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Avoiding the breakfast trap?

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Most of these posts seem to me to refer to the facilities available on the busier caminos. On my last camino, the VdlP, I could not count on finding an open bar within an hour or two's walk every morning. I always planned for breakfast before leaving my albergue. My immersion heater heats water for porridge, available in various forms in the tiendas, then more water for Starbuck's instant coffee (which I bring with me). My main meal and my picnic meal (bread, cheese, apple, sometimes carrots) depend on when the local bars or restaurants prefer to cook and when I arrive in a town at a mealtime. I usually managed to eat an evening meal on the VdlP, but I understand that I shall probably have to look for comida if I walk through a town at midday on the Madrid, and probably be very flexible on the Invierno. Unless you are walking the Frances, the Portuguese or the Ingles, you may want to carry your breakfast food with you and plan to prepare it before you leave the albergue. I think that I would be grateful for availability of any breakfast food, however basic, in an albergue, rather than having to carry a considerable weight of food where open bars and restaurants are few, and are cooking at their schedule, not mine. Of course, that is part of the adventure of travel in foreign parts.
 

DebR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances:
2013; 2014; 2015; 2017; 2018; and counting down to Christmas 2019
The absolute best tortilla I ever had was in the old bar in Burguette, the first village after Roncesvalles. I'd come off the Le Puy (the French albergues added insult to the bread and jam breakfast injury by refusing to serve it before 8am), so tortilla was beyond wonderful, and this place added cheese and ham to it. Sadly, the new place just further along opened and the old place doesn't open for breakfast anymore.
See, my best tortilla - bar none - has always been in the Cafe Bar Oasis, on the left in San Justo de la Vega, within sight of the walls of Astorga. To be so close to the city would seem to argue against stopping, but it’s always worth it. Always.
 

CdnDreamer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (12, 15 & 18) San Salvador (18), Portuguese (19)
My favorite breakfast. And I had never had baked beans with my breakfast.
Oh I DO miss Spanish bread.
Was that picture taken at the first restaurant in Molinaseca on the right after crossing the bridge? I had eggs and beans there and it was wonderful. It was so nice to sit outside and eat breakfast.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
This thread is really quite an interesting glimpse into the variations of how people handle life on the Camino. Those who ask "what do pilgrims do"... in whatever situation... need only read this thread to see how many answers there are.

Coping with breakfast is one of the interesting challenges of the Camino, especially on the less traveled routes where it is necessary to plan breakfast the night before. Maybe I am very dense, but it was a brilliant revelation to me when one bar owner, on telling me that he didn't open until late in the morning and there was no other place in town, suggested that I take a cafe con leche back to the albergue that evening and heat it in the microwave in the morning. I had never thought of that before. So, I did, supplementing it the next day with nuts, potato chips, banana or some stale pastry dredged from the depths of my pack, and I moved on, quite satisfied that I had risen to the occasion and met the challenge for another day!

At home, I am quite an organized person and enjoy a very healthy breakfast most days. Getting a decent breakfast on the Camino is definitely a first world problem.
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Point and counterpoint: I guess I'm not a connoisseur, but I never had a bad cup of coffee (cafe con leche) on the Camino -- in fact, IMHO, it puts overpriced and overrated Starbucks to shame. And those Napolitanos...yummm. I know it's not a typical American breakfast, but a mid-morning coffee break and a piece of fruit tides you over to lunchtime just fine.
Starbucks is not great coffee, I agree. But, as a category, brewed coffee is very different from espresso, which is what you get in Spain and usually doctor with milk to make it more drinkable, because, by itself, it is thick and bitter.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
When I walk with kids I make a real effort to make sure we have food available before walking anywhere. (The times I’ve failed have reminded me why!) Oats or muesli and yoghurt are great staples. Fruit, cheese, bread, nuts, eggs all work too.
Note kitchens may be closed/ locked in the mornings.

When I walked the Madrid by myself and it was sooooo hot (high 30s) I found I didn’t need to eat much.

Then I arrived in Sahagun and met a lovely American couple doing the Francés and they were raving about how wonderful it felt to legitimately be eating two breakfasts, lunch and dinner. Turned out they were walking 10-12km days - they would have benefited more from their camino ((healthwise) to cut back some of that caloric intake! But they were happy. (BTW I am NOT saying they did not walk far enough, just that they probably didn’t need so much sustenance in relation to distance covered)

After this couple I bumped into quite a number of people who seemed to be eating excessive amounts and I wondered if it’s become part of the “Camino experience” for many. I didn’t see that on the less frequented routes.
But maybe it was just coincidence.

Anyway, having said all that I’d encourage you to go to local supermarkets, tiendas, markets, bakeries and enjoy what you find. It’s all part of the adventure.
 

Pam Scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago compostella 2015
I walk for an hour or so before I stop for breakfast. I like to get a slice of tortilla and some orange juice, though sometimes a big flaky chocolate croissant tempts me. I rarely have breakfast at the albergues, and I definitely don't if it's an extra cost.
I agree with you, even down to the chocolate croissant TT😄
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
My teenage son complains that we waste a lot of good walking time in the morning because of my caffeine addiction. He has a point. So... When there is a kitchen I make a cup of strong tea, and I bring along some starbucks instant coffee. We eat some protein and bread in the morning. Usually cheese and bread, sometimes an egg, sometimes handfuls of nuts and raisins. -- and we're off! Los geht's!

Buen Camion everyone--

PS We'll be walking from Burgos in two weeks time!
 
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c0484

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
I have had a different experience with breakfast on the Camino. Like all pilgrims, I always start early and around 9 a.m. I can normally find a bar or shop that will sell me a reasonable breakfast.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
Going right back to your question: prepare the night before. When someone takes your stuff, change your menu. No more fridge stuff. And use your head. If the only option is something you don't want, drink some more water, and keep going till you find what suits you! This is still April 1st where you are, @H Richards...???
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 Francés, Le Puy / Francés (parts), 2018 Norte (Biarritz), Francés, 2019 Portuguese (Lisbon)
My question was rather prepare what the night before? With probably only the village Tienda for supplies, what sort of breakfasts can you always put together? The muesli and yoghurt idea is a good answer, for instance. Of course walking until a bar and then spending money on having someone cook you something is always an option, but that's not what I'm getting at here.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
My question was rather prepare what the night before? With probably only the village Tienda for supplies, what sort of breakfasts can you always put together? The muesli and yoghurt idea is a good answer, for instance. Of course walking until a bar and then spending money on having someone cook you something is always an option, but that's not what I'm getting at here.
You can usually make sandwiches. You can buy fruit and granola type bars or pastries. You don't need to eat traditional "breakfast" food.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
All God's chillun love scrapple!

And I confess that my cholesterol level could be better than it is....
Here in Cincinnati we have something equally as decadent as scrapple, it's an old German recipe called goetta which is made up of ground pork and pin head oats. There is even a Goetta Fest here once a year.
 
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Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Come to New Mexico (USA) and you get huevos rancheros with a corn tortilla underneath the eggs, pinto beans on the side and a choice of red or green chile (or both) on top. Mmmmmm
Sounds like instant obesity. Sign me up!

Actually, don't. I am starting to struggle with sugar addiction and our toxic food environment. I feel I should be more careful in my commentary. With 60% of people overweight a more measured attitude would be more helpful.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Actually, don't. I am starting to struggle with sugar addiction and our toxic food environment.
I'm 11 days in to my second round of the Whole 30 diet, which eliminates all sugar, sweeteners, alcohol, dairy, grains and legumes. It sounds extreme, but is actually very easy to do when you focus on what you can eat and not what you can't. I was shocked the first time that I did it how much I didn't miss the sugar.

https://whole30.com/whole30-program-rules/
 

calmeg

Member
On our walks around town after settling into the albergues we would buy 2-4 bananas and some yoghurt for the next day. Get up early, have our first breakfast, and off we went. Usually within 1-2 hours we would come by a bar- and have cafe con leche, and tortilla that set us up for the rest of the day. Also carried cheese and bread for the lunch break- and nuts and raisins for munching!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I usually walk about 10km before I stop for breakfast - and even then it’s usually just zumo and cafe con leche. But I have a massive lunch later. I don’t advocate this system for others, it’s just what works for me.

Just the once though I was hungrier than usual after staying in Ponferrada, and I had the best breakfast ever in Cacabelos in a place called La Moncloa (highly recommended if you pass by). It was about £7 BUT it had toast and homemade quince preserve, cheese, tortilla, cake, fruit, orange juice, coffee, and something hot that I can’t remember...maybe eggs? It was plentiful and delicious. I thought it was too much and I would pack some of it for later but I ended up eating it all and skipping lunch instead.
My son and I had a pretty nice breakfast in Cardeñuela Riopico, before Burgos. That's cafe con leche, fresh squeezed orange juice and french toast with condensed milk and chocolate for each of us, with tortilla with cheese and veggies for me and a bocadillo and slice of watermelon for him. My mouth is watering just looking at it. It looks like it was at Bocateria San Miguel. Also recommended.

54245
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
I need coffee first thing every morning so carry an immersion heater, cup, and packets of European Nescafe. Before stopping in the afternoon, I get fruit and tortilla or croissant, and yogurt, to have for breakfast, and sometimes whatever I will fix up for supper instead of eating "out".
 

Oregon's Mark

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May, 2017; return, leaving SJPP May 24, 2018, Frances #3 in May-June, 2019
I walk for an hour or so before I stop for breakfast. I like to get a slice of tortilla and some orange juice, though sometimes a big flaky chocolate croissant tempts me. I rarely have breakfast at the albergues, and I definitely don't if it's an extra cost.
I do the same, and it works well for me. Those morning breaks are very tasty and nutritious. For those who must have something before heading out---an apple or orange will work. Or an energy bar.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Sounds like instant obesity. Sign me up!

Actually, don't. I am starting to struggle with sugar addiction and our toxic food environment. I feel I should be more careful in my commentary. With 60% of people overweight a more measured attitude would be more helpful.
I have had huevos rancheros before in Texas. Some good stuff, there. Certainly one does not have to eat it all the time, but something like that occasionally is nice. After all, all work and no play makes Jack a dull bastard, and I suppose that applies to food as well. ;)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Just curious... (I have never been to the States) ... what is an American breakfast?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Thanks for the hint about the oven. I'll try to prepare it in a pan. That should work out too. Since I've got all ingredients at home I'll try that this afternoon :cool:.


Sure, here you go:

Baked Oats with fruits
Ingredients for 8 servings
300 g rolled oats
2 bananas, ripe, crushed with a fork
100 g dried fruits, roughly chopped (apricots, dates, figs, raisins or cranberries)
1 apple, coarsely grated
100 g hazelnuts / walnuts / almonds, roughly chopped
300 ml milk
2 eggs

Cinnamon, vanilla, cardamom, orange peel or coconut flakes for added flavor
Butter for the casserole dish

Preheat the oven to 180 °C . Mix the rolled oats with the crushed bananas, dried fruits, the grated apple and the chopped nuts. Stir in the milk and eggs. Season with cinnamon, vanilla sugar or cardamom.

Grease a baking dish and pour the mixture into the casserole dish. Approximately bake for 30 -40 minutes till it's slighly brown.

Can be eaten lukewarm and cold. At home I sometimes I dip the baked oats into honey yoghurt.
Yay, a breakfast bar without added sugar. (Well, aside from the fruit.)
My latest learning is that, if your tummy is habitually uncooperative in the morning, ask for manzanilla in the bar, and of course the pan tomate. (Don't ask for "te de manzanilla" as that is saying it wrong. Te is always black tea. Manzanilla is chamomile tea. Sugar packet on side, and not added before you get the drink, thank heaven.)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Of course, but why would one do that?
The Camino is hardly the Bataan Death March. At times you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a cafe or bar. :D
That is true of most of the Camino Frances. Not so much for the Norte and the Portugues, where there are parts with pretty much nothing for quite a while. (It really hurt to pass bars that were going to be open later in the day but not at 0900!) I only remember one part of the Frances where it was really necessary to bring picnic lunch along. We got a loaf of barra and some sardines and of course we had our water bottles.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I'm 11 days in to my second round of the Whole 30 diet, which eliminates all sugar, sweeteners, alcohol, dairy, grains and legumes. It sounds extreme, but is actually very easy to do when you focus on what you can eat and not what you can't. I was shocked the first time that I did it how much I didn't miss the sugar.

https://whole30.com/whole30-program-rules/
I've done that, too. I am a sugar-holic, but in a few days, the craving goes away. Nice thing about this diet is you can still have fruit and potatoes.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Sounds like instant obesity. Sign me up!

Actually, don't. I am starting to struggle with sugar addiction and our toxic food environment. I feel I should be more careful in my commentary. With 60% of people overweight a more measured attitude would be more helpful.
No sugar in huevos rancheros and not much fat, either! Eggs, chile and beans in the morning holds you over at least until late afternoon.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I've done that, too. I am a sugar-holic, but in a few days, the craving goes away. Nice thing about this diet is you can still have fruit and potatoes.
And when you can have potatoes, that means tortilla isn't off limits!!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)

Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Thanks for the info. It looks like it might be a good idea, I've been avoiding anything with added sugar or palm oil for a while. The industry is out to get you. I noticed that grapes are always very sweet in the UK. When they use previously healthy foods against you it feels like you are under attack.

It's one of the Camino bonuses, eating without concern.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
As a non coffee addict I don't know if this will be helpful or not, but I have an idea that might help those who need coffee before they are human in the morning.
I was thinking that if prior to the Camino you slowly alter the time that you have your first cup to later in the morning, perhaps you could get by on the Camino without starting with coffee, and instead waiting until you get to the next village.
Again, though I enjoy a cup now and then, especially with a nice fresh chocolate croissant, I never feel that I have to have it, so I don't know if this would work for the truly coffee addicted pilgrims.
No way. The people around me would have to deal with me....:D
 

alhartman

346 joyful days in Spain and France since 2005
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
On the Frances, I think cafe con leche and tortilla patatas.
On the other routes, I think GORP (Good Old Raisins and Peanuts from backpackers slang)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
On the Frances, I think cafe con leche and tortilla patatas.
On the other routes, I think GORP (Good Old Raisins and Peanuts from backpackers slang)
I managed to eat tortilla most mornings on the Norte
 

Kaiso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
My son and I had a pretty nice breakfast in Cardeñuela Riopico, before Burgos. That's cafe con leche, fresh squeezed orange juice and french toast with condensed milk and chocolate for each of us, with tortilla with cheese and veggies for me and a bocadillo and slice of watermelon for him. My mouth is watering just looking at it. It looks like it was at Bocateria San Miguel. Also recommended.

View attachment 54245
Ooo! my A1C just skyrocketed looking at that.

So a practical question, any Diabetics walking who might have breakfast plan suggestions/methods.
 
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D

Deleted member 73892

Guest
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
Hi H Richards - sorry to read you're having poor breakys. Its my favourite time, and as you're wondering what we all do, then I'll tell you my every day fave breaky routine/ritual: I'm an early starter, always have been, always will be, at home or underway. On Camino I make sure I have something light to eat when I'm ready to go - a couple of natural joghurts or oranges or bannanannas, and set off, usually in the dark, anticipating finding a good breaky once the sun is up and I'm ready for a break and sit down - that's when I always have a coffee and a chunk of Tortilla with bread. I love it, and have never had a bad coffee that I can remember, but a few disappointing slices of tortilla. I've had some memorable tortilla - yes, I can still picture then in my mind, the locations and special features. I like proper Spanish tortilla so much I've been working on traditional recipes a home, usually a sunday brunch feast. And on Camino, I find such a breaky fantastic value 😋 Hope you find something to satisfy you. Best wishes, Keith
 

Kevin Malinak

-kevin-
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, St Jean PdP, March 18 (2018)
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
My usual breakfast was a yogurt and an apple! Sometimes a boiled egg. ("Grocery store" eating). If I couldn't find my plastic spoon, I folded the foil lid into a makeshift spoon.
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 Francés, Le Puy / Francés (parts), 2018 Norte (Biarritz), Francés, 2019 Portuguese (Lisbon)
Hi H Richards - sorry to read you're having poor breakys. Its my favourite time, and as you're wondering what we all do, then I'll tell you my every day fave breaky routine/ritual: I'm an early starter, always have been, always will be, at home or underway. On Camino I make sure I have something light to eat when I'm ready to go - a couple of natural joghurts or oranges or bannanannas, and set off, usually in the dark, anticipating finding a good breaky once the sun is up and I'm ready for a break and sit down - that's when I always have a coffee and a chunk of Tortilla with bread. I love it, and have never had a bad coffee that I can remember, but a few disappointing slices of tortilla. I've had some memorable tortilla - yes, I can still picture then in my mind, the locations and special features. I like proper Spanish tortilla so much I've been working on traditional recipes a home, usually a sunday brunch feast. And on Camino, I find such a breaky fantastic value 😋 Hope you find something to satisfy you. Best wishes, Keith
Thanks for the comments Keith. Yes I think tortilla might just be the best value of all things you can find for breakfast. I can't eat it every day, but certainly for some!
 

p_mci

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Inglés, Portugués (2014) Norte, Primitivo (2015) Vía de la Plata (2017) Mozárabe (2018)
For me, first breakfast is almost always arroz con leche (creamed rice with cinnamon) with some mixed nuts sprinkled in. Traditionally it's a dessert so it is quite sweet, not something I'd usually go for except on camino. You can get a 2 pack in any supermarket for €1. Second breakfast is savoury: coffee and a tostada con tomate y aceite (toast with fresh tomato puree&olive oil). They will put a slice of ham or cheese on it if you ask, but the tomato alone is just perfect. As already mentioned, each bar-cafe does their own version of the tomato puree. It is addictive.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
The English Way
Thanks for the hint about the oven. I'll try to prepare it in a pan. That should work out too. Since I've got all ingredients at home I'll try that this afternoon :cool:.


Sure, here you go:

Baked Oats with fruits
Ingredients for 8 servings
300 g rolled oats
2 bananas, ripe, crushed with a fork
100 g dried fruits, roughly chopped (apricots, dates, figs, raisins or cranberries)
1 apple, coarsely grated
100 g hazelnuts / walnuts / almonds, roughly chopped
300 ml milk
2 eggs

Cinnamon, vanilla, cardamom, orange peel or coconut flakes for added flavor
Butter for the casserole dish

Preheat the oven to 180 °C . Mix the rolled oats with the crushed bananas, dried fruits, the grated apple and the chopped nuts. Stir in the milk and eggs. Season with cinnamon, vanilla sugar or cardamom.

Grease a baking dish and pour the mixture into the casserole dish. Approximately bake for 30 -40 minutes till it's slighly brown.

Can be eaten lukewarm and cold. At home I sometimes I dip the baked oats into honey yoghurt.
Hi Sugergypsy. I made your baked oats recipe last night. Absolutely delicious!!! We are off for a week in our touring caravan to continue our training for the Camino. So I had to make the baked oats to take with us. Regards Bruce and Margaret.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
But fortunately they do 4 other meals. :D
Second breakfast
Comida
Merienda
Cena
When I got home from my last Camino I had trouble convincing people that second breakfast is a thing
It most certainly was.
I dont eat breakfast at the albergue, I prefer to get on the road. Whenever I did it was inferior, and delayed my arrival time for the day, meaning I walked in the heat longer.
Now I just zip down the stairs and out the door, and have 6kms under my belt before breakfast.
I'd have a smallish first breakfast, walk 3 more hours, second breakfast. Worked a treat for me, means I dont walk with a full tummy which I find uncomfortable.
And it means when I arrive in the afternoon, I'm ready for my lunch/dinner.

The other weird thing is that wherever possible I try to eat breakfast outside, for some reason I like to spend that time outdoors.
 
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Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
It seems a bit of a culture difference. When in Rome...... since you usually eat late at night when the day cools down you do not need a large breakfast 🍳.

If my Albergues have a kitchen I make myself a small oatmeal- porridge and have instant coffee to go. If not I drink water and walk on hoping to find an open bar at my next stop. If I need sugar I always have nuts and dried fruit.
If breakfast comes with the overnight you can ask if they would give you instead a smal lunch packet, since I explain I cannot eat before a long walk. And they have been very kind. Of course if the overnight is 15 Euros I don’t ask.

Unless you are ultra thin and require constant nourishment it’s actually recommended to fast at least 16 h a day. Jaja some great advise out there. Plus eating walking and 40 degrees don’t mix for me.
So listen to your body and maybe not to your habits they take over soon enough.
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
If eating in albergue/hotel room: oat porridge and tea, made using immersion coil, with fruit, yoghurt or whatever we could find the day before. If the local bakery had GOOD pan integral, maybe bread and cheese/ham and olives.
If there's a restaurant: orange juice, tea and a fresh tostada with whatever's available - often tomato and/or cheese, with a handful of nuts afterwards.
If it's been a cold night: Hot chocolate along with whatever we can get. .
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
Just curious... (I have never been to the States) ... what is an American breakfast?
"American breakfast" is huge and goes back to when breakfast was served after getting morning farm chores done. Oddly, no one I know eats an "american breakfast" on a regular basis. (We make pancakes on holidays or maybe Sundays. We do make our own maple syrup every year or two from our maple trees.)

Growing up we had a bowl of oatmeal or cereal and glass of juice, or maybe a soft boiled or fried egg on a piece of toast. Now I usually have coffee, whole grain bread with butter or cheese, and a piece of fruit.
 

DannyFox

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Septembre 2016 or March 2017
I met this lovely woman named Carmen on my first and only Camino in 2016. She was a native to Rioja. She gave me “food for thought” about her breakfasts of when she was a child. A piece of baguette toast drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled generously with sugar. I know it sounds atrocious, but it is delectable! A simply PERFECT shot of energy. Oh, and, of course, a cafe con leche.
 

AlmostAnastasia

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2018
I haven't been yet on a camino, so I dont't know whether it's going to work out, but I hope to find a kitchen every now and then and make same baked oats (mix oats, milk, eggs, banana, dried fruits & nuts and bake). Tastes really nice, very nutriousious and keeps fresh due to the dried fruits for 5 or six days easily and does not weigh too much. I really love that for breakfast - I live close to the place where Müsli originally comes from ;) - and have already taken that to other multi-day trips and it worked out very well, but never baked it yet while being on the road.
Good luck! You will more likely find croissant, or Spanish facsimile, tortilla patatta and excellent french squeezed orange juice, and of course coffee.
 

Australian Crawl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPdP - Finisterre) 2019
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
Currently on the Camino frances. I don’t stay at albergues that offer breakfast, whether as an extra charge on ‘included’, cos accomodation is their primary function and breakfast is mlikely to be good. Instead I usually walk for 5-6 km and then stop at a bar in the next village for coffee and some tortilla patata. Or in the case if this morning, fried eggs and chorizo with tortilla!!! Breakfast of champions kept me going all day for 10 euro.
 

ShaLaw

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Sept./Oct. 2015. Future Camino Portuguese in 2022.
I had my fair share of toast too, but when I could, I would buy oranges for the next day, and yogurt too, if you had access to a fridge, which most of the municipal albergues do. I also liked to pick up tortilla for the next day too, so basically food that you can carry. Or, if you can have s cafe con leche to tide you over, you can also brunch on eggs and pork and French fries a little further up the road.

Buen Camino!
 

Canuck60

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept-Oct (2016)
Camino Portugues (2020)
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
My wife and I loved our breakfast. We usually planned to stop at the first open cafe. Always a cappuccino coffee, chocolatine and a freshly squeezed orange juice when available. And of course your first rest!
54467
 

mguillen

MGuillen
Camino(s) past & future
2019
I usually buy a large yogurt drink the night before. (It keeps refrigerated or not) Drink it on my way to the first open bar, get a great cafe con leche standing at the bar, then walk till about 10 when Spanish breakfast begins. Most bars have a tortilla prepared by then. (Sometimes you have to ask them to bring it out) Have that, and another cafe, and I'm set to Spanish lunch or my picnic.
Thx for indicating Spanish breakfast time!
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
I was once advised by a couple of Dutch professional pilgrims* to not worry, overmuch. Their view was clear, you can walk all day on a mars bar, people are much tougher than they think. It certainly hadn't stunted their growth.

It's actually pretty sound advice. IMO.

* they walked young offenders from Holland to Santiago as part of an alternative sentencing scheme,-- which had one of the lowest reoffending rates in their system. They knew about hardship. It was one of their tools.
Yes. I had a stomach bug once and dared not eat for fear of hurling. I walked my normal daily camino distance for two days without food. I don't have much stored fat but I was fine on just water. It was fabulous walking as usual.
 

Heather John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Ponferrada to Muuxia . returning to SJPD to Finisterra Sept to Nov 2018 with n2 friends
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
Hi I walked CF with 2 friends in 2018 and if breakfast was not included in accom then we bought a small tub of yogurt, a banana or apple the day before and stopped about 1-2 hrs into our walk, rested, ate breakfast and kept going. often we would have a coffee if possible before we left the town which is often all we felt like having at an early hr of the morning. worked well for us :)
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
I like my cup of coffee in the morning and so I bring Starbucks via along when coffee isn't available. When breakfast is included I ask for tomato, olive oil and salt for my toast. This is a favorite among the Spanish but when not available I carry my own tomato. Most times I ask for fruit for dessert at the meal the night before and save it for morning. Then after an hour or so of walking I enjoy coffee and eggs in a cafe. It took a few caminos to discover that you can ask for things not on the menu and if they have the ingredients they will make it for you. However, if you stop at the crowded first bar in town you get what they have. I like to stop at the second bar and there is no line for the bathroom.
 

Ponygirl1961

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances or primitivo (2019)
I"m not sure where you live, but in Portland, Oregon, people often pay over $4 for their morning cup of coffee. 3 to 4 euros seems quite affordable for all you can eat toast, jam, and coffee.

That said, there are plenty of places to stop along the way if you need more.
There are also plenty of markets where you can buy your own.
Here is a blog I did on this topic.

Breakfast on the Camino - Choices
Your blog won't let me read it. It said I have to be invited.
 

TMinAlaska

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF segments -2014 and 2016
CN/CP - 2018
Yes, I've done a smaller and fast version of the recipe in a mug ;). Takes only about 2 or 3 minutes in the microwave, so that should also work out for the whole recipe. Does anyone know in which size unit eggs are usually sold in Spain :D? I would not like to carry leftover eggs in my mochila 🙃 ... and I don't really like hard boiled eggs.
When we bought eggs at a small grocery store, they were sold individually. Worked great to get only what we needed.
 

leichecerca

Can’t stay away
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Finisterre: May 2018
Camino Frances: April-May 2018
Camino Frances: April-May 2017
As a non coffee addict I don't know if this will be helpful or not, but I have an idea that might help those who need coffee before they are human in the morning.
I was thinking that if prior to the Camino you slowly alter the time that you have your first cup to later in the morning, perhaps you could get by on the Camino without starting with coffee, and instead waiting until you get to the next village.
Again, though I enjoy a cup now and then, especially with a nice fresh chocolate croissant, I never feel that I have to have it, so I don't know if this would work for the truly coffee addicted pilgrims.
Great suggestion (to try and recalibrate the timing of your need for coffee). Or (take a breath) maybe consider going without it? I am a lifelong coffee addict, but I weaned myself off it before I went on my Camino — and I was so glad I did. Coffee was just not available in most albergues, so I saved a lot of money (even though Spain’s cafe con leche is much cheaper than Starbucks, it still adds up). It was lovely not feeling a like prisoner to that *need*. Caffeine addiction is another form of bondage and for me the Camino was an opportunity to throw off as much as possible and just embrace simplicity. I know that sounds horrifying for those who can’t function w/o caffeine, believe me, I get it. Just something to consider.
 

lovetoread3

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Abril 2018; Primitivo May 2018
I craved mustard. Almost no one had it unless you found a bar or cafe that had real hamburger 🍔
I'm so tempted to carry some mustard with me next time...it drove me crazy not to be able to have it on my bocadillas!
 

lovetoread3

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Abril 2018; Primitivo May 2018
hmm, I am allergic to dairy and eggs so obviously didn't experiment with the most common protein breakfasts available in Spain. I did partake of the jamon and pastries and oj. My main protein source was trail mix I prepared with nuts, dried fruit, etc. I had to prepare it 3-4 times on my 7 week trek but I ate every bit of it and still lost 10kg. My advice if you have dietary issues is to take the time to figure out how to accommodate them as easily as possible. Never skip the midday meal - the menus saved me. I also carried protein bars but they were expensive to buy and not readily available in the smaller pueblos where I chose to stay, or on the Primitivo. Stock up when you find them, if you want them, and figure out the sweet point for you with respect to how much you want to carry. Also, I carried tangerines or apples daily. I was hungry all the time, though, and again, I would recommend not skipping any meals. Buen camino
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
This thread is really quite an interesting glimpse into the variations of how people handle life on the Camino. Those who ask "what do pilgrims do"... in whatever situation... need only read this thread to see how many answers there are.
Getting a decent breakfast on the Camino is definitely a first world problem.
Every single question and inquiry on this forum is a first world problem. :D
 

T0M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
France (2019)
I"m not sure where you live, but in Portland, Oregon, people often pay over $4 for their morning cup of coffee. 3 to 4 euros seems quite affordable for all you can eat toast, jam, and coffee.

That said, there are plenty of places to stop along the way if you need more.
There are also plenty of markets where you can buy your own.
Here is a blog I did on this topic.

Breakfast on the Camino - Choices
Why would you provide a link to your blog, when your blog is readable by invitation only?
 

Ingsebingse

New Member
I do not know what people expect. What do you get for 3-4 euros ? In Denmark where I live you really can’t get anything for that price. How much is a coffee at Starbucks in the states ?
The small cafe’s- bars and alberques on the camino, is trying to make a living.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
All God's chillun love scrapple!
I was under impression that it was "us" Philadelphians that first came up with the recipe ;)
Regardless, I DO hope God loves me cause I never took a liking to it. Gimme a biscuit and gravy w\sausage any time 👍
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
I do not know what people expect. What do you get for 3-4 euros ? In Denmark where I live you really can’t get anything for that price. How much is a coffee at Starbucks in the states ?
The small cafe’s- bars and alberques on the camino, is trying to make a living.
Not everyone in States drinks Starbucks (I for one COMPLETELY refuse to patronise them precisely due to the fact that I find the idea of paying $7.00 for cup of coffee ludicrous!) and I can argue that "we are not in States". In Eastern Europe 3-4 Euros in most places (not counting Moscow, St.Pete's and cities of that caliber) get you plenty.
I agree with the sentiments of "trying to make a living" however from what I read above - there is no reason to serve people stale food and bad 'yesterdays' coffee (else we can take a page from Monsieur Thénardier's "kidney of a horse, liver of the cat" and argue that he was trying to make a living as well)
Thus IMHO if food was good I do not believe we'd have gripes about the price
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
So.... my question to those who make sandwiches and hard boiled eggs an evening before - where do you store it overnight? Are there refrigerators available?
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
I take a small pot of marmite with me. I buy a dried sausage (chorizo etc) so I can always pep up breakfast if I want.
I prefer not to start walking before I’ve had some breakfast and a clear out.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
One of the great things about the Camino is when you're exercising 6-7 hours a day you can eat most anything! Eggs are great protein and the fat gets burned off during the day.
I used to think that too - let me introduce you to my friend Atorvastatin ;)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
So.... my question to those who make sandwiches and hard boiled eggs an evening before - where do you store it overnight? Are there refrigerators available?
Hit and miss. Not every albergue has a refrigerator, but many do. I would just take advantage of the situation when I stayed in one that did.
One tip I can give, is when you do have things in the refrigerator, keep them in a bag tied off on the top. Lets other pilgrims know it is not food left over from pilgrims who have left. Quite common for a refrigerator in an albergue to have left over wine, bread, canned soup, eggs etc from pilgrims already gone. Donativo grub.
 

cbacino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?
Hunk of cheese, bread, or nuts. Coffee at the first cafe I stumble on, and a sandwich. I leave early, before 6:30. Not much open on the Norte-Primitivo at that time.
 

CillaP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April (2019)
I'm bringing my luxury item, an immersion coil, and instant Starbucks Via packets,to get a quick cup of coffee before waking. A necessity for me:)
Love this idea. I was thinking of doing the same thing for my upcoming Camino. Does this put us into a "party of 2?"
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
I take a small pot of marmite with me. I buy a dried sausage (chorizo etc) so I can always pep up breakfast if I want.
I prefer not to start walking before I’ve had some breakfast and a clear out.
Agh! No! Not the dreaded Marmite! I went to school the other side of the Oval to the Marmite factory. When the wind was in the wrong direction we had to have all the windows closed! Worst than the smell from the adjacent gas works.
About the only upside of a no-deal Brexit would be that Marmite would never leave these shores again! ;)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Love this idea. I was thinking of doing the same thing for my upcoming Camino. Does this put us into a "party of 2?"
This thread has me thinking about bringing one, too. An immersion heater coil, a titanium cup and packets of instant coffee. Relax with a cup full before I start walking in the morning.
 

CillaP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April (2019)
Agh! No! Not the dreaded Marmite! I went to school the other side of the Oval to the Marmite factory. When the wind was in the wrong direction we had to have all the windows closed! Worst than the smell from the adjacent gas works.
About the only upside of a no-deal Brexit would be that Marmite would never leave these shores again! ;)
Bahahaha....🤣🤣 Marmite is the staple diet of kiwis. It maintains our internal sense of humour when we coerce other cultures into trying it, leading them to believe they will have an estatic dining experience
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
Bahahaha....🤣🤣 Marmite is the staple diet of kiwis. It maintains our internal sense of humour when we coerce other cultures into trying it, leading them to believe they will have an estatic dining experience
That is just cruel. It is literally the scrapings from the bottom of the barrel! 😱
 

Peter Aulbury

Ozgrino
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances #1 by bike Pamplona to SdC May - June, 2014...(duration 14 days). CF # 2 May, 2015 SJPdp to SdC on foot (duration 40 days)...planning for #3.
I packed a bag of granola from home, but that soon gave way to...

“Un zuma grande e un cafe con leche e una tortilla de patatas e un napoletano por favor”
I get it about the large orange juice, coffee with milk and the spud tortilla, but what is the napoletano?
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
Great suggestion (to try and recalibrate the timing of your need for coffee). Or (take a breath) maybe consider going without it? I am a lifelong coffee addict, but I weaned myself off it before I went on my Camino — and I was so glad I did. Coffee was just not available in most albergues, so I saved a lot of money (even though Spain’s cafe con leche is much cheaper than Starbucks, it still adds up). It was lovely not feeling a like prisoner to that *need*. Caffeine addiction is another form of bondage and for me the Camino was an opportunity to throw off as much as possible andd just embrace simplicity. I know that sounds horrifying for those who can’t function w/o caffeine, believe me, I get it. Just something to consider.
But coffee is part of the camino experience, no?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago de Compostela
The best
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying

We experienced the same poor availability at most albergues. The trick is, to get up early, have a big drink of water and head off until you find a cosy cafe with reasonable coffee and substantial food offering. Don’t worry, there are plenty on most of the Camino.
 

MarcoPolo616

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018 Camino Portugues (Valença to Santiago)
2019 (planned) Santiago- Finisterre-Muxia
Coffee is a must have for me in the morning, so when possible I always stop at the first cafe I can to fuel up on java.
The breakfast food in Spain is another matter. Some toast and jam, or perhaps some other type sugary pastry is not breakfast to me, especially when about to begin a 25km walk. So whenever I can, I buy breakfast food the day before and make myself something with more substance in the morning. A sandwich of cheese and meat. A tin of fish or chicken. Some whole milk. Things along that line.
I do the same. It takes the worry out of whether or not you will get a good start. The only downside is the coffee. Sometimes it is not available early enough, so we do the same and just walk until we find a nice café. Actually, depending on the time we leave, we will walk an hour or so before eating our bocadillo. Everyone is different, but that works for us.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
When you get to your destination about midday plan your breakfast at some cafeteria that has good coffee and food, if you don’t eat breakfast just walk to the nearest town and have a snack and a rest.
He's already walked it Mick and a few others , I reckon he must not like Banana's ... if staying in an albergue have 1/2 Avocado [give the rest away] then to the nearest cafe for a short black , rest room visit with a small bit of thievery [paper] .....like us all 😇 and away.................. for the next 5 hours.
 
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NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Love this idea. I was thinking of doing the same thing for my upcoming Camino. Does this put us into a "party of 2?"
This thread has me thinking about bringing one, too. An immersion heater coil, a titanium cup and packets of instant coffee. Relax with a cup full before I start walking in the morning.
There is an entire thread devoted to the joys of immersion heaters, what they are called in Spanish, and where to buy them in Spain, with subsections on the kinds of mugs needed to make the fluid boil, as well as features ... well, seek it out and rejoice!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
There is an entire thread devoted to the joys of immersion heaters, what they are called in Spanish, and where to buy them in Spain, with subsections on the kinds of mugs needed to make the fluid boil, as well as features ... well, seek it out and rejoice!
Nah, I have already ordered both online. Took about five minutes of looking.
 

CatherineAnn

CF summer 2016
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012)
Camino Frances (2016)
I stopped at Food stores whenever I could and I would plan for the next days breakfast and carried in my pack. Maybe some nuts and a yogurt or banana and nuts. And then I would stop at the first café to get the second breakfast.

I’m not a coffee drinker, so there was no way I was paying for a five euro for dry toast and coffee. Occasionally I would have orange juice and a chocolate croissant which was heaven.

You’ll figure it out what works for you but do not count on an oven and most people get up and start walking without sitting down to eat or cook especially if you’re going In the summer when it’s hot. Eat on the go and then you stop get out of the sun for your second breakfast, and then you stop walking for gets too hot.

Buen Camino!
 

Sirage

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago (2005), Porto to Santiago (2007), Vezelay for 200 kms (2009), From Seville, May (2015), Le Puy to Sangüesa (2016), Norte-Primitivo (Sep-Oct 2016)
Another idea is to make sure you are not excessively lean (!!), and then start the day with whatever liquid you prefer, such as at the first bar, and then start walking. After an hour or so start looking for food such as fresh pastry or fruit etc. I have done quite a few Caminos and now only very rarely carry food, such as a few of the long stretches on the VdlP. Generally it might take 2 or 3 hours but I suspect most people can walk for that time without food. Some nutritionists recommend exercise before breakfast. Part of the Camino experience for me is the local food so I also have a policy or never cooking or preparing my own meals and certainly not carrying the extra weight of cooking equipment - just very light cup and cutlery. Other than some calories in the morning I get my important nutrients each day after walking. I gave up on the idea of a healthy Camino breakfast many years ago.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues (2019)
I"m not sure where you live, but in Portland, Oregon, people often pay over $4 for their morning cup of coffee. 3 to 4 euros seems quite affordable for all you can eat toast, jam, and coffee.

That said, there are plenty of places to stop along the way if you need more.
There are also plenty of markets where you can buy your own.
Here is a blog I did on this topic.

Breakfast on the Camino - Choices
I would like to read the article you linked about Breakfast on the Camino. How to gain permission?
 

ConnieCamino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
The money I've most felt like I've wasted on the camino has almost always been at breakfast time. I've lost count of the number of times I've dropped 3 or 4 Euros on some bad coffee and dry toast and jam.

So I'd like to ask you what do you do for breakfast each morning on the camino? What can you do instead to get a good head-start on the day without overpaying?

For the past year or so I've practiced a daily fast and I don't eat till noon from the previous night....very good health benefits that I won't get into here (google) therefore I then don't worry about breakfast. A fat coffee is during the a.m. definitely helps get you to lunch.
 

kdespot

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés SJPP-SdC Sept-Oct 2016
The immersion coil is the best! You'll never wonder when you'll get that first precious cup o' joe or tea. Oatmeal, or your choice of hot cereals, might look big in volume but it's super light and cheap.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
We usually stay in a private room for two..frequently in albergues or private pensions. Normally we walk around 15km per day. This gives us ample time and energy to shop. We buy a small box of Quaker granola cereal which we transfer to a zip lock bag. This lasts the two of us about four-five days. If you split it in two bags it does not weigh much at all. Each day, when we arrive at our destination, we purchase Greek yogurt and fresh fruit such as strawberries (in March) and a banana and a couple of oranges or tangerines. I like the fresh zumo that is prevalent in Bars but it gets costly. In the morning we mix the yogurt, granola cereal as well as a banana (for two) and strawberries in our room and eat it. We make tea in the room and we are then ready to go.

we also purchase supper ( and then eat in the room or kitchen). We buy lots of raw vegetables including tomatoes, green or red peppers, tomato, olives, sometimes a small can of corn, fresh bread, olive oil in the packets and we have a feast. We bring little salt packets from home.

However, since we limit our walking kms, we do stop once or twice for coffee or tea during our walk....

We eat lunch out most days when we arrive at our destination... More and more...we skip the peregrino meal!! We order a main dish and a drink and do not find it more expensive.... or sometimes the menu del dia is a good option. Somertimes we order a pizza and a salad and then split them....cheaper than the peregrino meal and definitely more satisfying.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September/October (2014)
Plain full fat yog if available, otherwise the low fat ones, and banana. Bought the day before from a shop. We didn’t fret too much about overnight refrigeration for yogs, telling ourselves that they are fermented products. We ate them at about the 5km point. We grabbed some black coffee if available, around that time too. Wish I could eat eggs, if I could, I’d have some hard boiled, as others have said.
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
we always carry some rolled/porridge oats and dried fruit, and have a mug/bowl of that with just cold water on - even better if you make it the night b4 and leave to plump up... if you have time or inclination you can cook it up , but it is just as nice cold and you can carry with you in a travel mug...
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
Agh! No! Not the dreaded Marmite! I went to school the other side of the Oval to the Marmite factory. When the wind was in the wrong direction we had to have all the windows closed! Worst than the smell from the adjacent gas works.
About the only upside of a no-deal Brexit would be that Marmite would never leave these shores again! ;)
Marmite, more divisive than Brexit.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013, CF 2014, CP 2016, CN 1st half 2018, CN 3rd qtr+R. Cantabrico 2019, Via Francigena 2017
Come to New Mexico (USA) and you get huevos rancheros with a corn tortilla underneath the eggs, pinto beans on the side and a choice of red or green chile (or both) on top. Mmmmmm
And you can do the pilgrimage to Chimayo!
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); SJPP - ?, three weeks in 2020!
My initial week-long Camino was in the company of one or more napolitano addicts; I don't know if the albergues we stayed in even had breakfast since they already planned stops at the first (and second. and third.) cafe known to have choice croissants. I did shop at some local tiendas for afternoon/evening snacks once we stopped walking for the day, so I'm now aware of alternate possibilities!

My packing list for my (mostly) solo trip includes both a stainless steel mug - suitable for stovetop or oven, and a pair of Tupperware bowls (with lids) - suitable for microwave (and spill-proof storage). My plan when on my own is to snack all day (breakfast, second breakfast, elevenses, lunch, and afternoon tea!) with foodstuffs I pick up locally and prepare, as needed, in the albergue kitchen/microwave. I'll most likely be able to splurge on a fancy dinner/supper out that way.
 

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