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Key Essential Item(s) for Your Camino

What would you say was or were the key essential item(s) you took on your Camino journey, that made

  • ear plugs

    Votes: 92 57.1%
  • sewing kit

    Votes: 32 19.9%
  • eye mask

    Votes: 22 13.7%
  • bottle holder

    Votes: 17 10.6%
  • spork

    Votes: 30 18.6%
  • head torch

    Votes: 56 34.8%
  • buff

    Votes: 74 46.0%
  • vaseline

    Votes: 54 33.5%
  • other

    Votes: 49 30.4%

  • Total voters
    161

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Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
#2
Baling twine. Came in VERY handy for a multitude of Helps. Small pack in front to easily get to items
of necessity. Extra socks to change when walking ones get wet. Tape for "hot spots". No blisters then.
 

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Waka

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
#7
I took an elasticated washing line, now I know people have said they're a waste of time but I used mine lots of times. In a lot of the albergues there just wasn't enough room, so the line came in handy between trees, certainly take is again.
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#8
Baling twine. Came in VERY handy for a multitude of Helps. Small pack in front to easily get to items
of necessity. Extra socks to change when walking ones get wet. Tape for "hot spots". No blisters then.
Wow! Baling twine. That's interesting. I can think of it as a wash line. What else?
 

guidance

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French 2012.Portugues,primitivo,Norte,English,Augusta,La Plata 2013-16.Madrid 25/04/17
#12
Small water heating coil, boil water for that morning Coffee,or that evening instant Soup,plus small tube of superglue for those instant repairs, metal hook to hang my pack onto the bottom of the bed.
 

Helix Gal

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013); Caminho Portuguese (2017)
#13
Definitely ear plugs and eye mask first, a small all purpose tool kit that has the sharpest pair of scissors for cutting the duct tape that helped my toes and I didn't get one blister on the CF. Also brought a pillowcase (to go over the albergue pillows and a silk cocoon for additional warmth when it's cold and by itself when it's warm. Needle and thread in case you need to 'bleed' a blister. Bandana or handkerchief for wiping off sweat and important meds like Tylenol, Advil for muscle pain, anti-diarrhea pills, meds for bug bites.
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#14
I took a few items on your list and used not one. I did find my scarf, handkerchiefs and nail scissors indispensable.
Thanks for response. Did you manage to sleep through the snoring pilgrims? Were the handkerchiefs cotton?
 

Helix Gal

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013); Caminho Portuguese (2017)
#15
Slept like a log with my earplugs and eye mask. The handkerchiefs were cotton. I actually brought 2 of the men's size, which is bigger. I lost one along the way. It was easy enough to wash and dry on the back of my backpack.
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
#16
I always bring a Fiskars Tomato Knife. Very handy for butchering bread, tomatoes, cheese and sausages, plus works just fine as a general kitchen knife - decent knives are not exactly plentiful in Albergue kitchens, but rather handy when you get fed up with pilgrim menus and want to cook a decent meal.
 

Suzanne S.

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Camino Frances/Muxia/Fisterre (2017) Caminho Portuguese/Fisterre
(2019) Camino del Norte
#18
Thanks for response. Did you manage to sleep through the snoring pilgrims? Were the handkerchiefs cotton?
The snoring only bothered me once or twice. And yes, the handkerchiefs are cotton. They're small and well broken in so they dried just fine overnight.
 

tomnorth

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); March/April (2019)
#19
Oh yes, another small essential item came to mind, a bandana. This came in handy for so many uses: drying hands when towels were not present (which was often), drying fruit after rinsing, cleaning glasses, drying off my camera, wiping a sweaty brow...etc.
 

mvanert

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona - Santiago 2014, St. Jean to Estella June 2016, Estella to Santiago April 17, 2018
#21
I tried to bring a positive attitude.I have a lot of tattoos and met a lot of judgmental people who were real jerks.
Being judgmental is easy. Erasing it from my character is an ongoing challenge, sometimes I succeed, sometimes not. I think it is a goal worth reaching for though.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#22
I found a lightweight backpacking type of utensil set handy....just the spoon and serrated butter type knife. The spoon for yogurt and such and the knife for cutting bread, chorizo etc. I believe you can get titanium ones if shaving off a few ounces of weight is important.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Burgos, Camino Frances (2012 - 2018)
#27
Nail scissors, definitely (I still have the expensive clippers I had to buy in Saugues) elastic washing line and cotton handkerchiefs, ditto - and a small towelling square (facecloth) for wiping sweat out of eyes, drying face and hands at standpipes, and hand gel, especially after eating oranges!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk with my husband June 2018
#28
Small water heating coil, boil water for that morning Coffee,or that evening instant Soup,plus small tube of superglue for those instant repairs, metal hook to hang my pack onto the bottom of the bed.
What type of metal hook? an S hook? Sounds like a great idea. About what size?
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
#29
Wow! Baling twine. That's interesting. I can think of it as a wash line. What else?
tying the poncho around the waist in whipping wind, using as a shoelace, tying backpack straps together for the flight, using as thread when picking apart the strands, wash line under the above bed in a rainstorm, etc.
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
Baztanés/Francés (2017)
Ingles (July 2018)
#31
My foot-care bag.
Especially the paper tape, lamb's-wool, and omnifix.
And the Swiss army knife to cut the above, and whatever else needs dismembering, like bread and tomatoes.
 

Chris Gi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
#32
I always bring a Fiskars Tomato Knife. Very handy for butchering bread, tomatoes, cheese and sausages, plus works just fine as a general kitchen knife - decent knives are not exactly plentiful in Albergue kitchens, but rather handy when you get fed up with pilgrim menus and want to cook a decent meal.
How did you get a knife through customs?
 

Victoria65

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's SJ to Sahagun 2015, Sahagun to Santiago 2016, Le Puy Route, SJPDP to Santiago (2018)
#33
Please don't do this. There are many threads here on why this is a bad idea, as you are basically creating a pathway for bacteria to enter a wound.
I personally met two different pilgrims who used the needle and thread, both became septic and the gentleman so much so he was hauled off the Camino in an ambulance to Leon. Not the way to end ones Camino. I agree, PLEASE don't do this. (retired RN speaking here)
 

Victoria65

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's SJ to Sahagun 2015, Sahagun to Santiago 2016, Le Puy Route, SJPDP to Santiago (2018)
#34
Snap Towel used around neck I swear saved me on those couple of blazing hot days!
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
#35
What type of metal hook? an S hook? Sounds like a great idea. About what size?
yes, the S hook was an essential for
What type of metal hook? an S hook? Sounds like a great idea. About what size?
metal hook also indispensable for hanging clothes and toiletry bag in shower area....about 4" long.
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
#36
How did you get a knife through customs?
I live in Denmark, so no problems with customs, as both countries are EU members.

I bypass airport security by mailing my walking sticks and my knife to myself "Liste de Correros" at my starting point.
Edit: there should be no problems, if the knife is in checked luggage. "Should" because I've experienced airports with extreme security (Narita, Tokyo, back in the seventies).

But any major city will have such a knife available for purchase. If not exactly a Fiskars, then something similar. I just happen to like the Fiskars, as it's light, fairly cheap, quite sharp and seems to be readily available throughout Europe.
 

Yoyo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP – SdC (2017)
Waiting for an opportunity to walk again...
#38
walking poles. Used them every step of the way. They especially helped my joints when going downhill, but I also loved the propulsion I felt on climbs and on even ground – and the upper body workout! I used pacer poles and loved them.

hiking umbrella. It made such a difference on the many hot days I experienced in May and June 2017 on the Camino Francés. As opposed to just a hat for sun protection, an umbrella provides shade for the better part of you body. To my surprise, I only saw two other people using an umbrella.

bandana. It was my towel in the morning when washing my face and brushing my teeth. No need to get the shower towel out. It then went in to the bag of my pants and was used as a hand towel and for wiping sweat off my forehead during the day's walk. Although it is cotton, it was always the first thing that was dry after doing my laundry.

clothes pins. I took 8 small plastic ones and was glad I did. Used them often.
The lightweight clothesline came out a few times, too. Maybe not essential, but I would take it again.

silk liner. I bought a rectangular one and cut it open (T-shaped cut right down the middle and to both sides on the bottom) as I hate to be confined while sleeping. That way I had a silk sheet covering my mattress and cushion. I used a very lightweight unzipped sleeping bag as a duvet. I was very happy with that combo.

pocket knife. Very handy for cutting bread and peeling oranges.

key chain LED light. It was all I ever needed to find my way to the bathroom. Very discrete. I found people using bright headlamps in the albergues quite annoying.

suction hook. Great for hanging your toiletry bag in the hook-less albergue bathrooms. Unfortunately I left mine in the bathroom at Tío Pepe's in Villar de Mazarife. Nice red one.
 

lt56ny

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
#41
Swiss Army Knife, clothes Pins, l use 12, whatever works to care for your feet.
If you don’t have anything on your backpack to hang stuff,
Safety pins. silk sleep sack way up on my list too
WHAT IS A BUFF????
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#42
tying the poncho around the waist in whipping wind, using as a shoelace, tying backpack straps together for the flight, using as thread when picking apart the strands, wash line under the above bed in a rainstorm, etc.
Brilliant! Thanks for that!
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#43
Swiss Army Knife, clothes Pins, l use 12, whatever works to care for your feet.
If you don’t have anything on your backpack to hang stuff,
Safety pins. silk sleep sack way up on my list too
WHAT IS A BUFF????
WHAT IS A BUFF????
It's a tubular cotton band that can be worn around the neck or on your head. It might be called a bandana outside of UK?
 

Mick McQueen

https://www.facebook.com/groups/
Camino(s) past & future
I am escorting the Roll of Honour (Afghanistan) on Camino France on 20 May from SJPDP
The Roll of Honour details the 41 young Australians who died on Active Service in Afghanistan. In the centenary of the ANZAC’s, the Roll of Honour will be escorted to 41 prominent places and events around the World, laying 41 Poppies at each location.
#52
Please don't do this. There are many threads here on why this is a bad idea, as you are basically creating a pathway for bacteria to enter a wound.
Worked for everyone I witnessed doing it
 

Mick McQueen

https://www.facebook.com/groups/
Camino(s) past & future
I am escorting the Roll of Honour (Afghanistan) on Camino France on 20 May from SJPDP
The Roll of Honour details the 41 young Australians who died on Active Service in Afghanistan. In the centenary of the ANZAC’s, the Roll of Honour will be escorted to 41 prominent places and events around the World, laying 41 Poppies at each location.
#53
The only thing that was important to me on the The Camino was pilgrim friendship the rest is immaterial, carry what you want
 

Mark Baron

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014) Via de la Plata (2018)
#57
Baling twine. Came in VERY handy for a multitude of Helps. Small pack in front to easily get to items
of necessity. Extra socks to change when walking ones get wet. Tape for "hot spots". No blisters then.
You have to be a certain "age" to even know what bailing twine is! Unfortunately I do :)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles May 2018 completed - the Very Last Camino of All!
#58
I personally met two different pilgrims who used the needle and thread, both became septic and the gentleman so much so he was hauled off the Camino in an ambulance to Leon. Not the way to end ones Camino. I agree, PLEASE don't do this. (retired RN speaking here)
One of the high points of my first Camino was watching my pixie sized Irish doctor friend berating a major/doctor from the Spanish army about this - SO funny but so serious.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
Camino Le Puy, Frances and Finisterre 2018
#59
I travelled with my vegan daughter on the Camino Frances in 2015. Something we found invaluable was a small slim cutting mat for our chickpea, olive, tomato and pepper meals. I cut it down from a larger cutting mat into a size that fitted into my pack. Lots of salads were made on the floor of rooms if dinner was hard to come by, eaten with a plastic spork from enamel mugs.
 

Janade

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(May 2018)
#60
Please don't do this. There are many threads here on why this is a bad idea, as you are basically creating a pathway for bacteria to enter a wound.
I just went to a foot care on the Camino lecture by a local podiatrist and she was asked specifically about this. She said that as long as the needle was clean, this can actually be very useful to drain the fluid from a large blister. I think it just comes down to common sense and hygiene. People can also get infections from leaving blisters alone if they don't keep things clean.
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#63
I just went to a foot care on the Camino lecture by a local podiatrist and she was asked specifically about this. She said that as long as the needle was clean, this can actually be very useful to drain the fluid from a large blister. I think it just comes down to common sense and hygiene. People can also get infections from leaving blisters alone if they don't keep things clean.
@Janade Draining a blister with a sterile needle is different than leaving a thread in the blister that can carry bacteria into the wound.
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
#66
Amazing spread of what people consider essential. I must admit that I'd place most of the mentioned items in the 'nice to have' category.

In reality, the only important physical items are: a passport or EU citizen ID, a comprehensive travel-/health insurance, a credential. Anything else, including ear plugs, are nice-to-have items. Work up from there ;)

The three most important things to bring, are an open mind, common sense and a sense of humor. If you forgot to bring any of those, then please abort the journey immediately and return home.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#68
yes, the S hook was an essential for

metal hook also indispensable for hanging clothes and toiletry bag in shower area....about 4" long.
I had a plastic S hook I used in the shower. (I can't picture how one would "hook a backpack under the bed"?)

Some other things I would add:

microfiber towel (and if you lose yours, ask the hospitalero for the "Lost and Found" because usually there are a few there that others lost)

solid shampoo and conditioner bars

my down quilt!!

re: knives, I just bought a wood Opinel knife there, which worked great. And I checked it with my walking poles home as a keepsake. It's a cheap knife and it stays sharp a long time.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#69
Earplugs are a big one for a majority of people. I had the disposable ones and was challenged by how to carry enough for a month and a half. I just read in a post here something that I thought was a brilliant idea. A small MP3 player with a loop of white noise and earphones to block out snoring and other noise. The person said you can get one with a timer that will shut it off in a few hours (when you figure you will be sound enough asleep not to notice the snoring).
 

Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Fistera (2015), Leon to Fistera (2016), CF, Salvadore, Primitivo (2017), CF run/walk 2018
#70
Bandana - (esp in warmer months), dunk it in water and have freshen-up, wipe sweat out of your eyes, protect your neck from the sun etc.
 

Oppis

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF -15, VdlP -15, Sanabres-16. Portugues -17, Norte/Primitivo -17, Mozarabe/Torres-18
#71
During these rainy days in Southern Spain only the proper raingear is essential. Crossing the rivers take the boots off and swim,, ha, haa. Done that several times.
Btw. Shortened my knife to 5,5 cm. At security control 6cm is allowed.
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
#72
A few metres of thin paracord. Tie it lengthways along a lower bunk from post to post. Serves to dry or air towel, clothes and acts as a privacy curtain. Remember to remove in the morning - I've left more than one behind!
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#74
Amazing spread of what people consider essential. I must admit that I'd place most of the mentioned items in the 'nice to have' category.

In reality, the only important physical items are: a passport or EU citizen ID, a comprehensive travel-/health insurance, a credential. Anything else, including ear plugs, are nice-to-have items. Work up from there ;)
My ear plugs a 'must' even at home. I have noisy neighbours. I will have snoring neighbours on the Camino
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#75
Earplugs are a big one for a majority of people. I had the disposable ones and was challenged by how to carry enough for a month and a half. I just read in a post here something that I thought was a brilliant idea. A small MP3 player with a loop of white noise and earphones to block out snoring and other noise. The person said you can get one with a timer that will shut it off in a few hours (when you figure you will be sound enough asleep not to notice the snoring).
You don't need a separate mp3 player. Just download a white noise app to your phone. Rather than earplugs or white noise I listen to podcasts when I'm going to sleep. I set a timer on my podcast app for about twenty minutes, but I'm usually asleep in five minutes or so. I find that having something to listen to works better than trying not to hear something like snoring.
 

Givesome

Cape Hiker
Camino(s) past & future
CF 27 March 2017
#76
Is that like duct tape?
Hi Galax1 Duct tape was made for the hardware industry and has many uses. It can be used to prevent blisters but it does not stick properly and come off easily. Leukotape however was made for the medical industry. You get various types of Leukotape and the one I am using is the "P" type. The P stands for Physiotherapy and it is: "a high strength, rigid strapping tape, with a very strong, zinc oxide adhesive. It is porous and hand-tearable, yet offers extra strong support for sprains and strains. Ideal for patellofemoral taping. Use in conjunction with Cover Roll Stretch".
So in simple terms it is normally used for the strapping of joints and other sport injuries.
The zinc oxide adhesive is very strong and does not come off easily or slide in a moist environment like sweaty feet. You can wear it for a couple of days without the need to replace.
Please keep in mind that this tape should not be used directly on a blister. It will cause more damage. I only use to prevent blisters and to eliminate friction.
Read more about the product here: http://www.bsnmedical.us/products/o...herapy/leukotaper-p-rigid-strapping-tape.html
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#77
You don't need a separate mp3 player. Just download a white noise app to your phone. Rather than earplugs or white noise I listen to podcasts when I'm going to sleep. I set a timer on my podcast app for about twenty minutes, but I'm usually asleep in five minutes or so. I find that having something to listen to works better than trying not to hear something like snoring.
Genius.
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#79
Hi Galax1 Duct tape was made for the hardware industry and has many uses. It can be used to prevent blisters but it does not stick properly and come off easily. Leukotape however was made for the medical industry. You get various types of Leukotape and the one I am using is the "P" type. The P stands for Physiotherapy and it is: "a high strength, rigid strapping tape, with a very strong, zinc oxide adhesive. It is porous and hand-tearable, yet offers extra strong support for sprains and strains. Ideal for patellofemoral taping. Use in conjunction with Cover Roll Stretch".
So in simple terms it is normally used for the strapping of joints and other sport injuries.
The zinc oxide adhesive is very strong and does not come off easily or slide in a moist environment like sweaty feet. You can wear it for a couple of days without the need to replace.
Please keep in mind that this tape should not be used directly on a blister. It will cause more damage. I only use to prevent blisters and to eliminate friction.
Read more about the product here: http://www.bsnmedical.us/products/o...herapy/leukotaper-p-rigid-strapping-tape.html
Thanks for that!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-July 2017)
Camino Primitivo (May-June 2018)
Camino Portugués (Spring 2019)
#80
WHAT IS A BUFF????
It's a tubular cotton band that can be worn around the neck or on your head. It might be called a bandana outside of UK?
They're both primarily headwear but buffs and bandanas are not exactly the same thing. Buffs are more versatile but are less popular among pirates. :)

My wife and I bought camino-branded buffs before our walk and loved having them. Actually, my wife still wears hers almost every day.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
#81
And, just in case you want to buy duct tape while there, it is called Cinta Americana in Spain. (I'm glad the US gets credit for something!) ;)
 

Galaxy1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September to October 2017
#84
They're both primarily headwear but buffs and bandanas are not exactly the same thing. Buffs are more versatile but are less popular among pirates. :)

My wife and I bought camino-branded buffs before our walk and loved having them. Actually, my wife still wears hers almost every day.
A Camino branded one sounds cool. Can you remember where you bought it?
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés (2004-), C. Portugués, C. de Madrid, 1/2 V. Plata, 1/8 Levante, hospitalera Grado 2016.
#87
Thin, large square wool scarf - for shade, heat, privacy, hairdrying, padding of backpack straps.

Heating coil, oatmeal and cocoa mix (not on the Francés, but there are plenty of Caminos where breakfast can be tricky).

Knitted holder for water bottle, which holds it at my left hip so I can take a small sip of water every time I feel like it.

Poles. Also excellent for clothes-drying between bunks when it's rainy outside. And ice-breaker when passing elderly locals, walking with a stick - I smile and say "Mejor con dos," lifting my poles, and we laugh together. Never fails to make us both smile.
 

hotelmedicis

Commercial Interests
Camino(s) past & future
CF: 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 (part), 2017
Finisterre: 2017
VDLP: 2012, 2018
#89
Leukotape P to prevent blisters where I know I am prone to get hotspots. The tape sticks like no tomorrow and does not come off easily.
I use Leukotape as well and have, unfortunately, gotten blisters under the tape.
 

lt56ny

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
#92
They're both primarily headwear but buffs and bandanas are not exactly the same thing. Buffs are more versatile but are less popular among pirates. :)

My wife and I bought camino-branded buffs before our walk and loved having them. Actually, my wife still wears hers almost every day.
Thanks to all
 

Earthkeeper

Have teapot; will travel
Camino(s) past & future
Salvador Sept (2017) Primitivo Sept (2017)
#94
Buff.
A small knife for Chorizo etc.
A kikoi/sarong, which I use variously as towel, skirt, curtain for privacy in bed, head wrap or sun shade cloth, wet evaporative cooling wrap, pillow cover, shawl, padding....and more.
A large S-hook for hanging my pack from bed/tree/bench. This was not my idea. I actually found one that had been left behind on my bed frame in the Oviedo hostel, adopted it, found it incredibly convenient because it put an end to the bent-double ferreting-around that is the default posture of many a pilgrim...and then promptly left it hanging (easy to do, alas) on a bed frame somewhere along the Primitivo for some other lucky pilgrim to slap their forehead over.
EAR plugs - never used them before doing the Camino, and had my doubts, but thank goodness for them!
 

Givesome

Cape Hiker
Camino(s) past & future
CF 27 March 2017
#95
I noticed two favourite items in this thread: S hooks and carabiners. You get a S-hook/carabiner combination. See http://www.niteize.com/product/S-Biner-Plastic.asp. It is available in various sizes and in metal or plastic.
It worked perfectly for me last year to attached my wife's very expensive boots to my backpack when she got blisters and had to finish the Camino in sandals.
 

Attachments

Undermanager

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Madrid (x2)
VDLP
Salvador
Primitivo
Fisterra
#96
The biggest thing by far that makes a Camino the best possible, fun trip is to take as much of nothing as you can. The more nothing I can stuff into my bag, the better. I'm planning on going out to the shops and buying more nothing in preparation for April 13th this year, and will have a trial pack to make sure it all fits into my rucksack. The second thing I think is essential is a credit card, to buy whatever I need when the nothing won't do the job.

:)
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#97
The biggest thing by far that makes a Camino the best possible, fun trip is to take as much of nothing as you can. The more nothing I can stuff into my bag, the better. I'm planning on going out to the shops and buying more nothing in preparation for April 13th this year, and will have a trial pack to make sure it all fits into my rucksack. The second thing I think is essential is a credit card, to buy whatever I need when the nothing won't do the job.

:)
:D:D:D:D:D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,2014,
Frances,2015
Madrid,2015
Salvador,2015
Mozarabe,
Sanabres,
Porto,2016
Levante,2017
#99
one small spray bottle of "new-skin" , spray bandage and antiseptic replaced lots of other misc to take care of feet. I like that stuff , sprays like transparent paint, flexible, lasts a few days, goes between toes and you don't feel it while walking.
 

Davey Boyd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
Something to sit on out on the path. I often use a small self inflating pillow - it means I can avoid the sometimes yucky ones in albergues, and it also makes a good seat.
I carry a small roll of bubble wrap for sitting down when it is damp! Weighs nothing too!
 

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