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Corkscrew do I take one with me?

AKBee

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
September 2020
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
 
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Agreed.
And in the very unlikely event of not having a corkscrew, you can always push the cork in. Them find some friends to drink the entire bottle with you (or not...).
 
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I do, always. Well, actually my Swiss Army knife with corkscrew, scissors, tweezers, toothpick, etc. A great tool that is small and light.
A corkscrew is pretty good for loosening knots too!

Sure, there are corkscrews - in the UK we must have millions of them .... but that one time that crops up when there isn't one or the only one is broken?

Oh, and a tea spoon .... yoghurt, ice cream pots, etc.
 
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Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
Sorry, I just want to say, rather than have to say: Spain has every convenience, including corkscrews.
edit: forgive the sorry, perhaps if this is going to be your first foray into Europe and the conveniences it may or may not offer...be assured. You will find a multiplicity of corkscrews for every possible occasion.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Sorry, I just want to say, rather than have to say: Spain has every convenience, including corkscrews.
edit: forgive the sorry, perhaps if this is going to be your first foray into Europe and the conveniences it may or may not offer...be assured. You will find a multiplicity of corkscrews for every possible occasion.

I so disagree with this, sorry. Sure, there are probably billions of corkscrews in Europe but there is always the time when a refugio doesn't have one, or if it does then someone has taken it into the garden and left it there, or the only one is broken, or you treat yourself to a night in a guest house and are in your room, no corkscrew .... there is strolling out in the evening with a couple of new friends to sit and look at a magnificent view and share ... no corkscrew there ... carrying wine with you and stopping by a stream to eat your packed lunch and have just one glass of wine, no corkscrew there ... I could go on ...

have you never been at a party that is spread out from the kitchen to sitting room to patio to garden and that house only has one corkscrew and it is nowhere to be found?
Oh, I did go on ;)
 
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I never go on a Camino without one. Yes, you rarely use it. But when you need it, its good to have.
I'm using the smallest Swiss Army knife that has a corkscrew, the Victorinox Waiter, which comes in at 38g and has a few other features including a small knife. I guess that's easily worth the weight.
 
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I have never brought one and can only remember one time that we couldn't find one in the albergue or from fellow pilgrims. We asked at the shop where we bought the wine if they had one and they opened it for us.

For reference the Spanish for (the/a) corkscrew is (el/un) sacacorchos [a portmanteau style word from sacar (to pull) and corchos (corks)
 
I didn't have one on my first Camino. Not every albergue had one back then. So I always asked the other pilgrims and offered some wine in return. It was a good way to get to know people! After a few days a group of italians who had already given me their corkscrew several times started to laugh when they saw me approaching them, because they already knew I was "the one with the wine" 😂.

Sometimes I bring one now, especially when I do a lot of camping. But in the albergues there's usually someone who has one. Communication is the key!
 
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The corkscrew on my Swiss army knife got frequent use on the Camino. Also useful on the knives my wife and I carried were the scissors and large blade. The knives couldn't go on our carry-on airline baggage but our tickets included a free checked bag, which we used for a box that contained our trekking poles and knives.
 
I have been allowed to bring a corkscrew in the cabin in my backpack as long as it has been one without the little knife and they always check. Possibly it's a questionable item like hiking poles and depends on the mood of the security personnel that day. I keep it with easy access in case they want to look at it.
 
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
We could never find one. My husband became an expert at removing corks with no corkscrew. Lol.
 
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Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
For all a corkscrew weighs I would pack one. Mine was an accessory on my swiss army style knife. Although pilgrims without one asked around and often I lent mine out
 
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
Never needed one. I guess if you're camping it makes sense. But don't bring it with you. Buy one there at a China store, as peregrinos usually refer to the dollar stores. They are not only cheap but are lightweight. They won't last long, but long enough for a camino.
 
I had thought to bring my Swiss Army knife, but found it too heavy for "just in case." Instead, I brought a corkscrew similar to this. It weighed almost nothing, but I did in fact need both the corkscrew and the little blade. This and my titanium spork, and I was covered!
 

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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
I used mine almost every day.
I check my bag at the airport, so I bring a small Swiss Army knife with a corkscrew.
The knife is also very useful for cutting cheese.
So definitely yes!
 
We asked at the shop where we bought the wine if they had one and they opened it for us.
That is my go-to method as well. I think that any private albergue, pensión or hotel will always be able to open a bottle of wine for you. I think it’s more the municipal albergues that people are talking about. But @David points out circumstances in which a spontaneous picnic or sunset could be less fun if you couldn’t open a bottle of wine. If that’s an issue for you, a corkscrew might be a good idea.

When I started carrying my electric coil, I stopped carrying my Swiss Army knife, as a “weight trade off” based on my assessment of how often I would need each one. I threw my knife in this year since I had a package to check on the plane over anyway. I did find it useful in a couple of the municipal albergues where we had managed to buy a bottle of wine beforehand. Cifuentes stands out on the Lana. If I had not had a corkscrew, though, I would have asked in either a bar on the way back to the albergue from the grocery store, or just ask a person outside working in their garden. When you’re on an untraveled camino you can be pretty sure that you will not find that these kinds of requests exasperate people — quite the contrary, they oftentimes like the chance to talk to you!

Spain may not have screw-on tops for wine, but it definitely has wine in boxes. And though many of those boxes are probably not very drinkable, I think there is a growing supply of not-so-bad wine in boxes.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Just get the simple "barman" Swiss Army knife. If you're arriving by airplane via Paris, that's the best place to find one.

Also good for cutting bread & cheeses, fruit & veg, salchichón y chorizo, and so much more besides.
 
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The Swiss make great red handled corkscrews that come provided with extra sharp edged tools.

Yeah, already mentioned but I had to have my say too.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I read once that the difference between a Swiss Army Knife and a Swiss Army Officiers' Knife was that the later came with the corkscrew.
 
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This is how you do it: go in the shop, look at the bottom of wine shelves, find the cheap (1 to few euros) bottle without any label just excise hologram*, buy it, right by the shop take out your Swiss knife with corkscrew, open the bottle, check quality by taste, pour the rest of wine into a lightweight plastic bottle, dispose of the heavy glass bottle. Good to go!
BTW red wine works wonders on tired legs: just a glass will take away all the heavy feeling and you can walk more km easily.
* Wines with protected names have limits for yield per hectare. When the harvest is better than allowed vineyards don't throw goodies away, they still make nice wine and sell it as anonymous. Tricks of the trade.
 
I purchased a pocket knife in St Jean. Had a corkscrew and small pair of scissors in it.
 
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In the context of this thread it seems there are two types of pilgrims:
1. Those who say "the Camino provides" - by which they mean "other pilgrims".
2. Those who say "I provide for myself - and those around who may be in need"

Luckily there's a happy balance of both kinds of pilgrims to balance things out. 😁

Edited to answer the question: I would pack one! :)
 
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In the context of this thread it seems there are two types of pilgrims:
1. Those who say "the Camino provides" - by which they mean "other pilgrims".
2. Those who say "I provide for myself - and those around who may be in need"

Luckily there's a happy balance of both kinds of pilgrims to balance things out. 😁
Not really. There are those that answer the question asked and point out that if you need something there are plenty of opportunities to get the item in country - in this case a corkscrew. I've yet to not find one in an alberque kitchen. Chances are in a group someone may well have one. The camino provides in many ways - not just materialistically.
 
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I so disagree with this, sorry. Sure, there are probably billions of corkscrews in Europe but there is always the time when a refugio doesn't have one, or if it does then someone has taken it into the garden and left it there, or the only one is broken, or you treat yourself to a night in a guest house and are in your room, no corkscrew .... there is strolling out in the evening with a couple of new friends to sit and look at a magnificent view and share ... no corkscrew there ... carrying wine with you and stopping by a stream to eat your packed lunch and have just one glass of wine, no corkscrew there ... I could go on ...

have you never been at a party that is spread out from the kitchen to sitting room to patio to garden and that house only has one corkscrew and it is nowhere to be found?
Oh, I did go on ;)
You are spot on. I’d go so far as to say that a corkscrew is literally indispensable.
 
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
Swiss Army Knife has everything you need. I don't go anywhere without it, on or off the Camino.
 
I bought a bottle of wine in a wine shop in Astorga once and asked the guy there if he could open it for me. He said he didn't have a corkscrew but "esperate!" and he left me alone to watch the store while he walked about two blocks away to a bar for them to open my bottle. That's what I like about Spain.
 
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My word. 48 posts and 48 opinions. Not bad for such a trivial thing. You walk between 5000 and 100km, fly from everywhere in the world to do it, and you can actually worry about whether or not you should bring a corkscrew. An item that costs about 4€ in any small supermarket in France or Spain. Oh well. I suppose that's human nature, to focus on the small stuff. But, IMHO, it doesn't, in the global scheme of things, actually have any importance. Far more significant is, once the bottle is open, how good is the wine, what drinking vessel do you use, and in what company do you drink it? Not that I can't drink a bottle of wine in my own company, but still, let's focus on the important stuff!
 
Far more significant is, once the bottle is open, how good is the wine, what drinking vessel do you use, and in what company do you drink it? Not that I can't drink a bottle of wine in my own company, but still, let's focus on the important stuff!
Hmmm, I think that would go from the 48 replies to 480. 😅
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Wondering if I should pack a corkscrew? The added weight verses the possible pleasure of enjoying a glass or two of wine in the evening at the Albergues might be worth it. Do the Albergues with kitchens general have one?
If you take a corkscrew, you will be more popular than you can imagine 😉
Most albergues have them though. . .
 
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what drinking vessel do you use,
The vessel is important to me when drinking wine. I always prefer standard wine glasses, whether modern or antique. On Camino I always pack a small stemless clear plastic glass with a comfortable rim that is not sharp and def has no color. I'm definitely not a wine snob, but I am particular about the vessel, so I must be a vessel snob.😅
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
The vessel is important to me when drinking wine. I always prefer standard wine glasses, whether modern or antique. On Camino I always pack a small stemless clear plastic glass with a comfortable rim that is not sharp and def has no color. I'm definitely not a wine snob, but I am particular about the vessel, so I must be a vessel snob.😅
Is it a Govino? I never thought I would enjoy drinking wine from a plastic cup, but these are fabulous! https://govino.com/shop Nice thin rim and the thumb notch is genius.

Before I knew about these glasses, once I entered the Bierzo region and left the camino briefly to visit some wine tasting rooms. I knew that ice axe loop on the back of my pack would come in handy someday... And the side pockets, too! I'd have to gain a lot of weight for my pack to have been 10% of my body weight then!
 

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Is it a Govino? I never thought I would enjoy drinking wine from a plastic cup, but these are fabulous!
No, Jill, my fave to bring on the Camino is this one on the left. I guess I am not a vessel snob after all as it was only 25 cents from my fave resale shop. When I pack up I stuff a pair of socks in it so it takes up no room.
Yours is lovely, btw.
IMG_20240401_103229498~2.jpg
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Prepare for your next Camino on California's Santa Catalina Island, Oct 27 to Nov 2
The vessel is important to me when drinking wine. I always prefer standard wine glasses, whether modern or antique. On Camino I always pack a small stemless clear plastic glass with a comfortable rim that is not sharp and def has no color. I'm definitely not a wine snob, but I am particular about the vessel, so I must be a vessel snob.😅
Sorry this may seem like a strange question but what do you regard as a standard wine glass? In Tumbler, long neck? In a USA bar at mo and wine served in a tumbler which I really like!
 
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Hi TM22, Not strange as I obviously didn't make myself very clear.
Standard, imo, are the normal wine glasses served in restaurants; usually a more fat shape is served for red, and a bit more slender for white wine. At home, I also have a set of etched crystal antique wine glasses.
I was only speaking of what I prefer to use when choosing a plastic drinking cup to bring on the Camino. Hope this helps.
 
Hi TM22, Not strange as I obviously didn't make myself very clear.
Standard, imo, are the normal wine glasses served in restaurants; usually a more fat shape is served for red, and a bit more slender for white wine. At home, I also have a set of etched crystal antique wine glasses.
I was only speaking of what I prefer to use when choosing a plastic drinking cup to bring on the Camino. Hope this helps.
Ah ok. Currently in a bar in USA and got served as per image. Different to Europe with a ‘long neck’ glass. Kinda prefer the USA glass!
 

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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Ah ok. Currently in a bar in USA and got served as per image. Different to Europe with a ‘long neck’ glass. Kinda prefer the USA glass!
Yes, stemless glasses have become quite popular in the US, but they still have more of a wine glass shape; much easier for bars to clean them with less breakage. I don't mind them, but stems seem more traditional.
 
Yes, stemless glasses have become quite popular in the US, but they still have more of a wine glass shape; much easier for bars to clean them with less breakage. I don't mind them, but stems seem more traditional.
Yea stems seem more traditional but like the stemless ones. Less traditional of course but feel more substantial and less likely to knock over!
 
At home Peg likes stemmed wine glasses but I prefer old jelly/jam glasses. A friend gifted us some plastic tumbler type glasses like in post #69 (with a thumb indentation yet). We have them in our travel trailer because they are unbreakable. At campgrounds where alcohol is forbidden empty coke cans are filled inside and used outside.
 
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At home Peg likes stemmed wine glasses but I prefer old jelly/jam glasses. A friend gifted us some plastic tumbler type glasses like in post #69 (with a thumb indentation yet). We have them in our travel trailer because they are unbreakable. At campgrounds where alcohol is forbidden empty coke cans are filled inside and used outside.
There are campgrounds where alcohol is forbidden? Wow. What strange country is this? I've seen trains with no drinking allowed, but camp grounds? Weird. Not going there.
 
There are campgrounds where alcohol is forbidden? Wow. What strange country is this? I've seen trains with no drinking allowed, but camp grounds? Weird. Not going there.
Mostly in the parks run by the state or county. Some forbid alcohol in the park but allow it on the campsites. It's easier to remove and fine drunks for drinking than proving that they were drinking too much.
 
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In our past four CFs, my wife and I carry on our backpacks, but check in a single nylon bag for our trekking poles and swiss army knife. The knife is invaluable to cut bread, cheese and chorizo for lunch and breaks, and at our destination, after we check in at the albergue, we find a relaxing place to enjoy a bottle of wine.

During my camino last fall, Cindi stayed home to help care for her mother that is developing several health problems. I decided to hike Camino Portuguese allowing 14 hiking stages from Porto to Santiago. I left my knife and trekking poles at home, and decided to purchase these in Porto. I found a sporting goods store and bought a nice set of trekking poles for a great price. The store did not have anything similar to a swiss army knife. I checked several other stores and was not successful. Running short on time, I walked to Porto's Mercado do Bolhao to buy provisions for hiking the next day. After buying a hunk of cheese (that did not require refrigeration), I turned around to the stand behind me and discovered a stall of a blacksmith that made a variety of items, including knives. Then I found one that was almost identical to SAK, including a bottle opener, two blades and a corkscrew! I was elated! And there were various types of hardwood (I selected cherry). Then his female partner asked me if I wanted it engraved! I wrote on paper "Camino Bob 2023) and within minutes I had my custom knife. It was wonderful and received heavy use every day.

When I returned home to the US, I looked closely at the knife's box and found an email address. I contacted Andre Fernandes and asked if I could purchase a custom, engraved knife for my brother's birthday. No problem. 75 euros for the knife and 25 euros to send to my home in Indianapolis. I will give to him when he comes to Indy for a few days of fishing. Bob
 
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Mostly in the parks run by the state or county. Some forbid alcohol in the park but allow it on the campsites. It's easier to remove and fine drunks for drinking than proving that they were drinking too much.
I see. Still think it's sad, though.
 
I have been allowed to bring a corkscrew in the cabin in my backpack as long as it has been one without the little knife
Oh! I did not know this was ok! https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/corkscrews-no-blade

Could I assume other security agencies would allow? I am flying a small Dutch airline from Paris to Biarritz/Bayonne. I suppose I wouldn't cry if it were confiscated. But it's the Paris airport! The French love wine. It should be just fine. ;) ha ha ha.
 
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My word. 48 posts and 48 opinions. Not bad for such a trivial thing. You walk between 5000 and 100km, fly from everywhere in the world to do it, and you can actually worry about whether or not you should bring a corkscrew. An item that costs about 4€ in any small supermarket in France or Spain. Oh well. I suppose that's human nature, to focus on the small stuff. But, IMHO, it doesn't, in the global scheme of things, actually have any importance. Far more significant is, once the bottle is open, how good is the wine, what drinking vessel do you use, and in what company do you drink it? Not that I can't drink a bottle of wine in my own company, but still, let's focus on the important stuff!
A hem! Wine IS important.
 
Something I discovered during a trip within the US awhile back. With an early morning flight, I forgot to leave my leatherman's knife at home. The model is "Juice" which I bought several years ago and it has been discontinued. Before I got to TSA, I placed it in my carry on luggage, hoping it would not be discovered. It was. I was sure it would be confiscated, but then the TSA agent asked me if I wanted to send it to myself! I was given a form to complete which included a $25 fee which I paid via credit card. Within a few weeks, it arrived at my Indianapolis home. I was elated! Kudos to TSA for adopting a customer friendly want to ensure compliance with flying regulations, but not throwing valuable items in the trash bin! Bob
 
Yes, stemless glasses have become quite popular in the US, but they still have more of a wine glass shape; much easier for bars to clean them with less breakage. I don't mind them, but stems seem more traditional.
And stemless are not ideal for white wines. Hand heat, bad for the white wines. :D I am fine with them for reds. It's only 13:00 here right now and I am craving a wine.
 
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A couple of years ago I stayed in an apartment in Santarém while on the Camino Portugués. Part of my grocery shopping was a bottle of red wine. I had already checked that there was a wine opener in the kitchen drawer. However, when I went to open the bottle I found that the opener was broken. After some Googling I learned that I could push the cork into the bottle with the handle of a wooden spoon. Crisis averted!
 
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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
On the French Camino last year, I just bought wine in boxes. Every supermarket has them - in small sizes too [e.g. 500 ml} with a screw top.
 
13:00 is a perfectly acceptable time to drink wine.
Definitely an acceptable hour, but if you still feel uncomfortable imbibing at that time, just remember it’s after 17:00 somewhere. Cheers! Santé ! and ¡Salut! wherever you may be.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
If you don't have a corkscrew but do have a fridge or some ice from the shop, then just drink champagne.
Yes! If I am hot and tired after walking and staying in private accomodations, I often love picking up a bottle of champagne or frizzae at a supermarcado(very inexpensive, yet yummy)...and a bag of ice cubes to make it icy cold...so refreshing!
I can not drink any version of white wine at room temperature and at restaurants I often ask for a glass of helio on the side, however I do get some odd looks from bartenders occasionally in Spain, but they do bring it.🙄😅
 
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