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Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Walking two Caminos on one trip.

Which one First

  • Short one or

    Votes: 5 22.7%
  • Long one

    Votes: 17 77.3%

  • Total voters
    22

DwainS

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances(2020)
Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
 
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Hola @DwainS Firstly, your desire to re-connect with “the Camino” is not unusual and there are aspects of all Caminos that pilgrims want to experience again.
So are you thinking about walking “All” the Frances or say just the last 500 km (maybe Start in Burgos). In either case I support walking the longer Camino first.
As for the Porto there are good connections from Santiago to either Oporto if are walking the last 230km.
So it’s your decision, a very special Buen Camino ! Chers.
 
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I had planned 2 Caminos for this autumn, Portuguese followed by Ingles and unfortunately had to cancel the Portuguese route :( . I had been told prior to walking Frances 2 years ago that it was addictive and I would want to walk again...I do not like being told what I will want...but they were right lol.

I have met a few people that have done back-to-back Caminos and I am envious! Book what you want to walk. I'm also in Western Canada and also feel like the price for airfare warrants more time to make the expenditure worthwhile. This year I can only escape for a couple of weeks, we'll see what next year allows!

Buen Camino!
 
The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other.
I walked three different Caminos during my trip this year. I started with the Madrid which was new to me, re-did part of the Frances where I had some unfinished business and then ended with the Portuguese from Tui.

In my case I enjoyed the Madrid the most because of my many kind interactions with local Spanish people and because of the challenges of the Madrid. I especially liked the challenges represented by the solitary nature of the Madrid.

Next, I enjoyed chasing away the ghosts of my 2019 Camino Frances where I became seriously ill after Sahagún and as a result struggled from there to O Cebrerio where I collapsed and was taken to hospital.

Much of that portion of the Frances was a blur in my memory and I enjoyed seeing it again with fresher eyes. I also marvelled at my stubbornness in 2019 to keep putting one foot in front of the other and keep going and contrasted that with my fitness at the same points this year when in three days I easily walked the same distance that had taken me seven days of struggle in 2019.

After these two experiences, walking the Portuguese became somewhat mechanical and while parts of it were nice, overall I was underwhelmed.

I suspect that many people will jump in on this last paragraph and extoll the virtues of the Portuguese and I am certainly not arguing with them on that but rather I am saying that in my case this series of Caminos had the Portuguese not be particularly interesting or significant for me.

From this I would offer you two pieces of advice.

Firstly when you rewalk the Frances don't try to relive the best parts of your previous pilgrimage. Throw those expectations away and try to walk it anew.

On every occasion when I purposely revisited a place where I had had a great experience in 2019 I was disappointed this year. On the other hand I had some of my most memorable days in places that simply didn't even register last time around.

Second piece of advice, perhaps walk the Portuguese first so that you are forced to treat it as a completely new experience then tackle the Frances with your fresh eyes. Perhaps consider starting at a different point to really reinforce that this Camino Frances will be completely different from your last one.

Of course, what you eventually choose to do will be the perfect choice for you and neither I nor anyone else can make those choices for you.

Buen Camino!
 
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Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
I think it depends on the two. In this case, I would probably do the short one first. Similarly, if the two are the San Salvador and the Primitivo, I would also definitely do the short one first. But if the two are the Frances and the Finisterre, I would do the Frances first.
 
Hola @DwainS Firstly, your desire to re-connect with “the Camino” is not unusual and there are aspects of all Caminos that pilgrims want to experience again.
So are you thinking about walking “All” the Frances or say just the last 500 km (maybe Start in Burgos). In either case I support walking the longer Camino first.
As for the Porto there are good connections from Santiago to either Oporto if are walking the last 230km.
So it’s your decision, a very special Buen Camino ! Chers.
Hola @DwainS Firstly, your desire to re-connect with “the Camino” is not unusual and there are aspects of all Caminos that pilgrims want to experience again.
So are you thinking about walking “All” the Frances or say just the last 500 km (maybe Start in Burgos). In either case I support walking the longer Camino first.
As for the Porto there are good connections from Santiago to either Oporto if are walking the last 230km.
So it’s your decision, a very special Buen Camino ! Chers.
I think i'am going to start from Pamplona this time. There was a festival there this year and the streets were super crowded so didn't really get the connection with the city. It was fun but most restaurants and bars were packed and just a little bit too busy for me to really enjoy. So I feel it will be like a fresh start for me to begin there. I was a chef so everyday at work I try to keep everything super organized. I think on my my first camino I was trying to keep everyday too organized and not be just more relaxed and enjoy all that was around me. Don't get me wrong it was great or I wound't be walking it again but I think being more relaxed this time will let me absorb more of the Camino vibe. Also I was nervous going solo but won't be this time.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I walked three different Caminos during my trip this year. I started with the Madrid which was new to me, re-did part of the Frances where I had some unfinished business and then ended with the Portuguese from Tui.

In my case I enjoyed the Madrid the most because of my many kind interactions with local Spanish people and because of the challenges of the Madrid. I especially liked the challenges represented by the solitary nature of the Madrid.

Next, I enjoyed chasing away the ghosts of my 2019 Camino Frances where I became seriously ill after Sahagún and as a result struggled from there to O Cebrerio where I collapsed and was taken to hospital.

Much of that portion of the Frances was a blur in my memory and I enjoyed seeing it again with fresher eyes. I also marvelled at my stubbornness in 2019 to keep putting one foot in front of the other and keep going and contrasted that with my fitness at the same points this year when in three days I easily walked the same distance that had taken me seven days of struggle in 2019.

After these two experiences, walking the Portuguese became somewhat mechanical and while parts of it were nice, overall I was underwhelmed.

I suspect that many people will jump in on this last paragraph and extoll the virtues of the Portuguese and I am certainly not arguing with them on that but rather I am saying that in my case this series of Caminos had the Portuguese not be particularly interesting or significant for me.

From this I would offer you two pieces of advice.

Firstly when you rewalk the Frances don't try to relive the best parts of your previous pilgrimage. Throw those expectations away and try to walk it anew.

On every occasion when I purposely revisited a place where I had had a great experience in 2019 I was disappointed this year. On the other hand I had some of my most memorable days in places that simply didn't even register last time around.

Second piece of advice, perhaps walk the Portuguese first so that you are forced to treat it as a completely new experience then tackle the Frances with your fresh eyes. Perhaps consider starting at a different point to really reinforce that this Camino Frances will be completely different from your last one.

Of course, what you eventually choose to do will be the perfect choice for you and neither I nor anyone else can make those choices for you.

Buen Camino!
The Madrid Camino sounds interesting. I'am flying into Madrid regardless of were I start and which Camino. Only spent one afternoon and evening there and really enjoyed it. Especially staying downtown, thanks to the forum members that recommended to do that before my flight out the next day. Yes, and I will try not to expect and relive the experiences I had on my first camino but try to make new ones. Comparisons are hard not to make.
 
One good way to combine those is SJPP > Santiago > Fátima.
 
For me long one first. More flexibility.
It gives you more options at the end.
To do the short one or not, do 2 short ones...
I was hoping to do 4 in one go this year, but ran out of time.
Did Longish, Shortish, Short.
VdlP, Invierno, Fisterra/Muxia
 
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I have done this a couple of times. Two short caminos a few years ago walking the CI then to Muxia and Fisterra. Then last year the Caminho do Tejo then CP from Tomar, ie a short camino followed by a much longer one. These pairs fairly naturally fall into sequence. Doing them the other way around would have been more involved, and not something I think I really contemplated.

So I think discussing this in the abstract is less helpful than having a clear idea about which parts of the French and Portuguese routes you would walk, and whether both would end in Santiago, or would one end in some other significant pilgrimage destination. For example, one could do a shorter distance on the CF and then walk to Fatima.

It seems natural to add Muxia/Fisterra to the end of another camino, but it is clearly possible to walk Fisterra/Muxia and then to Santiago as the first camino, then get to a start point on any of the routes through Spain and Portugal and walk to Santiago from there.

On whether to use a short camino as preparation for the longer camino, I personally want to be prepared for the whole set of pilgrimages before I start. I suppose it is an option, just not one that I would take.
 
I have done multiple Camino many times. I would suggest starting in Pau and walking the Aragones to Puente la Reina and join the CF for several weeks then depending on how much you liked Galicia after Astorga either walk on to SDC or take a train to Ferrol and walk the CI to SDC for a real Galician fix.
 
Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
Do yourself a favor, if you are thinking of doing again, do it!!! I had Covid stop me, time flew by, and now I’m here but it is so much more to grasp!!! I’m going to have to redo again 😫😫😫
 
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The Madrid Camino sounds interesting. I'am flying into Madrid regardless of were I start and which Camino. Only spent one afternoon and evening there and really enjoyed it. Especially staying downtown, thanks to the forum members that recommended to do that before my flight out the next day. Yes, and I will try not to expect and relive the experiences I had on my first camino but try to make new ones. Comparisons are hard not to make.
I got lost trying to do camino Madrid in 2018…. Not marked well enough then
 
I did walk two Caminos in a row: the Francés to Fisterra first and then the Inglés because at some point I sped up and after coming back to Santiago from Fisterra I would have to wait 6 days for my flight back home. Walking the 5 stages of the Camino Inglés turned out to be cheaper than changing my flight!
 
If combining the Frances and Portuguese, I'd simply walk the Frances to Santiago, then pick up the Portuguese heading south to Fatima.

If you want to end both caminos in Santiago, then i'd say where you start is more important than distance. Ultimately choose which one feels right - and that will be your right choice ; )

And yes, walking mulitple caminos per trip isn't unheard of ; ) - this is how i walk.
 
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I am here now and hoped to do 2 Caminos. Did the Portuguese first because I did the Frances last year and wanted to do the Frances again (I also felt I needed more of it)
I finished the Portuguese but fell and hurt my knee badly, so won't be able to do the Frances again. If I could do it over, I would do the Frances first and feel better about finishing everything and then do the Portuguese- hope this isn't too confusing!
 
Sorry to hear about the knee, Jeanne. Hope it heals up quick and you're back on the Frances before you know it.
 
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Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
Having now walked five camino’s - and travelling different routes each time - the experience is an addictive one. In fact we have arrived home after 11 long hot weeks doing the Gebennensis and Le Puy (then tacking on a holiday)…vowing that the ‘next trip’ has to get us off our feet and riding a bike. Well, wouldn’t you know it, last night I bought the guide for the Alpe-Adria Trail. Perhaps the feet won’t get a break after all.
While I don’t have a strong yearning to repeat the Frances (too many other great trails to walk) I wonder if you would consider walking it backwards? You could start in Porto arrive in SdC and walk to Frances, having a different experience. And you could stop at any point, or carry on…
 
We just walked the Portuguese Camino from Porto to Santiago. We are currently on a two week break in Spain and heading to St. Jean to walk a Camino Frances. It is addictive 😊
It’s your Camino-do as you like and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!
Sounds like my same schedule! Hard to go home, just want to stay and keep doing Caminos 😄
 
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Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
Why not start at the original starting place for the CF, namely Le Puy in France. It is a wonderful Camino. Around 1560km in total.
It’s a curiosity that the conventional CF is 95% in Spain whereas it truly has its name from the Bishop of Le Puy leading the first pilgrimage
Happy Mark
 
I would probably do the Francés first as that seems to be your primary goal. Then see what else calls when you get to Santiago. Fly to Porto for the Portugese? Or walk some other Camino eg Sanabres, Ingles etc.
I’m also wondering if you want to walk different Caminos or just walk for longer to get the most for your air fare dollar from Canada (I get it as I fly from Australia)
What about choosing to start the Francés earlier in France. A friend of mine started in Conques (not as far as Le Puy). think it’s about two weeks to St Jean and then off you go.
Whatever you choose May you have a wonderful Camino.
Buen Camino
 
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Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
What a great idea. I walked the Camino Frances May/June of ‘22. As long as my wonky knee heals in time I’m hoping to do the Camino Frances again for similar reasons-. I want to absorb more and even stay over at different towns for rest days. O’ Cebriero is one place I’d love to stay at overnight.
Your idea of doing the Camino Portuguese is intriguing and one I will consider for myself. Personally I’d do the Frances first and the Portuguese second. I’m turning 72 next July but age is just a number, right??
 
How about 3 Caminos: the Aragones, Frances and Invierno? You get to walk a big chunk of the Frances, and experience some new places. This year, I had plans to walk the Aragones to Punta de la Reina, get on the Frances to Ponferrada, and then take the Invierno into SdC. It would have been a combination of less-travelled and well-travelled Caminos. Unfortunately, I only got as far as Burgos.

Whichever Caminos you choose, good luck and buen Camino
 
I have done this a couple of times. Two short caminos a few years ago walking the CI then to Muxia and Fisterra. Then last year the Caminho do Tejo then CP from Tomar, ie a short camino followed by a much longer one. These pairs fairly naturally fall into sequence. Doing them the other way around would have been more involved, and not something I think I really contemplated.

So I think discussing this in the abstract is less helpful than having a clear idea about which parts of the French and Portuguese routes you would walk, and whether both would end in Santiago, or would one end in some other significant pilgrimage destination. For example, one could do a shorter distance on the CF and then walk to Fatima.

It seems natural to add Muxia/Fisterra to the end of another camino, but it is clearly possible to walk Fisterra/Muxia and then to Santiago as the first camino, then get to a start point on any of the routes through Spain and Portugal and walk to Santiago from there.

On whether to use a short camino as preparation for the longer camino, I personally want to be prepared for the whole set of pilgrimages before I start. I suppose it is an option, just not one that I would take.
I definitely want to include the Muxia/Fisterra as part of one of my options as I did not walk there on my first Camino. I was thinking of adding that on to my Portuguese Camino. I seem to be in more of a dilemma because of all the different responses and has me thinking of these different routes that I could do. That's what I like about this forum though. Gives me options that I had not thought of.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
What a great idea. I walked the Camino Frances May/June of ‘22. As long as my wonky knee heals in time I’m hoping to do the Camino Frances again for similar reasons-. I want to absorb more and even stay over at different towns for rest days. O’ Cebriero is one place I’d love to stay at overnight.
Your idea of doing the Camino Portuguese is intriguing and one I will consider for myself. Personally I’d do the Frances first and the Portuguese second. I’m turning 72 next July but age is just a number, right??
Yes, I want to stay at O' Cebriero also as I stayed at Laguna de Castilla last time. Although only one or two building in Laguna it was a great stay.
 
Why not start at the original starting place for the CF, namely Le Puy in France. It is a wonderful Camino. Around 1560km in total.
It’s a curiosity that the conventional CF is 95% in Spain whereas it truly has its name from the Bishop of Le Puy leading the first pilgrimage
Happy Mark
You know, I've watched a few YouTube videos on the Le Puy route and it looks fantastic. I would love to do this camino. The one thing i'am worried about is the language barrier. Most of them say English is rarely spoken on the Le Puy route. That being said this was not one of the options I had considered but maybe between now and next May and can overcome that fear and maybe walk this route. If I wasn't walking solo I would be more inclined to do it also.
 
For me long one first. More flexibility.
It gives you more options at the end.
To do the short one or not, do 2 short ones...
I was hoping to do 4 in one go this year, but ran out of time.
Did Longish, Shortish, Short.
VdlP, Invierno, Fisterra/Muxia
Yes, ideally I would like to stay over there for the whole 90 days and walk as many as I could. Just turned 65 so I feel I have to do as many as I can well I still have my health. Had cancer a few years back and still go for check ups, actually have one next April as I want to leave next May. Same as last May, had a check up 3 days before my flight to Madrid. I was so happy when she gave me the green light to go. Don't want to have the attitude that I will always have a later date to walk. Feel good now so time to walk.
 
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Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
you said you walked the camino last May! I am planning to walk the same route next May. I would really appreciate some advice! what time of May did you start and what was the weather and conditions on the first few days
 
you said you walked the camino last May! I am planning to walk the same route next May. I would really appreciate some advice! what time of May did you start and what was the weather and conditions on the first few days
Hello batty. To start with, I originally wan't to walk the Frances in September as my birthday was in September so I thought what a great birthday gift to myself. What changed my mind was a forum member mentioned on here one day to consider what time of day it gets dark, later in May and June and gets dark earlier in September. That never crossed my mind before. It was lovely sitting outside at 9 PM having drinks and snacks and it was still daylight out. It was warm May 17 when I arrived in SJPP. May 18 it was cloudy but not rainy or cold at the start. Half way up the mountain the wind was a little chilly. Next 3 days was cloudy but no rain and was not cold. Then after that the days were mixed with sun and clouds. Great for walking. Plan to walk the same time next year. Was absolutely beautiful sunny weather in Fisterra when I arrived there June 22.
 
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How about 3 Caminos: the Aragones, Frances and Invierno?
I'd count that as one Camino -- the Aragonés and the Invierno are really just variant routes of the Francès, and back in the 90s, what we now call the Aragonés was treated as a branch of the Francès.
 
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Why not start at the original starting place for the CF
Statistically, that would be Paris, via Chartres/Orléans > Bordeaux > Bayonne > Irun, then Vasco Interior to Burgos, etc.

That was the route taken by far the greater portion of French pilgrims until about the 18th Century or so, when the Parisians too started going via SJPP.

Southern France had a far smaller population proportionally than it has developed since the 19th Century.
It’s a curiosity that the conventional CF is 95% in Spain whereas it truly has its name from the Bishop of Le Puy leading the first pilgrimage
No, it takes its name from the many French or "French" who created French-speaking settlements along the Francès. All fully integrated now of course, many Centuries later, so they speak Spanish plus whichever regional language instead.

And that Bishop's Camino was certainly not the first pilgrimage !!
 
Walked my first camino this year, May-June which was the Frances. During my first week of waking I was enjoying it but wondered why people walked it more than once. Well two weeks after I got home all I could think about was walking another Camino. I was torn between walking the Portuguese route next but also wanted to walk the Frances again because I don't think I truly absorbed all that the Frances had to offer. The days flew by while walking and now I can barley remember certain stages that I walked so I want to do it one more time. Air fare is quite expensive from western Canada so i'am thinking about walking the Portuguese and Frances, one right after the other on the same trip. Turned 65 on September 1st so i'am retired now so time is not a problem as it was on my first Camino. The question I have is do many people do this and if so is there any sort of advantage of doing one before the other. Long one first or short one first? The two thoughts I had was, do short one first to get body ready or do long one first so you just have a short one at the end. Its a dilemma, but a happy one because I know i'am going back.
Hi,
I am also from Canada and I combined two Camino in one trip twice. Just a quick thought, you know this pleasure to meet someone and then run by him/her again later on along the Camino when you don’t expect it and that happen often, you probably experienced this also? If it’s something you like, perhaps start with the Longest in your case the Frances to experience this and arriving in Santiago with those friendships. After that you may appreciate the last 10-14 days on the Portuguese Camino a little more by yourself since you’ll walk against the flow in the other direction if you’re plan is going to be Porto. Nice evenings with people but in the morning you’ll move in the other direction from the others. Looking at some questioning me with concerns if they were hitting in the right direction :) Enjoy!
 
Why not start at the original starting place for the CF, namely Le Puy in France. It is a wonderful Camino. Around 1560km in total.
It’s a curiosity that the conventional CF is 95% in Spain whereas it truly has its name from the Bishop of Le Puy leading the first pilgrimage
Happy Mark
Hi Liz and Ken here, we are walking two Caminos back to back we are starting in SJPdP on 10th April and will allow 60 days then a week of to travel to Le Puy to walk to SJPdP again allowing 60 days. Its a long way from New Zealand upto 32hours so spend a few days to get over the jet lag. I will turn 80 between the two walks. Buen Camino everybody
 
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Hi Liz and Ken here, we are walking two Caminos back to back we are starting in SJPdP on 10th April and will allow 60 days then a week of to travel to Le Puy to walk to SJPdP again allowing 60 days. Its a long way from New Zealand upto 32hours so spend a few days to get over the jet lag. I will turn 80 between the two walks. Buen Camino everybody
Do you have a passport that allows you that much time in the Schengen zone?
 
Hi Liz and Ken here, we are walking two Caminos back to back we are starting in SJPdP on 10th April and will allow 60 days then a week of to travel to Le Puy to walk to SJPdP again allowing 60 days. Its a long way from New Zealand upto 32hours so spend a few days to get over the jet lag. I will turn 80 between the two walks. Buen Camino everybody
I am curious why you chose to walk SJPdP-SdC and then immediately Le Puy-SJPdP instead of just Le Puy-SdC?
 
I am curious why you chose to walk SJPdP-SdC and then immediately Le Puy-SJPdP instead of just Le Puy-SdC?
We walked the El Camino SJPdP to SdC in September to end of October in 2016 their Autumn so we now want to walk it in Spring. To leave Le Puy early there will be to much snow so that will answer your question. We have a Argentine friend living in Angers in France and will celebrate my 80th 12.6.2024 with them so should be a great day as it was about 2014 since we last visited them in Argentina.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
A few years ago, pre pandemic I walked the Camino Portugues (central route) to Santiago and then I continued on walking to Finisterre. I still had two weeks in Spain so I traveled to Pamplona and from there walked the Frances to Carrion de los Condes. I could have gone further, but I knew from Carrion I could catch a bus all the way back to Madrid to fly home, so I had to walk some short distance days (7-10 kms) to time it right and get to Carrion on the day to bus back to Madrid in the afternoon.
I guess I sort of walked three Caminos, as the walk to Finisterre is considered separate in a way.
The shortened Camino Frances I walked was nice but different knowing I was not going to Santiago. All the pilgrims I befriended was only for a short period and they would talk about getting to Santiago and I already had a new compostela in my pack and I knew I was egressing in Carrion and would not see them again.
 
Hi Liz and Ken here, we are walking two Caminos back to back we are starting in SJPdP on 10th April and will allow 60 days then a week of to travel to Le Puy to walk to SJPdP again allowing 60 days. Its a long way from New Zealand upto 32hours so spend a few days to get over the jet lag. I will turn 80 between the two walks. Buen Camino everybody
Amazing! Buen Caminos!!
 
Hi,
I am also from Canada and I combined two Camino in one trip twice. Just a quick thought, you know this pleasure to meet someone and then run by him/her again later on along the Camino when you don’t expect it and that happen often, you probably experienced this also? If it’s something you like, perhaps start with the Longest in your case the Frances to experience this and arriving in Santiago with those friendships. After that you may appreciate the last 10-14 days on the Portuguese Camino a little more by yourself since you’ll walk against the flow in the other direction if you’re plan is going to be Porto. Nice evenings with people but in the morning you’ll move in the other direction from the others. Looking at some questioning me with concerns if they were hitting in the right direction :) Enjoy!
Yes, all the way from SJPP to Santiago I met people on and off along the way. Also, some good friends I met along the way took a rest day in Burgos or Leon or had blister stops. As I walked 32 days straight I did not see them again along the trail. But I always formed new friends along the way. The nice part was I had 3 nights booked in Santiago so each day I walked down to the Cathedral Square and the friends that had stoped for a rest day or two I got to see them. In fact one gentleman that I walked into Santiago with said he regretted only staying one night in Santiago. Still not to sure which Camino's i'am going to walk and in which order so in the next couple weeks i'am just going to buy a ticket to Madrid for 8 weeks for May and June (my Christmas present to myself, ha ha) then I'll have 5 months to sort it out. My mind was set on Frances and Portuguese. Now thanks to comments on here I might do Portuguese and some other shorter Caminos like Primitivo and Ingles. Some fun and happy decisions for the new year.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
like Primitivo and Ingles
If you have time for the Primitivo and Ingles than you probably have time for the San Salvador and Primitivo. Much as I'm sure the Ingles is a great Camino, I'll recommend the Salvador/Primitivo combo for those who have the three weeks. The Salvador is a great Camino and flows so seamlessly into the Primitivo.
 
If you have time for the Primitivo and Ingles than you probably have time for the San Salvador and Primitivo. Much as I'm sure the Ingles is a great Camino, I'll recommend the Salvador/Primitivo combo for those who have the three weeks. The Salvador is a great Camino and flows so seamlessly into the Primitivo.
I agree. I always like to connect Caminos by walking whenever possible.
 
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time is not a problem
Hope this doesn´t just confuse the issue, but if time is not a problem, you could start in Madrid, follow the Camino de Madrid to Sahagún, then the Francés to Léon. From Léon you have the choice of turning onto the Salvador to Oviedo then the Primitivo. Or, from Léon you can continue along the Francés to Ponferrada where you have another choice: stay on the Francés or switch to the Invierno. Either way, you are following at least part of 2, 3 or even 4 different caminos to arrive in Santiago.
 
If you have time for the Primitivo and Ingles than you probably have time for the San Salvador and Primitivo. Much as I'm sure the Ingles is a great Camino, I'll recommend the Salvador/Primitivo combo for those who have the three weeks. The Salvador is a great Camino and flows so seamlessly into the Primitivo.
Thanks very much, I appreciate all the help. This may be the extra camino to go with my Camino Portuguese. So nice getting information from people that have walked these routes. The Madrid route sounds good to since that's were I will be flying into. Have 5 months to make my decision as May and June are pretty well a lock as the time I want to walk. Will have plane ticket by the end of December. Never thought I would be this excited about going back to the Camino.
 
Haven't read all the replies - sorry if I repeat, but why not the Frances in the Fall since you've done it in the Spring... I've done it mostly in the Fall, but once in the Spring, and it was wonderful seeing the difference in seasons!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Haven't read all the replies - sorry if I repeat, but why not the Frances in the Fall since you've done it in the Spring... I've done it mostly in the Fall, but once in the Spring, and it was wonderful seeing the difference in seasons!f
Yes that is a good plan. I originally was going to walk this past September for my first Camino as I turned 65 September 1st but I decided to go in May instead. Waited 3 years for this Camino and had a chance to leave in May so that was it I was gone. Met these great people from Brazil on my walk and there going to walk the Portuguese in May or June in 2024 and want me to join them, that's why I want to go in May and June. just I want to stay over there longer than 2 weeks. But and it's a big but I might be able to walk the Frances in the fall of 2025. Just checked the Salvador and Primitivo on Gronze and I think that's going to be the walk for me, that was a great recommendation. Plus I wanted to see Leon again so ticks a lot of boxes for me.
 
Thanks very much, I appreciate all the help. This may be the extra camino to go with my Camino Portuguese. So nice getting information from people that have walked these routes. The Madrid route sounds good to since that's were I will be flying into. Have 5 months to make my decision as May and June are pretty well a lock as the time I want to walk. Will have plane ticket by the end of December. Never thought I would be this excited about going back to the Camino.
I did the Madrid this year in June before walking on to the San Salvador and Primitivo. It is indeed a very nice Camino but somewhat solitary. Most of the time I was the only pilgrim in the albergue. A good route if you are looking for that solitude rather than the interactions with other pilgrims you would get on the Portugues. The other thing to be aware of on the Madrid is the need for some proficiency with Spanish or a translation app.
 
Yes that is a good plan. I originally was going to walk this past September for my first Camino as I turned 65 September 1st but I decided to go in May instead. Waited 3 years for this Camino and had a chance to leave in May so that was it I was gone. Met these great people from Brazil on my walk and there going to walk the Portuguese in May or June in 2024 and want me to join them, that's why I want to go in May and June. just I want to stay over there longer than 2 weeks. But and it's a big but I might be able to walk the Frances in the fall of 2025. Just checked the Salvador and Primitivo on Gronze and I think that's going to be the walk for me, that was a great recommendation. Plus I wanted to see Leon again so ticks a lot of boxes for me.
This has undoubtedly been mentioned above, but wonderful things happen when one doesn't plan too much... Buen Camino.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
This has undoubtedly been mentioned above, but wonderful things happen when one doesn't plan too much... Buen Camino.
Yes very true. On first Camino this year and it was the Frances and there was no doubt that that was the one I was going to walk. This year besides the 2 weeks walking the Portuguese camino I don't have to plan so much or choose which route I want to do till I land in Madrid. it's just nice to have these different routes to choose from that form members have recommended. I still like the recommendation of the Salvador because I can start in Leon than the Primitivo because I would really like to see Lugo. But whatever happens I feel free to do what ever camino appeals to me when I arrive in Spain. That's a great feeling.
 
You know, I've watched a few YouTube videos on the Le Puy route and it looks fantastic. I would love to do this camino. The one thing i'am worried about is the language barrier. Most of them say English is rarely spoken on the Le Puy route. That being said this was not one of the options I had considered but maybe between now and next May and can overcome that fear and maybe walk this route. If I wasn't walking solo I would be more inclined to do it also.
I will walk this route starting from Le Puy to Santiago in May 24.
Last year I walked from Germany to Lyon and switched to the Norte/Primitivo to Santiago.
Yes, the French people don't want to talk English. But its not that big problem. If you learn a few words, they will help you (most of them). I did not speak any French when I started.. and still don't speak ist. ;) So I am exited to walk in France again. :)
Who knows, maybe we will meet. :)
 

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