A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

See the full Camino Forum Store here with many more camino products.

COVID Off To Ganado, Az. . .

  • Thread starter Deleted member 67185
  • Start date
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Dave, who would think that an Indian reservation located in what sounds like a rather isolated area of New Mexico would be hit hard by covid. All the best to you as you do your part to help. May you arrive safely back home within the designated time you have committed to being away.
Keep us posted as you are able.
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
I write this with so much respect for you for stepping up to help, Dave. Wishing you all the best - I will keep the people there and you in my thoughts. For many social reasons, Indigenous communities are particularly vulnerable during this pandemic - in Canada as well. Stay safe and well 🙏
 
Last edited:

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
I will be keeping you and all the members of the communities which you will be helping. Please keep us posted.
My sympathies to you also on the loss of your preceptor. This Co-Vid Virus is such horrible and invasive virus....my thoughts and prayers. Please stay as safe as you can.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.

Give yourself and the people my love. You are in my prayers, many years back I met a young lady just completing Camino. I never asked but something told me she was Navajo. I have never been to that part of the world but have read a little. I also read up on the Hopi and Pueblo peoples. Take care and stay safe.

Vaya con Dios. ( I do not know how to say this in the language of the people and mean no disrespect)

The Malingerer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2018)
Primitivo (2019)
Invierno (2019)
Del Baztan (2020)
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
I grew up in Window Rock, and my sister was born at Sage Memorial in Ganado. This was where my foundation was laid, and still very much my home, many, many years later. My heart goes with you on this very different sort of Camino. Thank you for your work! I hope to meet you one day along my Camino journeys. 🤗
 

Sidekick

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis SJdPP to Astorga (Apr 2018)
Astorga to Santiago (Sept 2018);Camino Ingles (2018)
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
God be with you.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
A total of eight in the past 6 years!
Godspeed. The problem in the Navajo nation is starting to be recognized, finally. Safe travels and be safe!
 

Jenibee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
TBD
Thank you so very, very much for your compassionate heart towards our beautiful Navajo brothers and sisters. Having spent a good deal of time out in that part of the country and established relationships with those who call it home, I have seen the living conditions firsthand and understand what you're going into. You are truly an angel for caring.

I'm not sure if it's frowned upon to mention a charitable organization here, and if so I trust that the moderators will delete accordingly -- but I felt this an appropriate place to mention the Adopt-A-Native Elder program, which we have supported for a many years. We currently support an elderly Navajo couple living in Teesto, helping to provide food, firewood, and other necessities. The program is AMAZING, and I encourage anyone who may have an interest in the Navajo Nation to read about the wonderful work they do: www.anelder.org
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
Thank-you for volunteering, your hard work and your care for the Navajo. - I lived in Los Alamos (once upon a time), and still miss NM sorely. Stay well. You and those with you work with, will be in my prayers.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , Pamplona Burgos august 2018 Burgos to Santiago 19 /04 to 20/05/2019
Good luck to you!
I have been reading interesting books written by First Nations authors , Canadian mostly as Thomas King (The inconvénient Indian) ,Richard Wagamese ( Keeper’n Me),Joseph Boyden( Three days road)
I have a passion for the american littérature of the great outdoors and the history of the first settlers and the cohabitation with the Indian tribes
Jim Fermuch,Jim Harrison,Thomas Savage.. please if you can recommend a few titles about the Navajos or Hopis day would very grateful !
Many thoughts from the far west side f Brittany ... another irréductible Tribe of celts!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2018)
Primitivo (2019)
Invierno (2019)
Del Baztan (2020)
As a matter of fact, I have a very dear friend who works at Sage Memorial. I have not seen her in person since high school, but we keep in close contact through Facebook. Please give Marlene Gale my love and regards when you see her! ❤
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2018
Camino Ingles, Caminos Muxia and Finisterre 2019
@davebugg your soul is definitely 'help-shaped'. May all go well for you and you can truly assist the people in that area. Both you and they will be in my prayers
 

TerBear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2018
Dave, you are such a caring and especially giving man. Take care out there. Prayers for you and those you are helping.
 

travelgirl409

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September (2016)
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
I lived on the Rez and worked at Tuba City Boarding School for 6 years. My heart is so sad for the Navajos and all other First Nation people’s. Doctors Without Borders arrived on the Navajo Rez last week, so here we are as a first world country getting help typically reserved for third world😥😥
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hello all. A quick travel update:

Like most travel with layovers, I am sitting at the Albuquerque airport waiting for my ride to Ganado.

The flight was fine, although with fewer passengers than I am used to :) I even had a whole row to myself. Part of the normal Pre-Flight Instructions included a few new things, like no queing for the bathrooms. We did wear masks, and hand sanitizer was readily available (I brought my own, thank you :) )

Some butterflies. . . not so much because of personal concerns about safety, but with what needs to be done, and seeing the impact on families. I haven't really looked carefully at mortality rates as an outcome of COVID-19 infection, but given the way family units are structured as multigenerational households, it may be that family household are heavily impacted vs the average American household.

I thank you all for your support and well wishes. I have had a couple of members from this wonderful Forum, some who are either from the southwestern US, or who have deep roots with the Navajo Reservation in some way, ask about volunteering. Bless your hearts. . . you are dear people.

My public health training and background allowed me to be invited to participate in the contact tracing program. Right now, it is this aspect of public health experience that is needed most.

I do not speak Navajo (Dine'), so I will have someone with me who not only knows the area that I will be working. . there are few road signs and house numbers in much of the area where I'm at . . . but who can also translate if needed; and it will be needed.

CaminoforLife. . send me a PM of what department at Sage Memorial your friend works, and I'll see if I can stop by and say 'hello'. :)

I'll post again as I get settled and know more about what I'll be assigned. Bless you all.

Dave
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I lived on the Rez and worked at Tuba City Boarding School for 6 years. My heart is so sad for the Navajos and all other First Nation people’s. Doctors Without Borders arrived on the Navajo Rez last week, so here we are as a first world country getting help typically reserved for third world😥😥
Bless your heart. . . I hope any family and friends from the area are still safe and healthy. I won't be working in that area. . at least as far as I know right now.

I think the issues of health professional staffings are difficult given the intense personnel needs throughout the US. I have done some work with Doctors Without Borders, and it is a wonderful organization. In normal times, we would not see the types of spot shortages of people and supplies that most nations, including the US has seen.

I think of NYC as an example, where Samaritan's Purse set up a temporary and portable field hospital and provided staff and supplies. Typically, that organization operates that kind of medical support in the same types of locations around the world that Doctors Without Borders does.

I tend to think that the impact of health shortages during high level crises, like a pandemic, are directly proportional to both population densities and to service areas that, while maintaining adequate levels of care during normal times have little buffer with resources during unusual and intense health care demands.

In the case of Tribal medical care, there is a further logistical complication in how staffing is recruited with the primary agency being through the Indian Health Services.

I am also reminded that some European countries also received staffing help from China and Cuba medical teams due to the huge loads on staffing.

What has happened is equivalent to a hydroelectric dam that is perfectly capable of handling all the variations of water storage that can reasonably be imagined. However, if weather converges with water flows from a 'once in 500 years' series of storms or snowfall runoffs, what has been reasonably anticipated is no longer going to keep the dam from overflowing. Now you need all the people you can get your hands on to start filling sandbags.

I imagine that once the crisis is over, and we have recovered and are back to normal, a lot of things are going to be carefully evaluated about health care models in terms of both staffing, and individual medical facility Deep Central Supply Inventories for the '500 year floods'.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
If you have any specific ideas for donating to help this initiative, please let me know. I contribute to Native Hope but as a retired nurse, no longer able to do what you are planning, I'd like to support this work right now.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Have been looking some more; will be sending $$. And thinking of, praying for, you! Just discovered you live in Wenatchee. I'm in Tacoma; spent some days in Wenatchee/Leavenworth in December,
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
If you have any specific ideas for donating to help this initiative, please let me know. I contribute to Native Hope but as a retired nurse, no longer able to do what you are planning, I'd like to support this work right now.
Donation ideas would be good @davebugg . At least we can try to do 'our bit' in some small way.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
If you have any specific ideas for donating to help this initiative, please let me know. I contribute to Native Hope but as a retired nurse, no longer able to do what you are planning, I'd like to support this work right now.
I have no specific information, other than to pass on this link. I cannot vouch for the charitable foundation one way or the other, but please take time to make sure it suits your gifting needs.

A note to Forum members in general: I am not seeking donations for myself, or on behalf of any cause; nor would I accept any. This link was in response to a specific request for information. :)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Well, I'm finally settled a bit in my room. The bare and comfortable essentials with a kitchenette and hot water, a toaster oven and small microwave. Oddly, there is a near full-sized refrigerator.

All in all, I'm good. I took a quick shower, and then plugged in to my laptop. Although there is wifi, I am using it as a portal with a remote desktop application to utilize an additional security layer. It works just fine though, perhaps not quite as fast, but fast enough to watch 4k resolutions on Netflix (yeah, wanted to see if it was there) :)

Tomorrow I'll be doing a quick meeting a few of the administrative staff to sign some stuff and to get a bit of orientation to the campus. Then I will be meeting with someone from the community outreach health program. Hopefully, I can do a ride along with one of the staff after lunch, on their afternoon visits to get the feel of the protocols they are using with interviews and testings (I am not clear if they are doing them in the field or by appointment. Given the sheer distances, and transportation difficulties, my bet is that they are being done in the field as indicated)

Anyway, all the travel and sitting and insomnia last night is making that bed in the other room look awfully inviting. I am unsure of how often I can post, but I will try and keep events updated.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Have been looking some more; will be sending $$. And thinking of, praying for, you! Just discovered you live in Wenatchee. I'm in Tacoma; spent some days in Wenatchee/Leavenworth in December,
Thanks, Jane. Whereabouts in the Tacoma area are you?
 

Fred Gaudet

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances2014 Portugese2016 Primitivo2016 Mozárabe, Via de la Plata, Sanabres2018 Olvidado 2020
The Arizona Republic newspaper developed a zip code map of Covid-19 on the Navajo reservation. One of the zips has a higher rate of infection than any zip code area in New York.
 

MisterH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018 neither successful
Recently I have been reading novels from the Hillermans about that area of the US. It sounds as though you will have an interesting time. Have fun, and a little work and new experiences.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
I visited that area 30 years ago in a coast to coast trip. I have a photo in the confluence of the four states.
I hope things improve for the Navajo people.
 

alhartman

346 joyful days in Spain and France since 2005
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
Around 2004-5 I saw a part of a native prayer on a mojone at the Indianapolis museum. Turns out it is Navajo in origin; and has become my go-to walking meditation.

With beauty may I walk
With beauty before me may I walk
With beauty behind me may I walk
With Beauty above me may I walk
With beauty all around me may I walk
In old age, wandering on the trail of beauty, lively, may I walk.
In old age wandering on a trail of beauty, living again, may I walk.

And of course that is my wish for your deceased preceptor and all who have walked.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Again, I cannot thank you all enough for your wonderful and positive responses. I do appreciate you all so very much.

I am done for the day, and think I am going to go soak in a nice, hot bath for a looong time. It has been a busy couple of days. My bum and lower back are feeling all the bumps and ruts. :)

To give an idea of distances, our SUV has traveled over 572 miles in order to reach 22 households. I didn't keep track of the hours of driving, but yesterday we started out at 0730 meeting and greeting, and was on the road by 0930. Arrived back at my room at 19:40. Then this morning we were in the SUV by 0800 and right now it is around 14:25. No real lunch breaks, just eating on the fly.

Most travel is on dirt and gravel and single track roads, with travel on the main highways in-between.

1590355151253.png

Things are actually going better and more straightforward than I expected. Part of that is because of the limited movements by members of each household. Most are normally tending to ranch business, and not going into town except for groceries or other supplies. That is also the problem, because the number of stores are pretty small, so there is a lot of potential concentration for exposures.

Sage Memorial is not handling the severe respiratory cases of COVID-illness. . . it is not a tertiary care hospital, so if serious illness progresses to a certain level, patients are transported to larger hospitals. Of course, that means transporting quite a distance.

I haven't gotten a real sense that the staff involved with community health outreach are terribly overwhelmed, but you can tell that no one is standing around wondering what to do next. I think the main concern is what happens if one of the staff gets sick (from anything) and having a hole.

Right now, I am able to cut the time it takes to complete the interviews for the person with me, so that means we can reach more households in a given time frame.

I am hoping that we do not find a family member in their hogan who is horribly sick. I know from past experience that because of the distances to get to Sage Memorial in this area, a lot of people will wait until an illness (or labor) has progressed to a far more serious point.

Another thing I've noticed is that outside of the more aged individuals, speaking English is far more common than it was 35 years ago. That helps the community health nurse I'm with, because I have less need for a translator.

The cafeteria should be opening for dinner in a bit. Let me tell ya, I have really enjoyed getting re-acquainted with fry bread and mutton stews.

And again, I am so appreciative of your thoughts and well wishes. You are all a blessing to me.
Dave
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Pamplona to Finisterre 2015
Via de la Plata Seville - Astorga April 2017
Thank you so very, very much for your compassionate heart towards our beautiful Navajo brothers and sisters. Having spent a good deal of time out in that part of the country and established relationships with those who call it home, I have seen the living conditions firsthand and understand what you're going into. You are truly an angel for caring.

I'm not sure if it's frowned upon to mention a charitable organization here, and if so I trust that the moderators will delete accordingly -- but I felt this an appropriate place to mention the Adopt-A-Native Elder program, which we have supported for a many years. We currently support an elderly Navajo couple living in Teesto, helping to provide food, firewood, and other necessities. The program is AMAZING, and I encourage anyone who may have an interest in the Navajo Nation to read about the wonderful work they do: www.anelder.org
Thank you @davebugg for doing what you do and @Jenibee for sharing the link to a great program. Proud to say that my wife and I are now supporters.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19 ...
This disease seems to select differently to the last pandemic we all seem to heard of recently: the flu of 1918-1920.

The "first nations" of my country were very badly affected 100 years ago with about 25% of their total succumbing compared to a much smaller rate for others. This time around, despite marginally greater testing for them than the rest of the population, there have been very few cases among our "first nations" and no deaths.

All power to the work you are doing among the Navajo Nation. Kia ora tatou (may you all have good health)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Just now getting ready to end the long lunch break and get back to work. I gathered a few pictures of some locations we visited today, and thought you might enjoy a peek. Because of their spiritual beliefs, I tend to avoid taking pictures of the people themselves. . That, and the fact that even if it is fine with folks to do so, it could be viewed with suspicions, which needs to be avoided.

This home looks much more run-down in the photo than it actually is. It is severely weathered and worn, but it is weather tight and has good insulation and a concrete floor, instead of a packed earth floor. The owner keeps it spotless inside.

This home has a single, 82 year old great grandmother living there. She speaks no English, only Navajo. For some reason she found me to be hilarious, and when looking at me would smile real big and chuckle. The public/community health nurse I was with could not tell me why this was. . . or was knew and was keeping it to herself :)

I couldn't really be of help to the nurse, so I asked permission to look around. I wanted to do some quick spot checks to see if there were any noticeable environmental health concerns around her home. This is an area where Hantavirus is endemic, and so I wanted to see if there was evidence of mouse infestations/droppings, water, or plumbing issues, etc. Quick look at food stores, and issues with the house itself.

Typically, for elderly visitations, regardless of reason, the nurses always do a quick inventory checklist of such things, just in case.

1590442042387.png

In the photo below, you will see this family's traditional hogan to the left of the house. The parents of the wife lived in that hogan with 4 children. After she was married, wife's husband built the house. Currently, the wife and husband, two children, a sister, and the wife's mother live together in the house.

The hogan and the house both have their doorways facing the East, in traditional fashion.

1590445232497.png

This hogan we visited houses an elderly couple. He is 71 years of age, and still earns income by tending to his sheep. His wife tends a rather large vegetable garden in back of the hogan. As with many places, their water is from a well. Because they have electric power to the house, the well is operated by an electrical pump, with an old gasoline generator standing by in case the power goes out.

1590442122126.png

Things are going well overall. It is exhausting in its own way, mostly from anxieties about what we MIGHT find as we continue these contact visits. Due to the functions of the community health nurses, the contact tracing calls are combined with their normal routine visits.

A good example is a quick stop to do a post-natal visit to a recently discharged mom and baby. It was so wonderful to see such a precious little bundle. . . it also allowed my to actively help with assessing the baby girl, while the nurse checked on mom. It brought back a lot of fond memories from when I was there working as a midwife in training and later on as a visiting health professional.

And yes, with each visit, gloves, disposable gowns, and masks, and plenty of handwashing (5 gallon igloo water container in the back of the SUV) and hand sanitizer used as needed :)

Maybe THAT was why great, grandmother found me so funny. The gown and mask had to look funny to her. 🤪
 
Last edited by a moderator:

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'CP, Frances,Norte,Salv/prim;Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, Vdlp 2019>Táb/ Prt Levante 2020
Hi @davebugg
Very interesting read. Thankyou.
For some reason she found me to be hilarious, and when looking at me would smile real big and chuckle
And yes, with each visit, gloves, disposable gowns, and masks, and plenty of handwashing (5 gallon igloo water container in the back of the SUV) and hand sanitizer used as needed :)

Maybe THAT was why great, grandmother found me so funny. The gown and mask had to look funny to her
Probably you dressing up in a gown ‘may’ have been humorous to her .. 😁

Very inspiring to read of you and others putting yourselves out there in many different ways to give a helping hand.
Annie
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2018
Camino Ingles, Caminos Muxia and Finisterre 2019
Thank you it is nice to catch up with what you are doing and learn a little about the people.. Being English I have very little knowledge of Navajo people...I'd never heard of a Hogan house. My good hopes and wishes for these people can now have a little more sense of them. I hope it continues to go well for you.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019)
Just now getting ready to end the long lunch break and get back to work. I gathered a few pictures of some locations we visited today, and thought you might enjoy a peek. Because of their spiritual beliefs, I tend to avoid taking pictures of the people themselves. . That, and the fact that even if it is fine with folks to do so, it could be viewed with suspicions, which needs to be avoided.

This home looks much more run-down in the photo than it actually is. It is severely weathered and worn, but it is weather tight and has good insulation and a concrete floor, instead of a packed earth floor. The owner keeps it spotless inside.

This home has a single, 82 year old great grandmother living there. She speaks no English, only Navajo. For some reason she found me to be hilarious, and when looking at me would smile real big and chuckle. The public/community health nurse I was with could not tell me why this was. . . or was knew and was keeping it to herself :)

I couldn't really be of help to the nurse, so I asked permission to look around. I wanted to do some quick spot checks to see if there were any noticeable environmental health concerns around her home. This is an area where Hantavirus is endemic, and so I wanted to see if there was evidence of mouse infestations/droppings, water, or plumbing issues, etc. Quick look at food stores, and issues with the house itself.

Typically, for elderly visitations, regardless of reason, the nurses always do a quick inventory checklist of such things, just in case.

View attachment 75767

In the photo below, you will see this family's traditional hogan to the left of the house. The parents of the wife lived in that hogan with 4 children. After she was married, wife's husband built the house. Currently, the wife and husband, two children, a sister, and the wife's mother live together in the house.

The hogan and the house both have their doorways facing the East, in traditional fashion.

View attachment 75772

This hogan we visited houses an elderly couple. He is 71 years of age, and still earns income by tending to his sheep. His wife tends a rather large vegetable garden in back of the hogan. As with many places, their water is from a well. Because they have electric power to the house, the well is operated by an electrical pump, with an old gasoline generator standing by in case the power goes out.

View attachment 75769

Things are going well overall. It is exhausting in its own way, mostly from anxieties about what we MIGHT find as we continue these contact visits. Due to the functions of the community health nurses, the contact tracing calls are combined with their normal routine visits.

A good example is a quick stop to do a post-natal visit to a recently discharged mom and baby. It was so wonderful to see such a precious little bundle. . . it also allowed my to actively help with assessing the baby girl, while the nurse checked on mom. It brought back a lot of fond memories from when I was there working as a midwife in training and later on as a visiting health professional.

And yes, with each visit, gloves, disposable gowns, and masks, and plenty of handwashing (5 gallon igloo water container in the back of the SUV) and hand sanitizer used as needed :)

Maybe THAT was why great, grandmother found me so funny. The gown and mask had to look funny to her. 🤪
Dave it would be wonderful if you could post more photos and give us historical/cultural context. As an American it is shameful how little we as a country know about let alone learn about and respect Native American cultures and its peoples. Thank you.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
A bit of an update for today. . .

I have been at the Chinle, Az hospital community services department waiting for where we need to go next for some contact tracing visits in the area. So far, there has only been one visit we've made, so I haven't been doing much yet today. I would have thought we'd be hopping-busy, because Chinle area actually has had the highest caseload of COVID-19 illness

What is a bit frustrating is that Chinle Hospital made the request for assistance, which brought us up here fro today. Apparently the visitation teams from Chinle are very busy, and it was thought that we could help fill in to take a bit of the load off of them. I am scratching my head, wondering if there was a miscommunication between one Chinle department to another.

We have been told that there we should have a list of folks to visit in a short while. Given that it is an hour's drive from Chinle to Ganado, unless the visits are to our south, this is going to be a long day before getting back to base.

A bit of good news SEEMS to be developing, though. From the statistics gathered up to yesterday, it MAY be that the 'curve' is flattening a bit. I do not know much in the way of details, but the hospital's public health office staff seemed in good spirits at the news.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Today I'm doing something different than home visits. We've set up a table area at a convenience store and gas station outside of Ganado, near Burnside. This is one of just a few places where area residents can get fuel and snacks and some basic groceries like milk and eggs.

We're doing spot surveys, asking various COVID-19 related questions regarding perceived risks, recent outings, and recent contacts with family or friends. Just another way of doing some intelligence gathering about the extent of public interactions of residents in this area. We are trying to get a sense of the gap between what we now know, and how much information we might be missing about interpersonal contacts and public interactions.

This is the kind of tedious stuff that must be done to help discover how much still needs to be done. The information collected today - - so far there have been 29 completed surveys - - will be entered into a couple of GIS-based public health programs designed for disease outbreak tracking, as passive monitoring points. There is no way to accurately predict future outbreaks, but with GIS matchups to any future positive testing or diagnosis, it might help with interdiction strategies for potential outbreak clusters.

Outside of basic tedium, it is getting pretty warm. Thank goodness there's shade, and lots of cold drinks at the minimart. :)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
There has been nothing terribly different to share today so far. Instead of doing a few individual contacts visiting more isolated homes, we are visiting folks in a couple of small, housing communities. There are only two actual contacts that need to be made for potential testing follow up. A lot of what I'm doing is distributing information and items, like masks, to individual households.

I've been doing this with every contact visit, but the purpose of today's outreach is solely focused on distribution of information and materials. If no one is at home, items and informational pamphlets are left in door-hanger bags at the front door.

Last night at the cafeteria, one of the nurses I've worked with brought a young man (36 years old :) ) over and introduced him to me. It turned out that Samuel was one of the babies of the mothers I was midwife to in late 1984. Samuel's mother and father have been gone for a while, but an 'Auntie' of Samuel, (who also knows the nurse), remembered my last name and two and two got put together.

Apparently Samuel is employed by the local school district and lives near the Ganado campus. I would love to say that it was a great and joyful rekindling of acquaintance, but it felt awkward. Social distancing aside, while it was fun to see a baby all grown up and to hear that their life has turned out well, it is still me, an introvert, trying to make small talk with a stranger. :)

Samuel was pleasant, and it was interesting to see and meet him once again. I'm hoping, though, that this is just a one off experience :)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Today I spent the day at a clinic being held in the hospital (Sage Memorial). We've had some folks that were contacted come in for testing, and others seeking information. There was a lot of waiting around and not a whole lot of activity.

Tomorrow (Sunday), we will be making a few contacts with some nearby homes, but not much later in the afternoon. I'll use the time tomorrow afternoon to do some walking around and enjoying the outdoors a bit.

I had thought about trying to borrow a vehicle and visit Canyon de Chelly up north near Chinle, but I just don't have enough time to do make it worthwhile. It is a uniquely beautiful area, and it would have been wonderful to see it again.

I had hoped that Hubbell's Trading Post would have been open so that could shop for a Navajo Rug to add to my small collection. But it is closed. Oh, well. I have heard from one of the nurses that there are a couple of local rug makers, but I doubt that I could make a visit happen.

I head back to Albuquerque airport Monday morning to catch a flight back home later that evening. I wish I could stay longer, but there are things to do at home.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
I am happy to catch up on your service duty, thanks for posting. A small window into a world unknown to me. You have been in my mind as I join with a group of my community sisters each evening for a one minute silence, via Zoom, in solidarity with frontline workers in such different roles. For many of us, it is a small thing that we are able to contribute. Safe trip home.
 

Ivan_Prada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés-(septiembre 2018)
Portugués-(en planes 2021)??
Today I spent the day at a clinic being held in the hospital (Sage Memorial). We've had some folks that were contacted come in for testing, and others seeking information. There was a lot of waiting around and not a whole lot of activity.

Tomorrow (Sunday), we will be making a few contacts with some nearby homes, but not much later in the afternoon. I'll use the time tomorrow afternoon to do some walking around and enjoying the outdoors a bit.

I had thought about trying to borrow a vehicle and visit Canyon de Chelly up north near Chinle, but I just don't have enough time to do make it worthwhile. It is a uniquely beautiful area, and it would have been wonderful to see it again.

I had hoped that Hubbell's Trading Post would have been open so that could shop for a Navajo Rug to add to my small collection. But it is closed. Oh, well. I have heard from one of the nurses that there are a couple of local rug makers, but I doubt that I could make a visit happen.

I head back to Albuquerque airport Monday morning to catch a flight back home later that evening. I wish I could stay longer, but there are things to do at home.
Thank you, Dave for all you have done during this visit to Native Americans and keep us aware of their situation. I’m sure that your service was very welcome at this time, I’m also sure thatyou will leave them with plenty of recommendations based on your findings. Just take care and keep the excellent work you have accustomed the readers of your postings. Sincerely, Ivan.

1590941931323.jpeg
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I had thought about trying to borrow a vehicle and visit Canyon de Chelly up north near Chinle, but I just don't have enough time to do make it worthwhile. It is a uniquely beautiful area, and it would have been wonderful to see it again.
For those who haven't seen it:
Screenshot_20200531-192944.png
Thanks for your work Dave.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2020)
Today I spent the day at a clinic being held in the hospital (Sage Memorial). We've had some folks that were contacted come in for testing, and others seeking information. There was a lot of waiting around and not a whole lot of activity.

Tomorrow (Sunday), we will be making a few contacts with some nearby homes, but not much later in the afternoon. I'll use the time tomorrow afternoon to do some walking around and enjoying the outdoors a bit.

I had thought about trying to borrow a vehicle and visit Canyon de Chelly up north near Chinle, but I just don't have enough time to do make it worthwhile. It is a uniquely beautiful area, and it would have been wonderful to see it again.

I had hoped that Hubbell's Trading Post would have been open so that could shop for a Navajo Rug to add to my small collection. But it is closed. Oh, well. I have heard from one of the nurses that there are a couple of local rug makers, but I doubt that I could make a visit happen.

I head back to Albuquerque airport Monday morning to catch a flight back home later that evening. I wish I could stay longer, but there are things to do at home.
Hi Dave,

I am just seeing your posts and am so very grateful to you for your work on behalf of Navajo Nation. For those (I assume most) unfamiliar with New Mexico and Covid, we were incredibly lucky in that our governor was one of the first to shut things down, even when there were very few official cases. She has no doubt saved countless lives. Most of the state has done very well, but unfortunately the northwest of NM has been hit very hard. Navajo Nation has the highest per capita rate of infection in the entire U.S. Many of the homes do not have running water.

For those who would like to learn more, here is a link to a Washington Post article:

My husband is an ICU doctor who has been taking care of Covid patients and many have been flown in from Navajo Nation to get care. He has been shocked to see so many 40- and 50-year-olds on vents. It is a grim reminder that this illness can become deadly for anyone, not just the elderly.

Dave, I hope you will be able to come back to the land of enchantment in better times and get that visit in to the Canyon de Chelly. Thank you for all your efforts and help in New Mexico. Wishing you a very safe trip home.

All the best,
Lynda
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hi Dave,

I am just seeing your posts and am so very grateful to you for your work on behalf of Navajo Nation. For those (I assume most) unfamiliar with New Mexico and Covid, we were incredibly lucky in that our governor was one of the first to shut things down, even when there were very few official cases. She has no doubt saved countless lives. Most of the state has done very well, but unfortunately the northwest of NM has been hit very hard. Navajo Nation has the highest per capita rate of infection in the entire U.S. Many of the homes do not have running water.

For those who would like to learn more, here is a link to a Washington Post article:

My husband is an ICU doctor who has been taking care of Covid patients and many have been flown in from Navajo Nation to get care. He has been shocked to see so many 40- and 50-year-olds on vents. It is a grim reminder that this illness can become deadly for anyone, not just the elderly.

Dave, I hope you will be able to come back to the land of enchantment in better times and get that visit in to the Canyon de Chelly. Thank you for all your efforts and help in New Mexico. Wishing you a very safe trip home.

All the best,
Lynda
Thank you. Ganado is in Arizona, though, so I haven't done any work in New Mexico. Tell your husband that I am grateful for his work.

My wife, as a charge nurse on Pediatrics at our local regional hospital has not had to provide care to any children with COVID-19, although the general medical floor has had about 30 patients pass through the ICU. So far, no deaths have been recorded.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
After a short day of making two contact interviews, things are pretty much done for me. I finished packing up my backpack and am ready to head back tomorrow morning to the Albuquerque airport. I am still pretty wound up, so will probably take a nice, hot bath and soak for a while, then watch some Netflix.

I spent a lot of the afternoon walking around the area outside of the hospital campus and enjoyed the countryside. I took my daypack with plenty of water in the reservoir. It was in the mid-80’s f / 29 c, and the sun was in full exposure, until late afternoon.

I do not know why I enjoy this terrain so much, but I love the look and smell of the pinon pines and the sage, mixed with the high desert climate. I did see a couple of rattle snakes, but they were both lethargic and didn’t bother to take note of me as I gently passed them by.

The picture below is outside the hospital campus, near to the middle school. The ‘G’ is for Ganado.

1590976015165.png

The next picture is of the church on the Sage Memorial campus, near to one of the buildings that housed the small apartment I stayed in. This was in the late afternoon, and it almost looked like we might have been getting some rain.

1590975957694.png

Before dinner, a few of the staff that I have been working with dropped by my apartment room. They wanted to thank me and say their farewells. What absolutely blew me away was a gift that they presented.

The nurse I have spent the most time with (the one who told about some local rug makers), had a Great Grandmother who died several years back, and who had been a maker of Navajo rugs. Apparently, she was well regarded as a rug maker, and sold many of her rugs in Gallup and at the Hubbell Trading Post here in the Ganado area. Below is a picture of the small rug that the nurse gave to me.

What makes such rugs so desirable is not just the craftsmanship and traditional artistry of their weaving. These rug makers often spin the wool from the local sheep, and then they dye the wool with colors made from materials gathered from the local area. Many will use the same weaving and techniques that have existed since the Navajo first started making these rugs.

The monetary value of this rug is significant. From others I have purchased, I know that it is worth a lot of money. But the value to me, as a gift from a new friend that I’ve only known for 8 days, cannot be measured. I offered to pay the nurse for the rug, but she refused saying that her great grandmother wanted me to have it. Given the spiritual beliefs of the Navajo, her saying that gave a special meaning to the gift.

I have permission to include the picture of the woman who made this rug. You never take photos of Navajo without permission, as some have strong beliefs about having their image ‘captured’.

The picture is attached to the tag that is included with the rugs that are at a vendor store. This rug was originally at the Hubbell Trading Post to sell, but was returned to the family after Grandmother’s passing. I have always carefully detached these tags and laminated them to better preserve them, then I reattach the tags to the rugs with a threaded nylon line.

1590976214816.png

1590976251686.png

All in all, regardless of what I was able to contribute down here, I have received far more from the people here. Not all the staff at Sage Memorial are Navajo, but all of the staff made me feel very welcomed while I was here.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2020)
Thank you. Ganado is in Arizona, though, so I haven't done any work in New Mexico. Tell your husband that I am grateful for his work.

My wife, as a charge nurse on Pediatrics at our local regional hospital has not had to provide care to any children with COVID-19, although the general medical floor has had about 30 patients pass through the ICU. So far, no deaths have been recorded.

Hi Dave,

I read you were in Albuquerque airport and thought you were in Navajo Nation NM, although of course it spans a few states :). I was so touched reading about you volunteering and taking such big steps to go out of your way to help. And your story of being gifted the Navajo rug was equally touching. In a time of so much ugliness in the world, it is beautiful to hear of deep and meaningful connections being made between people and the best of everyone being brought out. Thank you for sharing with all of us.

I am curious, did you hear about or get any sense from your time there if there might be a silver lining of longer-term improvements and changes? It would be great if infrastructure could be built with some of the relief money for water, internet etc.

I'm so glad to hear your wife has not seen any pediatric cases, especially with the stories of the new inflammatory conditions in kids. I hope she stays safe 🙏.

And still wishing you a happy return to NM, where you will get to see more than the airport in Albuquerque :). The Southwest is indeed a very magical, very spiritual place. Wishing you a safe and peaceful trip home.

Lynda
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hi Dave,

I read you were in Albuquerque airport and thought you were in Navajo Nation NM, although of course it spans a few states :). I was so touched reading about you volunteering and taking such big steps to go out of your way to help. And your story of being gifted the Navajo rug was equally touching. In a time of so much ugliness in the world, it is beautiful to hear of deep and meaningful connections being made between people and the best of everyone being brought out. Thank you for sharing with all of us.

I am curious, did you hear about or get any sense from your time there if there might be a silver lining of longer-term improvements and changes? It would be great if infrastructure could be built with some of the relief money for water, internet etc.

I'm so glad to hear your wife has not seen any pediatric cases, especially with the stories of the new inflammatory conditions in kids. I hope she stays safe 🙏.

And still wishing you a happy return to NM, where you will get to see more than the airport in Albuquerque :). The Southwest is indeed a very magical, very spiritual place. Wishing you a safe and peaceful trip home.

Lynda
Hi, Lynda.

You are correct, I did arrive via the Albuquerque airport; it is the easiest way to get to Ganado, although certainly not the quickest as it is about 3 hours away by car. The closer and smaller regional airports have had passenger service interruptions from canceled flights, so catching a ride back and forth is it for me. :)

The Navajo Reservation is located mostly in Arizona, although New Mexico has a large section of it. Especially around the Gallup area. Utah also has a portion. Most of the off-reservation Trust Lands for the Navajo are all in New Mexico, I think.

There was a feeling from some of the latest stats a few days ago that might indicate a flattening of the curve. It will take a bit more analysis of the data, but when I was at the hospital in Chinle, the public health office seemed thrilled with the news.

As someone whose parents were Cherokee tribal members (I guess I'm enrolled, too), there was a lot of joking around and the poking of fun. But, really, it was a lot of focus on the work that needed doing, and in many ways similar to what I did before doing my early retirement from Chelan-Douglas Health District in Washington State. it helped that I was pretty familiar with the area and folks that live here.

I love the Southwest, and plan on continuing to visit the area as often as I can.

I appreciate your thoughtful and kind words.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
I have been popping in and out of the Forum while getting ready to depart to Ganado, Arizona, so I thought I'd give an update on what is going to keep me busy for the next little while.

I had been at Sage Memorial Hospital for 6 months during some clinical midwifery trainings in 1985-86. After that, I would travel down and spend a few months here and there as volunteer staff in various capacities related to both public health and midwifery. The last time was about 8 years ago.

I was notified last week that one of the folks I knew, who was a family practice physician at Sage Memorial when I was there, and who was one of my preceptors, died from COVID-19 related complications.

A few days later, I decided to contact the Navajo Health Foundation and offer to volunteer to help with COVID-19 contact tracing and notifications for follow up testing. The Navajo Nation has been hard hit by COVID-19, mainly around Gallup and a couple of larger towns on the reservation lands, like Chinlee, Tuba City, and Window Rock.

Many Tribal members live in the area around these more 'urban' centers. But a large number of Tribal members will also come into these towns and cities for periodic supplies, and then spread back out to their small sheep and goat ranches, or homes.

This corner of the US has some of the most terrible poverty in America, and because the population is spread out over a huge area of land, it is spreading the manpower of both the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Health Foundation way too thin to do all the contact tracing that is needed..

It was just too hard to not do something.

Anyway, I'll be catching an early flight to Albuquerque tomorrow morning. From there, it was either a small plane OR a three hour drive to Sage Memorial compound in Ganado. I chose to take a car. :) There is housing available on the campus, so I'll be in guest quarters. They do have a good WiFi setup, so that will allow me to keep in regular touch, and to be able to watch YouTube and NetFlix :)

Right now, the plan is to be there for 10 days, but who knows. . .

If you can keep the situation for these people in your thoughts and prayers, I would be grateful.
Ya'at' eeh. Formerly from Chinle, so know what you are taking about.
You must have arrived at Sage, and perhaps be on your way home. How was it?
 

Jenibee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
TBD
What a beautiful rug and what a treasure not only to have it, but to have the gift of that connection to the lovely soul who made it. What you have done for the Navajo people will come back to you tenfold, I believe. Bless you and your willing heart. This tired old world needs more just like you.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hi, all :)

As a follow-up to my time in Ganado, here it is Sunday, at 16:46, and finished up a call from my primary care person. After getting back from Arizona, I pretty much kept to a 'quarantine' until I could get testing completed on Friday. As I expected, the results were a Negative. So, that wraps up things up nicely for me. :)

Things seem to be going well enough on much of the Navajo Reservation area. There are still a few 'hotspots', but during a call to Ganado on Friday, there is a lot of positivity about the direction of COVID-19. Traffic Barricades have either been removed around the Reservation, or are being removed so that vehicle travel will be as normal again.

This is my last post, and I have appreciated the Forum.

Because I will soon not have access to either posting or Private Messaging, I wanted to give an email address. Emails are allowed to be posted, as long as the risks are recognized. So if desired, you can reach me at: dave1bugg@gmail.com.

This is a new email account unlinked to my personal or business email accounts. Spammers and computer do-bads, no problem :)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Dave will be sorely missed by the majority of forum members. This is sad news indeed.
I wish him a future filled with God's best, wherever his feet carry him.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Monasp Covid and the Camino 17
OLDER threads on this topic
COVID Pilgrims office of SJPP is closed

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 321 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 23 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 369 28.6%
  • October

    Votes: 154 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock