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How much did you spend and what was the total cost of your Camino Frances, start to finish?

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JulioCesarSalad

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
February
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
 
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€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
What are you hoping to understand?
You'll get such a broad range of responses, I'm not sure it will be of much value.

There are so many variables.

  1. How far the Pilgrim walks per day and hence how many 'days on the Camino'. It can vary from 25 days to 50+ days.
  2. The type of accommodation that was used.
  3. The dining preferences. DIY cooking to Pilgrims Menu to a la carte.
  4. Any 'additional' costs such as communications, medical.........
As a wild guess, it could easily range from 750 euros or less to 4,000 euros or more.

And perhaps a lot more for those on organised 'tours'.

Sorry, not trying to be difficult.

Afterthought. Why not post the question as a Poll.?
 
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I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?
Last time I walked Pamplona to Santiago was 2019. I spent in the order of €3,200, excluding flights and trains to and from the start and end points.

With no context behind that it’s hard to see how useful it is; but I’m happy to help.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
The issue of expenses today due to Covid and inflation is quite different from when I first walked the CF in 2016. Then, I was able to walk from SJPP to SdC for about €30 a day or about €900 total. Some days spending a little more; other days a little less. However, our two weeks on the CP this past spring proved to be much more expensive. From accommodations to food and drink to incidentals, everything is more expensive in this post-Covid, higher inflationary time. With that said, I’m heading back to the CF this spring for two more weeks of walking. My budget, and I think it’s pretty realistic, will be €40-45/day. So, depending on the number of days you plan to take, the math is pretty easy to do. Nonetheless, once you figure out what you think it will cost you, pad your budget a bit so you can travel at your particular comfort level which certainly varies from person to person.
 
Last time I walked Pamplona to Santiago was 2019. I spent in the order of €3,200, excluding flights and trains to and from the start and end points.

With no context behind that it’s hard to see how useful it is; but I’m happy to help.

My previous Caminos were in a similar range, but that was pre Covid.
 
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?
Something to consider is whether you still have money coming in while you are walking e.g. annual leave pay, renting out your house, or a pension etc. In the past we have ended up with more or less as much money as when we started simply because we were spending less money on camino than in normal living expenses. Transport depends on where you come from of course. We had to save for that.
 
The 9th edition the Lightfoot Guide will let you complete the journey your way.
Hola @JulioCesarSalad Whilst I can understand your question, like Robo says there are just too many variables. Plus the affects of COVID-19 have, in my opinion, have changed the situation. What did I spend in 2017 probably around 1500/2000 Euros, but that included an extra night in Pamplona Burgos and Leon. Hope this helpls
 
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?
Honestly - the only way to tell you the budget is "per day". Why? Your total cost will depend on the number of days you plan to be on the Camino. If you plan to walk from SJPDP to Santiago in 35 days your budget will be more than someone who walks it in 28 days and less than someone who walks it in 45 days. But your day to day average times the number of days you plan to walk/be in Spain will tell you how much to budget. You can spend 35 days on the Camino for about $1,500 Euros or USD. That is - staying mostly in albergues, eating pilgrim meals, and cheap breakfast lunches. I did this with some private stays as well. My daily average was about 40/day. A few days were much cheaper, a few days were much more expensive. But an average of 40/day is about what I spent. I did SJPDP to Santiago to Muxia to Finisterre in 35 days. But again - if I had walked much slower - I would have spent a much higher total budget.

And while I plan for about 40/day - I budget about 50/day for the number of days I plan to go. How much time does your cousin plan to be in Spain? Take his number of days in Spain and multiple that by about 50/day - more if he plans to stay in more private rooms then budget higher, same if he wants to eat at nicer restaurants. And then of course - add in transportation to/from.
 
Something to consider is whether you still have money coming in while you are walking e.g. annual leave pay, renting out your house, or a pension etc. In the past we have ended up with more or less as much money as when we started simply because we were spending less money on camino than in normal living expenses. Transport depends on where you come from of course. We had to save for that.
That’s a very good point @dick bird

When we ‘loosely’ tally up (after the event) what we spend while on Camino or travelling generally (airfare excluded) it often seems like more than we expected. 😳. But then we take off what we would usually spend at home on day to day living expenses and it suddenly doesn’t seem so expensive after all 😎
 
St James' Way - Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading to Southampton, 110 kms
When we ‘loosely’ tally up (after the event) what we spend while on Camino or travelling generally (airfare excluded) it often seems like more than we expected. 😳.

This is exactly why I am asking. People can provide all the projections in the world for per day spending but I would like to see what the real world results are.

For people mentioning variables, yes, so please explain them! Please say how much it cost, how much you were planning to spend, and if you stayed at private accommodations or ate out often.
 
Yes, I understand. I was only responding to the comment I quoted about taking into account what you would otherwise be spending at home. Sometimes threads take a brief detour to related ideas then circle back.

I didn’t offer any projections or ‘real world results’ - sorry - as it’s a very long time since I’ve been on the Camino Frances . And, more to the point, as others have mentioned, it can vary greatly and depends on parameters such as types of accommodation you plan to use (Albergues dormitories vs private rooms or combination) and how many days you expect to be walking. As @Robo has summarised at comment #2.

As I’m not able to answer your question, I won’t make any further comment 😎
 
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I don't keep track of every euro that I spend, but I do keep a spreadsheet of where I stayed and the cost of accommodations. In 2019 I did a "combo" Camino - I walked the Francés to León, then the Camino del Salvador, and finished off on the Norte. It took 40 days, and I spent 709 Euros on accommodations - mostly albergues with 9 days in private rooms. My most expensive stay was 62 Euros, and a couple of municipal albergues were only 6 euros. I would expect the prices to be slightly higher in 2023 than in 2019.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I dont know how useful 'real world results' from others will be to your cousin. What he spends walking a camino will depend almost entirely on where he chooses to stay, how he chooses to eat and drink and how many days he plans to walk for.

For a 'typical' 30 day camino on his own, he can expect to spend anywhere between €900 and €2400. Or perhaps more. Or perhaps less.
 
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I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
In 2012 I spent in the region of €1800 excluding flights, trains etc, going from SJPP to Santiago, Finisterra and Muxia staying in a mix of albergues, private rooms and Hostals, eating menu del dia and regular menus with some drink thrown in. That was me, how much you will spend is entirely up to you and how you want to do your Camino, that's the reality.
 
Something to consider is whether you still have money coming in while you are walking e.g. annual leave pay, renting out your house, or a pension etc. In the past we have ended up with more or less as much money as when we started simply because we were spending less money on camino than in normal living expenses. Transport depends on where you come from of course. We had to save for that.
I think this is a very good point. Obviously most folks have ‘fixed costs’ in terms of monthly spend, but if you have a significantly high variable costs then it may work out cheaper for you. If you rent than maybe a trip at end of rental period may be a winner. A cup of coffee in Pamplona is definitely cheaper than Manhattan or London!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
This is exactly why I am asking. People can provide all the projections in the world for per day spending but I would like to see what the real world results are.
Whose real world? As others have commented above there are too many variables; accommodation choices, food preferences, beverage preferences, transport usage.

I give you my camino / pilgrimage expenditures over the last 10 years. They will be as much use to you as the proverbial chocolate fireguard.

2012: €1700 & €400; 2013: €800 & €140; 2014: €2800 & €50; 2017: €5080 (two people over 52 days including two Birthday parties); 2018: €900; 2020: £3000 (7 days); 2022: €3857

Please note I do not "budget" my Caminos. I spend what I need or am inclined to spend. The figures above exist because I have a boring habit of checking my Bank and credit card statements and noting expenditure in my Camino diaries. The numbers above will almost certainly include clothing and equipment purchases made en-route and the purchase and shipping of the odd case of wine.
 
This person simply asked 4 basic questions. Almost all responders inserted preconceived notions, bias assumptions, some becoming quite preachy. Fact is, we have no idea why the questions were asked.
This thread is an interesting study in human nature and group dynamics in an online chat thread!
In 2016, 2 of us spent 4,150Eu.
We had planned 4,500
Approximately 15 days in hostels; 22 in private rooms and 3 in city hotels
We did not cook. Approximately 25 pilgrim neals served by our hosts, 15 restaurants
 
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In August/September this year I spent the following on average each walking day (31 nights)
1. Accommodation -€16 (stayed in albergues)
2. Desayuno - €4
3. Almuerzo - €9
4. Cena - €14
5. Cervezas - €8

Miscellaneous - Entry fees, water, fruit purchase of sabanas (bed sheets), etc €5

Over the full trip it was cerca €55 per day.

This is an average. My budget (€40) went out the window as the family I walked with became increasingly more social at the end of each day.

In SdC we splurged and stayed in a nice hotel (cost was cerca €110. Meals were more expensive about €18). These numbers aren’t included in the average.

Hope this helps. Buen Camino
 
Completed the CF 3 times from SJPdP to Santiago, (2014, 2016 & 2021) stayed in a mix of private and municipal albergues, 1 menú del día/peregrino per day, 1/2 coffees daily, snacks and lunches here and there depending on availability/need/desire etc.., approx 33 days duration and the overall cost without transport was always between €800 - €1000.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
After airfare, never more than 1500
 
This is exactly why I am asking. People can provide all the projections in the world for per day spending but I would like to see what the real world results are.

For people mentioning variables, yes, so please explain them! Please say how much it cost, how much you were planning to spend, and if you stayed at private accommodations or ate out often.
It seems to me you are suggesting our "per day spending" is not the same as "real world results". Which is not true. You are interpreting them as "estimates" (per your original question). But we are giving you what we spent daily as real world results. It is the most accurate way to compare different people's Camino spending - our per day spending times the number of days we travelled. We give averages because our day to day spending varies - but the average is our real world spending average - not some theoretical suggestion.

Maybe it would be more helpful to ask YOU the questions.
Where does your cousin want to stay? Does he want to stay in all municipal/religious albergues? Does he want to stay in private albergues? Does he want to stay in private rooms in Pensions?

Where does your cousin want to eat breakfast? Does he want to eat breakfast provided by private albergues or pensions? Does he want to buy breakfast from the supermarket or a local bakery? Does he want to stop at a bar for breakfast? Does he want to stop and get a full breakfast in an actual resaurant?

Where does your cousin want to eat lunch? Does he want to pack a lunch bought at a supermarket? Does he want to stop at a bar for lunch? Does he want to eat at an actual restaurant for lunch? Will that lunch be from the Raciones Menu, the Pilgrim's Menu, or the regular menu?

Where does your cousin want to eat dinner? Will he want to buy from a grocery store and cook? Will he want to partake in a communal pilgrim's meal at an albergue or at a bar? Or will he want to go out to sample the local cuisine? Or get an expensive meal at a fine dining establishment?

How many meals will he eat per day? Will he eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner? Will he have a second breakfast, lunch, or dinner? Will he buy snacks to carry? Will he stop and buy snacks?

Will your cousin only drink water during the day? And will he refill a water bottle from the tap or will he buy new fresh bottles of water daily? Will he stop to buy an aquarius or a soda? Will he stop to buy beer or wine? How many times will he stop and buy beverages besides water? Will he buy bottles of wine daily to share with friends? How many bottle will he buy to share with friends? Will he buy other food to share with friends?

How many km/miles will your cousin walk per day? How many days will he take to walk? How many rest days will he take?

Does he have any health issues that will likely flare up? Will he have injuries that need to be cared for? Will he need new insoles for his shoes? Will he need an ankle or knee support? Does he need to buy an extra jacket because he is colder than he intended? Did he lose his phone charger and need to buy a replacement?

Will he stop and tour cathedrals? How many cathedrals will he tour that are not free to visit? Will he stop and visit museums? How many museums will he stop to visit and how much do they cost?

Will he take a taxi or a bus or a train to skip a section or to find lodging if none is available in the town he was hoping to stay in?

How will your cousin get his money? Will he convert currency to Euros at home and bring all of his Euros with him? Or will he go to ATM's along the way. If he goes to ATMs, how many will he visit and how much are the ATM fees for his bank? What about additional fees by the bank in Spain? Does he have foreign transaction fees on top of the other bank fees? Will he be using his credit card? What foreign transaction fees will they charge?

When booking lodging - will he walk up and pay in cash, or card? Or will he reserve in advance - in which case, are they charging more because he is using a booking service? Or did he book directly and they owner gives a discount to those booking directly?

Will he use a travel service in any way? - because they have lots of fees too.

These are all variables that make it very hard to compare my Compare total costs - and I am sure there are many other variables that I am not mentioning. One person can do the entire Camino Frances SJPDP to Finisterre for less than $1000, while another may spend $5000 or more. All you can really do is compare average costs - the variables are too great.

Again - I spend an average of 40 Euros/day times the number of days I am in Spain. So - when I am in Spain for 35 days I spend less than $1500 (not including airfare and travel to/from start/finish). When I stay in Span for 45 days I spend around $1800 before adding in pricier "tourist activities" after my Camino is complete. I stay in a combination of public and private albergues. But I also stayed in private rooms a couple times/week. I often stop at a bakery for breakfast, a bar for lunch, and have a pilgrim's menu for dinner - except sometimes I order from the raciones menu and sometimes I go somewhere nicer. My first Camino I bought shoe inserts twice plus a fleece pullover, leggings, a t-shirt, and 2 ankle supports. My second Camino I bought 2 pairs of extra socks and a brush and can't think of what else I bought extra. I didn't need to see a doctor at all - but I did loose a filling in Spain and needed to see my dentist upon return. A result of biting into French break with a very hard crust. I carry snacks all the time. I bought aquarius but never drank alcohol unless it was served with my meal or offered to me by a friend who was sharing a bottle of wine. That is just some of MY variables - but again - I am sure I am leaving out many - like how many museum and cathedral fees/donations I paid. And quite frankly - I am not going to spend my time recording every penny I spent and what I spent it on - because that would turn my restful pilgrimage into work. So - my average daily spending budget will have to suffice.
 
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I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
As per your guidelines here is what I spent strictly from SJPdP to SdC
(hence I am not counting any expenses occurred while traveling to SJPdP, but I am including the 1-night stay in SJPdP - Beilari so dinner & breakfast the following morning incl.)

It took me 36 days (May-June 2022) and I spent roughly $2,100 (USD). Stayed mostly in private Albergues, had a private room 4 times, spent extra night in Burgos and took public transportation 3 times. All meals eaten were either the ones offered in Albergue or Pilgrims Menu or Menu del Dia - no crazy 'splurging'.
Roughly $100 of those were spent on blisters care - took a bit of trial-n-error to get to point where it started working. There are also various entry fees to museums, cathedrals etc....

The cost of doing a 4-day SdC --> Finisterre came to about $450 (give or take) however it must be noted immediately that my wife accompanied me on that Camino and the cost of accommodations (3 albergues & 1 hotel; all private rooms with A\C, views, etc... so slightly more on 'luxurious' side than your common bunk bed) and even some meals (which also now have to be multiplied by 2) obviously contributed to the increase.

So there you have it from my perspective. Hopefully that will help although it is unquestionably on a high end of the daily budget specter (IIRC the exchange rate at the time was 1€ = $1.08 - 1.10) and chances are you can do better (that is if so desired)

Good luck in planning and calculations
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I think this is an interesting question and I ran some numbers. We were on the Frances 42 days, April-May 2022, and spent about $6,000 US total on Food, Lodging, Misc (pharmacy, etc) (pharmacy is apparently a big expense when walking 400 miles! Also we spent @ $300 on Covid tests) Things to consider: we were sick for a week in Pamplona and holed up for a week in a fairly expensive hotel there. Also, we primarily stayed in single rooms. We are in our 70's; I guess comfort, privacy are more important to us. That works out to @ $143 a day. Were I doing this alone, I could see reducing the cost down to $2,000 or so.
 
This person simply asked 4 basic questions. Almost all responders inserted preconceived notions, bias assumptions, some becoming quite preachy. Fact is, we have no idea why the questions were asked.
This thread is an interesting study in human nature and group dynamics in an online chat thread!
In 2016, 2 of us spent 4,150Eu.
We had planned 4,500
Approximately 15 days in hostels; 22 in private rooms and 3 in city hotels
We did not cook. Approximately 25 pilgrim neals served by our hosts, 15 restaurants
Totally agree! The asker has already prefaced the question saying they know there are variables, etc. Just answer the question, and stop quasi-criticizing the question and stop trying to preach. A person's common sense can work out the rest. Anyone can easily figure out why the questions was asked. It's completely obvious. And yes, this thread is a very interesting study in human nature as you say. I see these types of responses so much. It's like one can't ask a question without being spoken to in a condescending tone. Kudos to all of those here who just simply answered the question as it is a great question. ~ Thank you
 
Did a summer camino in 2014 from SJPP to SDC. due to some foot problems and having to rest it cost me about €1600 excl. flight. In 2017 did a winter camino from SJPP to SDC and as most food was taken in albergues this camino only cost me €700. So you never really know what the cost will be. I am flying to Biarritz next Monday to walk again from SJPP and have no idea what the cost will be at the end
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
In 2014, SJPDP-Muxia costs were about 1k€... but I was on the fast side... so roughly 40€ per day and I feel it might be still a valid number.
 
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
My husband and I completed the Camino Frances from St. Jean to Santiago in 2022. We arrived Oct.8th in St Jean and finished in Santiago Nov. 8th. We spent 3 days in Santiago and left on Nov. 11. I just finished putting all our expenses on a spreadsheet and we spent 3,227 euros for both of us from Oct. 8th - Nov. 11th. Here's the breakdown:

accommodation (private rooms and mostly private bathrooms) : 1,800 euros
food (mix of pilgrim's menu, cooking dinner and lunch, fruits and junk food) : 462 euros
cash (most of the cash was for food, and some tickets and donations to the churches): 895 euros
pharmacy (blister care, new insoles, shampoo etc.): 70 euros

Hope it helps a bit :)
 
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Approx Euro 2500 per person…party of 4….33 days….SJPP to Santiago….mostly hotels….bag transfers….wine and a lot of good meals.
 
This person simply asked 4 basic questions
No they didn’t. They asked the same question expressed three different ways. The first two sentences are assertions, not questions.
I’ve been prepared to assume there was innocent curiosity behind the question rather than an attempt to assess the relative wealth and spending potential of the average forum member. I’ve also assumed that a sufficiency of useless answers will help the OP to the conclusion that daily budgeting based on known costs will be of more use to their cousin than a completely arbitrary aggregation of the total spend of a few people who could be bothered to respond.
If I had any desire to budget my next Camino I would do that based on known, current, 2022/3 costs as available from live or recent reports. Known lodging costs from sources such as Gronze or Booking and a contingency of 15% given current inflation rates in Europe. Any other approach is at best frivolous. And the question equates to the string length question- the answer to which has been, and will always be,“6 inches short”.
 
Mrs C and I walked for 35 days from SJPdP to SdC. We typically booked either one or two days ahead. Cheapest overnight accommodation cost £22. Most expensive £72 (bit more in SdC but we treated ourselves). Meals ranged from bocadillos and pilgrim menu up to nice restaurants. Average spend £100 per day between us, i.e. £50 each per day. We could have got by on total £60 per day, i.e. £30 each had we wanted/needed to.
We did drink a lot of beer. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0BFFNMDV2/?tag=casaivar-21
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
My spend this year St Jean to Finnisterre and last year SJ to Muxia were both about $2100. It took me 26 days walking last year and 28 this year. I stopped at bars for coffee and breakfast 2-3 times each morning, 2x for lunch, couple beers before eating the pilgrim menu (10-15e) or communal meal almost every night. Bought a lot of snacks along the way from markets. Never bought bottled water. Almost never prepared my own lunch/dinner. Many late nights bought more wine and orujo with other pilgrims. Stayed about 3/4 of the nights in albergues (mostly private) and 1/4 in 40e or less hotels. Never did bag transport. Did my own laundry EVERY day except paid 4e once; one other time albergue host did it for free. Made some moderate donations along the way. I buy ibuprofen, voltarin, vaselene, toothpaste, suntan as necessary. Spanish SIM card is about 20e for a month. Never bought travel or foreign medical insurance, but maybe next time. I don't budget, but put an amount in debit account for ATM cash and use credit cards as much as possible. It is easy to sum all expenses from credit statements and debit withdrawals once I return to US, so the $2100 is very accurate. It does not include my moderate gear costs prior to starting. It did cost more in 2022 and 21 than prior CF's 2016, 17, 18 and 19 due to plague and inflation. ...and I never follow anyones guidelines
 
This person simply asked 4 basic questions. Almost all responders inserted preconceived notions, bias assumptions, some becoming quite preachy. Fact is, we have no idea why the questions were asked.
This thread is an interesting study in human nature and group dynamics in an online chat thread!
In 2016, 2 of us spent 4,150Eu.
We had planned 4,500
Approximately 15 days in hostels; 22 in private rooms and 3 in city hotels
We did not cook. Approximately 25 pilgrim neals served by our hosts, 15 restaurants
Possibly some of us can’t figure out what earthly use a simple answer to the question as written could be. Perhaps they’re having a lottery?
 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
On my first camino of 41 days (36 on the ground and 5 getting to/from) I kept my on the ground expenses to 27 euros per day with some being far less, and some being splurges.

Second camino 4 years later was roughly the same at 28 euros per day over 21 days on the ground.

My last two caminos also 21 days per, have come in at 35 euros per day -- and again: always with some splurges and some 6-8 euro albergue days and with most days being around 20 to 25 euros all in.

I don't include airfares here as I usually fly on points..

Special transit (trains out of Madrid, the taxi to SdC airport, flight from SDC to MAD) I have left out of the cost calculation
 
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.
I have walked 10 Camino's in the last 12 years
All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?
I spent between $800. to $1300. on food and accommodation. My camino's lasted 25-33 days.
What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
I had Pilgrim meals, menu del dia and rarely cooked except when with a group or a communal meal. Occasionally a nice dinner on walk and always in Santiago. Private accommodations more often on more remote Camino's, otherwise Albergues. Hotels only in Santiago.

I never had any cost plan.

Even though you did not ask. Transportation cost varied between $1000 - $2000. That includes air, train and bus if required. My origin is Chicago, ingress points Madrid, Barcelona, Paris and London.

Hope this is helpful,
Joe
 
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I note that the question has been edited since I first answered it, which may make my response to it less valid.

I don’t mind being criticised for missing a stationary target; but this is getting a little like Ronnie Corbett’s Mastermind subject ‘answering the question before last’
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Mrs C and I walked for 35 days from SJPdP to SdC. We typically booked either one or two days ahead. Cheapest overnight accommodation cost £22. Most expensive £72 (bit more in SdC but we treated ourselves). Meals ranged from bocadillos and pilgrim menu up to nice restaurants. Average spend £100 per day between us, i.e. £50 each per day. We could have got by on total £60 per day, i.e. £30 each had we wanted/needed to.
We did drink a lot of beer. https://www.amazon.co.uk/EL-CAMINO-SANTIAGO-BEERS-WAY/dp/B0BFFNMDV2/ref=sr_1_21?crid=1CMKCY25BZ2C4&keywords=camino+de+santiago&qid=1670931790&sprefix=Camino,aps,392&sr=8-21
Man cannot live on bread alone.
 
In 2015 I spent an average of 45 euros a day. I soon realized that that sharing a private room with a walking partner was not much more expensive than albergues. A twin room in pensions or hostals usually cost us around 20 euros each.
We always found a tienda each evening to buy juice, yoghurt etc for breakfast. Lunch was a bocadilla and coffee. Dinner was the pilgrims menu.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
25-40 Euros/day while walking. I stay in albergues. I often make my own dinner there. I do not spend money on breakfasts (that's me). I enjoy a cold beer or two during the day's walk (like medieval pilgrims did...). Not difficult. How long it takes to do it does not matter to me: The government sends me a monthy pension. Thank you, governent.
 
This is such a difficult question to answer, particularly as some of us are travelling long distances to get to Europe. As a consequence we make decisions that others wouldn’t (e.g. buy walking poles in SJPdP) need to. Our airfares are significantly greater (do you fly economy/premium economy/business/first class). Where do you fly into and how do you get to your starting point (train, bus, internal plane, Uber, or a combination). Are you walking, riding a bike or using a donkey? Do you need to buy kit to walk the Camino (of choice)? Which Camino are you walking? Are you doing any route variations? Then there are the daily considerations what to buy at the pharmacy (if anythinng), where to sleep, what to eat (do you pay for others or just yourself), what to go and see, what donations do you give for sellos, do you buy candles in churches, do you need to replace shoes or clothing (worn out to misplaced), do you buy food at the supermarket and make your own meals or do you eat at local bars/cafes, do you hand wash or use the washing machines and dryers, do you buy water/cervezas/soft drinks/aquarius…

The list is almost endless…hence the default to averages (and usually only the big items)

Does get you thinking of your last walk and the little things that you encountere/experienced
 
I think many of the responses here whilst on the surface could appear judgemental or patronising are coming from the perspective of wanting to help.

My response certainly was intended that way. I was merely trying to understand the purpose behind the question, so as to better provide an answer.

I have DM'd the OP with my budgeting process in the hope that it may help.
(it covers 3 levels of spending)

I still think a Poll might be interesting though :)

I think my first budget 2015 was about 60-70 euro per day, over 40 days = 2,400-2,800 Euro.
The last one in 2018 was closer to 100 euros a day (for 2 people) over 40 days = 4,000 Euro
My next one is budgeted at 85 Euros a day ( 1 person) over 61 days = 5,185 Euro.

The budget includes all conceivable expenses other than getting to and from the Camino.
It includes things like medical treatment along the way.

I have found my budgets to be very close to actual spending.
(They are very detailed)
But they are my budgets.......everyone's mileage will vary.

I stay in private rooms, from Albergues to small Hotels, with a fancy one now and again if it is unique in some way. Historic building etc. No DIY meals. I enjoy the food and wine along the way..... probably too much!

Hopefully amongst all the responses the OP is finding what they seek.
 
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In 2015 I spent an average of 45 euros a day. I soon realized that that sharing a private room with a walking partner was not much more expensive than albergues. A twin room in pensions or hostals usually cost us around 20 euros each.
We always found a tienda each evening to buy juice, yoghurt etc for breakfast. Lunch was a bocadilla and coffee. Dinner was the pilgrims menu.
I agree that sharing a private room is a way to help save money, but spending approximately €8-13 individually on sleeping in albergues added up over 30+ days is a quite a difference in total price output. It is not really comparable cost wise, but comfort and more privacy, yes, it is a good deal, but not all can afford it.
 
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I have not been 100% exact on my spending this year.
I guesstimate i did spend a total of around 3.000 to 3.500€ while on the camino.
To me, at first, that sounds quite much. After all, the majority of times, i slept in albergues and had some kind of pilgrims dinner in the evening.
However, i guess quite a lot of my expense comes in the "in between". I did enjoy a beer or five a day. I did enjoy inviting my friends. The bigger cities, i liked an Airbnb, and they have gotten pricey. Also my last night in Santiago, there was this festival and hotels were extremely expensive. Like 200€ for my room.

So, that being said, my camino could have been significantly cheaper with little lost comfort. But i honestly, I don't regret it.
 
The issue of expenses today due to Covid and inflation is quite different from when I first walked the CF in 2016. Then, I was able to walk from SJPP to SdC for about €30 a day or about €900 total. Some days spending a little more; other days a little less. However, our two weeks on the CP this past spring proved to be much more expensive. From accommodations to food and drink to incidentals, everything is more expensive in this post-Covid, higher inflationary time. With that said, I’m heading back to the CF this spring for two more weeks of walking. My budget, and I think it’s pretty realistic, will be €40-45/day. So, depending on the number of days you plan to take, the math is pretty easy to do. Nonetheless, once you figure out what you think it will cost you, pad your budget a bit so you can travel at your particular comfort level which certainly varies from person to person.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
2017: spent 2200$ including RT airfare (650$) from NYC
2022: spent 3500$ includes RT airfare (430$) from NYC
I started both Caminos in SJPDP and finished in Santiago in 35 days. In 2017 I also went to Finisterra.

I stay on in municipals unless not available, which happened a lot in 2022. I eat street food and pilgrim meals almost exclusively, reducing my meal costs as much as possible. In 2017 I had a trip to the hospital that cost 110$ which is included in my total. I purchase very little alcohol and no suveneirs. In 2022 I ended up taking a lot of public transportation between towns as well as using BlaBla car, both of which are very inexpensive (included in my total). I do nothing on the Camino except walk eat and sleep so I had no extraneous expenses.

I hope this information is useful.
 
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For a 35-day trip beginning in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Finisterre, our total budget pre-trip for two people, minus airfare and transportation, was $6,400 USD. Those expenses included all of our gear (backpacks, clothing, shoes, trekking poles, rain gear, sleep system, etc.), e-bike rentals for 3 days on the Meseta and travel insurance.

Of that total:
  • $1,150 was budgeted for accommodations (we planned to stay in dormitories most of the time with a few private rooms along the way),
  • $1,700 was budgeted for meals.
We actually ended up spending $3,200 on accommodations, meals, some additional clothing/change of shoes, bag transportation services, and a few souvenirs — altogether about $350 more than we planned to spend — which I didn't think was too bad with the considerable changes we made to our plans.

We ended up staying in private rooms much more frequently than our original plans, which cost on average about €15–€30 more than we'd budgeted for the dorm-style accommodations in albergues. We also started sending our backpacks ahead much more frequently about mid-way through the camino, which added about €10–€14 per day to our expenses.

Hope this is helpful!
 
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
In 2017 we spent approximately 50 days in spain walking the Camino frances out to the coast with some rest days scattered through mostly albergas but a few cheap hotels(5ish). We ate out every day and did not budget.... we are not big eaters or drinkers and spent 8500.00 Australian dollars approximately 5500 euros not including travel bearing in mind that this is for two people.
We did the Norte in 2019 costing approximately the same. Hope this is helpful
 
I had no "budget" but had an expected cost.
I took Bla-bla car from Madrid to SJPP.
I went SJPP to Sarria, looped back to Triacastella for a few days, back to Sarria, then SDC, then Finisterra for few days, then train to Madrid.
45 days in country.
Expected $1500
With a few "splurges" I spent just under $2200.
That was 2018, and I bet that wouldn't be enough today.

Hope this helps
Bob
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
My total spend on the CF is not too useful, given it was in 2006. I would come out at the very bottom of the cost chart, though, and still do, as I didn't and don't splurge. We each have different available funds and criteria.

OP, I hope some day your cousin will appear in person to speak up for himself.
Let nobody tell me I am being judgmental or condescending. (Do if you like, I know my own motivations. I won't be offended).

I actually think that, as others above have noted, all or perhaps most replies have been either trying to respond to a difficult phrasing of a request, or simply giving figures.
At the very beginning of this thread, the OP let us see that he has indeed done some searching and has come up with sample figures. So, why the research here, and no response to @Robo's suggestion of turning this into a poll...?

I note that another thread of the Op's has been closed at his request.
Perhaps it is time to close this one...

(I recently departed the forum, but came back with a capital letter of a difference😁, because I missed the connection with some members and also because I value the civility in general, and while at times the unexplained vigilance of the moderators gets on my wick, they do a really valuable service to the forum).
 
I value the civility in general, and while at times the unexplained vigilance of the moderators gets on my wick, they do a really valuable service to the forum).
I feel the same. But if I were to speak my mind freely to some on this forum as I would often wish to, I would have been banned long ago. Perhaps then, it's a good exercise in moderation for me too.
Just saying..
 
Well you
I feel the same. But if I were to speak my mind freely to some on this forum as I would often wish to, I would have been banned long ago. Perhaps then, it's a good exercise in moderation for me too.
Just saying..
Well you can imagine what it was like for the moderators then. 😊
 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I think many of the responses here whilst on the surface could appear judgemental or patronising are coming from the perspective of wanting to help.

My response certainly was intended that way. I was merely trying to understand the purpose behind the question, so as to better provide an answer.

I have DM'd the OP with my budgeting process in the hope that it may help.
(it covers 3 levels of spending)

I still think a Poll might be interesting though :)

I think my first budget 2015 was about 60-70 euro per day, over 40 days = 2,400-2,800 Euro.
The last one in 2018 was closer to 100 euros a day (for 2 people) over 40 days = 4,000 Euro
My next one is budgeted at 85 Euros a day ( 1 person) over 61 days = 5,185 Euro.

The budget includes all conceivable expenses other than getting to and from the Camino.
It includes things like medical treatment along the way.

I have found my budgets to be very close to actual spending.
(They are very detailed)
But they are my budgets.......everyone's mileage will vary.

I stay in private rooms, from Albergues to small Hotels, with a fancy one now and again if it is unique in some way. Historic building etc. No DIY meals. I enjoy the food and wine along the way..... probably too much!

Hopefully amongst all the responses the OP is finding what they seek.
Robo,
Thanks for adding some sanity to this thread. The Camino is not meant to be a cheap backpacker race to see how little one can spend; arriving in SdC in rags, bare feet and looking like a refugee. I’ve seen a lot of this and frankly it is degrading to all of us who are there for a slightly higher purpose.
 
A sincere thank you to everyone who has been helpful!

The reason I ask is that people online will always point toward an average per day figure that uses only pilgrim menu and accommodation costs.

However, I had a strong feeling, now confirmed, that real world costs typically go beyond that of the "you can do this for 20/30 euro a day if you stay at public shelters" estimates.

People may say that it can be done for $30/day, but the reality is that at least for the group here that does not happen. People want to eat out, people want to visit the sites. People want to do things that end up costing extra.

Thanks to @Robo and his incredible excel sheet, plus Gronze's detailed information of shelters along every route and their prices and offerings, I've been able to find a projected on-Camino cost of €1,694 for 40 days on the Camino Frances.
(34 potential stages, with 6 days added for an epilogue or city visits)

Comparing this figure with information from this thread it seems that is realistic.

This is a cost of $45 per day.
  • 100% public shelters, lowest cost private when public not available
  • €400 Accommodation, avg €10/day
  • 30% community dinner, since only 10/34 of February shelters offer community dinners, avg €10/community dinner
  • 70% restaurant dinners, budgeting €20/dinner for menu del día/peregrino with inflation,
  • Little if any lunch, budgeting around €4/day between no lunch and simple lunch
  • €3 breakfast, €1 for water if needed (€40 water total, doubt it would be more)
  • €1,014 in food total, average €25/day (€680 dinner, €174 lunch, €120 breakfast, €40 water)
  • Churches €40, toiletries and medical €120, miscellaneous €120 (These are not daily expenses so just counting totals)
Not all shelters have a kitchen, and I am aware costs can be cut by cooking yourself. However it is safer to calculate the total cost and make sure that money is there, having the cooking or restaurant decisions made each day. Calculating restaurant cost ensures one won't be left hungry without money.

I ask for the total figures spent because there are always unforeseen things that pop up throughout the trip that, for someone with a healthy enough bank account back home, may not be notable, but they do add up, especially with European inflation the way it is right now.

@jeanineonthecamino your response and explanation about the $50/day is super helpful, and I suspected it was the most realistic per day estimate I had seen. Turns out it was! And should probably be used as the estimate going forward.

To everyone else, too many to tag individually, thank you. I know it may not have seemed so at the start but this was all very helpful, every single figure shared gave me an idea of what realistic spending might look like. I appreciate your help
 
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While your other estimation numbers seem reasonable I can guarantee you that you will be very hard pressed to find an accommodation for €10\day. When I walked this past May\June the cheapest I was paying came to about €11-12. I am sure it went up since.
I have never stayed at donativo places but as it was suggested many times on the Forum one should donate a 'reasonable ongoing rate'....
I would humbly suggest to up that estimate to anywhere €15-20\day. If as you walk you will be able to find accomodations for less - then you truly didnt lose anything. Better be pleasantly surprised then find yourself under-budgeted
Buen Camino!
 
The 9th edition the Lightfoot Guide will let you complete the journey your way.
While your other estimation numbers seem reasonable I can guarantee you that you will be very hard pressed to find an accommodation for €10\day. When I walked this past May\June the cheapest I was paying came to about €11-12. I am sure it went up since.
I have never stayed at donativo places but as it was suggested many times on the Forum one should donate a 'reasonable ongoing rate'....
I would humbly suggest to up that estimate to anywhere €15-20\day. If as you walk you will be able to find accomodations for less - then you truly didnt lose anything. Better be pleasantly surprised then find yourself under-budgeted
Buen Camino!
But if you eat your main meal at lunchtime, you shouldn't pay more than about €12-14 for a menu del dia.
 
While your other estimation numbers seem reasonable I can guarantee you that you will be very hard pressed to find an accommodation for €10\day. When I walked this past May\June the cheapest I was paying came to about €11-12. I am sure it went up since.
I have never stayed at donativo places but as it was suggested many times on the Forum one should donate a 'reasonable ongoing rate'....
I would humbly suggest to up that estimate to anywhere €15-20\day. If as you walk you will be able to find accomodations for less - then you truly didnt lose anything. Better be pleasantly surprised then find yourself under-budgeted
Buen Camino!
I pulled the cost of each shelter from Gronze, looking only at the shelters open in February. For donation shelters I input €10, and calculated the average for all of them.

Did you stay at shelters the whole way through, or hostels? If shelters, especially if your €12 is from public shelters, then I will certainly update it
 

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Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Churches €40, toiletries and medical €120, miscellaneous €120
I've only paid for churches a couple of times on 6 Camino trips when there was an entrance fee for a Cathedral - for example in León and Burgos. The fee is usually discounted with a pilgrim's credential.
Never spent anywhere near that much for toiletries and medical supplies. And I didn't have miscellaneous costs that approached €100.
Did you stay at shelters the whole way through, or hostels?
What you are calling shelters are albergues - hostels for pilgrims and aren't much different than other hostels, except that you are required to show a pilgrim's credential.

  • 70% restaurant dinners, budgeting €20/dinner for menu del día/peregrino with inflation,
  • Little if any lunch, budgeting around €4/day between no lunch and simple lunch
  • €3 breakfast, €4 for water if needed
€20 is high for a restaurant meal. The Pilgrims menu usually is around €12, and that's for a complete meal with two courses, dessert, and choice of beer, wine, or water. Cooking with others in the albergues is much cheaper.

I rarely skip lunch, but lunch food can be purchased at supermercados inexpensively.

Breakfast may be more expensive. I've never bought water.
 
The best of luck achieving this, it's unrealistic unless you are prepared to live like a monk IMO.
Is there a reason you believe this to be an austere estimate? I'm attaching the planning sheet, which is 100% shelter stays with costs pulled from Gronze, and estimating $17 per dinner, with a basic cheap breakfast or lunch

Anything you see that catches your eye?
 

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Join our full-service guided tour and let us convert you into a Pampered Pilgrim!
I pulled the cost of each shelter from Gronze, looking only at the shelters open in February. For donation shelters I input €10, and calculated the average for all of them.

Did you stay at shelters the whole way through, or hostels? If shelters, especially if your €12 is from public shelters, then I will certainly update it
As I stated originally I stayed mostly in private albergues, not public\parochial, municipal etc.
My average cost in those was about €14-15\day. The afore-mentioned private rooms were obviously more as well as SJPdP, Orisson & Roncesvalles... but that €14-15 throughout the 'main' if you will Camino Frances is pretty much average figure per bunk.
Again, like I said - if you budget 15 and pay 10 - you lost nothing, but if its the other way around - that does not make for a 'nice' worry-free trip. Just MHO of course.
 
Transport luggage-passengers.
From airports to SJPP
Luggage from SJPP to Roncevalles
To paraphrase Mr Micawber, it’s better to budget higher and be pleasantly surprised.

I think you (or your now famous cousin) will struggle on that accommodation budget; although I would recommend a search for Nobelhiker’s thread in which I think he came in well within your budget.

I applaud your research and attention to detail; although I did find your methodology a little confusing.

I seem to be able to spend money in an empty room; even in Spain; and wouldn’t personally set forth without a good €1000 more available to me. If Mrs HtD was with me then, much as I love her dearly; I would barely have crossed the border into Spain before I was looking for an ATM.
 
Is there a reason you believe this to be an austere estimate?
I think that your estimate is doable. I have met plenty of (mostly younger) pilgrims who were on a shoestring budget and got by on much less. Usually they slept only in municipal albergues and rarely ate in restaurants, choosing to purchase their food in supermercados and cooking for themselves.
 
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To paraphrase Mr Micawber, it’s better to budget higher and be pleasantly surprised.

I think you (or your now famous cousin) will struggle on that accommodation budget; although I would recommend a search for Nobelhiker’s thread in which I think he came in well within your budget.

I applaud your research and attention to detail; although I did find your methodology a little confusing.

I seem to be able to spend money in an empty room; even in Spain; and wouldn’t personally set forth without a good €1000 more available to me. If Mrs HtD was with me then, much as I love her dearly; I would barely have crossed the border into Spain before I was looking for an ATM.
Yes, Noble Hiker did the whole camino Frances in 19 days on a very tight budget but apart from one or two occasions he never sat down to a proper meal.
I know for me it would be little things like the odd beer here and there that would take me over budget.
 
While personall having spent quite a bit more than your projected cost, I think it should be possible if you keep your excess (social) spending to a minimum. A few coffes, a beer or tapa can add up quite a bit over the length of a camino, so if it's possible, plan for a little more. On the other hand, a beer from the supermarket and a pack of chips does also work and costs quite a bit less.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
If Mrs HtD was with me then, much as I love her dearly; I would barely have crossed the border into Spain before I was looking for an ATM.
LOL

Me solo: 36.5 days Camino Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) - $2,100 (USD) avg $57.50\day
Met wife in SdC, 2.5 days there and then Camino Finisterre over 4 days (6.5 total) - $710 avg. $109.20\day

Thank heaven for little girls
Thank heaven for them all
No matter where,
No matter who
Without them
What would little boys do

:);)😇😍🥰
 
A sincere thank you to everyone who has been helpful!

The reason I ask is that people online will always point toward an average per day figure that uses only pilgrim menu and accommodation costs.

However, I had a strong feeling, now confirmed, that real world costs typically go beyond that of the "you can do this for 20/30 euro a day if you stay at public shelters" estimates.

People may say that it can be done for $30/day, but the reality is that at least for the group here that does not happen. People want to eat out, people want to visit the sites. People want to do things that end up costing extra.
Just a follow up - our average daily costs that people post usually do include everything except the transportation to/from the Camino. I know mine do.

And there are quite a few people who manage quite nicely for 30 Euros/day (and less - but less is more challenging). I have known them. And while I said 40 Euros/day in this thread - my reality was 35 Euros/day for the Frances in 2021 and 40 Euros/day on the Norte/Primitivo in 2022. The Norte goes through more tourist towns and is more expensive. And I will say - I almost always ate at bars and restaurants and had pilgrims meals on the Frances, and then on the Norte I did a lot more supermarket shopping for food. And yes - I did quite a few private room accommodations with both - but with some very cheap municipal albergues kept the overall average down. For example - I had several nights that the cost of the albergue was 5-8 Euros, so that brought down the average cost when calculated with all my other lodging.

My only expenses beyond that budget that I didn't include would be my tourist expenses AFTER the Camino was complete. For example - I spent several days in Madrid in 2021 and I spent a couple weeks in Sicily in 2022... and in those places - I did not stick to a Camino budget and did touristy things beyond the Camino. But my quoted daily budget for the two Caminos did include all visits to museums and churches and donations in church donation boxes in the towns that I passed through ON my Caminos. And quite frankly - there isn't a lot of "tourist" stuff to do in most towns along the way - mostly in the bigger cities.

But yes - it can be done for 30/day... but budgeting for 40-50/day is much more comfortable. In fact - I usually come home with extra money - even after being a tourist AFTER the Camino. .
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Is there a reason you believe this to be an austere estimate? I'm attaching the planning sheet, which is 100% shelter stays with costs pulled from Gronze, and estimating $17 per dinner, with a basic cheap breakfast or lunch

Anything you see that catches your eye?
I think that budget is fine - UNLESS going mostly private rooms and/or eating out at more expensive places.

But I will throw one more question out to you - how much does your cousin like to drink alcohol? Why? Because that is the other area I saw people blowing their budget. Most of us had wine with our meals (usually included with dinner), some had a glass of wine or a beer at lunch. Some drank all day long.... and those that drank all day long spent way beyond their intended budget - even though much of the wine was very inexpensive.

BTW - I didn't pay 17/dinner very often. Most of the time it was 12-15 Euros.

By 100% shelter says - are you referring to staying in albergues/dorm rooms? I highly recommend planning for a few days in private rooms. There will likely be times when your cousin just needs a good night sleep and a long hot shower/bath. And there MIGHT be rare occassions where there are no albergue beds available.
 
By 100% shelter says - are you referring to staying in albergues/dorm rooms? I highly recommend planning for a few days in private rooms. There will likely be times when your cousin just needs a good night sleep and a long hot shower/bath. And there MIGHT be rare occassions where there are no albergue beds available.
Wholeheartedly agree. When I hit my 1st private room - it was like Heaven.... just to be able to 'stretch out' and spread my stuff all over.
When I spent extra day in Burgos... OH LORD! The morning when I slept until IIRC almost 9 AM .... after 2 weeks of "communal sleep" ... Lets just say that you WILL cherish those moments and perhaps they are good for a bit of sanity check as well.
 
Not any kind of answer to the question that was asked, and I don't want to derail the thread, but I had reason to look up the cost of a bunk bed in a mixed dormitory at a hostel in Sydney for tomorrow night - $Aus138 (€87, $US94). The church porch is looking good.

I am so grateful for the good accommodation infrastructure for visitors to Spain.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I'm glad the spreadsheet was useful @JulioCesarSalad .

But.... budgets are a very personal thing, and there are so many variables as many have pointed out.

The items are based on what I spend and the idea is to adjust it according to what you expect to spend.

As others have pointed out........

You don't generally pay to go into Churches. But I allow a small amount each day to drop in a donation box, light a candle, etc

Medical stuff. I spend quite a bit on that as I go through lots of tape, need physio every couple of weeks etc.

and so it goes on...........

But it got you started. And has allowed others to provide feedback. ;)

Fine tuning it now, to reflect our needs, is all part of the fun of planning.........
 
Hi - I am attaching photos of all my daily expenses for walking from Pamplona to Santiago. I mainly stayed in private hotels along the way. These expenses do not cover my gear purchases prior to arriving in Spain or the cost of my airfare to/from Spain. They do include all costs of transport within Spain, getting from Mad to Pamplona and Santiago to Barcelona etc. I started walking on 5/7 and arrived in Santiago on 2/8.

My tattoo expense is also in here, 100eur so you could probably deduct that.

Here are my overall totals:
TrabeePocket(iOS, Android)
TOTAL
3219​
Category
Groceries (food)EUR
27.95​
ShoppingEUR
98.5​
coffeeEUR
17.05​
Bev. non alcoholicEUR
40.7​
TransportEUR
143.2​
snackEUR
74.65​
beerEUR
7.1​
LodgeEUR
1634.62​
etc.EUR
237.19​
MealEUR
938.45​
 

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I have watched this thread develop with almost morbid fascination trying to understand how we might be helping the OP.

It is almost inevitable that the estimate will be wrong, or at least, inaccurate. There is a silly truism that I recall from my time as a project manager that only 10% of project cost estimates prove accurate in the least significant place, whether that is cents, dollars, tens of dollars or thousands. This will be no different.

What I do think is that this estimate could lead to the OP's cousin making an achievable budget provision, and getting approval from whatever powers that be in their household to put that aside for them to undertake their camino. It won't really matter whether the individual elements are more or less realistic. I don't think they are individually, but it is the aggregate that I think is more important here. I think the OP has come to a figure that seems to be achievable, even though it might require his cousin to be frugal along the way.

Looking back over the thread, I see one way of characterising the advice is to think of the estimate having three basic elements:
  • a provision for all the known activities. On the camino these are largely food and accommodation if one is discounting the cost of getting to and from the camino. But they might also include visits to museums or cathedrals, catching the bus to Fisterra and Muxia or any other activity that has been planned.
  • a contingency to cover both unforeseen increases in the costs of planned activities, and the costs of otherwise unexpected activities one cannot avoid. This might include having to stay in a more expensive place, or for an extra night when seeking medical treatment should one be unfortunate enough to be injured or become ill. While one might hope not to dig into the provision for this, it will be unavoidable when it is needed.
  • a change budget, which should not be confused with a contingency, even if you eventually just make one provision for both of these. It addresses adding activities that had either not been contemplated, or had been discounted during planning your camino, where it becomes obvious along the way that your camino would be much better for their inclusion. Including this element is entirely optional, but if one doesn't it means you might not have the financial flexibility to contemplate adding activities that would enhance your camino experience.
How much is allocated to contingency and a change budget is a personal choice. For example, it would be possible to research how much extra accommodation might cost if one's preferred options are unavailable, but other things might not be so easy to discover. And to be quite honest, I haven't ever done this with any rigour in making a provision for any of my pilgrimages. After my first camino, I have generally added an amount that 'seemed about right', and made sure that I had that available.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Is there a reason you believe this to be an austere estimate? I'm attaching the planning sheet, which is 100% shelter stays with costs pulled from Gronze, and estimating $17 per dinner, with a basic cheap breakfast or lunch

Anything you see that catches your eye?
In some ways it is austere, in other ways not. It depends on pilgrim lifestyle.

I notice that it doesn't include food or drink outside of mealtimes. Some people like to go out for a few beers, wines, sangrias, etc. with fellow pilgrims after a day's walk, or carry snacks with them while they walk. I also tend to think that 10 euros a night is likely a significant underestimate these days. But then, I like to be a bit more generous in donativos, since I am paying for tomorrow's pilgrims. On the other hand, I expect you are overestimating the cost of a pilgrim menu (although I accept that the more upscale menus del dia are a bit more expensive than pilgrim menus).
 
Looking back over the thread, I see one way of characterising the advice is to think of the estimate having three basic elements:
  • a provision for all the known activities. On the camino these are largely food and accommodation if one is discounting the cost of getting to and from the camino. But they might also include visits to museums or cathedrals, catching the bus to Fisterra and Muxia or any other activity that has been planned.
  • a contingency to cover both unforeseen increases in the costs of planned activities, and the costs of otherwise unexpected activities one cannot avoid. This might include having to stay in a more expensive place, or for an extra night when seeking medical treatment should one be unfortunate enough to be injured or become ill. While one might hope not to dig into the provision for this, it will be unavoidable when it is needed.
  • a change budget, which should not be confused with a contingency, even if you eventually just make one provision for both of these. It addresses adding activities that had either not been contemplated, or had been discounted during planning your camino, where it becomes obvious along the way that your camino would be much better for their inclusion. Including this element is entirely optional, but if one doesn't it means you might not have the financial flexibility to contemplate adding activities that would enhance your camino experience.

Good points @dougfitz

I tend to do a 'budget' before I go, purely so that I know that I'll need 'at least' this much available.
It gives me a rough idea of what my level of spending per day should be.
Some days will be more, some less of course.
But my budget covers most things and so it's usually close to what I spend.

A key point being though, that the 'budget' is more of an estimate really. A 'ball park' figure.
How much do I need to take.
The precise spending categories will of course vary.......though the total will be close.

The 'real world' outcome for example could be I might spend more on meals and less on accomodation than anticipated.
The 'budgeted' amount per spend category, WILL be wrong. OK it might be within 10-15%.
How could it possibly be accurate?
But as long as the overall spend is close.

My 'budget' includes a bit of contingency for unforeseen circumstances.
Maybe some medical costs or finding a really cool but expensive place to stay.

And the 'change' element I totally get. Kind of. As I have a budget for that too :)

For example on my next Camino if I have time and health, I might try to squeeze an extra short Camino.
So I have an 'add on' budget for that.

In this way, I know how much I'll need for most eventualities.

Of course for a major unforeseen cost, such as illness, or flying home for an emergency, the credit cards are a plan B :rolleyes:

It's a bit like going out for dinner at home.
I might pick a restaurant and 'estimate' in my head that the bill should be about $70 per head.
But it all depends how many decide to order steak, if anyone wants wine etc etc........
If I think that my estimate of $70 per head is a bit expensive,
I'll pick a restaurant where I might expect more like $50 per head.......
A Camino is a bit like that too........

You won't know the precise breakdown of the meal bill, untill you get it.
But your overall estimate is hopefully close.
 
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The 9th edition the Lightfoot Guide will let you complete the journey your way.
I have a different approach to all this. Life has thought me that in the words of Sun Tzu "no plan survives first contact with the enemy" so if I decide to go on Camino, holiday, hiking trip, I just go and take it from there, I spend what I spend without going mad. No point wasting time working out spreadsheets on what I might spend or what food and lodging might cost, life is too short. Tell your cousin to go on his Camino and enjoy it, if he feels that he can't afford it then wait until he can.
 
I have a different approach to all this.
My approach is similar to yours, @wayfarer. I do not make a budget before I go, and the only spreadsheet I make is for my pre-arranged lodgings including the date of each, address, contact info, and price, but do not tally it up.
When the trip/Camino is over I do compile a list of my expenditures out of curiosity to give me a general idea of how much I have spent. I am not frivolous, so I am rarely surprised at the final outcome.
 
I can understand how some Pilgrims just go.........without the need for budgeting.
But I imagine not all Pilgrims have that level of financial freedom and may need to save up for the trip.
The question then is............how much do I need to save? Hence a budget.

In my own case, I use a Euro bank account and create a budget so I know how much I'll need to have in that account.
 
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Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I can understand how some Pilgrims just go.........without the need for budgeting.
But I imagine not all Pilgrims have that level of financial freedom and may need to save up for the trip.
The question then is............how much do I need to save? Hence a budget.

In my own case, I use a Euro bank account and create a budget so I know how much I'll need to have in that account.
I have a budget than add an extra thousand for the unexpected. Like taking a taxi, buying walking sticks, new shoes, umbrella, things like that. I don't plan on buying those things but who knows? Since I've never taken a walk of this magnitude before I just want to concentrate on enjoying the walk and not sweat the little things. At least that's what i'am hoping for If I don't use that thousand then I have a plane ticket for my next camino.
 
Life has thought me that in the words of Sun Tzu "no plan survives first contact with the enemy"
I have never seen this quote attributed to Sun Tzu, and cannot find it in 'The Art of War'. If someone can trace it to Sun Tzu, please let us know.

The much less pithy version I am familiar with is from Helmuth von Moltke (The Elder) from around 1870, and translates as: No plan of operations extends with any certainty beyond the first encounter with the main enemy forces.

I never thought it would be used as a rationale for not doing any planning, and I would be almost certain that wouldn't have been von Moltke's intent either. But there is a first time for everything.
 
I have never seen this quote attributed to Sun Tzu, and cannot find it in 'The Art of War'. If someone can trace it to Sun Tzu, please let us know.

The much less pithy version I am familiar with is from Helmuth von Moltke (The Elder) from around 1870, and translates as: No plan of operations extends with any certainty beyond the first encounter with the main enemy forces.

I never thought it would be used as a rationale for not doing any planning, and I would be almost certain that wouldn't have been von Moltke's intent either. But there is a first time for everything.
I do plan my trips, I just don't spend too much if any time on what things cost me when I get there, that can only really be determined when you get boots on the ground.
Each to their own.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I have a budget than add an extra thousand for the unexpected. Like taking a taxi, buying walking sticks, new shoes, umbrella, things like that. I don't plan on buying those things but who knows? Since I've never taken a walk of this magnitude before I just want to concentrate on enjoying the walk and not sweat the little things. At least that's what i'am hoping for If I don't use that thousand then I have a plane ticket for my next camino.
That's the way I work as well. If I'm on my own I stick pretty much to my budget - if I stay in an expensive place, then I shop at the supermarket and cook. If a cheaper place then I tend to eat out - pluses and minuses. I very rarely have an expensive place and expensive food - sometimes at the end in Santiago or Fisterra.

But I like to know I have a spare thousand for emergencies. The what ifs. Dentists, transport, replacement clothing, that type of thing. I haven't needed it, but good to know its there.

Another thing I do is to take the budgeted days cash out and put it in my shorts pocket in the morning before I set out. Sometimes I have left over - it goes back in the kitty, and I start the next day with only the budgeted amount. I found that its easy to track the cash I'm spending that way. I usually have around 5 'cheap ' days before an expensive one, (I like to have a private room now and again).
 
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I walked 2018, 2019 and did the CF this year 2022 from SJPDP to Mansilla de Mulas (16 days walk) and then again Nov-Dec from Mansilla de Mulas to Santiago de Compostela to Finistere to Muxia 18 days walking. I slept exclusively in Albergue's (and 1 budget hotel on my last night). I didn't eat in restaurants I purchased my food from local shops and supermarkets. For the entire CF it cost me less than 1000 euros, nearer 900.
 
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In August/September this year I spent the following on average each walking day (31 nights)
1. Accommodation -€16 (stayed in albergues)
2. Desayuno - €4
3. Almuerzo - €9
4. Cena - €14
5. Cervezas - €8

Miscellaneous - Entry fees, water, fruit purchase of sabanas (bed sheets), etc €5

Over the full trip it was cerca €55 per day.

This is an average. My budget (€40) went out the window as the family I walked with became increasingly more social at the end of each day.

In SdC we splurged and stayed in a nice hotel (cost was cerca €110. Meals were more expensive about €18). These numbers aren’t included in the average.

Hope this helps. Buen Camino
I love that you have a beer budget.
 
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I understand that there are general guidelines of 20-40 Euros a day depending on your accommodations.
I am not asking for an estimate on per-day spending.

All things considered, from Saint Jean to Santiago or Muxia, how much did you spend from start to finish?

What was the total cost of the Camino for you, excluding transport to and from the Camino itself?

How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
I have done it for under $20/day in 33 days, municipal hostels & donativos, and eating picnics and ramen for my meals, spending under $650 total, and I have just done it again this year, a few years older and more financially solvent for about $3,000 in 38 days, around $80/day using fairly inexpensive hotels and eating out most of the time (with cheap wine). The range is really whatever you want it to be.
 
In 2015, Sept 17 - Nov 3 from Halifax Nova Scotia: everything (air-fare, albergues most nights, hotels about 8 nights, 35 days including 'Sabbath' extra days in Burgos, Leon, Ponferrada, SdC, a night in Paris on the way there, a week in Paris afterwards, trains to and from Paris, peregrino meals most evenings, sight-seeing (Muxia/Fisterre/Paris), souvenirs and gifts) $10,000 Cdn. Not extravagant.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
How much did you plan to spend, what was the actual final tally, and what did your Camino look like? Eating out often, cooking, private accommodations or public?
I bet a lot depends on why you want to walk a Camino. If it is for a vacation then you could spend almost any amount depending on where you stay or eat. I was thinking of all the people I met walking the Caminos. Most stayed in Municipal Albergues and bought their food in grocery stores. The pilgrims that I met were searching for something. Here at home I could always go to a retreat or mediation center. But for some unknown reason I wanted to find our more about myself and God on the Caminos. This is what I wanted. I spent according to my means and I did not have any problem living simply and modestly. Sir go and just enjoy yourself; there are a lot of beautiful angels out there. Thank you.
 
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