A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

See the full Camino Forum Store here with many more camino products.

Camping Can you camp along the Camino?

karinjanet

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future - ASAP / Pending with the Coronavirus
Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp? Has anyone done this before and if so, any tips?

Thank you in advance!
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
It does get done, but free camping is not always legal. Some albergues let you camp in the garden for a fee - which lets you use the shower and maybe the kitchen. There are some campgrounds; not a lot, but some. From what I’ve read, most folks who free camp, wait to set up at dusk and are gone at first light; no fires or cooking. Sometimes if there is a farm in sight, ask permission.

Most spaces alongside the trail where you’d think a tent would nicely fit, various folks have already used it as a toilet, so beware.

There have been threads on this topic; use the search function for camping and you’ll find lots of info.

Have fun planning!
 

Dan_Hiker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Was Apr 1, "2020" now fall "2020"
Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp? Has anyone done this before and if so, any tips?

Thank you in advance!
A couple of months ago I was on YouTube watching Camino videos and I saw a man who had made a video of him camping the entire route. It may have been 2 men because I remember them trying to find a tree to camp under when it was raining. But there is a video in YouTube. A little searching and you should find it. I was thinking the same thing because of the virus. I would feel a lot better knowing I had my own little area and it was free of any virus.
 
Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp? Has anyone done this before and if so, any tips?

Thank you in advance!
Yes I did this back in August/September 2012 brought a Bivi tent with me. Locals will tell u off if they catch u but it's easy to do saves money and makes it more of an adventure. (I think it maybe illegal or really frowned upon - because you don't pay anyone or ask permission) However I feel, If u clean up after yourself then there is no trace u even there. Bonus - beautiful clear night sky with the moon and stars
 

Travellingman

Active Member
Much has been discussed on here about camping on the camino, mainly the fact that in Spain it is largely illegal to camp outside of official sites, However, given the current situation, maybe it's time to relax this rule - at least social distancing could be maintained, and some revenue would come into the country. I cannot see albergues, with the close proximity of dorm sleeping, being allowed in the foreseeable future - camping has always been the choice of a tiny minority, so a huge surge in tented pilgrims is unlikely, not least as the initial expense of obtaining the equipment is not small.
I have take a gamble for next year, and booked fights to Madrid for a 2 week bivouac on the Camino Madrid to Sahagun - maybe a waste of money, but fingers crossed.:)
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I am thinking of this, not really for financial reasons or safety from the virus, but because I am an experienced camper and can no longer walk very far in a day. Accommodation is infrequent on the less-busy routes which I prefer, and may be more so as some places have to go out of business due to the pandemic. I have found that, with a little simplifying, my one-person tent will fit into the top pouch of my 40 l. camino backpack, leaving adequate space for other necessities. However, as camping would be for me only a last-ditch action if I found nowhere else to stay, I am more likely to take only a lightweight emergency bivy and my camping mattress, if I think I might need them. I no longer want to carry any excess weight, either.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Biggest problem with unofficial camping is water. Still, if you don't have a donkey you won't need much. It's a lot easier to do on the Norte than on the Frances. Official camp sites aren't cheap. I found the Gardia pretty helpful, actually. They would take me round to a friendly farmer more often than not. The trick is not to interrupt their lunch hour.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I applaud those of you who are willing to try to free camp in order to be able to enjoy the camino in these uncertain times. Leave no trace...and it's more of a hardship for you, but I say "good for you"!
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp? Has anyone done this before and if so, any tips?

Thank you in advance!
Below is a post I had made before, so maybe this will give you some direction in investigating this.

Without knowing their legal status for use, there has never been a point, while walking along any of 'stages' of either the Frances or the Ingles, where I did not spot many different places for a cold camp with a small tent. Given my backpacking background, doing a spot check for such sites was sort of a game that I would play in my mind toward the end of a walking day.

I would also consider making inquiry at the local police station or town office, if possible. Check out the availability of using a church or alburgues garden or yard area (if there is someone to talk with).

If water is an issue, no biggie. When you get to the end of the day, fill up on 2 or more liters of water at the last large water source you think will be available. . bar, water fountain, a friendly home, etc. In the morning, dump out all water not used except for the .5 to 1 liter amount you'd normally carry. If you do plan to camp, then there are extremely lightweight and collapsible water containers you can stuff in your pack until needed.


-----------------------------------------

Wild camping in Spain is complicated. There is a “mother law” Article 46.1 of the order for July 28th, 1966 ( El artículo 46.1 de la orden del 28 de julio de 1966), which states that:
“Apart from tourist camp sites no more than three tents of caravans may be placed at the same location, nor should there be more then 10 campers, nor may the camp be in place for more than three days. Tents and (caravans) within 500 meters of each other are considered to be part of the same group.”
The law also states that it is prohibited to free camp within 200 meters of the sea, within a few kilometers of military installations, within a few kilometers of a regular camp site, and in protected areas like national parks, natural parks, bird sanctuaries called ‘ZEPA’s, (Zona Excepcional de Protección de Avifauna), etc.
However, there is the new law under the Spanish Constitution of 1978, which created seventeen ‘autonomous regions’ each with considerable, though varying, powers to make their own legal codes with their own territory.

Under these laws, wild camping in Spain is COMPLETELY PROHIBITED in: Andalucía, Aragón, Asturias, Extremadura, Galicia, Navarra, Valencia. These areas have their own laws/permit requirements for wild camping: Cantabria, Murcia, La Rioja.

These areas fall under national rules and wild camping IS permitted: Basque Country, Cataluña, Madrid, Castilla y León, Castilla la Mancha. But in these areas you still can’t camp near the beach, in national parks, protected areas, etc. Also, a lot of the land is privately owned, so you’d have a hard time finding anywhere that would even fall into the permitted wild camping areas.

This link says that the fine for illegal wild camping can be up to 5000 euros!

If you are just looking for a place to camp for free but not necessarily wild, this article has recommendations.
I’d avoid making a fire while wild camping in Spain. The locals might turn a blind eye to wild campers in some areas, but the risk of forest fire is very real and the fire will likely quickly attract police!"
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Below is a post I had made before, so maybe this will give you some direction in investigating this.

Without knowing their legal status for use, there has never been a point, while walking along any of 'stages' of either the Frances or the Ingles, where I did not spot many different places for a cold camp with a small tent. Given my backpacking background, doing a spot check for such sites was sort of a game that I would play in my mind toward the end of a walking day.

I would also consider making inquiry at the local police station or town office, if possible. Check out the availability of using a church or alburgues garden or yard area (if there is someone to talk with).

If water is an issue, no biggie. When you get to the end of the day, fill up on 2 or more liters of water at the last large water source you think will be available. . bar, water fountain, a friendly home, etc. In the morning, dump out all water not used except for the .5 to 1 liter amount you'd normally carry. If you do plan to camp, then there are extremely lightweight and collapsible water containers you can stuff in your pack until needed.


-----------------------------------------

Wild camping in Spain is complicated. There is a “mother law” Article 46.1 of the order for July 28th which states that:

The law also states that it is prohibited to free camp within 200 meters of the sea, within a few kilometers of military installations, within a few kilometers of a regular camp site, and in protected areas like national parks, natural parks, bird sanctuaries called ‘ZEPA’s, (Zona Excepcional de Protección de Avifauna), etc.
However, there is the new law under the Spanish Constitution of 1978, which created seventeen ‘autonomous regions’ each with considerable, though varying, powers to make their own legal codes with their own territory.

Under these new laws, wild camping in Spain is COMPLETELY PROHIBITED in: Andalucía, Aragón, Asturias, Extremadura, Galicia, Navarra, Valencia. These areas have their own laws/permit requirements for wild camping: Cantabria, Murcia, La Rioja.

These areas fall under national rules and wild camping IS permitted: Basque Country, Cataluña, Madrid, Castilla y León, Castilla la Mancha. But in these areas you still can’t camp near the beach, in national parks, protected areas, etc. Also, a lot of the land is privately owned, so you’d have a hard time finding anywhere that would even fall into the permitted wild camping areas.

You can read more about wild camping in Spain here. In the linked article, it says that the fine for illegal camping is 30 euros per square meter of space used, per day. However, this link says that the fine is up to 5000 euros!

If you are just looking for a place to camp for free but not necessarily wild, this article has recommendations.
I’d avoid making a fire while wild camping in Spain. The locals might turn a blind eye to wild campers in some areas, but the risk of forest fire is very real and the fire will likely quickly attract police!"
Great information, Dave. On the Norte, specifically, I saw several times men who were camping on the porches/overhangs of small chapels along the way. It reminded me of "olden times". Not sure if legal, but I thought it wonderful...the church originally being used to help pilgrims to stay out of the elements on their way to Santiago.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
What then is the definition of camping, for our purposes?

If I bed down in a bivy sack on the porch of a church, under a bench in a rest area, or in a small wooded area out of sight, am I considered to be camping or simply a vagabond/vagrant?

No fire, no cooking, leave no trace.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
What then is the definition of camping, for our purposes?

If I bed down in a bivy sack on the porch of a church, under a bench in a rest area, or in a small wooded area out of sight, am I considered to be camping or simply a vagabond/vagrant?

No fire, no cooking, leave no trace.
A great questiom, @Northern Light, and I do not have tbe answer...if there even is one...
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
What then is the definition of camping, for our purposes?

If I bed down in a bivy sack on the porch of a church, under a bench in a rest area, or in a small wooded area out of sight, am I considered to be camping or simply a vagabond/vagrant?

No fire, no cooking, leave no trace.
For "camping" as used as a legal term by the Spanish government, my thought is to consider only the definitions that are given in the primary statute, which seems to cover sleeping outdoors in proximity to urban and municipal areas.

For porch sleeping, and other informal park-bench style occupancies, I would look at what Spain considers vagabonds, hobos, homeless, or other municipal area sleep-outs. Properties that are privately owned or publicly maintained within a local urban jurisdiction, like churches, fire or emergency stations, alburgues, other lodgings may be allowed to determine who they can 'host' and in what fashion when it comes to itinerants whether Pilgrim or non-pilgrim.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
For "camping" as used as a legal term by the Spanish government, my thought is to consider only the definitions that are given in the primary statute, which seems to cover sleeping outdoors in proximity to urban and municipal areas.

For porch sleeping, and other informal park-bench style occupancies, I would look at what Spain considers vagabonds, hobos, homeless, or other municipal area sleep-outs. Properties that are privately owned or publicly maintained within a local urban jurisdiction, like churches, fire or emergency stations, alburgues, other lodgings may be allowed to determine who they can 'host' and in what fashion when it comes to itinerants whether Pilgrim or non-pilgrim.
"The plot thickens." 😄
 

TMcA

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
I am not an expert on European norms, but I think Western Europeans are more compliant with norms and regulations (like prohibitions against wild camping) than Americans. So it kind of boils down to can you do this and get away with it or get away with it most of the time? Even if the answer to each of these questions is yes, you would still be transgressing and behaving like a scofflaw visitor in a foreign country. BTW I don't think most Americans are sensitized to this unless they have lived in Western Europe or have spent a lot of time there.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I am not an expert on European norms, but I think Western Europeans are more compliant with norms and regulations (like prohibitions against wild camping) than Americans. So it kind of boils down to can you do this and get away with it or get away with it most of the time? Even if the answer to each of these questions is yes, you would still be transgressing and behaving like a scofflaw visitor in a foreign country. BTW I don't think most Americans are sensitized to this unless they have lived in Western Europe or have spent a lot of time there.
Are you assuming that all wild camping along the Caminos is illegal, based on Spanish laws? Just checking, because that is not what I understand from reading the legal limitations and prohibitions (such as prohibition of open fires)
 

TMcA

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
@davebugg Based on your own post, in Navarra and Galicia it is prohibited. And people do camp, with permission, on property adjacent to some albergues and perhaps in the occasional, rare campground.

I don't think that is what the op was asking about...
are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp?
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
@davebugg Based on your own post, in Navarra and Galicia it is prohibited. And people do camp, with permission, on property adjacent to some albergues and perhaps in the occasional, rare campground.

I don't think that is what the op was asking about...
I do not disagree with what you stated.

It is worth noting that the laws are not applicable to private properties within Navarra or Galicia, only for the government owned lands. Camping on private properties may be allowed, although such use can be regulated by local jurisdictions. This can mean that an individual wanting to camp on private property, may need to obtain permission to do so.

Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp?
I did take the OP's question to mean if a 'legal' camp could be made, which is why I answered the way that I did; as a way of pointing out that wild camping, legally, can be a bit complex for anyone to give a simple "yes" or "no" as an answer.

As we know, there are quite a few who do camp out along the various routes. As to whether they have done so legally, I do not know. . . maybe or maybe not. I do echo your concern that it is important to not just follow the 'letter' of the law, especially as foreign visitors, but also the 'spirit of the laws.

Some others may have run into Americans who have wild camped, whether legal or not. I haven't, yet. When I've stopped to rest or chat, it seemed that it was mostly Europeans doing the camping, usually long distance wanderers seeming to 'live' along the various Caminos.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I think davebugg has pretty well got it covered. Certainly I camped most nights the first time I walked the Norte, and not often on official campsites. As to permission, when there was someone to ask, I did so. I was refused sometimes, not often but it did happen. The approach to Lugo was the worst for that. I ended up with Dalie at a riding stables (proteccion civile helped here) and I was in the shiny new albergue several km away n the town centre with a lot of shiny new pilgrims just starting. Who probably didn't appreciate me trying to creep in at curfew, with a bocadillo and a bottle of wine in my hand, the first things I had eaten all day apart from a croissant given to me by the proteccion civile. I ate my luxurious supper in the corridor by torchlight. I'd left everything apart from sleeping bag at the riding stables. The lights went out on the dot of 22.00. I would have preferred sleeping in the straw with my donkey, who wouldnt have kicked me out unwashed without breakfast at 07:30.
Then of course I had to find the stables. That was an interesting taxi ride. Apparently there are two riding stables near (ish) to Lugo. All part of life's rich sweet tapestry I suppose, the sort of thing that never happens to the well organised and regulated pilgrim. Not that I ever was.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I've never understood why there are not more campsites, particularly along the Frances. I'm sure many would prefer to use them in the summer, and maybe help alleviate the bed race.
I imagine opening a campsite would be easier than an albergue as you only need a small field or garden, with a tap and a composting toilet. A hot shower would be welcome but not essential.

I wild camped every night along the Frances without any problems, but it was a different world back then.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
I've never understood why there are not more campsites, particularly along the Frances. I'm sure many would prefer to use them in the summer, and maybe help alleviate the bed race.
I imagine opening a campsite would be easier than an albergue as you only need a small field or garden, with a tap and a composting toilet. A hot shower would be welcome but not essential.

I wild camped every night along the Frances without any problems, but it was a different world back then.
How economically viable would these campsites be? Are you catering for a couple of pilgrims a day, a week, a month? Don't forget that, for the most part, the Caminos are not particularly touristy (save the main centres like Burgos, Leon etc.) so you're not going to get a lot of passing traffic other than pilgrim walkers and cyclists.

I'm sure that Spain, like most European countries I've camped/campervaned in, have regulations as to sanitation etc. of campsite so would the effort of complying with the bureaucracy be worth the financial return?
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
How economically viable would these campsites be?

I'm sure that Spain, like most European countries I've camped/campervaned in, have regulations as to sanitation etc. of campsite so would the effort of complying with the bureaucracy be worth the financial return?
I'd imagine that they could be as economically viable as an albergue, and I don't see why there would be any more regulations to open a basic campsite compared to an albergue. Even in the U.K we have some very basic sites with just a cold water tap and composting or basic toilet.
Obviously it all depends on how many pilgrims would want to camp which if there was a network then I'd imagine then probably quite a few, I certainly would. And it would also help solve any problems with wild camping. Most wild campers would quite happily pay for a safe basic site if the had the choice. So there would be potentially a steady supply of pilgrims without the need for extra tourists. They would be just open air albergues.
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
Back in the late 1970s, we wild camped in northern Spain on a couple of holidays, including various places around the route of the Camino Frances. We had no idea as to whether it was legal or not - I doubt that it entered our young heads at all. Generally, things went well and we had some superb campsites, though I do recall having to share a couple when, near dusk, a VW camper van turned up.

On one extremely memorable occasion though, things did not go smoothly. It was dark and we were about to retire to bed. I was behind a bush when the Guardia turned up. Headlights blazed from their car as I tried to hastily pull my trousers back up. They approached with guns ready until I emerged from the bushes at which point it all became amicable. They even wished us a good night's sleep.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
If tenting becomes more popular along the Camino, I hope campers follow "leave no trace" guidelines. Education reinforcing good practices (like how to properly dispose of waste 💩) will be key.

The Camino Frances, in particular, is a narrow corridor, and we need to keep the support of the local residents by being respectful. It is frustrating to see soiled toilet paper, cigarette butts, and pilgrim trash along sections of the Camino. :mad:

I'm hopeful that it can work. I met a handful of pilgrims on the GR65 from Le Puy to St. Jean-Pied-de-Port (Camino Podiensis) who preferred tenting over the albergues. 👍
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
For the sake of fellow pilgrims and people in the bars and cafes along the way, I think that some kind of showering facilites woukd be essential! 😉
Obviously hot showers would be nice, and most sites probably would have them, but as long as there's water they're not essential, to keeping clean.
 

Kosmos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2017
Last year a couple did the Camino del Norte camping, sometimes in campsites and other times wherever

 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Last year a couple did the Camino del Norte camping, sometimes in campsites and other times wherever
The main concern about camping seems to be about the 'wherever' part. Camping itself is not the problem. It is fairly easy to locate a spot to set up an overnight camp. The problem comes from making sure that a camping spot is legal to use.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
I spent 35 days at sea in a small yacht in 2000 (actually did break this down to France to Madeira, Madeira to Brazil with a re supply in Madeira). 150 litres of water each leg for two of us for all purposes other than drinking. Sea water for flushing the toilet. We didn't wash other than face and hands. Hair wash once a week in salt water with a 1.5 litre bottle of drinking water to rinse off the salt. Wet wipes. We didn't stink. Showers are not essential to life. When camping it is considered acceptable to wash in cold water when the weather is warm. When the weather is cold then wet wipes.
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Times may have changed due to the virus, but just last year a lot of popular tourist meccas were complaining vociferously about the negative impact of hordes of visitors overrunning everything. It seems to me that camping -- especially outside the very rare designated campsites -- risks offending even more locals. I know that if I owned a farm in the countryside I'd be pretty unhappy to see an unauthorized tent in the pasture. From my experience on the Frances, Portuguese and Sanabres I can recall very few places where one could camp without being sure you aren't setting up on someone's private property -- and (excuse me) where are you going to sh#t, a point rather delicately avoided in the discussions above? And lastly, it seems to me that if you are wealthy enough to afford a trip to Spain you ought to be willing to contribute a little more to support a weak and recovering economy. I've done some backpacking and wilderness camping -- Inca Trail, Kokoda Trail, and West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island inter alia, but those places were mostly or totally uninhabited and it was necessary. That is most definitely NOT the case along the various caminos. In short I think camping is miserly, insensitive to local feelings and property rights, and conducive to giving all of us a bad name. It's hard to believe that on the same forum where hard-up albergues are begging for financial support there are those who advocate paying nothing at all for the priceless privilege of using the caminos.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
What then is the definition of camping, for our purposes?

If I bed down in a bivy sack on the porch of a church, under a bench in a rest area, or in a small wooded area out of sight, am I considered to be camping or simply a vagabond/vagrant?

No fire, no cooking, leave no trace.
Oh come ON - thats easy! You are simply a camping vagabond vagrant! 😂

On a serious note - I would tend to agree with the posts that advocate doing it legally (i.e. either go into an established camp site if one exists or ask permission if planning to do it on private land).
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Times may have changed due to the virus, but just last year a lot of popular tourist meccas were complaining vociferously about the negative impact of hordes of visitors overrunning everything. It seems to me that camping -- especially outside the very rare designated campsites -- risks offending even more locals. I know that if I owned a farm in the countryside I'd be pretty unhappy to see an unauthorized tent in the pasture. From my experience on the Frances, Portuguese and Sanabres I can recall very few places where one could camp without being sure you aren't setting up on someone's private property -- and (excuse me) where are you going to sh#t, a point rather delicately avoided in the discussions above? And lastly, it seems to me that if you are wealthy enough to afford a trip to Spain you ought to be willing to contribute a little more to support a weak and recovering economy. I've done some backpacking and wilderness camping -- Inca Trail, Kokoda Trail, and West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island inter alia, but those places were mostly or totally uninhabited and it was necessary. That is most definitely NOT the case along the various caminos. In short I think camping is miserly, insensitive to local feelings and property rights, and conducive to giving all of us a bad name. It's hard to believe that on the same forum where hard-up albergues are begging for financial support there are those who advocate paying nothing at all for the priceless privilege of using the caminos.
@mikebet
Yes I have given donations to accommodations along the camino that host pilgrims. But I may still consider taking a bivy and a camping mattress with me to spend the night if the place where I planned to stay is not open when I go past. This may need to be part of my planning for the immediate future of the caminos, as some accommodations close and the remaining places to sleep are too far apart for older pilgrims (me).
 

anthikes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP > SdC
2018 Porto > SdC
2019 Sevilla > SdC
I have always carried a tent as it only weighs the same as a litre of water. Have camped many times in aalbergue back yards and gardens, also on private land with permission.

It's entirely viable and a good option in light of what's happening with the virus.
 

Bob from L.A. !

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
Just out of curiosity has anyone had any interactions with the gardia when camping along any camino ? What are the penalties? (or do they just tell you to get up and go?)
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
It seems we need a thread about camping in legally, established campsites, with paid services and amenities. Otherwise, the talk will be muddled forever with the endless discussion about wild camping.
For the record, I would not object being charged in a good campsite a tarif similar to the usual in a private albergue. My current interest is not about saving a few euros.
 

CWBuff

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
in Planning stage: Frances (SJPdP --> SdC) & Finisterre "2021" ... (GOD WILLING!)
Just out of curiosity has anyone had any interactions with the gardia when camping along any camino ? What are the penalties? (or do they just tell you to get up and go?)
Look at some previous posts on this thread
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I spent 35 days at sea in a small yacht in 2000 (actually did break this down to France to Madeira, Madeira to Brazil with a re supply in Madeira). We didn't stink.
You did. You just didn't notice what all the others noticed :) I have been a (leisure) sailor, crossing oceans, for decades. Been there, done that. But I agree with you to some extent: it is doable to go with less. :cool:
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
It seems we need a thread about camping in legally, established campsites, with paid services and amenities.
I would further refine that as existing, legally established campsites. Or of camping places that are currently being proposed and are under construction or development. Otherwise it becomes a discussion that is more 'wish list' than 'resource' :)

I have seen at least one place, essentially an empty lot in a village, where the owner posted a sign that allowed overnight camping. I'll see if I can find that. Perhaps the new thread that Felipe proposes could be a resource list.
 

Don Camillo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17,
Ruta de la Lana 09/18
The trick to stealth camping is to bed down late evening and be away very early and leave no trace. It also helps not to advertise where you are or by making it overwhelmingly obvious. I used to work in policing and one of the common maxims was along the lines of "if you do not see there is a problem then generally there isn't one" (mostly at the end of a shift) - that also applies to the impact your behaviour has on local people as in " if they do not see or have any consequences to your actions they are less likely to involve policia locale or Civil. I would suggest fires are a definite no no.
I also do not advocate tents as they are too visible and more of an imposition that would not allow anyone to simply turn a blind eye. Bivvy bags are better as they go under the radar and even in half light almost invisible. I also reckoned on a 2 nights out 1 night in rule of thumb figuring that 2 nights roughing it freed up money to spend in a hostel. It also completely opens up camino stages as you are not bound by daily goals and can stop where and when you like. Albergue full - no problem keep on walking till you find somewhere discrete and put the mat out.
A flip side to this is, and has to be, safety. I always let my partner know where I am bivvied out and text in the morning. Never had a problem but you need to be situationally aware when choosing a site and mindful of your surroundings. Plus take enough water to last the night and have a fix on where that first coffee is to be found in the morning.
Don
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
The trick to stealth camping is to bed down late evening and be away very early and leave no trace. It also helps not to advertise where you are or by making it overwhelmingly obvious. I used to work in policing and one of the common maxims was along the lines of "if you do not see there is a problem then generally there isn't one" (mostly at the end of a shift) - that also applies to the impact your behaviour has on local people as in " if they do not see or have any consequences to your actions they are less likely to involve policia locale or Civil. I would suggest fires are a definite no no.
I also do not advocate tents as they are too visible and more of an imposition that would not allow anyone to simply turn a blind eye. Bivvy bags are better as they go under the radar and even in half light almost invisible. I also reckoned on a 2 nights out 1 night in rule of thumb figuring that 2 nights roughing it freed up money to spend in a hostel. It also completely opens up camino stages as you are not bound by daily goals and can stop where and when you like. Albergue full - no problem keep on walking till you find somewhere discrete and put the mat out.
A flip side to this is, and has to be, safety. I always let my partner know where I am bivvied out and text in the morning. Never had a problem but you need to be situationally aware when choosing a site and mindful of your surroundings. Plus take enough water to last the night and have a fix on where that first coffee is to be found in the morning.
Don
If an area or site allows legal camping, then there is no need for 'stealth camping' as a means to escape observation by legal authorities. :)
 

Don Camillo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17,
Ruta de la Lana 09/18
My point was that if you attract attention then you generally receive it. I always thought that wild camping in Spain was illegal (although in Pyrenees there are exceptions I think). I did walk for a couple of day with a policia locale from Barcelona and I asked him about it. His view was also that it was illegal but that unless you were way out of order you were unlikely to be troubled by law enforcement.To be honest I cannot recall any campsites along any of the caminos I have walked so I guess the question of legality is academic. Unlike UK though plently of open space and "wilderness" areas.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
My point was that if you attract attention then you generally receive it. I always thought that wild camping in Spain was illegal (although in Pyrenees there are exceptions I think). I did walk for a couple of day with a policia locale from Barcelona and I asked him about it. His view was also that it was illegal but that unless you were way out of order you were unlikely to be troubled by law enforcement.To be honest I cannot recall any campsites along any of the caminos I have walked so I guess the question of legality is academic. Unlike UK though plently of open space and "wilderness" areas.
The legality is not academic. . it is either legal, or not. One can choose to ignore the law with a variety of rationalizations, but such rationalizations are not justifications for illicit behavior. I object to the encouragement of illegal camping, regardless of how it is camouflaged and wrapped, as a discussion on this Forum.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
We have an issue in New Zealand with "Freedom Camping", and one of the benefits of the Covid 19 lockdown has that the ban has been policed - forcing these campers to move on to campgrounds and fining them if they persist, resulting in the people who live in these areas, petitioning to have the ban on these campers policed permanently.
The Covid situation has brought out a strong sense of wanting keeping the environment clean in communities.
Only self contained vans are permitted to 'freedom camp" tents and non-fitted vans are not. The emphasis is on being self-contained.
The culprits are often basic van campers, sometimes with tents, travelling on the cheap, who leave a huge and unsanitary mess behind them. There are of course proper camping grounds around as well which do have facilities, these people are avoiding the camp fees.
Some campers do clean up after themselves, but evidence shows that most of them do not.
I dont believe people would behave any differently in Spain (our wild campers are mainly from other countries), people are people. The odd one would be conscientious and leave no trace, others would not care.

On another note, last year the numbers we met that started at Sarria seemed to have increased from my previous Camino 2 years earlier.
Most of these people carried very tiny daypacks. I have a suspicion that carrying a larger pack with everything to allow camping, would not be so appealing.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
We have an issue in New Zealand with "Freedom Camping", and one of the benefits of the Covid 19 lockdown has that the ban has been policed - forcing these campers to move on to campgrounds and fining them if they persist, resulting in the people who live in these areas, petitioning to have the ban on these campers policed permanently.
The Covid situation has brought out a strong sense of wanting keeping the environment clean in communities.
Only self contained vans are permitted to 'freedom camp" tents and non-fitted vans are not. The emphasis is on being self-contained.
The culprits are often basic van campers, sometimes with tents, travelling on the cheap, who leave a huge and unsanitary mess behind them. There are of course proper camping grounds around as well which do have facilities, these people are avoiding the camp fees.
Some campers do clean up after themselves, but evidence shows that most of them do not.
I dont believe people would behave any differently in Spain (our wild campers are mainly from other countries), people are people. The odd one would be conscientious and leave no trace, others would not care.

On another note, last year the numbers we met that started at Sarria seemed to have increased from my previous Camino 2 years earlier.
Most of these people carried very tiny daypacks. I have a suspicion that carrying a larger pack with everything to allow camping, would not be so appealing.
@Anamiri:
Only once in my life did I practice what you call "freedom camping" and that was in New Zealand, on the last night of the Round the Mountain Track on North Island. I did not get to the hut before sunset and it was too dark to go on, so I set up my bed on the mountain side (no tent or sleeping gear). There was a soft bed of moss next to a stream, very comfortable. But I was cold, too cold to stay asleep. So I slept, woke up to watch the southern stars on that moonless night, then fell asleep again. It was my best night on a trail ever, so beautiful, and my best memory from New Zealand. I do not plan on wild camping on the caminos, but if I need to do so, I want to be minimally prepared to deal safely with the challenges that might arise. If there are legal challenges I shall deal with those too.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
@Anamiri:
Only once in my life did I practice what you call "freedom camping" and that was in New Zealand, on the last night of the Round the Mountain Track on North Island. I did not get to the hut before sunset and it was too dark to go on, so I set up my bed on the mountain side (no tent or sleeping gear). There was a soft bed of moss next to a stream, very comfortable. But I was cold, too cold to stay asleep. So I slept, woke up to watch the southern stars on that moonless night, then fell asleep again. It was my best night on a trail ever, so beautiful, and my best memory from New Zealand. I do not plan on wild camping on the caminos, but if I need to do so, I want to be minimally prepared to deal safely with the challenges that might arise. If there are legal challenges I shall deal with those too.
I think on the whole wilderness trampers (hikers) are not considered too much of a threat to the environment. I'm pretty sure they (mainly) abide by the pack it in -pack it out rule - although I have encountered the remains of food sachets and plastic bags in the middle of no-where, so some do not care. Ive also found the remains of fires in the bush and by beaches in fire-ban drought seasons, where the no-fire signs were clearly obvious.
Their volumes are quite low compared to something like the Camino Frances. I think anywhere you have to walk with some length and difficulty to reach, reduces the amount of people prepared to go there.
Our issue is the sheer numbers of people stealth camping in rest areas beside roads, or easily accessed beach-sides. Often these areas are equipped with at best a picnic table, usually nothing. And the people staying there are doing so because it is free.
Here's an example that bugs me:
On the harbour opposite my cottage up north is a long beach that extends for walking for many kms, and in the summer people are sometimes found sleeping overnight . Sometimes I row my dog and I over for a different walk - the land owner is my cousin. In summer months, less than 100 metres around the corner from the houses we have found found human faeces, plastic and other rubbish lying on the sand and grass above the high tide mark. Sometimes broken RTD bottles. Boaties often see them packing up their sleeping bags and sneaking back around the corner to the main beach in the morning. (I have heard that the house owners have sometimes let the tyres down of repeat offenders). In summer this occurs many times a week, and my cousin gets pretty angry with the cleanup required. On our side of the harbour there is a legal and cheap camping ground right by the beach. People have made the choice to camp FREE as opposed to legal camping for a modest fee.

But again I think of the Sarria - Santiago region.
How would that region cope if everyone decided to stealth camp. (probably a moot point as I said earlier)
I know the people on this forum probably do respect the land, but I am sadly certain that many people do not.
 

stinmd

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
Yes I did this back in August/September 2012 brought a Bivi tent with me. Locals will tell u off if they catch u but it's easy to do saves money and makes it more of an adventure. (I think it maybe illegal or really frowned upon - because you don't pay anyone or ask permission) However I feel, If u clean up after yourself then there is no trace u even there. Bonus - beautiful clear night sky with the moon and stars
Put it this way: Would you let strangers camp in your backyard even if they promise to clean up afterwards?
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
I always let people camp in my garden! I sometimes stop cyclists/walkers when I'm out and ASK if they have somewhere in mind - cos they are welcome at ours!! In the UK it is lawful to allow 'paid' camping for 28 days a year without any permissions from 'authority' and free camping......unlimited!
On a Camino or other long trip involving feet or bicycle I always camp - wildly most of the time! Leave no trace and there is no problem. It is almost impossible to find out who owns a particular field or tiny plot of land - anywhere is Europe for sure! I have tried - and failed - and whenever anyone is around to ask or enquire if they know who owns it - they always say - oh just go ahead, no-one will mind - are you sure you will be ok? Sometimes I have been dragged off into someones garden or they come back to me with food, water or wine...! Most people are good people and appreciate that everyone has to sleep for a while... the world will not stop turning because someone lies down on god's/God's/goddesses (insert as appropriate!) ground then gets up and starts walking again at dawn.....
I have been doing this every year since I was 10 months old (obviously my parents had the same ideas...!) now I am 54 (how did that happen!) and I am still waiting for someone to say - 'no - you cannot camp here...' hopefully they never will.... I certainly would never begrudge someone somewhere to sleep.....!
 

Paladina

old woman of the roads
Camino(s) past & future
CF, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles etc (2018), Mozarabe etc (2019), tbc (2020)
Put it this way: Would you let strangers camp in your backyard even if they promise to clean up afterwards?
Yes, I would and I do. I had about 20 cycle tourists stay here last year, either inside the house or camping in the garden, all strangers when they arrived and friends when they left.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Land is precious to the landowner along the Francés and maybe some will get away with camping in the open , but if unpopular, and if any item remain, it will rub off on the rest of the crowd.
Along the Via de la Plata there are plenty of signs : Coto Privado de Caza and other signs that warn of hunting & hunting with dogs !!
It is more polite to at least ask if possible.....
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
There is a member on the forum that spent every night camping while walking the'Frances'.
Yes , It is not legal and most of the time there is not a land owner to be seen to ask for permission. I usually take a fair size tent and use it just a few times - I then leave it in a prominent spot for other Pilgrims to enjoy. I must say that a few nights under the stars does satisfy the yearn for solitude and camping is an adventure all on its own.
Here are a few of my secret spots - The first is just before the Alto del Pérdon sculpture Even though it is right next to the path one cannot see it. The second spot is in the garden of an Albergue in Puente La Reina - I paid the going rate of €5. I made use of all the facilities but there were restrictions - The Albergue door was locked at night and I was hounded to pack my tent and leave in the morning , there is a price to pay for conformity. Third is an amazing abandoned picnic spot near Ventosa which can no longer seen now on the edge of a new vineyard.
Continuous camping would be exhausting to say the least. Hope you have a cracking time whatever you decide .a.jpgaaaaaa.jpgaa.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Yes , It is not legal and most of the time there is not a land owner to be seen to ask for permission.
And that, in my mind, is the crux of the issue in all of the posts discussing illegal camping. Discussions about if and where it is legal are one thing. Postings on how to get away with plainly illegal behavior, if not a violation of Forum rules, should be.

This isn't an issue of 'can I get away with illegal camping'. Sure, it can be done, and quite easily; just as one can get away with a lot of things.

"But, officer, a lot of people talked about how they did stealth camping on Caminodesantiago.me"
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
People state it is illegal to camp - in the uk and in Spain, people will quote they have found this or that law - but quite often if you then look up the actual letter of the law - it is not illegal. Many laws are framed so that if a social behaviour is deemed to be a problem, steps can be taken to stop it, but in the normal course of events it is not taken to be illegal. This is why in Spain (and France, Greece etc) many people have had policemen show them to a discreet place to camp - even though a law of that country could be used to stop camping - if appropriate.... In the UK there are many times when you can march against or for something in the streets and make your views heard - but if the powers that be decide - they can deem it illegal - tell you to disperse and if you don't - you would then be breaking the law. It is a good way to use the law - utilise it IF there IS a problem, but if there is no problem, then 'no problem!'
So if the guardians of law and order are able to accept this.....?
With wild camping there would never be more than a small amount of people who are either willing to put up with that basic form of accommodation - or (and this is a point widely ignored by the wealthier folk it seems!) too poor to have any other option. Even the poorest feel a need to go on pilgrimage, take a holiday - or just get away from the 'slings and arrows' for a while. Maybe those who denigrate other peoples choice of mode of travel should read Satish Kumar or others of the many who have travelled the world or part of it with little or no funds - but a heart full of compassion and love - which (imho) is far more use in the world than our topsy turvy economic system.... Most people travel with adequate or excessive funds and that is great for the places they spend their cash... but there are many travellers who give their time, their attention and their prayer to others that is just as valid and needed. Of course there will always be a few selfish freeloaders - but they are a minimum and will probably grow and change in time....
There is space for us all - and we all have something to give....😀
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I'm glad I come from Scotland that has always been very accepting of wild camping, and which has been for the past few years legally lawful. Previously it had been neither legal or illegal just always accepted and no need for a law either way, as most respected each others rights. Therefore being brought up in that society I find it impossible to comprehend how anyone would deny a person to sleep outside, (something that would be legal if it was light but not after dark), never mind consider it a crime.
I just wonder if the Spanish people think of it as such a problem or illegal or whether it is as it is in the rest of U.K, where although technically illegal, it is not a crime that the police can do anything about, and where very few would consider it to be wrong or would try to move you on,

However at the end of the day it's up to Spanish [EDIT or any other country that the pilgrimage to Santiago passes through] to decide and for us to abide or not. I see no benefit in debating it.
It would be more beneficial to pilgrims to have information on places that you could legally camp, particularly along the Frances.
I know there is/was a campsite in SJPdP that I stayed at and from a quick look at google maps there seems to be campsites near Roncesvalles , Pamplona, Estella, Logrono, Burgos, Ponferrada, Sarria, and Santiago I don't know anything about them but I'm sure others might and could give their thoughts on these well as a list of Albergues with gardens or outdoor spaces that allow camping, which would help those who would prefer to camp for whatever reason.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
People state it is illegal to camp
I haven't read that. I have read, and in my own posted research have found, that 'wild' or 'stealth' camping is illegal in some defined areas.

Many laws are framed so that if a social behaviour is deemed to be a problem, steps can be taken to stop it, but in the normal course of events it is not taken to be illegal.
In some cases, a police officer may find mitigating reasons to not arrest or cite someone, but that does not mean that they are doing an enforcement nullification of an existing law.

If
there are laws that give the police the defined option to not enforce that law, then that is stated in that law. So the relevant question is, does that option exist within the legal prohibitions attached to wild camping?

With wild camping there would never be more than a small amount of people who are either willing to put up with that basic form of accommodation - or (and this is a point widely ignored by the wealthier folk it seems!) too poor to have any other option.
You are arguing that extenuating circumstances make it acceptable to have discussions on how to violate established law. The issues you raised are not behind the discussions in this thread. The issues have primarily centered around personal choices as a preference. . . apart from issues of affluence or poverty.

I would also point out that the laws in Spain about 'wild camping' DO define specific limits to the number of users per site WHERE 'wild camping' is allowed.

Maybe those who denigrate other peoples choice of mode of travel
You have tried to frame the argument as an attack on people, but it really isn't. What has been written in this thread are posts which both support, and disapprove of, illegal behavior.

I would suggest that there is a distinction between advocacy to support the change of laws that pertain to wild camping in order to incorporate your concerns, versus actively providing information on how to violate existing laws.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
If there are laws that give the police the defined option to not enforce that law, then that is stated in that law. So the relevant question is, does that option exist within the legal prohibitions attached to wild camping?

You are arguing that extenuating circumstances make it acceptable to have discussions on how to violate established law. The issues you raised are not behind the discussions in this thread. The issues have primarily centered around personal choices as a preference. . . apart from issues of affluence or poverty.
I didn't see the post in quite the same light. I saw the post as speculating whether camping laws in Spain might be like "public nuisance" laws in other countries. The suggestion was that these laws don't make an activity (like gathering in public) illegal per se, but rather only make it illegal when it becomes a nuisance. So it isn't a question of giving the police an option not to enforce a law against an illegal activity, but rather flexibility around when that activity is actually illegal, and leaving it completely legal until it becomes a nuisance.

Personally, I don't know if the laws against camping in Spain are framed that way. Neither, I think, is hecate105, who just seemed to be speculating that they might be so framed and, if so, wind camping might not be as illegal as was being presented. In that light, I'm not so sure it was a case of advocating for people to disregard laws and act illegally, but rather look carefully at the laws to determine what is illegal.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I didn't see the post in quite the same light. I saw the post as speculating whether camping laws in Spain might be like "public nuisance" laws in other countries. The suggestion was that these laws don't make an activity (like gathering in public) illegal per se, but rather only make it illegal when it becomes a nuisance. So it isn't a question of giving the police an option not to enforce a law against an illegal activity, but rather flexibility around when that activity is actually illegal, and leaving it completely legal until it becomes a nuisance.

Personally, I don't know if the laws against camping in Spain are framed that way. Neither, I think, is hecate105, who just seemed to be speculating that they might be so framed and, if so, wind camping might not be as illegal as was being presented. In that light, I'm not so sure it was a case of advocating for people to disregard laws and act illegally, but rather look carefully at the laws to determine what is illegal.
Admittedly, I am illiterate in the reading and writing of Spanish, so when reading the various laws and legislation, needed to depend on translation apps. There may have been nuances that I was not able to read.

Given that it seemed the legislation took pains to define specific terminology and locations of application, which is often done to narrow flexible or broad interpretations of how enforcement is applied, I did not view it as a threshold nuisance type of law.

For example, situations where wild camping - - if not prohibited based on location (near military bases, within certain distances to some beach areas, etc) - - was allowed DID state the number of tents allowed at a site. It made the laws appear to be more concretely defined than typical examples of nuisance laws.

As I said up top, I read the translation of the wording of the relevant laws, and perhaps that means I am not correctly reading the intent of the law.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I think that we have adequately presented to the forum members the fact that camping is not legal in many places and circumstances in Spain, but that any casual observer will see that it is sometimes practiced.

Perhaps we should leave it to the forum members to pursue their detailed research and hire legal teams as appropriate.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I think that we have adequately presented to the forum members the fact that camping is not legal in many places and circumstances in Spain, but that any casual observer will see that it is sometimes practiced.

Perhaps we should leave it to the forum members to pursue their detailed research and hire legal teams as appropriate.
Got it. Ok. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Going back to the OP's question, for me the answer is yes.
I have camped or "slept out" several times on various routes of the Camino - sometimes in the yard of an albergue or church, once on the VDLP in a closed hotel patio - sometimes in a quiet out of the way place. As to its legality, I honestly don't know but what I DO know is that I've been in a situation where a woman showed up at the albergue late and there were no beds and the hospitalera directed her to a nearby churchyard, after allowing her to use the shower and kitchen.That night there was more than person sleeping out. I've seen people camping out in several gite or albergue yards, with permission. Zubiri, San Anton, and Roncesvalles come to mind. I suggest you set up late and leave early, leaving no trace. I also suggest you walk THROUGH a village, buy your food, and camp on the other side. I've met many people camping, and none have been harassed by those in charge. I agree that a bivey would be a better choice than a tent. Joe and I have carried a screen tent, which is super lightweight, and a good choice for summer walking when no rain is expected. I think as long as you are respectful, ask permission when it's appropriate, and leave no trace, you'll be fine.
 

allykat

Camino Hopeful
Camino(s) past & future
(2013) 6/19-7/31 CF/Fisterra
(2021) 6/16-7/31 CF/Fisterra
I know it was possible. Back in 2013 two young kids (early twenties), a brother and sister, from an Eastern European country I can't quite remember were on the Camino and joined our familia, but they only had about 300Euro between the two of them for the whole trip from SJPDP to Santiago. They had a little tent and while we'd often involve them in our meals and socializing, they'd always finish the night by walking just a bit further and camping down somewhere. I never did see where but they made it to Santiago safe and sound, were a very respectful couple of kids and I never could tell where they camped because they never left a trace.

My only experience with "camping" was the day I made it to Portomarin and originally my intention was to eat with my faster walking friends and then head a few more miles up to Gonzar (or beyond) to find a place for the night so I'd have a bit of a head start on them. I was also contemplating *not* staying in the big towns anymore, so as to get a more personal experience on my Camino.

But the wine and talk ran long and people convinced me I should stay in Portomarin. Now, I knew that there'd be no beds left by then, but at 8pm they wandered me around trying to find room at any albergue. No room at the inn so I finally convinced them to let me continue walking. Passed by a few guys with a hammock cooking dinner who offered I join them, and I politely declined.

There is a large wood inbetween Gonzar and Portomarin and as I got to it I saw the moon was high and the trail was quite dark and I was tired, so I pulled out my mat and sleeping bag and zipped my coat up tight and rested awhile staring at the moon in what I later found out used to be an open air brothel! It wasn't an easy nights sleep, but as the first pilgrims neared I quickly re-packed my bag and started my walk for the day.

Not sure if that counts as "camping" but it was probably illegal and probably the most interesting night of my camino!
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Camping - short word; lots of argument. As a kid I spent much time in ex-army Bell tents; Benders (cut some Hazel stakes, bend them into a tunnel shape, throw some hides or a tarpaulin over) or the occasional Vango - none of which are recommended for the Caminos. On Camino I've spent nights in Church porches, barns, hedgerows, not overly derelict buildings and even underneath a bench in a bar which was still open when I awoke the following morning. I don't carry a tent - to much weight - but I do carry a sleeping bag that'll cope with a 0'C night.

The OP asked: "Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp?" To which the only realistic answer is "Yes", possibly qualified with a "but". Unfortunately the OP doesn't appear to have returned to the Forum since they posed the question which suggests they weren't that bothered about any possible answers. Meanwhile members have rehearsed the old arguments of practicality, utility and legality. Its good to see a discussion that doesn't involve a bloody virus but a shame its one we've had so many times before.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Camping - short word; lots of argument. As a kid I spent much time in ex-army Bell tents; Benders (cut some Hazel stakes, bend them into a tunnel shape, throw some hides or a tarpaulin over) or the occasional Vango - none of which are recommended for the Caminos. On Camino I've spent nights in Church porches, barns, hedgerows, not overly derelict buildings and even underneath a bench in a bar which was still open when I awoke the following morning. I don't carry a tent - to much weight - but I do carry a sleeping bag that'll cope with a 0'C night.

The OP asked: "Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp?" To which the only realistic answer is "Yes", possibly qualified with a "but". Unfortunately the OP doesn't appear to have returned to the Forum since they posed the question which suggests they weren't that bothered about any possible answers. Meanwhile members have rehearsed the old arguments of practicality, utility and legality. Its good to see a discussion that doesn't involve a bloody virus but a shame its one we've had so many times before.
Perhaps now that there is a specific sub-forum devoted to camping, there will be no rehash of legalities. Those who are concerned with Laws for Wild Camping can avoid that sub-forum altogether. And those who intend to camp, irrespective of legalities, have a unique space to seek help, sans that rehash. :)
 

Rclarke

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving April 6 from SJPP
why do it if its illegal, don't get me wrong there where days when I was younger and dumber, so Im not preaching, if you can afford the donativos or alburgues than use them, the funds will really help the local business's. I see a post about a young couple who tented because they only had 300 eros between them, maybe they shouldn't go until they have a bit more. Or the person who said Im going to tent, not for financial reasons but because Im, a great experienced tenter, maybe do the Appalachian or John Muir trail then. From an earlier post on here the camping ban was installed after a very deadly grass fire caused by a camper, I willing to bet that those who tent when they know they shouldn't are also those that leave waste and garbage in the ditches and bush., and while im on a rant, don't pick grapes off the vine to eat, that's someones livelihood. In other words we are guests in a different country, obey the laws and respect the property.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
why do it if its illegal,
Because it is not illegal in many circumstances, and if people choose to camp legally then they have as much right to walk as anyone else, no matter what their funds. I think you must have forgotten that for many the whole point of the pilgrimage is to travel to the tomb of St James which is not on the Appalachian or John Muir trail.
This is where this forum can educate those wishing to camp or those that think camping is illegal, as to the rules of where/how and when it legal. As long as one knows and abides by the rules, then there is no problem, and that goes for people leaving rubbish, toilet paper, graffiti, picking grapes etc.
I'm glad I walked the Frances when there was little other choice but to camp, cook your own food, no rubbish and a warm welcome.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
I...

I'm hopeful that it can work. I met a handful of pilgrims on the GR65 from Le Puy to St. Jean-Pied-de-Port (Camino Podiensis) who preferred tenting over the albergues. 👍
There seemed to be more campgrounds from Le Puy, and more gîtes listed where camping was welcome.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
There seemed to be more campgrounds from Le Puy, and more gîtes listed where camping was welcome.
I think France is more "camping friendly". I used to follow the blog of an Australian couple who hiked exclusively in France every summer and they always camped at campgrounds on all the many trails...they enjoyed splurging on food and drink rather than lodging.
I loved staying in the gites on the Le Puy route!
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
To see how well it can work to have pilgrims sleeping in tents one only has to look at France. It‘s common there, never witnessed any littering because of it, tent pilgrims still spend money in the local towns and for their camping spots at the gites (albergues).


Easy ways of making the Camino in Spain more tent-friendly, too:

1) If an albergue has the space for tents and allows camping, indicate it at the entrance. Put up a sign „tents welcome“ and a price if you want to. No more need to ask/beg at every place only to be send away at most of them. Albergues have to realize that pilgrims with tents are just the same as others, and no homeless hobos looking for a spot to sleep for free and leaving a mess behind.

2) Include the information about tent-friendly albergues and campsites in the albergue list you get at St Jean. Guide books will follow soon. Miam Miam Do Do for the French part of the Camino / GR 65 for example lists all this. That way you can plan your stages just like everyone else.

3) Create simple „official wild campsites“. Already existing picnic-places for pilgrims could be used for that. Often there‘s already a bench, a bin and a water tap. Add a compost toilet and it‘s perfect. Only thing you need then is someone to come and collect a small fee in the evening. Bonus points if that campsite is close to a town, so that pilgrims can still go for shopping, a meal or a beer and spend the money the locals so desperately need.


That way you have the tent-pilgrims in designated spots, and the whole wild camping debate is irrelevant and everybody's happy.
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Is it possible to walk the camino Frances camping all the way instead of staying in albergues? Yes, it's possible in normal times and there's a small contingent of people who have done it, although most that camp also mix it up with albergues etc. And some of us just carry a light shelter for contingencies that almost never occur.

Is it a viable option to walk the camino Frances camping all the way during the C-19 pandemic, as an alternative to staying in albergues? Not for the foreseeable future.
In a phase where Spain is trying to prevent the spread of the infection, how do you deal with all the daily necessary tasks (eating, drinking, toileting etc) without catching or carrying the infection along the route - for which you'd need to clean everything you touch and maintain social distancing? What do you do in the big cities and when you reach Santiago? And that's assuming people will let you into their shops etc along the way. Consider: where do you relieve yourself if bars are closed?
I guess that anyone considering this is thinking mostly about their personal journey, but it's important to appreciate the Camino as a collective endeavour. What if thousands of people decided to camp all the way? We already know from the litter and effluent that some deposit along the way that not everyone has the same sense of social responsibility - and there'll always be a proportion that just don't care.
If even a small percentage of folks who planned to walk 2020 start to think camping is a viable option for this year, not only will the potential for carrying the infection be dangerous for others, possibly illegal and unlikely to elicit a warm welcome, but the mess along the way will be pretty gruesome too, despoiling the environment for locals and for the rest of us when we return.
People, please just be patient and wait.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
Is it a viable option to walk the camino Frances camping all the way during the C-19 pandemic, as an alternative to staying in albergues? Not for the foreseeable future.........And that's assuming people will let you into their shops.....not only will the potential for carrying the infection be dangerous for others, possibly illegal and unlikely to elicit a warm welcome, but the mess along the way will be pretty gruesome too, despoiling the environment for locals and for the rest of us when we return.
People, please just be patient and wait.
All of the above as well as your other points would apply equally to those using Albergues or other accommodation not just to pilgrims camping.
The only part I might agree with is "please be patient and wait" which I would apply to all.

THE ALBERGUE PILGRIM: Who are ye in rags and rotten shoes, You dirty-bearded, Blocking up the way?
THE CAMPING PILGRIMS: We are the (camping) Pilgrims, master: we shall go. Always a little further
 
Last edited:

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Zubiri, San Anton, and Roncesvalles come to mind.
do you happen to know which albergue in zubiri? san anton is convento de san anton before castrojeriz?
I am updating my list of albergues and campings.
thanks!
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
To see how well it can work to have pilgrims sleeping in tents one only has to look at France. It‘s common there, never witnessed any littering because of it, tent pilgrims still spend money in the local towns and for their camping spots at the gites (albergues).


Easy ways of making the Camino in Spain more tent-friendly, too:

1) If an albergue has the space for tents and allows camping, indicate it at the entrance. Put up a sign „tents welcome“ and a price if you want to. No more need to ask/beg at every place only to be send away at most of them. Albergues have to realize that pilgrims with tents are just the same as others, and no homeless hobos looking for a spot to sleep for free and leaving a mess behind.

2) Include the information about tent-friendly albergues and campsites in the albergue list you get at St Jean. Guide books will follow soon. Miam Miam Do Do for the French part of the Camino / GR 65 for example lists all this. That way you can plan your stages just like everyone else.

3) Create simple „official wild campsites“. Already existing picnic-places for pilgrims could be used for that. Often there‘s already a bench, a bin and a water tap. Add a compost toilet and it‘s perfect. Only thing you need then is someone to come and collect a small fee in the evening. Bonus points if that campsite is close to a town, so that pilgrims can still go for shopping, a meal or a beer and spend the money the locals so desperately need.


That way you have the tent-pilgrims in designated spots, and the whole wild camping debate is irrelevant and everybody's happy.
this is exactly what I have been thinking while updating my list of albergues with the albergues which have been known to allow tent camping and with official campgrounds. the situation is much better then I thought, actually.

I appreciate info on any more albergues that allow tent camping. san bol? san nicolas de puente fitero? poblacion de campos? (there are hammocks there already if I'm not mistaken?)
 

Attachments

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
That's a very useful resource, thank you. Anyone up for doing that for the Norte?
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Is it possible to walk the camino Frances camping all the way instead of staying in albergues? Yes, it's possible in normal times and there's a small contingent of people who have done it, although most that camp also mix it up with albergues etc. And some of us just carry a light shelter for contingencies that almost never occur.

Is it a viable option to walk the camino Frances camping all the way during the C-19 pandemic, as an alternative to staying in albergues? Not for the foreseeable future.
In a phase where Spain is trying to prevent the spread of the infection, how do you deal with all the daily necessary tasks (eating, drinking, toileting etc) without catching or carrying the infection along the route - for which you'd need to clean everything you touch and maintain social distancing? What do you do in the big cities and when you reach Santiago? And that's assuming people will let you into their shops etc along the way. Consider: where do you relieve yourself if bars are closed?
I guess that anyone considering this is thinking mostly about their personal journey, but it's important to appreciate the Camino as a collective endeavour. What if thousands of people decided to camp all the way? We already know from the litter and effluent that some deposit along the way that not everyone has the same sense of social responsibility - and there'll always be a proportion that just don't care.
If even a small percentage of folks who planned to walk 2020 start to think camping is a viable option for this year, not only will the potential for carrying the infection be dangerous for others, possibly illegal and unlikely to elicit a warm welcome, but the mess along the way will be pretty gruesome too, despoiling the environment for locals and for the rest of us when we return.
People, please just be patient and wait.
Absolutely, camping should not be used as a means of evading the precautions needed to slow the spread of Covid-19. But I don't think that anyone has suggested that camping on the Camino be so used. Mostly, I've seen it suggested as (a) a way of saving money and (b) a way to extend the capacity when the Camino has been opened up for walking and travel between provinces and autonomous regions in Spain has been permitted again as restrictions are gradually relaxed and Spain attempts to get the economy moving again.

As well, most of the recent posts I've seen on camping have been suggesting the use of campgrounds or albergue properties where there are facilities and trash receptacles. In such a context, I don't see why one would assume that camping pilgrims would leave any more waste or pollution on the camino than other pilgrims.

In the context of a recovering Spain, where travel is not seen as dangerous and permitted (possibly encouraged - at least, "touristic" travel) and where bars and groceries are open (albeit likely allowing fewer customers inside at any given time), I'm not seeing the extra harm or difficulty of camping for those who prefer it. And it seems common sense to me that sleeping in a tent will pose less risk of contagion than sleeping in a dormitory.

Not that I would want to do a camino that way myself. I stayed at one campground on the Camino Frances (Fuentes Blancas, in Burgos, just the sort of big city that you seem to think would be especially problematic for campers). In addition to the tenting space which was most of the campground, they had some cabins with bunk beds for pilgrims as a sort of albergue. But my experience was that the campground didn't seem to have the same communal pilgrim atmosphere as an albergue, with most of the campers staying in their own spots by their tents. For me, in addition to the lighter backpack and more comfortable bed, the communal atmosphere of an albergue makes it preferable to a campground.

But I would be hard pressed to argue that sleeping in a dormitory is safer and more responsible from a "slow the spread of disease as we reopen the Camino" perspective than sleeping in a tent.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
do you happen to know which albergue in zubiri? san anton is convento de san anton before castrojeriz?
I am updating my list of albergues and campings.
thanks!
I saw several tents at the Zubiri Municipal. I bet if you asked, El Palo de Avellano might also let you camp for a very small fee. They have a huge backyard. You might ask Rebekkah of Moratiños if they're going to allow camping in tents at San Anton. They have in the past. And yes, the one right before castrojeriz. They don't open their gates, however, until at least 2 pm. Honestly, I'd just send out emails to those albergues you know have yards. I've also camped in Hospital de Orbigo at the Municipal in their back yard. You also might check with Orisson. And between Orisson and the summit, years ago, there was a tipi set up for sleeping - I'm not sure who owns that property, but you could check with the Pilgrim Office in Roncesvalles.

If I think of others I'll let you know.
Caminka, I'm going to PM you.

Would you please send me a copy of your list, once you have it?
Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
I spent 35 days at sea in a small yacht in 2000 (actually did break this down to France to Madeira, Madeira to Brazil with a re supply in Madeira). 150 litres of water each leg for two of us for all purposes other than drinking. Sea water for flushing the toilet. We didn't wash other than face and hands. Hair wash once a week in salt water with a 1.5 litre bottle of drinking water to rinse off the salt. Wet wipes. We didn't stink. Showers are not essential to life. When camping it is considered acceptable to wash in cold water when the weather is warm. When the weather is cold then wet wipes.
Do wet wipes decompose? I thought they were toilet blockers!:) All these old tales remind me of my navy days ( Royal) when we used sea water showers :)

The Malingerer.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Do wet wipes decompose? I thought they were toilet blockers!:) All these old tales remind me of my navy days ( Royal) when we used sea water showers :)

The Malingerer.
I dont know. ALL our rubbish other than veg peelings went in bin -bags for disposal on shore.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
I saw several tents at the Zubiri Municipal. I bet if you asked, El Palo de Avellano might also let you camp for a very small fee. They have a huge backyard. You might ask Rebekkah of Moratiños if they're going to allow camping in tents at San Anton. They have in the past. And yes, the one right before castrojeriz. They don't open their gates, however, until at least 2 pm. Honestly, I'd just send out emails to those albergues you know have yards. I've also camped in Hospital de Orbigo at the Municipal in their back yard. You also might check with Orisson. And between Orisson and the summit, years ago, there was a tipi set up for sleeping - I'm not sure who owns that property, but you could check with the Pilgrim Office in Roncesvalles.

If I think of others I'll let you know.
Caminka, I'm going to PM you.

Would you please send me a copy of your list, once you have it?
Thanks!
thank you for this!
I am collecting options. I know situations change and hospitaleros change, but if there is a list, you at least know there are options.
I wouldn't expect an albergue to change hours or anything else to accommodate tent pilgrims. I would expect everything would be the same, except you slept in your tent (hopefully with the access to the loo in the night).
I gather you meant parroquial in hospital de orbigo? municipal was in the campground and has been closed for years.
I've seen pictures of tents behind orisson, yes. I remember they had a reduced half-pension if the beds in the albergue were full. maybe they stoped doing that when they opened gite kayola.
the list is actually in the resources, here's the link.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
......... if they're going to allow camping in tents at San Anton. They have in the past.
I was hospitalero there a few years ago.
I had been resting on one of the obligatory green Catholic benches when I heard a crack above my head which had me get up and move like lightning. A small part of the ruined wall had broken away. What did fall to the ground was not much but nonetheless , a direct hit on the head could have killed me. Sooooooooo , if ever you do get to camp there , stay away from the walls.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I was hospitalero there a few years ago.
I had been resting on one of the obligatory green Catholic benches when I heard a crack above my head which had me get up and move like lightning. A small part of the ruined wall had broken away. What did fall to the ground was not much but nonetheless , a direct hit on the head could have killed me. Sooooooooo , if ever you do get to camp there , stay away from the walls.
lol! I was hospitalera there a few years back also.
One of my favorite places to sleep and to help out.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
thank you for this!
I am collecting options. I know situations change and hospitaleros change, but if there is a list, you at least know there are options.
I wouldn't expect an albergue to change hours or anything else to accommodate tent pilgrims. I would expect everything would be the same, except you slept in your tent (hopefully with the access to the loo in the night).
I gather you meant parroquial in hospital de orbigo? municipal was in the campground and has been closed for years.
I've seen pictures of tents behind orisson, yes. I remember they had a reduced half-pension if the beds in the albergue were full. maybe they stoped doing that when they opened gite kayola.
the list is actually in the resources, here's the link.
Yes, sorry, parochial. St. Michael's? I'll have to ask Joe.
 

ParistoCapeCod

"Come on mom this 14k isn't going to walk itself."
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese, Primitivo, Norte. Hospitalera
Hi there! I'm looking to bring a tent and post up along the way instead of staying at hostels. Is this possible? Even if there aren't designated camp spots along the way, are there spots off to the sides to discretely set up camp? Has anyone done this before and if so, any tips?

Thank you in advance!
While this has not been the norm in the recent past for various reasons, I hope it will be more widely permitted for the next two years. It will be safer until there's a vaccine. Pay the donitivo or nightly rate and camp in the yard if there is one. There are few actual campgrounds along the three routes I've walked. In El Burgo Ranero when I volunteered there was a town park adjacent where many camped, not necessarily pilgrims. There is a risk of only people who can afford private hotels on the caminos if camping isn't an option.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
lol! I was hospitalera there a few years back also.
One of my favorite places to sleep and to help out.
A very , very special place - I think that a handful of pilgrims offered Ovideo their help on a permanent basis. This was a few years ago so one would probably think that it will be due for a change - Rebekah should know more?
Not Many places such as this come to mind - San Bol perhaps?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
A very , very special place - I think that a handful of pilgrims offered Ovideo their help on a permanent basis. This was a few years ago so one would probably think that it will be due for a change - Rebekah should know more?
Not Many places such as this come to mind - San Bol perhaps?
Another favorite.
How's your head? 🥴

My favorite thing that happened at San Anton was the baby owl (who lived on the roof) we watched fledge.
 

OxFyrd

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese 2018, voie d'Arles 2019 (Arles -Santiago)
Scheduled : Le Puy-Bilbao - Primitivo
thank you for this!
I am collecting options. I know situations change and hospitaleros change, but if there is a list, you at least know there are options.
I wouldn't expect an albergue to change hours or anything else to accommodate tent pilgrims. I would expect everything would be the same, except you slept in your tent (hopefully with the access to the loo in the night).
I gather you meant parroquial in hospital de orbigo? municipal was in the campground and has been closed for years.
I've seen pictures of tents behind orisson, yes. I remember they had a reduced half-pension if the beds in the albergue were full. maybe they stoped doing that when they opened gite kayola.
the list is actually in the resources, here's the link.
I camp on the Camino last year and suggest you make difference between a night in camp and camping several nights on site . Camping is prohibited in France and Spain. One night is usually not an issue. Set up your tent late (after 7pm) and leave early (before 9:00). If you camp wild, try remote areas (1 mile
min out the Camino), you should not hear a dog barking.. Buen camino.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
My favorite thing that happened at San Anton was the baby owl (who lived on the roof) we watched fledge.
I hope that you do not feel that this is a competition but we had a PAIR of baby owls in that small recess above the roof , they had just started to fly short distances.
At 3am the mama owl would bring live food for them to kill and devour - the racket?!!
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
I camp on the Camino last year and suggest you make difference between a night in camp and camping several nights on site . Camping is prohibited in France and Spain. One night is usually not an issue. Set up your tent late (after 7pm) and leave early (before 9:00). If you camp wild, try remote areas (1 mile
min out the Camino), you should not hear a dog barking.. Buen camino.
I thought it was obvious that if you are not staying in the official campground, there is the same one night stay as in the albergue dorm. I didn't want to use different words (camping, tenting, bivouacing, bivvying, wild camping, stealth camping...) because I think it would be too confusing. camping is also the most widely understood, also for those not speaking english. but I will add an explanation at the start.

I am aiming to collect enough info for (one night) camping / tenting in the albergue backyards that pilgrims will see that this is actually possible and hopefully rather camp there then in the wild because this can always be an issue, especially in an agricultural land. (let's not go in the legal debate here, there are plenty other threads on this topic.)
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
"Anniesantiago, My favorite thing that happened at San Anton was the baby owl (who lived on the roof) we watched fledge.
A pilgrim painted the Albergue - the male was considerably lager than the female. Note that the birds position themselves to poop out of the nest.
CAMINO HOSPITALERO JUNE 2016 223a.jpgCAMINO HOSPITALERO JUNE 2016 157.JPG
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
Just a word to the ladies about camping.
I met a tough ourdoors woman of about 30 years old who had been wild camping in her one 'Woman' tent ;)
When I say she was tough , she really was - she could put many soldiers to shame.
She told me that a fellow pilgrim had started to pester her and that she had had a really bad experience with this chap. It was ruining her Camino and she no longer felt safe.
The bottom line is , wild camping is not altogether safe and my night in the Albergue 'Jardín' was a cheap , even Luxurious option.
15 years ago I met a Scotsman who had two large dogs - the Austrian Albergue in Los Arcos accommodated them in their garden - the dogs even had their own beds hauled by this outlandish pilgrim.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I imagine part of the concern for many albergues regarding tenters in the garden would be one of security. Do they have to leave the door unlocked so tenters can use the toilet in the night? Many might not be comfortable with that. The alternative would be an accessible-to-the-outdoors toilet facility; which triggers sanitary issues.

In rural areas a composting toilet outhouse in the garden might work, if handwashing can be sorted.
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 322 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 23 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 369 28.6%
  • October

    Votes: 154 11.9%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock