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Anyone have a favourite British Pilgrimage?

2020 Camino Guides

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Sadly, yes, I do know. And no, my pockets are not hugely deep. But I am good a pinching pennies so I can use them where I'd rather...
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Yes, @Togabogie, I'm considering that too. But I have a better sense of what's there - and am considering the train from continental EU, so GB (especially England) is easier.
 

MickMac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013
Frances 2016
Frances 2017
Frances 2018
Frances 2018
Ponferrada-Santiago
July 2019
V
New visa restrictions for England shortly Ireland wild Atlantic way better option.
 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
From experience I would avoid the North Downs Way as accommodation is extremely limited. Similarly, the South Downs way, although a lovely stroll, is surprisingly poorly supported by the way of accommodation on or near the trail. I have no direct experience of the others, although the SW Coastal path is a great walk.
 

roving_rufus

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013-2015) Camino Portugues from Lisbon (2017-2019) Via Francigena (2018-??)
I had planned to walk the St Cuthbert Way but had to cancel, and have not yet replanned that one. It means timing the crossing to Lindisfarne.
But I am hoping to get to the Dingle Way this year which has the benefit of also being a Camino route (Celtic Camino) (and for me not have to plan getting off the island). There is a mix of hostels and B&Bs
And if you have dates in mind it can sometimes be cheaper to fly rather than train (despite the environmental implications of train vs plane)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago planned for end April 2020
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
I know it's not a pilgrimage, but the Coast to Coast is a wonderful walk. It's about 300 K and takes anywhere from 9 days to about 14 days. I've walked it twice and will probably will again some time next year. good thing is you can camp most of the way if you choose.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
New visa restrictions for England shortly
Meaning? :eek:
(What, and when, is what I'm wondering...)

Thank you everyone...lots to digest!
Keep the ideas coming - I'm open to them all.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
Oh I think you must do St Cuthbert, it is one of the best 100km possible (outside Spain, claro, he adds hurriedly), taking in several fine abbeys, Walter Scott's gaff, Roman ruins and a road, glorious border countryside (the border I live on), the end of the Pennine Way, the magnificent rolling high empty Cheviot hills, the meanders of the Tweed and, best of all, the walk across the sands to holy Lindisfarne - take your boots off and walk barefoot at low tide across the sucking sands for the best (free) foot massage ever. Let me know when/if you're coming and stay at my place on the way there/back.

When I was still writing for the Guardian I did a few pieces on it:

 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
No Spain this year @VNwalking !! 😞

This one has intrigued me. Friends have walked part of it and said it was spectacular.


As mentioned above, it's the cost of accommodation on walks in Britain that are the sticking point. I haven't investigated but the recent thread from @peregrina2000 about accommodation support for Dave's walk across America made me wonder if there is a pilgrim accommodation network in the UK?
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hi there, @VNwalking


… here are some other gorgeous posibilities. Each one has historic and spiritual significance, if one digs a little deeper. I learnt to bog-hop on the Penine Way; to climb fences on Offa's Dyke; to day dream about the Romans and Vikings on Pedars Way and along the Norfolk coast. I read Chaucers Canterbury Tales along the The Southdowns Way and carried a copy of Veneral Bede on my way to Glasonbury Tor….

Winchester Cathedral to Canterbury Cathedral is sometimes called The Pilgrims Way -one could start at Salisbury Cathedral, follow the Clarendon Way to Winchester then the Southdowns Way to Canterbury. It's lovely. Before leaving Salisbury, spend a day hiking through the fields to Stone Henge on the Salisbury Plains using Ordenance Survey maps and, also, visiting the Thomas à Becket Church in Salisbury where there is a Doom painting, commisioned as a thank offering by a returning pilgrim. In the left hand corner there is a painting of Saint James. Thomas à Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral. Pilgrims flocked to his shrine...

Wainwright's Coast to Coast passes by the ruins of Shap Abbey ending in Robin Hood's Bay which is about 11 kilometers along the coast to Whitby Abbey and township , a place of pilgrimage for Australians and New Zealanders. Captain Jame Cook did his apprenticeship with Quaker shipowners in Whitby (1747).

Britain is wonderful!

Cheers
Lovingkindness

Doom painting 2012.jpgSaint James Salisbury .jpg487653_10150957037763925_701237229_n.jpg
 
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Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
As mentioned above, it's the cost of accommodation on walks in Britain that are the sticking point. I haven't investigated but the recent thread from @peregrina2000 about accommodation support for Dave's walk across America made me wonder if there is a pilgrim accommodation network in the UK?
There isn't, or if there is it is so far underground its probably run by Antipodeans ;)

There could be. If enough people worked together to build it. The British Pilgrimage Trust are trying to build a network / sequence of budget conscious / free accommodation along the Old Way http://britishpilgrimage.org/old-way/ but there are serious challenges - though I loved the guy who offered a night in one of his Shepherd's Huts at a discounted £100.

Aspirants might like to remember that when Henry II undertook his penitent pilgrimage he had the advantage of a series of Castles, Manors and Monastic establishments that were unlikely to seek to avoid accommodating Rex and his retinue, nor likely to require his credit card number before showing him to the guest suite.

My house is open to Pilgrims. You don't even have to be a pagan to get in. I suspect there are others like me but we will not stick our address and available dates on an open forum and, as yet, there isn't that network that might provide. PilgBnB, I suspect will remain in the concept stage.

Meanwhile. On pilgrimage in the UK. Post your route and intentions in this wonderful forum and see what a PM may bring you :)
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
V
New visa restrictions for England shortly Ireland wild Atlantic way better option.
So they won't apply to Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland?

I have walked the Cotswold Way - beautiful scenery and pretty towns/villages, 7 days ending in Bath - but accommodation is not cheap. In Scotland, the West Highland Way is popular (and challenging in parts) but essential to book accommodation in advance.
 

malingerer

Active Member
Sadly, yes, I do know. And no, my pockets are not hugely deep. But I am good a pinching pennies so I can use them where I'd rather...
Try the Mary Michael route. Believe it is now signed from Lands end to the Norfolk coast. They have tried to keep it following a reasonable route to include campsites, youth hostels etc and it passes through Glastonbury. Speak nicely to hotels who might let you camp in grounds. :)

Good luck and buen camino. There is of course Northern Ireland and the sacred mountain of Slieve Donard.

The Malingerer.
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
The Greensand Way is nice and The Ridgeway in Berkshire and the Pilgrims Way. Try looking for Air bnb accommodation nearby, Travel Lodges and Youth Hostels for accommodation.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I did not see this fact clearly stated above, but while time spent in the UK is or may be out of the EU Schengen free travel area, the Irish Republic is in the EU. So time spent in Ireland is the same, visa wise, as time in Spain.

if I am wrong, please correct me. Both Ireland and the UK both have wonderful pilgrimage routes.

Johnnie Walker would be a good “go to” source. Also, the Camino Society of Ireland would be a good source for the Irish routes.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I am wrong, please correct me. Both Ireland and the UK both have wonderful pilgrimage routes.
The Schengen travel zone and the EU are two different and separate entities which overlap to a large extent. There are EU countries which are not parties to the Schengen agreement and there are Schengen members which are not part of the EU. Ireland is an EU member but not part of the Schengen zone and so time spent there should not count towards the Schengen zone 90 day visa-free travel period.
 

mjal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF : stages 2008, 2017, 2018 ; completed.
The Schengen travel zone and the EU are two different and separate entities which overlap to a large extent. There are EU countries which are not parties to the Schengen agreement and there are Schengen members which are not part of the EU. Ireland is an EU member but not part of the Schengen zone and so time spent there should not count towards the Schengen zone 90 day visa-free travel period.
I was typing a reply but Bradypus beat me to it (and used a very clear and elegant construction)...

Some nationalities require a visa for Ireland and some for the UK. A valid UK visa does not entitle you to travel to Ireland unless you qualify for the Short Stay Visa Waiver Programme.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
OMG, I feel like someone who asked for a piece of toast and got a whole bakery! Heartfelt thanks one and all!
A lot to explore...and it looks like planning is actually necessary? I'm used to facing away from the rising sun and going, without much forethought beyond acquiring a good map, then reading some geology, natural history, and human history.

And yes, @t2andreo, the responses are spot on: Ireland is in the EU but not the SZ. Unlike other offshore countries, like (very annoyingly) Iceland, which is in both.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
There is a beautiful walk in NI-- the coastal causeway way. I walked a bit of it with my son in 2016. There is also the Ulster Way which is 1000km. There is also a St. Patricks Pilgrimage-- but I haven't walked it (yet). More info here!


and here is St. Patrick's Way:
 

Aurigny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés; Português Central; Português Interior; Primitivo; Português da Costa; Invierno
I walked St Patrick's Way (132 km, from Eamhain Mhacha near Armagh to Downpatrick) this January, and posted a daily description here. According to the guidebook it's an excessively leisurely ten days; not having very much time available, I did it in four. That was quite manageable. If you like being on your own, I can recommend it.
 

MickMac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013
Frances 2016
Frances 2017
Frances 2018
Frances 2018
Ponferrada-Santiago
July 2019
Schegen controls matched up with current Great British plans make life harder for world citizens like yourself.
New laws in Great Britain which may come in shortly will mean end of free travel between European Union and Great Britain.

Visa travel from European Union will be in place to Great Britain pre entry tourist online forms will be put in place as well.

A new points system for all immigrants (Australian model) will be substituted to replace current freedom of movement within the European Union.

These are some of current British governments proposals "watch this space" .

Britons will have to pay €7 (£6.30) every three years to travel to EU countries.

The European Commission has confirmed that while UK travellers will not need a visa, they will need to apply for and buy another document.

It is called an ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System) and although not launched yet, is expected to come into force in 2021.

The travel requirement is not just for the UK but for many non-EU countries.
 
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Galloglaigh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), VFnS + Thessaloniki (2020)
As mentioned before, the main issues with pilgrimages in Britain is the accomodation. Salisbury to Canterbury either by the North Downs Way or the South Downs Way is possible by hostel or camping. There has also been a growth in pub chains offering affordable accomodation.


The South Down Way is a lesser travelled one as it is further away from the larger towns but you may be scrambling for accomodation.


The BPT are promoting the "Old Way" for which accommodation should be easier, as it passes the coastal towns.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Oh I think you must do St Cuthbert, it is one of the best 100km possible (outside Spain, claro, he adds hurriedly), taking in several fine abbeys, Walter Scott's gaff, Roman ruins and a road, glorious border countryside (the border I live on), the end of the Pennine Way, the magnificent rolling high empty Cheviot hills, the meanders of the Tweed and, best of all, the walk across the sands to holy Lindisfarne - take your boots off and walk barefoot at low tide across the sucking sands for the best (free) foot massage ever. Let me know when/if you're coming and stay at my place on the way there/back.

When I was still writing for the Guardian I did a few pieces on it:


Oh just gorgeous!
Just did some research. A travelcompany here in the Lowlands has it in their portfolio.
They have some suggestions for the daily etapas. Perfectly possible to organise it independently but the accomodation prices are rather steep!
 

thejoker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
many
There is an absolutely beautiful walk that combines three trails.

Starting in Ulverston (after a visit to the Laurel and Hardy museum) you could take the Cumbria Way through the beautiful Lake District, all the way to Carlisle. A total of 5 to 7 days.
Then in Carlisle transfer to the Hadrian's Wall long distance footpath and get the best of this trail until it arrives at Heavensfield.
Then start the pilgrimage known as St Oswald's Way, which would take you through beautiful Northumberland in 6 - 8 days before arriving at Holy Island, a fitting place to end a pilgrimage.
The whole pilgrimage would take .
The total length of this would be from 14 to a more pleasant and leisurely 20 days. I walked this in 19 days in 2004 and it is one of the most beautiful (and wet) walks I have done and ending at Holy Island is absolutely perfect.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
The remark about Ireland set off quite a bit of thread drift ;). Anyone who does not hold a passport of a current EU country - and that may be the majority on this forum - only needs to know that nothing will change for them as far as their 90 days Schengen allowance in Spain is concerned: whether you walk in Ireland or in the UK, the time spent there does not affect your 90 days allowance. And that's not going to change for you non-EU passport holders, come what may this Thursday and beyond.

Has anyone actually walked the trail of "The Old Way"? I understand that the promotors are trying to organise accommodation along the trail, including sleeping at churches. Is there an accommodation list? The BPT website mentions only the possibility of staying at the church in Firle, which I think is the one with the famous rev?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
The Schengen travel zone and the EU are two different and separate entities which overlap to a large extent. There are EU countries which are not parties to the Schengen agreement and there are Schengen members which are not part of the EU. Ireland is an EU member but not part of the Schengen zone and so time spent there should not count towards the Schengen zone 90 day visa-free travel period.
Thank you. That is good to know. VNWalking...you are good to go... Contact the Camino Society of Ireland... Our mutual friend OIhana is a big player there. OM me for her contact info. She does not usually participate in this forum.
 

nedspencer

They gave me this T-shirt to stop me singing!
Camino(s) past & future
May 2013 - Camino Frances.
Sep 2015 - Del Norte from Santander
Sep 2017 - Ingles from Ferrol
so many options here in the UK!!
Many mentioned already above

But here are two more to add to your list:
Offa's Dyke - Chepstow to Prestatyn
North Wales Pligrim's Way - Holywell to Bardsey Island
(NWPW also known as The Welsh Camino!)
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
Not a pilgrimage, in a ‘conventional’ sense, but if you want to ponder on the wonders of nature check out South West Coast Path. https://readingontheroad54893552.wordpress.com/2019/09/18/enchanted-by-the-coast-path-the-south-west-coast-path/
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I know it's not a pilgrimage, but the Coast to Coast is a wonderful walk. It's about 300 K and takes anywhere from 9 days to about 14 days. I've walked it twice and will probably will again some time next year. good thing is you can camp most of the way if you choose.
As mentioned before, the main issues with pilgrimages in Britain is the accomodation. Salisbury to Canterbury either by the North Downs Way or the South Downs Way is possible by hostel or camping. There has also been a growth in pub chains offering affordable accomodation.


The South Down Way is a lesser travelled one as it is further away from the larger towns but you may be scrambling for accomodation.


The BPT are promoting the "Old Way" for which accommodation should be easier, as it passes the coastal towns.
An additional comment about accommodations on British walks--I walked the Coast to Coast Walk in September 2018 with a Camino friend and managed to stay in relatively inexpensive places most of the time. There were bunk barns (very inexpensive), YHA hostels (also inexpensive and even more so if you join the organization), and B&Bs (very reasonable because we shared a room with two twin beds). We ate most dinners in pubs, which saved a lot of expense, and took sandwiches along for lunch. It was certainly more expensive than the Spanish Caminos I've walked, but was very doable. It did take advance planning though. I made all our reservations well in advance, including for the YHA hostels. You can have a company do it for you, but it was much cheaper and more fun to be my own tour guide. If you don't book ahead, you run the risk of being forced to stay in much more expensive places.
 

TonyC

Geriatric
Camino(s) past & future
(2014) Frances Pt1
(2015) Frances Pt2
(2016) Portuguese, from Lisbon
(2108) Frances in Sep/Oct
Another "Not a pilgrimage" route, but one we entitled "Our Yorkshire Camino" when we walked it in May 2018 having previously walked the Frances (twice) and the Portuguese from Lisbon in previous years.

This route is a combination of 'The Wolds Way' followed by a short section of the 'Cleveland Way', to just north of Scarborough. From there along the 'Tabular Hills Walk' to Helmsley, where followed the 'Cleveland Way' again from the other end, taking us around the North Yorkshire Moors, eventually ending back in Scarborough.

In total about 240 miles of very varied terrain. The rolling, pastoral, Wolds were followed by the forests of the Tabular Hills. Then the initial moorland stretch of the Cleveland Way' finishing with a glorious clifftop stretch along the rugged Yorkshire coast

This took us three weeks of generally easy walking, although some stretches were reasonably testing without being rugged. Accommodation was generally reasonably priced, but definitely NOT Camino de Santiago prices. It was reasonably easy to find, but ingenuity was needed in places.

I created a blog of the journey and have all the details of the route, including where we stayed, if anyone is interested.

We would both happily walk this delightful route again, and probably will.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
@VNwalking, as an American citizen you have special privileges to stay in Poland beyond the restrictions imposted by the Schengen Agreement. You have to leave Poland for a day every 90 days or so (and not to another Schengen country) but otherwise you have an unlimited stay.

I mention this as a stay and a pilgrimage there could be cheaper than one in IRE or the UK. I'll dig for more details if you are interested. There is something similar for Denmark too.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Too. Many. Good. Ideas.
!!!
:eek: 🤣🙏🙏🙏

Iceland IS in the Schengen zone, but IS NOT a member of the EU.
Du-uh. Of course. I knew that. :oops:

You have to leave Poland for a day every 90 days or so (and not to another Schengen country) but otherwise you have an unlimited stay.
There is something similar for Denmark too.
Except going to Poland doesn't give me a 'pause" in the schengen visa clock, right? And I don't want to go to Denmark. It's a dangerous place. Last time I was there I gained 10 pounds in two weeks.

Anyway, you have all guaranteed I want to go nowhere else! If I plan and pinch pennies now,10 days in GB should be quite do-able.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Except going to Poland doesn't give me a 'pause" in the schengen visa clock, right?
Nope, not right. Google Nomadic Matt bilateral if you ever want to pursue this. He explains the legal background of bilateral agreements that are still valid. You need to leave Schengen (getting a Schengen Exit stamp), then enter Poland from outside Schengen and you are good and can enjoy the benefits of a Poland-US bilateral agreement. What he doesn't explain: How to enter Poland from outside Schengen and stopping Polish border control from stamping another Schengen Entry stamp in your passport at a Polish airport or other Polish border control point ...

Did you walk in the UK before? Romantically inclined as I am, I would be tempted to get the boat to England and then start walking as soon as I set foot on the ground again 😇.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Except going to Poland doesn't give me a 'pause" in the schengen visa clock, right?
No pause. You want to do the Poland visit as your last stop or stops in Schengen before heading home until you qualify for a return visit. You should also keep receipts to prove that you did not leave Poland for another Schengen country during that time. It is tricky but someone must have done it before.

Anyway, to get back on topic, happy pilgrimage to you.
 

jmwlester

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances
2014 Jesus Trail
2016 Via Francigena (Italy)
2017 Camino Portugese
Another "Not a pilgrimage" route, but one we entitled "Our Yorkshire Camino" when we walked it in May 2018 having previously walked the Frances (twice) and the Portuguese from Lisbon in previous years.

This route is a combination of 'The Wolds Way' followed by a short section of the 'Cleveland Way', to just north of Scarborough. From there along the 'Tabular Hills Walk' to Helmsley, where followed the 'Cleveland Way' again from the other end, taking us around the North Yorkshire Moors, eventually ending back in Scarborough.

In total about 240 miles of very varied terrain. The rolling, pastoral, Wolds were followed by the forests of the Tabular Hills. Then the initial moorland stretch of the Cleveland Way' finishing with a glorious clifftop stretch along the rugged Yorkshire coast

This took us three weeks of generally easy walking, although some stretches were reasonably testing without being rugged. Accommodation was generally reasonably priced, but definitely NOT Camino de Santiago prices. It was reasonably easy to find, but ingenuity was needed in places.

I created a blog of the journey and have all the details of the route, including where we stayed, if anyone is interested.

We would both happily walk this delightful route again, and probably will.
 

jmwlester

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances
2014 Jesus Trail
2016 Via Francigena (Italy)
2017 Camino Portugese
Another "Not a pilgrimage" route, but one we entitled "Our Yorkshire Camino" when we walked it in May 2018 having previously walked the Frances (twice) and the Portuguese from Lisbon in previous years.

This route is a combination of 'The Wolds Way' followed by a short section of the 'Cleveland Way', to just north of Scarborough. From there along the 'Tabular Hills Walk' to Helmsley, where followed the 'Cleveland Way' again from the other end, taking us around the North Yorkshire Moors, eventually ending back in Scarborough.

In total about 240 miles of very varied terrain. The rolling, pastoral, Wolds were followed by the forests of the Tabular Hills. Then the initial moorland stretch of the Cleveland Way' finishing with a glorious clifftop stretch along the rugged Yorkshire coast

This took us three weeks of generally easy walking, although some stretches were reasonably testing without being rugged. Accommodation was generally reasonably priced, but definitely NOT Camino de Santiago prices. It was reasonably easy to find, but ingenuity was needed in places.

I created a blog of the journey and have all the details of the route, including where we stayed, if anyone is interested.

We would both happily walk this delightful route again, and probably will.
Yes, I would love to read your blog about this journey. Thank you in advance.
 

TonyC

Geriatric
Camino(s) past & future
(2014) Frances Pt1
(2015) Frances Pt2
(2016) Portuguese, from Lisbon
(2108) Frances in Sep/Oct
Yes, I would love to read your blog about this journey. Thank you in advance.
Hi. You'll find it HERE , hopefully. I've tagged the link so that it should display in ascending date order, rather than the default 'newest first' order. If you want any more info just let me know.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
John Muir Way from Helensborough to Dunbar. Not a pilgrimage route per se but lots of history!
BC SY

PS Sorry to hear we will not see each other this year, sniff-sniff ...
 

Joe Sharratt

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Fisterra sept 2019
On hearing of my Frances this Autumn, my daughter’s friend discussed with the authors of Augustine Camino, Andrew And Paula Kelley, who created a new pilgrimage from Rochester to Canterbury and on to the shrine of St Augustine Ramsgate.
This is a seven day walk of about 10 miles a day through the Kent countryside where I have walked for years. I will be giving it a try soon - when my feet have fully recovered! There is a guide and web is www.augustinecamino.co.uk
And Andrew, if you see this post thanks for the Walking Guide.
Joe
 

Randy Hay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
I walked the Fife Coastal Path in 9 days
but
extremely fortunate to have a family member who loves to drive and windshield explore
and who did daily drop off and pick up
but
expensive in terms of car rental and airbnb
but
great path - wonderful variety - some parts quite challenging
Randolph from Michigan
 

Dromengro

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Partial Frances 1984
Frances (2020)
Here's some Scottish pilgrimage routes, www.thewayofstandrews.com There's not really any specifically pilgrim infrastructure along these routes and some would only be really suitable with a tent. They're probably a bit wilder and more remote than most would be used to, but some may find it useful.
Many years ago I walked from Dunkeld to Iona and back roughly along what is now the St Columba's Way bivvying in caves and woods and fishing for trout.

EDIT to add. Iona Cathedral is one of the oldest Christian sites in Europe and burial place of many Scottish Kings. About half way across Scotland you pass an even older secret Pagan site Tigh nam Bodach which is recognized as the oldest uninterrupted Pagan ritual in Britain, some say in all of Europe.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 (2019) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
...So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
I walked the John Muir Way in Scotland a couple years ago. It is not a pilgrimage route and he didn’t walk it, but it runs 215km from Dunbar, JM’s birthplace, to Helensborough, where young John and his family set sail for America...and the rest is history. The website has downloadable maps and guide (or at least list of accommodations). The trail is well maintained and runs through a number of interesting towns & cities. It is well-marked and you can walk east-to-west or west-to-east.
 

Phil Smith

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016)StJ to Viana (2017): Viana to Castrojeriz (2018) Castrojeriz to Leon
(2019) León to Sarria
My son and I completed the Peak Pilgrimage this summer. A nice little walk (took us 3 days) through some beautiful Derbyshire countryside. Booklet available with stamps in each church along the way, finishing in the village of Eyam; known as the village that succumbed to the plague. Details are on the BPT website. We did it in summer and camped, making it very cheap. I know fellow pilgrims who've done it by BnB, which is more expensive , but less damage on your sleep patterns! Also, I wouldn't advise camping in Derbyshire at this time of year!
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble?
I have two British/UK pilgrimages for your consideration:

1) Whithorn Way
From S Mungo's Cathedral, Glasgow (also known as S Kentigern), through the major towns of Paisley and Ayr to Whithorn, Galloway. This is about 250 km. Whithorn is said to where the first church was built (by S Aidan, about 400 AD) in what is now Scotland. Nothing remains of that building, but there are remains of a chapel built many many year later. This was a major pilgrimage destination in the middle ages. A short bus trip to Isle of Whithorn will show where the pilgrims came ashore.
I have walked Paisley Abbey to Ayr. When I return I will walk to Girvan by an inland route, then train to Barrhill to absolutely avoid the busy A77 which does not have shoulders over much of its length.

More info at http://www.whithornway.org

2) Augustine's Way
From Rochester (second cathedral in England), through Canterbury to Ramsgate (and a shrine of S Augustine of Canterbury). This is said to be about 7 days. For the most part it is separate from the Noth Downs Way to Canterbury. It is on my bucket list.
More info at http://augustinecamino.co.uk

As many have said above infrastructure in the UK is sadly very, very deficient when compared to much of Spain.
That applies to both accomodation and routes. Backpackers, for example, are typically only found in major towns and cities.

My UK rellies tell me they book B&Bs (or whatever) several months ahead and that one of them takes several book to read while waiting at the agreed end of day rendevous, drive the walkers (back) to the accommodation and return them to their new start point the next day.

So, VN, kia kaha.

Adjust text on Friday, 3 Jan 20 in last sentence from "return" to end.
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
PS Sorry to hear we will not see each other this year, sniff-sniff ...
Me too. ☹
These all look fantastic, but I would far rather be walking into Santiago. Not possible, alas.
But I am keeping an open mind. Who knows what might unfold out of what seems like alas-ness. ;)🙏💖
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Finisterre 2014
Camino Frances,Muxia and Finisterre 2015
Camino del Norte,Arzua to Ribadeo 2015
1) Whithorn Way
From S Mungo's Cathedral, Glasgow (also known as S Kentigern), through the major towns of Paisley and Ayr to Whithorn, Galloway. This is about 250 km. Whithorn is said to where the first church was built (by S Aidan, about 400 AD) in what is now Scotland. Nothing remains of that building, but there are remains of a chapel built many many year later. This was a major pilgrimage destination in the middle ages. A short bus trip to Isle of Whithorn will show where the pilgrims came ashore.
Saint Ninian is believed to have brought Christianity to Whithorn and Scotland in about 397 AD.There is a cave on the shore that he is thought to have used as a retreat.
Many,if not all,Scottish Monarchs made the pilgrimage to Whithorn known as Candida Casa,the White House.
There are some ruins of the mediaeval cathedral,the crypts still being fairly intact,also a museum and visitor centre containing lots of articles excavated on the site.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Two walks in Essex
One is a pilgrim path.......St peters way ..from Ongar to Bradwell on sea ..its 41 miles long and is well marked. I'm not sure about the accommodation though.

Second walk is The Essex Way ...about 82 miles from Epping to Harwich on the coast, it's well marked also and can be walked in either direction.
One of the cicerone books"walks in Essex" covers the second walk
Both are nice walks but best walked in dry weather as Essex mud sticks to the shoes/ boots like glue!!

Also any thoughts on canal walks in the UK?
With all the great suggestions above....there's really only one solution now.........

Walk them all!!!
Annette
 

Jimmy Smith

Jimbob
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
Two great pilgrimages in the Ancient Kingdom of Northumbria

Both previously mentioned.

Durham to Holy Island. Been walked as a pilgrimage for a very long time. Especially during Holy Week. The other, Melrose to Holy Island.
It can take up to 3 hours to do the low tide crossing to Lindisfarne so use your smartphone, get tide times, time it right and DO Not take any chances.

You may hear the Northumbrian pipes and realise that the oldest Tartan, the Border Drab is as native to this part of England as it is over the modern border. Kilts can be worn in this region also but very very few do so.

Relics of our patron Saint, St. Cuthbert, St Oswald and the Venerable Bede rest in Durham Cathedral. Which is in itself a UNESCO World Heritage site.

You'll always get a canny welcome in Durham, Northumberland and the Borders.
 

igailfh

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Português, Camino de Tejo (Fatima)
Hadrian's Wall is an obvious choice but well worth walking. I just walked it in September & thoroughly enjoyed it. You have to like sheep, I'm a Kiwi, cows/cattle, I'm a Kiwi, dogs, boggy paddocks, muddy paths, & some steep grassy climbs when you're right at the Wall, but it's all marvellous. Do buy a current guidebook/app.
There's also an excellent UK magazine, Country Walking, who publish 27 walks each month of various lengths & degrees of difficulty in the UK.
Tap into the YHA network, they have hostels all over, & that will bring your prices down some.
Have fun!
 

Donna Sch

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Levante-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
England Camino routes ?2024
Accommodation is the main limiting factor. Barrie and I would love to do a trail that allows us to visit aging family in Poole so the SWCP is the obvious one. Researching accommodation is seriously scary. Ie we will have to bring a tent as that will bring the costs right down.
 

igailfh

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Português, Camino de Tejo (Fatima)
The remark about Ireland set off quite a bit of thread drift ;). Anyone who does not hold a passport of a current EU country - and that may be the majority on this forum - only needs to know that nothing will change for them as far as their 90 days Schengen allowance in Spain is concerned: whether you walk in Ireland or in the UK, the time spent there does not affect your 90 days allowance. And that's not going to change for you non-EU passport holders, come what may this Thursday and beyond.

Has anyone actually walked the trail of "The Old Way"? I understand that the promotors are trying to organise accommodation along the trail, including sleeping at churches. Is there an accommodation list? The BPT website mentions only the possibility of staying at the church in Firle, which I think is the one with the famous rev?
Yes, William Parsons was the first. He started walking on 6th April, I can't remember how long it took him. 'The old way pilgrimage to Canterbury' should lead you to his posts on fb. I followed him the whole way & yes, in some places he slept in churches. I have since checked online & there is a small network of churches available for accomodation but they're not cheap!
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
...Also any thoughts on canal walks in the UK?
Hi there @Annette london
Here's another favourite! Have you considered walking from Reading to Oxford along The Thames Path?

Reading
*The mummified hand of St James, Reading Abbey :
*St James Church, Reading : Camino information
*Bayeux Tapistry Replica (19th century), Reading Museum

Pangbourne
*Map of Reading, Wokingham & Pangbourne : OS Map 159
At Pangbourne several major walking trails converge : The Thames Path; The Chiltern Way; E2 European long distance trail; various circular paths; Berkshire circular routes.
* 'Wind in the Willows' author, Kenneth Grahame retired in Pangbourne. Illustrations for the book are said to have been inspired by the Thameside landscape near Pangbourne.

Goring & Streatly
*The Ridgeway and The Thames Path intersect at Goring & Streatly
*YHA Streatly-on-Thames : Accommodation

Wallingford
*Walking the Dame Agatha Christie Trail from Wallingford to Cholsey
*Walking the Ridgeway between Goring and Wallingford,

Abbingdon
*Abingdon Abbey and meadows : History
*Abingdon County Hall Museum : Monk’s Map of the River Thames (16th century)

Iffley
*St Mary’s Church, Iffley lock : English Romanesque architecture

Oxford
…… wonderful places to explore…
Ashmolean Museum
Pitt rivers Museum
Colleges
College choirs : Christ Church College, Magdalen College and New College , sung services every day
Cornmarket Street musicians 😊
Oxford YHA : a big bath with oodles of hot water to soak in at the end of a muddy day…( xtra bathrooms, at the end of the hall, stages one + two)

Happy browsing!
Lovingkindness
15972520_10154392986903925_6500905194019289505_o.jpg
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Hi there @Annette london
Here's another favourite! Have you considered walking from Reading to Oxford along The Thames Path?

Reading
*The mummified hand of St James, Reading Abbey :
*St James Church, Reading : Camino information
*Bayeux Tapistry Replica (19th century), Reading Museum

Pangbourne
*Map of Reading, Wokingham & Pangbourne : OS Map 159
At Pangbourne several major walking trails converge : The Thames Path; The Chiltern Way; E2 European long distance trail; various circular paths; Berkshire circular routes.
* 'Wind in the Willows' author, Kenneth Grahame retired in Pangbourne. Illustrations for the book are said to have been inspired by the Thameside landscape near Pangbourne.

Goring & Streatly
*The Ridgeway and The Thames Path intersect at Goring & Streatly
*YHA Streatly-on-Thames : Accommodation

Wallingford
*Walking the Dame Agatha Christie Trail from Wallingford to Cholsey
*Walking the Ridgeway between Goring and Wallingford,

Abbingdon
*Abingdon Abbey and meadows : History
*Abingdon County Hall Museum : Monk’s Map of the River Thames (16th century)

Iffley
*St Mary’s Church, Iffley lock : English Romanesque architecture

Oxford
…… wonderful places to explore…
Ashmolean Museum
Pitt rivers Museum
Colleges
College choirs : Christ Church College, Magdalen College and New College , sung services every day
Cornmarket Street musicians 😊
Oxford YHA : a big bath with oodles of hot water to soak in at the end of a muddy day…( xtra bathrooms, at the end of the hall, stages one + two)

Happy browsing!
Lovingkindness
View attachment 67758
Hi Loving kindness
Many thanks for the info
We haven't walked this part yet
Some small sections in London though are quiet scenic and nice
Also walked parts of the Grand Union canal on the London Loop walks
Annette
 

Martin64

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2nd 2017
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
Look up “The Cornish Camino”. Maybe include some camping and it shouldn’t be too expensive.
 

Julia Mumford

Adventure Geek
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016, 2017, 2018, 2019)
Camino Ingles (2018)
Similarly, the South Downs way, although a lovely stroll, is surprisingly poorly supported by the way of accommodation on or near the trail. I have no direct experience of the others, although the SW Coastal path is a great walk.
I'm not sure when you walked it, but I walked the South Downs Way in July this year (wrote a book on my experience) and I would say that it is very well supported with accommodation, right on the trail. Many B&B's, a few hostels, and lots of camping opportunities.

The Cotswold Way is a fabulous pilgrimage to walk (although expensive).
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Hopefully Via de Bayona/Burgos to Ponferrada/Camino de Invierno
Also walked parts of the Grand Union canal on the London Loop walks
Annette
Oh yes, thanks Annette, there is also the ‘London Loop’! I haven’t walked it but it is on my ‘to do’ list 😁 Not a pilgrimage as such though...
Look up the London Outer Orbital Path if interested.
 

Ray J

Where exactly are we?
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2015)
Portuguese & Rota Vicentina (2016)
Le Puy & Paris to Moulins (2017)
Via Francengina (2018)
In September, we hiked the South West Coast Path, starting in Holywell Bay and ending in Falmouth. It's not a pilgrimage, but it was spectacular. Beautiful scenery with lovely towns and villages, and the people of Cornwall were the kindest and most helpful we've ever run into. A fairly physical hike (many steps carved into the hills) but totally worth it. Warning: the St. Ives to Trewellen leg was listed as "severe" ... Believe it!

After that, we went to Scotland and hiked the John Muir Way from Helensburgh to Dunbar (we always like to go completely across at least one country :) ). It was a fairly easy hike, many times along canals so fairly flat, giving plenty of time to enjoy the scenery and contemplate which, after all, is sort of the point of a pligrimage, right? After we finished, we decided it was one of the best hikes we'd ever done. So beautiful and relaxing! Maybe we were channeling the great man, himself.

So, not pilgrimages, per se, but we felt it was as meaningful as any of the official ones we've been on.
 

Calisteve

Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 16 CF
July 17 CF with my son
July 18 CP with my wife
July 19 Ingles Muxia & Finisterre
There's the new prilgrimage route - Cornish Celtic Way, 125 miles: https://www.cornishcelticway.co.uk - haven't done it myself but am planning to in either 2020 or 2021.

Another option - not a pilgrimage but would recommend the Great Stones Way (2-3 days, from new Swindon to Salisbury) although make sure you have GPS as the way marking leaves something to be desired. Didn't see anyone else walking it when I did it in 2018 but very scenic and nice country pubs at the end of the day.
 

David Pettee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
GPM '86; Soviet/Amer. Walk '88; Death Valley to Mt. Whitney '89; CF '18; Coast to Coast '19; CP '20
My partner and I walked the Coast 2 Coast earlier this year. It is not really a pilgrimage, but more of a beautiful hike through parts of England that are still quite wild. It remains poorly marked which makes it kind of fun!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Oh yes, thanks Annette, there is also the ‘London Loop’! I haven’t walked it but it is on my ‘to do’ list 😁 Not a pilgrimage as such though...
Look up the London Outer Orbital Path if interested.
Thanks Domigee
Yes the London Loop is a great walk and already we've walked 11 of the 15 sections over the past few years and it passes by the house about 10 mins away

I've been posting the most recent trips on the "where have you walked locally" thread
Sometimes hard to believe that the whole "ring" is just a stones throw from the great metropolis and so easily accessible by tube and local train
A mixture mainly of national parks and forests tracks and fields and we like the fact that we can always find a cafe or pub on the walk
The Freedom Pass for free travel is also a bonus
The Ordinance survey maps are in the book by Aurum press publishers and the whole loop is so well marked too
Hope you enjoy it when you do get the chance to walk it
Annette
 

Elizabeth Cheung

Existential Sherpa
Camino(s) past & future
Let's just say I've been around ;-)
I did the Wales Coast Path last year (all of it ) and I found out of all the "pilgrim" routes I have done (so far 5), this one was the most spiritual. Stunning scenery, tons of old churches till operating and filled with history and Celtic Influence. You really feel like you have been "touched" on this route. Not cheap to walk but not as bad as walking in England . The people are lovely and very accommodating.
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
Here is the website for the Michael Mary Pilgrim's Way - https://marymichaelpilgrimsway.org/ probably the best 'Way' for experiencing the rich history and beautiful countryside of England...
Like Tincatinker said - when you have decided a route - tell the forum and see what accommodation offers you get! We have touring cyclists to stay often (WarmShowers.com) and would always accommodate any passing pilgrims too. So if you walk the SW Coastpath pm me! Good luck.
 

Christine miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances and Portuguese
Another "Not a pilgrimage" route, but one we entitled "Our Yorkshire Camino" when we walked it in May 2018 having previously walked the Frances (twice) and the Portuguese from Lisbon in previous years.

This route is a combination of 'The Wolds Way' followed by a short section of the 'Cleveland Way', to just north of Scarborough. From there along the 'Tabular Hills Walk' to Helmsley, where followed the 'Cleveland Way' again from the other end, taking us around the North Yorkshire Moors, eventually ending back in Scarborough.

In total about 240 miles of very varied terrain. The rolling, pastoral, Wolds were followed by the forests of the Tabular Hills. Then the initial moorland stretch of the Cleveland Way' finishing with a glorious clifftop stretch along the rugged Yorkshire coast

This took us three weeks of generally easy walking, although some stretches were reasonably testing without being rugged. Accommodation was generally reasonably priced, but definitely NOT Camino de Santiago prices. It was reasonably easy to find, but ingenuity was needed in places.

I created a blog of the journey and have all the details of the route, including where we stayed, if anyone is interested.

We would both happily walk this delightful route again, and probably will.
I would be interested to know more of the route/accommodation. I plan to walk a couple hundred miles in UK next year.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
... Venerable Bede rest in Durham Cathedral.
S Cuthbert has pride of place, his shrine being just beyond the high altar.

Bede is interred in a black table (above ground) tomb about as far away from the high altar as it is possible to get, in an addition beyond the west end of the Cathedral. Around the top edge of this tomb is inscribed "Hac sunt in fossa Bedae Venerabilis ossa."
A popular translation, showing rhyme in both Latin and English: In these stones are Venerable Bede's bones.

Percy Dearmer, an Anglican priest in his The Little Lives of the Saints (1904), suggests the title Venerable was given, shortly after Bede's death, by one of his pupils so the epitaph would have a balanced metre (see http://anglicanhistory.org/dearmer/lives/04.html) and it stuck.

So, @VNwalking , Durham Cathedral would make an excellent end for a pilgrimage in that part of the world.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Also any thoughts on canal walks in the UK?
Please look at the Kennet and Avon Canal trail at hiking.WayMarkedTrails.org.

In the early days of this canal it started at the Floating Dock, Bristol with the River Avon, changes to the canal at Bath and meets the Kennet River well before Reading. At reading it joined the River Thames. Its original purpose was to move goods to and from ocean going vessels at Bristol and delivered them at many points along the way to London.

There is a walkable path from Bristol (with a high point at a whole 150 metres above sea level) through to Reading and runs for 140 km. It is mainly in the country. From Reading you can elect to go up or down Thames Path.

Another walkable canal is a short train ride south from Reading. This is the Basingstoke Canal which runs for nearly 60 km from Basingstoke towards Weybridge where it meets the River Wey navigation. A separate path runs from that meet along this navigation, past Weybridge to Thames Path a short distance on. Also found on hiking.WayMarkedTrails.org.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
As mentioned before, the main issues with pilgrimages in Britain is the accomodation. Salisbury to Canterbury either by the North Downs Way or the South Downs Way is possible by hostel or camping. There has also been a growth in pub chains offering affordable accomodation.


The South Down Way is a lesser travelled one as it is further away from the larger towns but you may be scrambling for accomodation.


The BPT are promoting the "Old Way" for which accommodation should be easier, as it passes the coastal towns.
In 1990 I was able to walk the South Downs Way from Eastbourne to Winchester staying only in YHA hostels. No longer possible today, as so many of the properties have been sold. And it's the same all over England and Wales. Most pubs & B&Bs are a few miles from the trail, so the best bet would be a taxi to & fro, unless you're willing to camp, which might not be a bad option during the summer months.

It seems like the BPT is trying to coordinate a series of "donativos" along the Old Way, sleeping in churches and barns close to the path, precisely for the reasons mentioned above.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014; 2019)
Camino Primitivo (2016)
Camino del Norte (2016-2018)
San Salvador (2018)
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
My but this OP has generated a bonanza of replies.

Just as Channel 4 offers an 'alternative' to the BBC, here is my daft but pleasure-inducing alternative suggestion for a British pilgrimage. I read about a lady, not so long ago, who had made it her mission, together with her partner for most of it (now sadly passed away, so she carried on alone) to visit every single Wetherspoon pub and hotel in the company's vast network. There are around 1000 of em! And guess what? Generally, they carry Estrella Galicia alongside beers from all over the planet. So, why not mock-up a camino pub crawl, visit some historic buildings (and I'm still talking about Wetherspoons here) and get a taste of the international by sampling world beers alongside a good, affordable meal? You might even find a bed for the night.
 

MoniRose

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(5/28-7/4, 2012) Camino Frances - SJPP to Santiago
(7/22-8/2, 2013) Camino Finesterra
(?) Camino Le Puy
My sister and I tried the Cotswold Way. Sadly, after the 2nd day it was so secluded (literally saw no own on Day 4) we didn’t feel comfortable out the alone so we hopped a cab and spent extra days in Bath.
It was beautiful, tho, and the B&B’s and our hosts were outstanding. A more experienced hiker than I probably would love it.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
My but this OP has generated a bonanza of replies.
Seriously.
I think I will have to do a poll, but it'll take a wee bit of time before I can get to it.
I'm very much enjoying everyone's posts...a few definitely stand out, as I digest what you're posting...

So, why not mock-up a camino pub crawl, visit some historic buildings (and I'm still talking about Wetherspoons here) and get a taste of the international by sampling world beers alongside a good, affordable meal? You might even find a bed for the night.
Well, this is awkward. :oops:
Great idea, @Dominum Philippum...but I took on some vows and one of them is that I don't drink alcohol.
But someone else might take to this like a duck to water, so thank you!
 

josephine upton

Keep on walking
Camino(s) past & future
camino de frances, finesterre 2002
norte ,primitivo 2015
Portuguese 2018/9
2019 Norte!?
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
This could be just right!1657F620-BC9B-4F8E-9AC7-E315536CE51C.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014; 2019)
Camino Primitivo (2016)
Camino del Norte (2016-2018)
San Salvador (2018)
Seriously.
I think I will have to do a poll, but it'll take a wee bit of time before I can get to it.
I'm very much enjoying everyone's posts...a few definitely stand out, as I digest what you're posting...


Well, this is awkward. :oops:
Great idea, @Dominum Philippum...but I took on some vows and one of them is that I don't drink alcohol.
But someone else might take to this like a duck to water, so thank you!
A very commendable vow. I'm sure you can find something teetotal in 'Spoons, as well as American-style coffee refills. But good luck finding your next walk.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But good luck finding your next walk.
I obviously have huge and wonderful choice.
As well as lots of friendly advice to call on...
Gracias, one and all!

[Would it be churlish to admit I would rather be walking the Invierno again, or the Aragones, or the Lana from Soria, or the Olvidado? :oops: Or am I just spoiled rotten? ]
 

Gilmore Girl

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
This year the pesky Schengen visa requirements and my unalterable commitments conspire together to prevent me from walking in Spain. So I have been looking to Britain for solace, and escape from the Schengen Zone for a few weeks.
And I found this:
And oh what a rabbit hole it is! I know this wonderful website will absolutely be no news to many, but I have had my head in the Spanish sand - so have not been paying any attention to pilgrimages in Britain.

So anyone with feet on the ground and some walking experince...
Please can you give me a recommendation for your favourite week/10 day/2 week amble? It doesn't have to be one of the ones the BPT lists...anything is fair game at the moment.
Thanks!
The Confraternity of St. James in London might be able to help. I thought there was a pilgrimage route in Scotland which had been restored as well.
 

hollyw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués in 2020
These aren't exactly pilgrimages, but have you looked at National Trails in the UK? https://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/ The South Downs Way is 100 miles, which is a nice easy length, and The Ridgeway goes through a lot of ancient historical sites. It starts near Avebury, the largest stone circle in Europe. The Trailblazer guidebooks are great for walking National Trails. Let me know if you have any questions.
 

Lleslie

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Via Podiensis (2018)
Another vote for Hadrien's Wall and St Oswald's Way finishing with crossing the sands to Lindesfarne which my husband and I are doing next September😊 Hadrien's Wall has a mix of accommodation from YHA, bunkhouses to B&B whereas St Oswald's Way seems to be more bnb/pubs/hotels than alberque style accommodation.
Buen camino, Linda
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
There are a few variations in Scotland that go to/near/from St Andrews - there's a website -
https://www.thewayofstandrews.com
and are historically pilgrimages...!
 

Lynda t

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago May 2010
Lisbon to Santiago May 2012
Read 'The salt path' before embarking on the South West footpath. A bit grim to start with though. The book is available on Bookbox from your local library.
 

Jimmy Smith

Jimbob
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
I am surprised that the only UK pilgrimage that counts towards a Compostela has not been mentioned. It includes Durham Cathedral and is accepted in Santiago towards a Compostela as part of the Ingles.
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
I am surprised that the only UK pilgrimage that counts towards a Compostela has not been mentioned. It includes Durham Cathedral and is accepted in Santiago towards a Compostela as part of the Ingles.
The St Michael's Way is only a short walk but a very enjoyable one, and it is now officially counted towards your 100km for a Compostela which is useful if you are subsequently doing the Ingles.

 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
I'm not sure when you walked it, but I walked the South Downs Way in July this year (wrote a book on my experience) and I would say that it is very well supported with accommodation, right on the trail. Many B&B's, a few hostels, and lots of camping opportunities.

The Cotswold Way is a fabulous pilgrimage to walk (although expensive).
I live right next to the south downs way and the last time I looked most of the accommodation was not close to the path.
 

thejoker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
many
I am surprised that the only UK pilgrimage that counts towards a Compostela has not been mentioned. It includes Durham Cathedral and is accepted in Santiago towards a Compostela as part of the Ingles.
I had no idea about this pilgrimage. Thank you so much for posting it.

Finchale Abbey was my favourite place many many years ago as a child. I used to love the walk down from West Rainton to the Wear to cross to this magical place and play in the 'secret' underground passages that ran below it (now all bricked in), before a Notrianni ice cream van came mid afternoon with the best ice-creams ever.
 

Jimmy Smith

Jimbob
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
Looks like 50 km of the 100 required can be walked on. The two UK based Camino permitted pilgrimages now we need another 50 km and we only need to fly direct to Santiago de Compostela for the bit of paper. 😁😁😁😁😁 tee hee
 
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onwayhome

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Ponferrada-Santiago,(c1986)
Frances SJPP-Santiago (2011)
Portuguese Porto- Finisterre (2016)
St Michaels Way (2016)
Wow what a rich thread, thank you for starting this off. If you are looking for a British version of Santiago then I suppose Canterbury comes the closest - it does have an extensive pilgrim history though compared to Santiago there's a very low key contemporary presence but a warm individual welcome if you do turn up with a pilgrim passport
As has already been posted there is the ' traditional' route from Winchester also the Old Way being pioneered by the BPT and a comparative newcomer St Augustine's Way. This latter route does have a pilgrim orientated guide book, the possibility of bag transport, accommodation booking and enthusiastic founders. I enjoyed walking it last year and you can find accounts from other forum members if you do a search.
 

Bella2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014,2015,2016.
March 2017 Oct 2018 Camino ingles june 2019 cancelled Camino Portuguese Oct 2019
O way home seriously considering st Augustine camino but need a break every 3 miles. Did you find many cafes en route or pubs? Do you recommend any places to stay. Did you need to use taxis to get to your accommodation .
 

onwayhome

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Ponferrada-Santiago,(c1986)
Frances SJPP-Santiago (2011)
Portuguese Porto- Finisterre (2016)
St Michaels Way (2016)
There are several villages with pubs along the way Bella2017, though in smaller places they can't be relied upon to always be open. You might find it useful to track along the map in the guidebook (augustinecamino.co.uk), this also mentions likely pubs for lunch stops.
I particularly enjoyed Ayelsford priory as a place to stay- parts date back to the 13thCentury and it has large peaceful grounds to wander in. I didn't use taxis, everywhere I stayed was on the route. I'd suggest contacting Andrew Kelly at the website above, I found him very helpful. Hope your plans work out well.
 

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