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LIVE from the Camino Burgos

Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
 

Bella2017

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014,2015,2016.
March 2017 Oct 2018 Camino ingles june 2019 cancelled Camino Portuguese Oct 2019
Was thinking of the great food at cerveceria Morito in Burgos where I had black pudding and egg with eels
 
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ConDios

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2019
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
The “long drag into town”. Four little words that so charitably understate that entry into Burgos!
 

Bella2017

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014,2015,2016.
March 2017 Oct 2018 Camino ingles june 2019 cancelled Camino Portuguese Oct 2019
I didn’t like black pudding but in Burgos it tastes really good. I had some with eggs this morning and was reminiscing of how great it tasted when I arrived in Burgos.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
I stayed overnight on Mother's Day 2017 in Castanares, then on Monday walked the river route into Burgos. It was cool in the early morning, and the river was like a companion. I wasn't even bothered by the sign letting me know there are rattlesnakes about. . .
Thanks for making me laugh 😂 It is a lovely route, and worth the effort of trying to find it...
 

M&A

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Oct. 2015
Camino Frances, St Jean Pied De Port to Estella, May 2018.
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Did that route last June. Finished in Burgos. Planned to pick it up across the Mesata hoping to reach Leon this year in May. Had to postpone due to lockdown. Planning to continue though may be in 2021. Will follow your journey with much interest Buen Camino .
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Did that route last June. Finished in Burgos. Planned to pick it up across the Mesata hoping to reach Leon this year in May. Had to postpone due to lockdown. Planning to continue though may be in 2021. Will follow your journey with much interest Buen Camino .
The Meseta, starting in Burgos, is possibly one of the most beautiful and reflective stretches of the Camino. Easy to walk, peaceful, and with lots of time for inner reflection. I love the Meseta. Incredible. Peace.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
The Meseta, starting in Burgos, is possibly one of the most beautiful and reflective stretches of the Camino. Easy to walk, peaceful, and with lots of time for inner reflection. I love the Meseta. Incredible. Peace.

Buen Camino!
Alex: the Meseta experience moved me to the place of reflection you describe like no other stretch of the Camino. I wrote about it extensively in my journal. To be completely lost in thought for days on end was pure bliss. Although it has been 3 years, I think about that crossing every day when I walk through our local forest lands. Thank you for lending your voice to something deeply felt by many.
 

Aysen Mustafa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan on walking the Camino April 2018.
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
I feel so envious, I can recall those days walking from Villafranca da Orca to Burgos about two years ago. At Burgos I said goodbye to Ute who I met at Orisson, we both stayed at the Gite as their main place was full.
 

Shona

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2018)SJPP to Santiago Sep/Oct 2018
I would have missed the river route too but met an English lady who lives in Paris and had walked the CF 14+ times told me exactly what to watch out for in the next village. i was sitting in a bar drinking coffee and she came over and joined me, both drying off after rain. It was my first Camino and, on reaching the village, I knew I would have completely missed the turn off the main road without her directions. The river route was quiet and glorious. sure glad I didn’t know about rattlesnakes!
thanks so much for your posts. Hope your backpack doesn’t feel too heavy as I have jumped in 😀
 

Dave W96

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015,2017,2018,2019 Camino Frances; 2019 Santiago Muxia Finisterra
"2021"vdlp
The Meseta is great once you have reached the top of"killer hill" I am sure you will love it.
I will be with you all the way as I am thinking of walking from Burgos next month.
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
There are no rattlesnakes in Spain, @Shona ... so no worries. You missed nothing.
(Well, vipers, maybe... ;) )

I found the river route very easy to find, just using Brierly's map. It is lovely, and infinitely better than an industrial strip.
I didn’t mind too much as otherwise I would not have had coffee at all during the stage.

I am enjoying Burgos. The cathedral is great, and I can recommend the Museum of Human Evolution which gives a discount to Peregrinos unlike the cathedral. Were I homo medievalensis I would see an allegory in this.
 

GraemeHall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017/18; Portugués 2019
I didn’t mind too much as otherwise I would not have had coffee at all during the stage.

I am enjoying Burgos. The cathedral is great, and I can recommend the Museum of Human Evolution which gives a discount to Peregrinos unlike the cathedral. Were I homo medievalensis I would see an allegory in this.
When I was there in 2018 (twice) there was a substantial discount for pilgrims at the cathedral. How quickly things can change.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Enjoy the Meseta - my favorite part.
 
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Santiago (2012, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2019)
Via Francigena (2018); Via Podiensis (4-6, 2020)
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Thank you for the report of the current status. No matter how many times I walked that Camino, I'm always ready to return. Clean and garbage free! I hope we'll keep it that way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
GNS, thanks for your excellent summary and providing flashbacks to me on our caminos. A few memories:
  • During our first camino (2015), when we arrived in Najera, the first albergue was "completo" so we decided to stay at the municipal albergue. It was donativo and the hospitaleros were very nice. We went to find a bed and found out that there was a single sleeping room with 46 bunk beds! And by early evening, it also was "completo". Imagine sleeping with over ninety pilgrims in one room. Poor ventilation, lots of snoring and other nighttime noises. There was one bath / shower room for men and another for women. Of the three showers in the men's room, one was broken.
  • Checking in at the San Juan de Ortega municipal albergue, the hospitalero asked if we wanted to have dinner there. We knew there was a bar nearby, so we declined. He then behaved very nasty towards us, like the Soup Nazi episode on Seinfeld. We did have dinner at the bar and it was excellent. The bartender declared they serve the very best morcilla (blood sausage) in all of Spain. A few pilgrims that had eaten at the municipal came to the bar, saying their dinner was disgusting. By the way, that is how we recalled the night in the municipal, dark, dirty, smelly.
  • I still recall the extremely steep climb right out of Castrojerez. I thought we'd never make it. Having finally made it to the summit, a fellow pilgrim from the US (named Lyle). screamed out "That hill just kicked my ass!"
  • Our second camino we hiked the "river route" into Burgos. It was so scenic and peaceful. We were determined to hike it again last year, but missed the turnoff, so walked the commercial route into town. We'll be more attentive next time !
GNS, thanks for helping me relive some fond memories! Bob
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
When I was there in 2018 (twice) there was a substantial discount for pilgrims at the cathedral. How quickly things can change.
I am afraid you are right. I checked the website and I did get a discount. A good story spoilt, but another reason to walk the Camino Torres. At the cathedral in Ciudad Rodrigo the discount is 100 %.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
GNS, thanks for your excellent summary and providing flashbacks to me on our caminos. A few memories:
  • During our first camino (2015), when we arrived in Najera, the first albergue was "completo" so we decided to stay at the municipal albergue. It was donativo and the hospitaleros were very nice. We went to find a bed and found out that there was a single sleeping room with 46 bunk beds! And by early evening, it also was "completo". Imagine sleeping with over ninety pilgrims in one room. Poor ventilation, lots of snoring and other nighttime noises. There was one bath / shower room for men and another for women. Of the three showers in the men's room, one was broken.

Another experience: 2016

We stayed at the municipal albergue in Najera, and I was so tired, I don't remember falling asleep! We had walked 27 miles that day-- For dinner, we made too much food for the two of us, and so we fed the next four pilgrims who came through the door. -- And then we wandered the town where there was a wonderful fiesta going on. We bought an apricot pie and a huge meat pie and feasted the next day. Back at the hostel, I fell into my top bunk, and didn't hear a thing until it was time to get up the next morning.

Buen Camino everyone!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
We can translate víbora as vibrate, hence rattle.
According to this source, the origin of the word "viper" in English is not "vibrate." My guess is that it would not be so in Spanish, either. In Spanish, "vibrate" is "vibrar". Now we could look into the origin of that word! In any case, I think it is safe to conclude that a vibora is a viper, and not a rattlesnake.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Here's the photo I took of the snake sign. It was shortly after joining the 'river route' outside Castanares. We can translate víbora as vibrate, hence rattle. View attachment 80011
Vibora means snake. Not rattle. Similarity to English words will get you if you're not careful. Embarasada is one that has given rise to some hilarious stories...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
Vibora means snake. Not rattle. Similarity to English words will get you if you're not careful. Embarasada is one that has given rise to some hilarious stories...
Ahhh, but a rattlesnake—just not this snake which I wish would rattle— is a viper. As is a cottonmouth, copperhead, brown snake, bamboo viper, etc. They are hemo-toxic as distinct from neuro-toxic snakes like the coral snake and banded krate. I'm not a herpetologist, and, apparently, not a linguist either. But, I am happy, now, to be corrected and exposed to the error of my on-the-fly Spanish translation. Obviously a bit wide of the mark. My Mexican friend has informed me a Vibora is a viper. I know a little about word trouble, too. On my first visit to a bar in Madrid, I ordered Jabon y Huevos. Life goes on once the egg is removed from the face. . .:cool:🐍
 

marylynn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2019 CF, Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
GNS, thanks for your excellent summary and providing flashbacks to me on our caminos. A few memories:
  • During our first camino (2015), when we arrived in Najera, the first albergue was "completo" so we decided to stay at the municipal albergue. It was donativo and the hospitaleros were very nice. We went to find a bed and found out that there was a single sleeping room with 46 bunk beds! And by early evening, it also was "completo". Imagine sleeping with over ninety pilgrims in one room. Poor ventilation, lots of snoring and other nighttime noises. There was one bath / shower room for men and another for women. Of the three showers in the men's room, one was broken.
  • Checking in at the San Juan de Ortega municipal albergue, the hospitalero asked if we wanted to have dinner there. We knew there was a bar nearby, so we declined. He then behaved very nasty towards us, like the Soup Nazi episode on Seinfeld. We did have dinner at the bar and it was excellent. The bartender declared they serve the very best morcilla (blood sausage) in all of Spain. A few pilgrims that had eaten at the municipal came to the bar, saying their dinner was disgusting. By the way, that is how we recalled the night in the municipal, dark, dirty, smelly.
  • I still recall the extremely steep climb right out of Castrojerez. I thought we'd never make it. Having finally made it to the summit, a fellow pilgrim from the US (named Lyle). screamed out "That hill just kicked my ass!"
  • Our second camino we hiked the "river route" into Burgos. It was so scenic and peaceful. We were determined to hike it again last year, but missed the turnoff, so walked the commercial route into town. We'll be more attentive next time !
GNS, thanks for helping me relive some fond memories! Bob
Your experience at San Juan de Ortega was similar to mine on two different occasions. Never again!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Thank you for posting this. I feel very envious, I actually chickened out of walking the Camino francés this year.
Buen Camino!
 
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Lynn McCoy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
St. Jean Pied de Port to Logroño in 2015.
Logroño to Castrojeriz in 2016.
Complete to Santiago in 2017 & 2018
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Buen Camino.
Brings back many wonderful memories.
Gracias.
 
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Africa

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Flights booked and paid! Flying out of Sydney 5 April 2018
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
Thank you for sharing. It has brought back wonderful memories. Stay safe and enjoy
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I stayed overnight on Mother's Day 2017 in Castanares, then on Monday walked the river route into Burgos. It was cool in the early morning, and the river was like a companion. I wasn't even bothered by the sign letting me know there are rattlesnakes about. . .
Rattlesnakes? Those are a North American specie. You won't see them in Spain, unless you bring your own.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
It wasn't me, Kirkie, VNwalking, and Rebekah, I swear! I'm self quarantined here in Anacortes (which sounds like a small town outside Madrid, I know). I hate snakes. I have nightmares from my time in Viet Nam when I was nearly dispatched by a bamboo viper. We have no poisonous snakes west of the Cascade Mountains which is why I live here. I never thought my casual mention of a beautiful walk into Burgos along the 'river route' and a photo of a viper would get me into so much trouble. But our wonderful Forum community has a way of letting down gently all who err. So, if you'll excuse me, I'll return now to tilting at windmills. . .;)
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I still recall the extremely steep climb right out of Castrojerez. I thought we'd never make it. Having finally made it to the summit
I still recall that hill with amusement.

The change in elevation is not significant - about 120 metres. What is significant is is that change occurs over about 1.1 km or about a 10% rate.

My amusement came when a very much younger person and I started at the same time - late morning. We kept pretty much in step for most of the distance. Then, much to my regret she began to pull ahead with about 200 metres to go to the shelter at the top. Then 50 metres from the top she stopped and pulled out a water bottle. The tortoise (me of course) kept going, stopping only at the top. She caught me up there and just kept going.

That hill just confirms my understanding of the diabolical nature of the route planners. Not just here, but everywhere. We go up 100 metres. And immediately descend most of it over the next 1 or 2 kilometres.

This thread is a recap of the writers journey from Logrono to Burgos. And, as I write, @gns has most probably passed through Castrojeriz. To avoid the hill there is a slightly longer route to Puente Fitero (the bridge over the Rio Pisuerga). At the foot of the hill turn right. From there it is 2 km to the village Mota de Judios. From the village its is 7 km along the road BU 403 that leads directly to the Puente. Along this road is a very gentle rise of 50 metres and and equally gentle descent to the bridge.

So you pays your money and you take your choice.

@gna, to you I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, keep going) and I look forward to reading your next installment.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
I still recall that hill with amusement.

The change in elevation is not significant - about 120 metres. What is significant is is that change occurs over about 1.1 km or about a 10% rate.

My amusement came when a very much younger person and I started at the same time - late morning. We kept pretty much in step for most of the distance. Then, much to my regret she began to pull ahead with about 200 metres to go to the shelter at the top. Then 50 metres from the top she stopped and pulled out a water bottle. The tortoise (me of course) kept going, stopping only at the top. She caught me up there and just kept going.

That hill just confirms my understanding of the diabolical nature of the route planners. Not just here, but everywhere. We go up 100 metres. And immediately descend most of it over the next 1 or 2 kilometres.

This thread is a recap of the writers journey from Logrono to Burgos. And, as I write, @gns has most probably passed through Castrojeriz. To avoid the hill there is a slightly longer route to Puente Fitero (the bridge over the Rio Pisuerga). At the foot of the hill turn right. From there it is 2 km to the village Mota de Judios. From the village its is 7 km along the road BU 403 that leads directly to the Puente. Along this road is a very gentle rise of 50 metres and and equally gentle descent to the bridge.

So you pays your money and you take your choice.

@gna, to you I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, keep going) and I look forward to reading your next installment.
IMG_2803.jpg Alwyn: Do these photos look familiar? I recall going up that 12% grade outside Castrojerez. I'd move up 300 paces, then pause, then count 200 paces, and pause. Then 100 paces. I began to wonder what was wrong with me. For such a short distance, it was brutal (photo1) And then the steep 18% grade down (photo 2)
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
View attachment 80087 Alwyn: Do these photos look familiar? I recall going up that 12% grade outside Castrojerez. I'd move up 300 paces, then pause, then count 200 paces, and pause. Then 100 paces. I began to wonder what was wrong with me. For such a short distance, it was brutal (photo1) And then the steep 18% grade down (photo 2)
Sorry, Alwyn, I misspelled. Correction: Castrojeriz.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I still recall that hill with amusement.

The change in elevation is not significant - about 120 metres. What is significant is is that change occurs over about 1.1 km or about a 10% rate.

My amusement came when a very much younger person and I started at the same time - late morning. We kept pretty much in step for most of the distance. Then, much to my regret she began to pull ahead with about 200 metres to go to the shelter at the top. Then 50 metres from the top she stopped and pulled out a water bottle. The tortoise (me of course) kept going, stopping only at the top. She caught me up there and just kept going.

That hill just confirms my understanding of the diabolical nature of the route planners. Not just here, but everywhere. We go up 100 metres. And immediately descend most of it over the next 1 or 2 kilometres.

This thread is a recap of the writers journey from Logrono to Burgos. And, as I write, @gns has most probably passed through Castrojeriz. To avoid the hill there is a slightly longer route to Puente Fitero (the bridge over the Rio Pisuerga). At the foot of the hill turn right. From there it is 2 km to the village Mota de Judios. From the village its is 7 km along the road BU 403 that leads directly to the Puente. Along this road is a very gentle rise of 50 metres and and equally gentle descent to the bridge.

So you pays your money and you take your choice.

@gna, to you I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, keep going) and I look forward to reading your next installment.
I live up a hill like that - the last 50 metres to my driveway is much much steeper, and it is a gravel road - short, sharp and steep. Everyone who visits loves the amazing view (270 degrees close sea view around a peninsula), they look down to the wharf below and want to walk down to it. I do warn them that they will have to walk back up, but no-one realises the steepness on the way down! I have had visitors walk down then ring me and ask to collect them in the car! Its only 200 metres. When you get to the beach and look up, you get a much more accurate sense of the steepness. Ive been there nearly 20 years, and walk it multiple times a day, I can tell you, it never gets any less steep, even my dogs lag. There is a playground in the camp ground by the beach that the kids loved, but they would walk down and then yell at me to collect them.
It can actually be a challenge to drive up, not for me, Im used to it, but for some people who freak out, they phone first and let me know they're on their way, park at the beach and I have to collect them (200 metres) in my car.
My dad describes my location as being 'steep to overhanging' - which is an exaggeration - but he has never had any trouble getting his big touring bike up there (the area around the actual house is flat).
The whole area around is also hilly, which is good practice for the Camino. Most of the year we leave the dinghy and canoes down at the beach, but in the summer it gets busy and we have to take them home each time or risk them being 'borrowed'. Two people up that hill carrying two kayaks is a workout.
The only flat land I have ever walked on is the beach itself.
 
Last edited:

AussieWayne

Walked Camino Francis April 2018 from SJPdP.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino St JAMES from SJPdP April 2018.
Plan Camino Portuguese Sepl 2019
Reached Burgos today after 12 days of walking. Since I posted in Logrono there has been no real change to the precautions. The weather has been variable with on big rainstorm which luckily came after the end of a stage.

Logrono to Najera was memorable mainly for the rabbits and red squirrels in the park at the edge of Logrono. There has been a major project to upgrade the camino as you leave Logrono. I don’t know if this is new. The municipal in Najera was closed and most people seemed to be in the private Purrta de Najera by the bridge which waa very good.

Najera to Santiago Domingo de Calzada was without difficulty and we all stayed at the big municipal de Santo albergue. The regulations here are being enforced strictly. Mattresses have been removed from the top bunks and alternate facilities in the bathrooms taped over to prevent use. There was still plenty of space.

After Granon the next day we crossed into Castile y Leon. The day was hot and none of the bars or cafes in the intermediate villages were open before stage end in Belorado. We stayed at the Albergue a Peregrinos at the start of Belorado for eight euros. Our room had sixteen capacity reduced to six. They are careful about mask wearing but bathroom facilities are not restricted.

As the people I was walking with decided to take a rest day in Belorado I set out at 5am to try and reach Atapuerca before it got too hot. The first open bar was in the hotel above the church in Villafranca. Once I reached the top of the climb I walked alone through the forest to San Juan de Ortega before continuing to Atapuerca. Bars were open in both San Juan and Ages. During 30km I saw one group of four Spanish pilgrims at the cafe in Villafranca and one pilgtim in the bar at San Juan. Bar a couple of locals and a few cyclists I walked in solitude and bright sunshine. It was oneof the best days I have had on Camino. I stayed in La Plazuela Verde which is a sensitive restoration of an old barn (I think) for 12 euros spoilt a bit by loud music next door.

This morning’s walk to Burgos was fine. I saw three Peregrinos I know and we had coffee at the start of the long drag into town. This was ok as it was Saturday morning with little traffic and early enough to be cool.

I will take a rest day tomorrow then on to the Meseta.
I live up a hill like that - the last 50 metres to my driveway is much much steeper, and it is a gravel road - short, sharp and steep. Everyone who visits loves the amazing view (270 degrees close sea view around a peninsula), they look down to the wharf below and want to walk down to it. I do warn them that they will have to walk back up, but no-one realises the steepness on the way down! I have had visitors walk down then ring me and ask to collect them in the car! Its only 200 metres. When you get to the beach and look up, you get a much more accurate sense of the steepness. Ive been there nearly 20 years, and walk it multiple times a day, I can tell you, it never gets any less steep, even my dogs lag. There is a playground in the camp ground by the beach that the kids loved, but they would walk down and then yell at me to collect them.
It can actually be a challenge to drive up, not for me, Im used to it, but for some people who freak out, they phone first and let me know they're on their way, park at the beach and I have to collect them (200 metres) in my car.
My dad describes my location as being 'steep to overhanging' - which is an exaggeration - but he has never had any trouble getting his big touring bike up there (the area around the actual house is flat).
The whole area around is also hilly, which is good practice for the Camino. Most of the year we leave the dingy and canoes down at the beach, but in the summer it gets busy and we have to take them home each time or risk them being 'borrowed'. Two people up that hill carrying two kayaks is a workout.
The only flat land I have ever walked on is the beach itself.
I absolutely loved Burgos when I passed through there at Easter 2018. A pilgrim I met lived in Burgos and invited me to stay at his home. We had a magic time - Burgos is famous for its Easter parades and afterwards, boy can the locals play!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
I absolutely loved Burgos when I passed through there at Easter 2018. A pilgrim I met lived in Burgos and invited me to stay at his home. We had a magic time - Burgos is famous for its Easter parades and afterwards, boy can the locals play!!!
How fortunate you had that experience! Nothing is better than being in the local scene with someone who knows it. You are, obviously, simpático.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Do these photos look familiar?
And then the steep 18% grade down
At least someone had the good grace to put an everlasting surface on the 18% descent. Plus it is only about 300 metres. But, I think, this proves my point the promoters of this route have a view one is not a true pilgrim until you have endure their local adversity. I just come across it some many times.

I live up a hill like that
I have a similar situation on one of my training walks. The first 8 km from home is in three sections:
1) 4.7 km ascend 183 metres - quite gentle most of the way and great views looking back:
2) 1.4 km descend 82 metres - quite gentle between two hills, so no views:
3) 1.9 km ascend 216 metres - similar rate of climb to the hill west of Castrojeriz - great views looking back.
The fourth section is a 6 km descent of 350 metres down to a river - very gentle - starts as a farm then urban

I usually have a breakfast after section 3

@Anamiri, kia kaha
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
On my current virtual Camino Frances, I was recalling this:
"The photos of the hill though, after Castrojeriz. Is it something of Mostelares? I can still feel the determination as I tackled that. I invented a way of breathing to propel me up and over: two breaths in, two breaths out. 17 minutes. I didn't stop. I was too afraid that I would just collapse and refuse to take another step! We are talking chicken here. Armchair athlete. Not any more though, thankfully." Numbers and gradients and all ups and downs - they don't mean much to me till I am walking them.
That's why my face looks like this when I see what rises ahead!
montes de oca.png
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
That's why my face looks like this when I see what rises ahead!
Beautiful.
This is a classic version of what a friend and I call "the camino look." Seen when tackling something that takes grit...and grace. The halfway-up-that-tough-hill look, AKA the "I-ain't-gonna-stop" look.
💖
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
I still recall that hill with amusement.

The change in elevation is not significant - about 120 metres. What is significant is is that change occurs over about 1.1 km or about a 10% rate.

My amusement came when a very much younger person and I started at the same time - late morning. We kept pretty much in step for most of the distance. Then, much to my regret she began to pull ahead with about 200 metres to go to the shelter at the top. Then 50 metres from the top she stopped and pulled out a water bottle. The tortoise (me of course) kept going, stopping only at the top. She caught me up there and just kept going.

That hill just confirms my understanding of the diabolical nature of the route planners. Not just here, but everywhere. We go up 100 metres. And immediately descend most of it over the next 1 or 2 kilometres.

This thread is a recap of the writers journey from Logrono to Burgos. And, as I write, @gns has most probably passed through Castrojeriz. To avoid the hill there is a slightly longer route to Puente Fitero (the bridge over the Rio Pisuerga). At the foot of the hill turn right. From there it is 2 km to the village Mota de Judios. From the village its is 7 km along the road BU 403 that leads directly to the Puente. Along this road is a very gentle rise of 50 metres and and equally gentle descent to the bridge.

So you pays your money and you take your choice.

@gna, to you I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, keep going) and I look forward to reading your next installment.
Walked up the hill this morning. While it wasn’t easy I always take pleasure later in a Camino in how much fitter I am than whe I started. The view is a real reward as well
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC

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