with bunch of t-shirts
Weight came at about 16lbs so that's like what, 9kg?....
Did just a couple of 8 miles hikes on mixed terrain trails. Feel very comfortable so far (and probably should mention that the temps are in mid-90s and it's humid) so hopefully with less weight and perhaps more favorable weather it will work just fine for me when the True Walk commence
Whatever you ultimately settle on - Good luck and Buen Camino
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
Depending of what time of year you are walking: 30-50l

I had a well fitting low-cost/ultralight rucksack 36l from meteor (afaik OEM for decathlon) expandable up to 42l and never used the 36l to full extend but walked in high summer in July '19.

After shopping in Porto at the end of my Camino francès it was almost filled ;-)
It fits into the overhead-compartment of almost all airplanes. No need to check it in.

HTH

BC
Roland
 

Harland2019

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April/May "2019"
And now for something different - sorry it is so long!
I am 6'3" tall (1.9 metres) and weigh 15 stone 8 pounds i.e. 98.9 kilos aged 73. I walked the Camino Frances last year with a Lowe Alpine AirZone 35+10 and that was fine although I stayed in hostels and I did transport some stuff daily. I took more on the trip than I needed but that was in the knowledge that I was going to transport some and I was concerned that my lack of any other language apart from English and walking in different temperatures than I was used to could prove a problem - it didn't. Most of my stuff/equipment I have had since 2003 but I bought what I wanted at the time rather than the lightest. All my walking had previously been in the UK carrying everything daily, including walking the 630 mile South West Coast Path, but using a Lowe Alpine Frontier 65+15. I know that is enormous compared to what others are reporting but it fits like a glove with adjustable back length, well padded shoulder straps and waist strap. The difference in weight between the two is c. 1 kilo. I am planning/hoping to walk the same route again in 2022 but taking the 65+15 - I won't fill it up but I am big so my clothes are big, currently my first attempt is 10.7 kilos including the sac and all my wet weather gear as I prefer to walk in just shorts and T shirt. I know that I can reduce that weight by about a kilo, that is excluding water and a limited amount of food. So to summarise I will be taking a much bigger sac than most, but it is easier to pack and find things with two side pockets (and 2 pockets in the top for small things that I want to get to quickly e.g. money) and more importantly I hardly feel the weight when it is properly adjusted with the weight mainly on my hips. If your rucksack supplier is local then get them to adjust it when you have packed it with everything you are taking. I had set my mind on the sac I wanted but the local supplier told me that it didn't fit my height so he guided (not sold) me to another but cheaper model. You need to find a good walking shop rather than the Internet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
Pookiebear I love your handle!

Don't forget to add extra space for carrying food like bread, oranges and chorizo.

It also depends on the season your are walking. In cold weather you will need more space for extra clothes and perhaps a warm sleeping bag.
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 195 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 321 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 23 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 369 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 154 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock