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Bucket List - What we must plan to not miss on the Way?

Alun26

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019 April - May Camino de Frances
#1
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#3
In the same way that most pilgrims need to train their bodies in order to succeed in walking the camino distance for several weeks many of us also need to train or retrain our minds in order to fully appreciate what we may be seeing. One good resource filled with a multitude of possibilities re the cultural richness found along the way is The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago by David M Gitlitz and Linda Kay Davidson. This is available on Amazon in both paperback and as a Kindle ebook.

Happy research and Buen camino!
 
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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
#4
For me, making the most of the Camino is not about seeing or doing particular things, but having the opportunity to just *be*, simply walking and discovering who I can bless each day.
And while I love to plan my Camino in advance, as soon as I hit Spanish soil I abandon the plan and let each walk take its own course.
I say this not to discourage you from researching, but to encourage you to hold your pre-walking discoveries lightly.
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
#5
Planning is a good thing and as Baden-Powell said "Be Prepared"! H-o-w-e-v-e-r, having said that, my greatest joys and moving moments on all the various Caminos I have walked center on the amazing, unexpected, absolute, and total surprise! Twofold actually. One: the amazing unexpected surprising and overwhelming people you will meet at every turn! Something which cannot be foreseen. Two: their are absolute gems and treasures waiting to be discovered all along the Camino. I do not mean the usual and expected cathedrals, Gaudi, architecture, and art but the small almost unnoticed sites which are often simply passed by. Examples? Naverette! Two actually. The Iglesia Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, nothing much to look at from outside almost nondescript, a few sculptures - the Spaniards are bonkers about statues, inside the church all is dark and uninviting until someone spends a Euro and the lights come on! Half a ton of conquistador gold on the walls. Don't think origins and source simply stand and be amazed. Secondly, in the courtyard of the church there is a small tavern!!! Eat only here!!! Another? Vilar de Donas 2.5k off Camino from the Portos albergue. If you insist, leaving Burgos the Monasterio de Las Huegas Reales. There is much much more so don't consider skipping anything at all, nose around, pick around, be inquisitive. Did I mention markets? Mercado de Abastos de Santiago is only one of many!
 

stgcph

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
#6
I think it would be good to do some reading in guides and in books on the history of the Camino. That may inspire you about places and sights of interest; but it may all change. I did my reading but, as it turned out, the greatest experience was to be there on the ancient road, in the moment, in the weather, in the mountains, on the plains and among the pilgrims.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#7
Several small examples of the cultural richness in the Meseta near and around Carrion de los Condes. Villa Cazar de Sirga with its wonderful regional restaurant El Meson de los Templarios. The accomodations at the monastery San Zoilo and the heritage site of Villa Olmeda not far away with its well preserved mosaic floors dating back from the first century.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#8
I recently wrote the post about all of the fascinating things that I saw and experienced on my travels along the Aragones. But, the most impressionable experiences I have had of my three Caminos have come from what I did not see. One time was walking across the paramo on the way to Mazarife with just the sounds of my boots, the birds and the wind. Another was walking down the mountain from Cruz de Fero. I was totally alone, the only person in the world. I have never been good at expressing my feelings but whatever it was, the feeling inside hit me with great emotional force.

Do not miss your first sighting of the cathedral in Compostela nor your first sighting of the ocean on the way to Finisterra.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#9
For me, making the most of the Camino is not about seeing or doing particular things, but having the opportunity to just *be*, simply walking and discovering who I can bless each day.
Well I have just found someone to bless today.

Now, on to the subject at hand. I say to read about Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture beforehand (besides history.)

The church in Naverette was one of the highlights of my camino. Another was the museum of the church of San Isadoro in Leon. We only had half an hour there before it closed. If it wasn't closed and I could have gotten rid of Peg I think I could have spent an hour or two at the Pantheon there. They have a well documented Holy Grail there too. Not proven but more likely the one than the other several hundred.
 

Shazenalan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018
#11
I have loved reading this thread today. I returned ftom Fromista in September, with the last section of the Camino planned for September 2019. Oh how I planned, listed, researched. And, but, well... actually ON the path, I discovered that the point was to not do that, but to accept what unfolded, and to ‘fold it in’ as I walked. So now, 2 months after my return, I am wondering if there IS any coming back from the Camino. OP - be prepared to fold it in, just as it is, for you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#12
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
I completely understand your taking on it (It's your very first Camino, after all, and you cannot know what to expect).

Do your research and read-up: This forum is an abundance of qualified information. Use the Search function.

There are many magnificent things to see (I assume the Camino Frances): The very first day of walking, just being there, and knowing that you have made it to the Camino, and you are there, walking! The first week: You understand the system and the ease of it. The communal albergue in Granon.The Chalice of Christ in Burgos. The plains of the Meseta. The Cruz de Ferro (Bring a stone). Ponferrada's magnificent 1100 AD Templar Castle. O'Cebreiro. The huge monasterio of Samos. And much, much more. They are all directly on the Way-

But, hopefully (and I think you will discover it), the most valuable you will find, is not a holiday/vacation/sights, but your own new soul. The Camino has a profound impact on many people. Cannot be explained (by me), but nevertheless it exists. I hope you will get to see the most important thing you can find/see on the Camino: Your you. The Camino is about you. And remember, however weird it may sound now, The Camino will give you what you need, not neccessarily what you want. And I am not talking about sights, but you.

All this may seem meaningless to you right now, but you will (hopefully) perfectly understand it when, after weeks of walking, you stand in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela, realising that your long walk is over. But a new one is in the making: The walk of the rest of your life, based on lessons learned on the Camino. The Camino is a strong teacher.

And then you will return and walk again in order to better understand what happened to you, and become even better :) And you will become an addict like so many of us. :)

As soon as you have started walking, the best plan is to not have a plan. Let each day decide. Be surprised and make decisions accordingly.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#13
I discovered that the point was to not do that, but to accept what unfolded, and to ‘fold it in’ as I walked.
I love this.

I would say to research if you want, but leave behind your expectations, and don't feel bad if you aren't able to see and do everything that you think that you want to do.
I like the idea of studying up a bit about the art and architecture of the region so that you have a greater appreciation of what you are seeing, but don't focus in too much on specific sites.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
#14
The communal albergue in Granon.The Chalice of Christ in Burgos. The plains of the Meseta. The Cruz de Ferro (Bring a stone). Ponferrada's magnificent 1100 AD Templar Castle. O'Cebreiro. The huge monasterio of Samos. And much, much more. They are all directly on the Way-
"The" Granon albergue was closed the day we were there.
Ponferrada's magnificent castle was closed.
I whizzed past Samos's monastery in a taxi - taking my daughter to a hospital to have her arm set in a cast as she had broken it two days earlier at O' Cebreiro.

Three things to take from this:
1) remember to hold your expectations lightly
2) even if things don't go as planned, they can still be great - we had a delightful night in another sweet wee albergue in Granon instead and got to sing for our supper - will never forget the roast potatoes brought up from the bakery down the street.
3) as much as I love the less travelled routes, maybe I need to return to the Frances for the things I've missed! You might be the same!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#15
I did my reading but, as it turned out, the greatest experience was to be there on the ancient road, in the moment, in the weather, in the mountains, on the plains and among the pilgrims.
Yourself, and your own Soul.
:)

The camino journey is as much about what happens inside than seeing and doing things.
So let yourself get lost and totally disoriented. And then find the way home.
You can do that on the Camino much more easily almost anywhere else...
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#17
The responses above are right, magic just happens when you let the Camino unfold - Often the smallest things bring such joy . After two caminos some of the random things that stick in my brain:
The wonderful communal dinner with pilgrims all sharing their food at Najera (and then no sleep that night as Real Madrid won that day). The albergue came with a tiny little Yorkie who was really cute
The amazing museum in Burgos where we spend 4 hours - I forget the name - Human Evolution I think
A little place in Viana, where we had an unexpected afternoon of meditation, tea, foot massages and soaking our feet. And we slept that night with a fellow pilgrims dogs. (I missed my dogs)
Villafranca del Bierzo where we caught up with a pile of Camino people we'd met earlier and had a reunion. And then nearly got locked out of the albergue after a night of cheese, wine and laughter.
The smell of eucalypts in Galicia in the rain, and the boulder crossings over the streams
The monastery at Samos is truly impressive, especially viewed from above on the hill through the gaps in the stone wall
Looking down through the mists to the valleys below OCebreiro
The amazing rivers in the Meseta - and the cuckoos
Moving the tables apart at an outdoor cafe at O Pedrouza so the stock cars could race through between the tables (I think they won the football that night too)
On day 2 crossing the bridge into Zubiri and being overwhelmed by a sense of history
The place in Navarette with all the cats, and the owner brought us warm figs from his trees. I fell half way down the stone stairs the next morning and completely escaped injury.
The cathedral in Leon is truly magical
The stork nests everywhere
The 'templar' with the falcon on the way to Rabanal and Rabanal my all time favorite village
The Gaudi palace in Astorga
The delight I felt when I finally found a pharmacy that was open
Sunflowers fields in Navarre - and someone made a smiley face out of a flower
And also the delight when I found a yarn shop next to our hostal in Leon (I'm a knitter - that was such a bonus)
Bursting into tears at the sound of the bagpipes in Santiago
The amazing place at Ambasmestas with its own lake and individual rooms. They had a Scottish fold cat, and served food grown and caught on their own property. Lovely people. Magic.
The place in Los Arcos with the wobbly uneven spiral staircase to the attic where we slept - and some kind of worms fell out of the beams above on to our mattresses
I just have to look at the stamps in my credential to bring back the memories - most of which would never be found in a guide book
And above all - all the wonderful people we met, talked to and walked with - and what I learned about myself.
I know I came away a different person - I like the person I am when on Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances October 2018
#19
I agree with all of the above. The memorable moments for me often include people: other pilgrims, supportive albergue owners, helpful pharmacists, animals etc. The stillness of the meseta with its gorgeous full moon and sunrises. The shocking hail storm we got stuck in with no shelter - it was hilarious! The time we got snowed in at O'Cebreiro and spent the night at the pub with no electricity. The moment we got to an albergue to find our camino family already there, waiting for us. Monte De Gozo - very emotional, with the first viewing of the 3 cathedral spires of Santiago. Gorgeous towns like Torres Del Rio, Azofra, Navarette (mentioned by many others) and its cathedral, Hornillos Del Camino. Walking into the square in Santiago with people clapping and cheering for us (don't expect this - we were just lucky).

That said, some albergues I would not miss include: Beilari (SJPDP), Orisson, Suseia (Zubiri), Cuatro Cantanas (Belorado), Albergue Rosario (Castrojeriz), Complexo Xacobeo (Triacastela). A restaurant in Hornillos Del Camino called 'The Green Tree'.

I agree with the others. Everybody has amazing experiences based on themselves and their growth, their wonderful company, the weather and other things that can't always be managed. I have no doubt that when I do another camino, this list would change again. Enjoy compiling your own list to share with others when you return. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#21
If you accomplish your Camino with the wisdom and judgment of an adult, combined with the wonderment of a young child, and the excitement of a puppy or kitten, and you have a recipe for a brilliant Camino.

As the old saw about traveling goes, bring half as much stuff, and twice as much money and you will do fine. Also, budget enough time to be able to do things that lengthen your overall time on Camino.

NOTE: The money only needs to be accessible through an ATM. Do not carry more than 200 - 300 Euros on you at any one time,

Have fun!

Hope this helps.
 

DonnaS18

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept (2018)
#22
I completely understand your taking on it (It's your very first Camino, after all, and you cannot know what to expect).

Do your research and read-up: This forum is an abundance of qualified information. Use the Search function.

There are many magnificent things to see (I assume the Camino Frances): The very first day of walking, just being there, and knowing that you have made it to the Camino, and you are there, walking! The first week: You understand the system and the ease of it. The communal albergue in Granon.The Chalice of Christ in Burgos. The plains of the Meseta. The Cruz de Ferro (Bring a stone). Ponferrada's magnificent 1100 AD Templar Castle. O'Cebreiro. The huge monasterio of Samos. And much, much more. They are all directly on the Way-

But, hopefully (and I think you will discover it), the most valuable you will find, is not a holiday/vacation/sights, but your own new soul. The Camino has a profound impact on many people. Cannot be explained (by me), but nevertheless it exists. I hope you will get to see the most important thing you can find/see on the Camino: Your you. The Camino is about you. And remember, however weird it may sound now, The Camino will give you what you need, not neccessarily what you want. And I am not talking about sights, but you.

All this may seem meaningless to you right now, but you will (hopefully) perfectly understand it when, after weeks of walking, you stand in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela, realising that your long walk is over. But a new one is in the making: The walk of the rest of your life, based on lessons learned on the Camino. The Camino is a strong teacher.

And then you will return and walk again in order to better understand what happened to you, and become even better :) And you will become an addict like so many of us. :)

As soon as you have started walking, the best plan is to not have a plan. Let each day decide. Be surprised and make decisions accordingly.
Beautifully written- I could not have said it better. A guidebook of what you are passing is also interesting to decide what you’d like to stop and see and also when to walk alternate more scenic routes - not along the busy highway for example. Invariably the most interesting journey is that of self discovery. I 100% agree the Camino will privide, Hopefully what you need, or came in search of, even if you don’t know what that is yet. The people you choose to meet and mingle with are icing on The Way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 SJPP-Burgos, 2014 Burgos-Leon, 2018 Leon-Santiago
#23
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss...
Hello, and welcome.
The Camino experience sometimes hangs in my memory like a chain of evanescent details. One thing that always remains is the sound and the feeling of a young Canadian man singing in the extraordinary Santa Maria de Eunate, a little church that is now in private hands, but which used to be a pilgrim detour with a small dormitory a few kilometers off the Camino near Estella.
This type of ephemeral experience can’t be planned. All you can really do is to be in the place and make yourself available for what comes. In this case, it was an emotional and spiritual moment I won’t forget.
I went to the place, but I saw and felt so much more than that little church with stone skylights. The people around you and your availability to wonderment will make your Camino. See the sights but let yourself be moved.
All the best,
Paul
 
#26
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago
#27
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
I think one of the simplest pieces of advice I could offer would be to avoid being “tunnel visioned”. Every now and again STOP and look behind you. You will be amazed how the view and more importantly your relationship to it changes. Also I don’t know how many times I sit 4 or 5 meters off the track under a tree and people walk past looking neither left or right. You never know what’s just off the track. Don’t forget to do things like buy a bottle of Rose and some cheese find a paddock sit and relax. Other writers are correct. Best moments are spontaneous. Plan a bit don’t do a rest stop in a big town on Mondays. Museums are closed. Build in a few rest days in bigger towns. Relax a bit.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#28
The responses above are right, magic just happens when you let the Camino unfold - Often the smallest things bring such joy . After two caminos some of the random things that stick in my brain:
The wonderful communal dinner with pilgrims all sharing their food at Najera (and then no sleep that night as Real Madrid won that day). The albergue came with a tiny little Yorkie who was really cute
The amazing museum in Burgos where we spend 4 hours - I forget the name - Human Evolution I think
A little place in Viana, where we had an unexpected afternoon of meditation, tea, foot massages and soaking our feet. And we slept that night with a fellow pilgrims dogs. (I missed my dogs)
Villafranca del Bierzo where we caught up with a pile of Camino people we'd met earlier and had a reunion. And then nearly got locked out of the albergue after a night of cheese, wine and laughter.
The smell of eucalypts in Galicia in the rain, and the boulder crossings over the streams
The monastery at Samos is truly impressive, especially viewed from above on the hill through the gaps in the stone wall
Looking down through the mists to the valleys below OCebreiro
The amazing rivers in the Meseta - and the cuckoos
Moving the tables apart at an outdoor cafe at O Pedrouza so the stock cars could race through between the tables (I think they won the football that night too)
On day 2 crossing the bridge into Zubiri and being overwhelmed by a sense of history
The place in Navarette with all the cats, and the owner brought us warm figs from his trees. I fell half way down the stone stairs the next morning and completely escaped injury.
The cathedral in Leon is truly magical
The stork nests everywhere
The 'templar' with the falcon on the way to Rabanal and Rabanal my all time favorite village
The Gaudi palace in Astorga
The delight I felt when I finally found a pharmacy that was open
Sunflowers fields in Navarre - and someone made a smiley face out of a flower
And also the delight when I found a yarn shop next to our hostal in Leon (I'm a knitter - that was such a bonus)
Bursting into tears at the sound of the bagpipes in Santiago
The amazing place at Ambasmestas with its own lake and individual rooms. They had a Scottish fold cat, and served food grown and caught on their own property. Lovely people. Magic.
The place in Los Arcos with the wobbly uneven spiral staircase to the attic where we slept - and some kind of worms fell out of the beams above on to our mattresses
I just have to look at the stamps in my credential to bring back the memories - most of which would never be found in a guide book
And above all - all the wonderful people we met, talked to and walked with - and what I learned about myself.
I know I came away a different person - I like the person I am when on Camino
What is a Scottish fold cat?
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#29
Camino(s) past & future
St. Francis Route 2017
#30
I think one of the simplest pieces of advice I could offer would be to avoid being “tunnel visioned”. Every now and again STOP and look behind you. You will be amazed how the view and more importantly your relationship to it changes. Also I don’t know how many times I sit 4 or 5 meters off the track under a tree and people walk past looking neither left or right. You never know what’s just off the track. Don’t forget to do things like buy a bottle of Rose and some cheese find a paddock sit and relax. Other writers are correct. Best moments are spontaneous. Plan a bit don’t do a rest stop in a big town on Mondays. Museums are closed. Build in a few rest days in bigger towns. Relax a bit.
This, Craig, from my May 22, 2018 post on this forum regarding my 2017 Camino: "I live on an island with a rugged coastline and near the North Cascade Mountains. Lessons, read as tumbles, experienced in youth hiking and climbing prepared me well for the Camino. I paused often to breathe in the air, take stock of my surroundings, look back from whence I came, listen to the birdsong. I was in no hurry because the thought was constantly with me that I may never pass this way again. If Paris is a moveable feast, so too is the Camino. It is with me every day."
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#31
The sights are spectacular but the traditions of the Caminos are just as important. For instance - Don't forget to give a big hug to every member of the Guardia Civil that you encounter; in Leon it is expected that you will throw the first 'tapa' you are offered on the floor and demand "Mas"; if you don't like the bunk you have been allocated at Roncesvalles just move someone else's kit and take theirs. And, if you pass through London on your way to the Camino don't forget to test the famous echo in the Reading Room of the British Museum. ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#32
The sights are spectacular but the traditions of the Caminos are just as important. For instance - Don't forget to give a big hug to every member of the Guardia Civil that you encounter; in Leon it is expected that you will throw the first 'tapa' you are offered on the floor and demand "Mas"; if you don't like the bunk you have been allocated at Roncesvalles just move someone else's kit and take theirs. And, if you pass through London on your way to the Camino don't forget to test the famous echo in the Reading Room of the British Museum. ;)
Excuse me? I think I have come into the wrong thread...
 
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
#35
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
This is a really interesting question. And my answer might sound a little odd to you. The first time I did the Camino, I had the same question. But the more I have done them, the more I have given up on those ‘must-see’, ‘must-eat’, ‘must-do’ lists associated with tourist destinations. There are lots of things to see on the Way. Some you can’t miss. But really, I think the road kind of takes over, and lets you discover things - about the space and about yourself. That’s what makes the camino really really special and different. Hope you find lots of things to love and remember :) Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#37
This is the cat, they have a genetic cartilage issue that causes them to have ears that fold forward. This one was the boss of the place

View attachment 49687
Thank you, Anamiri! I have never heard of that. My new learning for the day, yesterday. Now I will be inspecting cats to see if I can spot the difference...
sorry for the side track, folks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#39
Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
One thing I encountered in my reading was the memorial about 4 km after Villafranca Montes de Oca to the fallen on one side of the Spanish Civil War. I suspect they thought of themselves as loyalists to their country.

The night before I had stayed at Viloria de Rioja. During a walk around the village I encountered the parish church and noticed in a porchway a memorial to, presumably, local loyalists who had died or served some 80 years ago.

@Alun26 , kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 
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Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
#40
IMHO you cannot plan in this fashion. You will be stringed along with strained breath.
I am not on top every day and not game for anything I cannot take in just now.
I plan to come back for seconds next time around....
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 5, 2013
CF June 5, 2015
CF June 3, 2017
#41
Hello:)
So I'm planning my firs Camino at April, and I'm looking for recommendation what I should plan to not miss.
I saw a great discussion about albergues to not miss, and I would like to start something similar with programs (like horse riding, or take a break in a thermal pool).
(not to make the way easier, to to something different what you can do only there)

Did you do something on the Way what is a nice memory and normally not part of the road?
Thank you:)
Alun,

I wrote notes day-by-day on what not to miss! I can send it to you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
Oct 2017 Bits of Le Puy /Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
Oct/Nov 2108 Francés
#45
So here's some Camino Frances not-to-misses:

Albergues:
  • Granon church (amazing atmosphere and communal meal)
  • San Anton monastery (genuine old templar hospital, no electricity, really intimate evenings)
  • Albergue Verde in Hospital del Orbigo (heavenly eco-farm albergue with hippy ethos, lovely garden and amazing vegan food)
Buildings:
  • Church of Los Arcos
  • Cathedral of Leon
  • San Isidoro Basilica, Leon (the paid museum not the free church)

Landscape:
  • Sunrise from the top of O Cebreiro (stay there at the Xunta albergue) - incredible colours and landscape
  • Mid-morning view from Orrison. Most welcome sandwich and coke ever, and what a view.
  • Mountain-crossing routes from Villafranca del Bierzo to Las Herrerias (amazing also in the dark for the brave!) These are detailed in Brierley.
Food
  • Meson A'esquipa, A Salceda (Galicia) - amazing coal-grilled meats and octopus
  • Casa de Amancio, Vilamaior (Galicia) - incredible roast lamb
  • Albergue Verde, Hospital del Orbigo (after Leon)- every day different vegan cuisine, all homegrown ingredients
  • Green Tree Irish bar/restaurant in Hornillos (after Burgos). lovely people, amazing food and atmosphere. Not sure what's happening with their food as their famous chef just left at the end of this season, so check first by phone.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2017
#46
I bought Brierley at the last minute in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port and didn't really reference it until halfway through, but wished I had looked from the beginning. He generally mentions one or two things of interest on each leg to look for, with a sentence or two of background about them. In the second half of my Camino, I glanced at what was ahead each morning, and then decided whether to check something out as I walked along.
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
Oct 2017 Bits of Le Puy /Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
Oct/Nov 2108 Francés
#47
One thing I encountered in my reading was the memorial about 4 km after Villafranca Montes de Oca to the fallen on one side of the Spanish Civil War. I suspect they thought of themselves as loyalists to their country.

The night before I had stayed at Viloria de Rioja. During a walk around the village I encountered the parish church and noticed in a porchway a memorial to, presumably, local loyalists who had died or served some 80 years ago.

@Alun26 , kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
Reading Ghosts of Spain by any chance? :)
The forest monument itself is a fairly unprepossessing concrete affair though, if memory serves.
 
Camino(s) past & future
24 May- 14 July (2016)CF
Hospitalera, Zamora Dec 15-31, (2017), Hospitalera Grañón Dec 15-31 (2018)
#48
Another good resource is the hospitalero, who can usually tell you if there is some "can't miss" thing going on in town. We tried to explore each town as we went, both large and small.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
#51
Everyone's Camino is somewhat different I had 3 fantasies for my Camino before I left Horseback riding in the Spanish Mountains so I did for 2 hours up to O Cebrio. Glorious, I am so glad that I did this even though I probably hadn't ridden a horse in 20 years and this was the first time for me on a English Saddle. I also wanted to be walking along a road/trail and have a herd of sheep and cows come up the same road and that happened too. My thoughts are learn what you can before had, think what you would like to do but once you go on the walk go with the flow and do what you feel like what you want to do.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future (October 2018)
#52
For me, making the most of the Camino is not about seeing or doing particular things, but having the opportunity to just *be*, simply walking and discovering who I can bless each day.
And while I love to plan my Camino in advance, as soon as I hit Spanish soil I abandon the plan and let each walk take its own course.
I say this not to discourage you from researching, but to encourage you to hold your pre-walking discoveries lightly.
I too abandoned all plans except for music. I lived in the present taking in the sights, sounds, tastes, touches and smells of the Camino. We had many "Camino" moments totally unexpected and things that could never be planned for. So good to let these special moments unfold. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#53
I agree with @notion900 that bucket-list thinking doesn't work on the Camino. Maybe the Camino was on someone's bucket list, but once started, that thinking is better left behind.

Maybe the most definitive things that you shouldn't miss are "step 1", "step 2", "step 3".... up to over 1 million.

Apologies to the OP, but you probably didn't realize that the wording of your post and thread title touched on something that is fundamental to the pilgrimage experience for many of us. You have that to look forward to. Sure, create your list of things to do and see (I still do that each year, as well) but don't let that list distract you from the Camino experience. This is valid whether you are religious or not.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#54
I admit that when I went on camino with my son in 2016, there were things I was hoping to see, some I hadn't really been aware of in 1989 and others I was looking to see again: the Alto de Perdon, the bridge in Puente la Reina, the chickens in Santo Domingo, the cathedrals in Burgos and Leon and the pantheon in San Isidro in Leon, the churches in Torres del Rio and Fromista, the Cruz de Ferro, the castle in Ponferrada, O Cebreiro, the pulpo in Galicia, the monument at Monte do Gozo, the swinging of the botafumeiro in Santiago, sunset at Finisterre. Some of these I experienced, others I missed. Somehow our camino never took us past the monument at Monte do Gozo and they didn't swing the botafumeiro at any of the masses we attended. The church at Torres del Rio was closed when we went passed, but we did see the church at Eunate, which hadn't been on my list. The Camino is such an archetypical journey it is hard to fault someone for wanting to identify and experience the signature locations along the way.

But others are not wrong when they say that the things one must really not miss are of a quite different type. Now I would say that the essentials that one must really not miss are:
- getting up and walking kilometre after kilometre for the fifth day in a row
- a communal meal with other pilgrims
- being someone's "Camino Angel" and helping them out when they could use a hand
- a non-transactional interaction with a local Spanish person
- some time walking alone and some time walking with another pilgrim

Ideally, one should also experience (in my opinion, but of course this is all only my opinion)
- at least one night in an albergue dorm
- at least one day carrying one's own belongings rather than having them transported (although I recognize that for some, health conditions may prevent this)
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#55
Wonderful lists from @Puiu and @H Richards .

Of all I would emphasise

1) Cathedral Church of Santa María de la Regla, Leon. It almost unique (of those I encountered) as being gothic and not baroque in style. And unique in the quantity and quality of stained glass.

2) Bishops Palace, Astorga. This is unique both in detail and for a bishop never having lived there since its completion over 100 years ago. Designed by Anton Gaudi (well known for his works at Barecelona, especially the basilica of Holy Family (Sagrada Familia) it is a riot of colours and shapes. On the inside it may seem confusing as to how it all fits together. But the plan (as seen from directly above) is a simple cross with arms of equal length.

3) Church of Saint John, Portmarin. From the outside it is quite gaunt. No wonder: it was built as a fortress for issues found back in the day. Inside it is more welcoming. A feature is the horseshoe shaped chancel/apse with a bench seat (with a continuous cushion). A small community for Mass can be accomodated in a more intimate connection.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
#56
Calle Laurel in Logroño was something that I missed on my Camino and can heartily recommend as others have already done. I visited it several times last month on my drive home from the Costa Blanca to Bilbao.
Pulpo a la Gallega is a gastronomic treat.(I know someone else has mentioned it too.
A full body massage at Casa Mágica, in Villatuerte (a very well thought of alberque) is on the expensive side but does mean your legs keep working. Worth having one if finances allow.
A free meal in Santiago, a chance to look round a very special building and a chance to talk with other pilgrims who have taken different routes and had different experiences. https://www.parador.es/en/blog/ten-free-meals-pilgrims-way-st-james.
Make a point of talking to other groups of people on your camino and other individuals. As others have mentioned the people you meet will make your camino memorable.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019 April - May Camino de Frances
#57
Thank you, for all your answers and advises.

Maybe my wording was wrong and sorry if somebody took it personally. (I really don't want to hurt anybodies feeling or pulling somebodies leg, I just couldn't put into words what was in my mind.) I don't want to over plan it, I was just so happy when I find out, we still have the opportunity to do a small part of the way on horse back. Just because I really like horses, but in the city I don't have the chance, to be with them in nice places. I really like to share the nice places of the nature with my dog also, but she can't come with me, I know I will miss her the most. Now I understand, the best of the Camino is what you share with others, and you can't plan it or control it.

Thank you for sharing your memories, it was really inspiring to read, I hope we will meet to share some nice moment.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
#58
Alun26, don't apologise for your query. There are a few people on the website that are of the opinion that there way of doing things is the only way of doing things. Remember "It's your camino!" You do it however you want. There is no wrong or right way.
The chances are that you will not be walking the Camino de Santiago more than once. You might regret missing something special because of ignorance. You might not be able to do everything that you'd like to do because of time constraints but, if you have done your research and planning, you will have some things that you won't want to miss.
There are things that won't be planned that just happen and they are magical too.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
#59
It was
Thank you, for all your answers and advises.

Maybe my wording was wrong and sorry if somebody took it personally. (I really don't want to hurt anybodies feeling or pulling somebodies leg, I just couldn't put into words what was in my mind.) I don't want to over plan it, I was just so happy when I find out, we still have the opportunity to do a small part of the way on horse back. Just because I really like horses, but in the city I don't have the chance, to be with them in nice places. I really like to share the nice places of the nature with my dog also, but she can't come with me, I know I will miss her the most. Now I understand, the best of the Camino is what you share with others, and you can't plan it or control it.

Thank you for sharing your memories, it was really inspiring to read, I hope we will meet to share some nice moment.
Alun 26, it was a perfectly good question. And there were lots things that people suggested that would be fun to do :)
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#60
The good thing is that most places to see are actually on the Camino, and you will happen upon them as you go.
The horses I think that although you will pass the place - you need to ring and book. There is a thread in here that gives you Victors phone number on order to book.
My husband will try and ride up to O Cebreiro next year.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#61
Maybe my wording was wrong and sorry if somebody took it personally. (I really don't want to hurt anybodies feeling or pulling somebodies leg, I just couldn't put into words what was in my mind.)
I hope that you haven't taken our comments as personal criticisms, either! I understand how words and phrases on the internet sometimes don't work exactly as we intended. I was one of the people who cautioned against "bucket list" thinking, and I think that point was a valid one to be made. I hope you will accept it as another piece of information (or another perspective) about the journey you are planning.

I also tend to be a detailed planner, and I thoroughly enjoy that part. Best wishes with yours!
 
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Future? Levante-VDLP-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
#62
When I was 16, I spent my Christmas holidays in Holland with my Dad's family. One day we drive to Dusseldorf to do some Xmas shopping. Now I really don't like shopping at the best of times, and I would rather have gone with my male cousins who checked out flash cars. But what really peeved me when I returned home to NZ was the realisation that the Neanderthal Valley was close and that was something I would have loved to check out.
So I am an obsessive Holiday planner who thoroughly researches everything because I don't want to miss out. But once there I am quite flexible. I don't have to see everything; I just want to know what to prioritise. I will only be on the CF from Astorga to Ponferrada. I suspect that I will check out Gaudi as I am a mosaic nut, the Cruz de Ferro is on the way and the Templar Castle in Ponferrada is too big to ignore. But otherwise I haven't decided anything.
 

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