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My dogs are up for it but i think the people dont want them there

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Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Dogs are great. I love them. Have owned many. I think if one were doing a wilderness walk where you tent camp every night, and you and your dog are together and looking out for each other, that's cool. Our ancestors domesticated them for that very reason.
On a busy Camino route? Ummm, not so great, IMO. You and the dog may not get along so well with local dogs and of course there's the whole matter of finding accommodations for the night. I cannot imagine staying in albergue where a fellow pilgrim has a dog tied up outside and the dog is constantly barking and howling. It's just not fair to the dog and to other pilgrims.
Not everyone enjoys the company of domesticated animals, and many see them only as a tool of sorts. That is the way I grew up around dogs. They were a working asset. They had a job.
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
RJM stated it very well.

This was mentioned before on the forum. I didn't say much. Though it over and now time to speak up and tell it like it is.

Sorry, not everyone enjoys and loves your dogs.
Please don't bring dogs on your Camino.
Leave them at home.

Not a good idea. If you like, read on. Lets really get down to the nitty gritty of this idea of yours......

You are correct, majority of the people on this forum do not want your dogs on the Camino.

A major airline recently did a survey of so called "comfort dogs" "service dogs". ((yes there are many bonified cases where these dogs are helpful and warranted. BUT, the survey revealed that the majority of people were fakes! Over 65 to 80 % were fakes! The majority of customers did not want dogs on the flights. So why did these people keep on bringing these so called "comfort dogs?" Cause it was about them. Not others. ))

I am sure you are going to have the goodie too shoes on here who will say bring them...

Let me be frank about this.............leave them at home and do us a favor.

Besides the issues on the trail walking. Such as pooping on the trail (nice to smell dog poop on shoes in the A'burg), barking at other walkers who want peace and quite, jumping, snapping and barking at bikers (there are enough problems between walkers and bikers as it is now -- why add more problems?).

Lagging more food and water along for the dog (unless they can carry their own in doggie packs). Biting some one ((yes it does happen - even with the nicest puppies out there)) and having to deal with that. I know walkers who would be scared to pass you and your dogs on a tight section of the trail. Leaving them tied up outside a cafe/bar to bark while you are inside buying something or enjoying your morning what ever....
Transportation? How are you going to get them to the start of your Camino and back home? How are you going to do that? Not on most buses in Spain. Nor on trains. So more problems for you.

I am sure you love your dog. That is good. But, what about the dog? What happens if it gets hurt? or cannot walk due to hurt pads? Sick? Your walk is hard enough. You signed up for it. The dog didn't. Why put him/her through it?

Now, lets talk down to earth reality in the A'burg:

Did you ever consider that others have allergies to dogs? And DO NOT want your dogs around them?

Here we go....dogs inside the A'burg. Smell. Fleas. Ticks. Barking. Potty time? Dog food on the floor. More smell...
Stinky feet are enough. Why add more?

Snoring is enough of a problem on the Camino. So why don't you add barking, whining, dogs ?? duhhh

Don't care how well you take care of your dogs....on a long distance walk like the Camino... fleas and ticks will find their way to your dog. And in turn to us.
We have enough worries with bed bugs.
Rainy days... ughhhh ... adds more smell. Yes, dogs smell when wet.

How are you going to care for your dog all night long?
Dogs bark and whine. We want our peaceful sleep.
Your dogs will bark at other dogs, cats etc. Of course you will say they won't bark and keep others up at night. That may be so. But when they see a stray cat or dog the WILL bark.

What you gonna sleep with them in the bed?
Great for the next walker.
Nothing like dog smell residue in the bunk - bunk area.

So you tie them up outside. Most dogs will bark. Waking us up anyway.
So you keep them by your bunk. People are going to have to step over them.
When a dog is stepped on by a stranger = the dog bites. More problems.

Oh forgot about the very mean big boy farm dogs. They would eat your dogs for lunch. And you won't dare put your hands in the middle of it. So why do that to your dogs?

List can go on and on.

Hey, can I bring my pet pig along? Let him sleep inside with me in my bunk?
How about other animals?
Where is the line drawn?
Good enough for your barking, whining, smelly, dog...why not chickens? Pigs?
Rabbits? Crocs? Birds?

IMHO I would say the majority of people on this forum do not care for your idea.

With the greatest respect, one must ask, if you are one of these "all about me" types? Could care less how your dogs are a nuisance to people (barking, smell, poop, pee, whining, biting, etc)?? You don't sound like that type. But, there are many of them out there. Who will follow suit and bring their dogs.

Of course, everyone who has a dog will say:
"oh no, not my dog"

Dont get me wrong. I love and enjoy all animals. Especially cats and dogs.
But your Camino is not for dogs.

If addressing it head on now on this forum is not for you, then how are you going to cope with someone being very straight forward to you face to face on the Camino and tell you "your dogs dont belong in here on the Camino". ??

Better to get true open feed back now on this forum than waiting to run into the rude person on the Camino who has his/her fill of dogs and lets you have it.
While my response may sound rude, I am sorry. I feel it is better to get your attention and have you think it out. Than to be sorry on the Camino.

Think about it...

The way you sound about your dogs makes one to believe you would be very sensitive to someone saying something negative face-to-face about your dogs.
Then what? Makes not a pleasant Camino for you, the dogs, and others.
 
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kaixo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino del Norte 2012
Geneva/Le Puy/SJPP/Bilbao 2015
Prague/Geneva ?
I'll just share a story from my 2012 camino.
I met Grite (sp) from Belgium and her dog Kafka somewhere mid camino and crossed paths with them numerous times all the way to Santiago. Grite was a lovely, sweet, mild mannered young woman and Kafka was the epitome of man's best friend. Kafka was always by Grites side, she was friendly and extremely well behaved. See Kafka under table.
IMG_1202.JPG
They camped out because it was difficult to find places to stay that welcomed dogs. One rainy morning I encountered them as they were packing up for the day. They were both wet and tired and disheveled but they continued on. Grite wondered how their equipment would possibly dry.
I met them again just before Triacastela and Grite shared this story. She was in tears as she explained that Kafka's paws were raw and bleeding from the walking. I'll paraphrase her words: "The camino is something I wanted to do. Kafka didn't have a vote. She came along because I wanted her with me and now look at her, I have caused her pain". Grite was so sad and she felt so guilty. See Kafka with new booties.
IMG_1136.JPG
Lastly, in Santiago Grite explained the difficulty of getting back home because dogs were not allowed on public transport . She was going to have to hitch hike home.

So @Tamargrace, please consider:
1) accomodations
2) pet paw problems
3) transportation
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Paul, glad you have some humor.

Yes, omg, how could I have forgotten peacocks!

Actually, they would be a great alarm when stealth camping.
No one would sneak up on you.

Love your humor.

Actually if taking a animal on a hike, take one that will:
1. Protect you, loves you and keeps you warm.
2. Be a good alarm for you; and,
3. One that you can eat if it comes to that!
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
I'll just share a story from my 2012 camino.
I met Grite (sp) from Belgium and her dog Kafka somewhere mid camino and crossed paths with them numerous times all the way to Santiago. Grite was a lovely, sweet, mild mannered young woman and Kafka was the epitome of man's best friend. Kafka was always by Grites side, she was friendly and extremely well behaved. See Kafka under table.
View attachment 40038
They camped out because it was difficult to find places to stay that welcomed dogs. One rainy morning I encountered them as they were packing up for the day. They were both wet and tired and disheveled but they continued on. Grite wondered how their equipment would possibly dry.
I met them again just before Triacastela and Grite shared this story. She was in tears as she explained that Kafka's paws were raw and bleeding from the walking. I'll paraphrase her words: "The camino is something I wanted to do. Kafka didn't have a vote. She came along because I wanted her with me and now look at her, I have caused her pain". Grite was so sad and she felt so guilty. See Kafka with new booties.
View attachment 40039
Lastly, in Santiago Grite explained the difficulty of getting back home because dogs were not allowed on public transport . She was going to have to hitch hike home.

So @Tamargrace, please consider:
1) accomodations
2) pet paw problems
3) transportation

Sad to hear that.
Feel sorry for the dog.
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Members are reminded to strive to avoid personal criticism.

Dogs on the Camino is a topic that easily generates strong opinions and heated discussion. The OP seems to be aware of this. As the OP has not actually asked a question members might consider that no response is required.
Tin, agree. I went back and cleaned up some of my OP.
Purpose is to get one thinking about the real day to day life on the Camino with dogs. Better to do it now. Then be sorry later.
Hopefully, I was not being rude. Only want to open eyes and have a frank discussion about this in a respectful way.
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
I for one would love to bring my dogs, but that would mean at least 1 very long flight. When walking the Camino this past year I kept coming across a couple from Belgium with their small dog resembling my small one back home. The joy that little bundle of fur gave me and the wonderful encounters we had each few days was lovely, fulfilling. The couple did share with me that they had to hunt for places that would accept dogs,but always managed. In Santiago the threesome arrived very happily. It was great to see. Having said this they were 2 people able to spell each other off. As far as rain and doggie aroma, I daresay I encountered all types of (human boot &sock) aromas that just about knocked one senseless....dog raingear exists so that would alleviate that problem. Dog botties would be a good protective idea because once the paw is raw....takes time to heal. Prevention is best. It is at least 30 days of long distance walking over many different types of terrain. The Spanish dogs are very well behaved and many are without leash. They are part of their lifestyle, incorporated in cafes, etc. I love this open welcome to the canines and wish it would be the same where I live. Alas, not. It takes many to make a community & some are not as open minded as others...as far as evening noises ? surely the snoring and all night street parties has kept a few awake......and those are human noises, all that must be tolerated. A dog will sleep very well after much walking,....as for the feeding...this might be tricky. Need the water too, especially if it's excruciating temperatures as it was last year. Can your dog's carry their supplies? This would be helpful. Anyways, ithought I'd share another viewpoint, and suggest to make sure to know which places accept our wonderful friends before you leave home, so as to have a good idea of where you would be aiming to sleep each night. All the very best to you with your decision. Oh and last but not least, remember the baggies for toilet cleanups. Good thing dogs don't use toilet paper lying around everywhere.....I think humans do that nasty one.......
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Joziane, thanks for your comment.
Always good to have another point of view.

Yes, TP is a unnecessary product of humans on the Camino.

Such a shame people dont carry doggie bags to carry their workings and TP off the trail.
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Thank-you. After pressing the send button 2 thoughts came.... Which route is the op planning to walk? And at what time of year? Some are less travelled and perhaps cooler. 2) fleas....perhaps a dog collar that repels fleas or a lavender & tea tree oil spray to repel them? Just a few ideas..
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Thank-you. After pressing the send button 2 thoughts came.... Which route is the op planning to walk? And at what time of year? Some are less travelled and perhaps cooler. 2) fleas....perhaps a dog collar that repels fleas or a lavender & tea tree oil spray to repel them? Just a few ideas..
Looks like (per her) she is going to walk irun to bilbao. She says "to test the water in a few weeks."

Also, she lives in Basque part of Spain. So that may make transporting the dogs easier to/from Camino.

She also relates excellent health of the dogs. That is fine. BUT,

I stand by my arguments against bringing her dogs (or anyone bringing their dogs) on the Camino.

Not only for the things I tried to point out but other reasons as well.

Simply stated, I pray she does not bring them.

Take a cat! At least it does not use TP and covers IT up.
Small. Can be carried if needed. Good to snuggle with in the bed. Put a harness on the cat so does not wonder off in the A/burg.

I knew this day was coming:::: the Camino is going to the dogs!
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Thank-you. After pressing the send button 2 thoughts came.... Which route is the op planning to walk? And at what time of year? Some are less travelled and perhaps cooler. 2) fleas....perhaps a dog collar that repels fleas or a lavender & tea tree oil spray to repel them? Just a few ideas..
Hi, the OP has no issues with flea collars that she has posted here. The track she is interested in to walk with her dogs is the start of de Camino del Norte: Irún to Bilbao in a few weeks first 'to test the waters'

Dog Vivant has a map with dog friendly lodgings along the CdN:
https://www.dogvivant.com/sitios-dog-friendly/alojamientos-camino-santiago
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
I guess if you live close by, have transport arranged, by car etc - not public transport, and are prepared to sleep outside - you could do it. If it gets too hard you can always bail and have them collected.

I have two dogs that love to walk with me, but they prefer to run ahead, smell, investigate stuff, pee on things, chase birds and rabbits, - generally behave like dogs - especially off lead. I don't know that walking on hard hot tarmac or sharp gravel hour after hour, day after day, would really be their idea of fun. They would try to though, because they want to be with me.

I take my smaller one with me sometimes when I'm training for a longer walk or event. She can happily do about 3 hours max, 15-17 kms. She doesn't like wearing boots, and I have to try and find grass, sand or soft surfaces for her to walk on. Not always easy. With New Zealand having a lot of endangered flightless birds, walking through bush tracks with dogs is usually not permitted. And during daylight saving time, we have to be off the city beaches by 10am.
This year I've had to watch her like a hawk on coastal walks, because with the warm summer, we had some poisonous algae that made her vomit for a week.
We have to leave early in the morning in the dark, to keep her cool, I have to carry kilos of water for her and a bowl. And at the 3 hour mark, I have to ring my husband and get her collected. At that point she's happy to jump in the car, while I continue on.
She sees me putting my walking shoes on, and she really wants to join me, but taking her requires a lot of route planning, tide coordination, a 5am start, someone to collect her, and I have to carry a lot more weight than I like to.
 

Jerry B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 18 2015 frances,august 2016 camino madrid, august 2017 camino frances bike
Dogs are great. I love them. Have owned many. I think if one were doing a wilderness walk where you tent camp every night, and you and your dog are together and looking out for each other, that's cool. Our ancestors domesticated them for that very reason.
On a busy Camino route? Ummm, not so great, IMO. You and the dog may not get along so well with local dogs and of course there's the whole matter of finding accommodations for the night. I cannot imagine staying in albergue where a fellow pilgrim has a dog tied up outside and the dog is constantly barking and howling. It's just not fair to the dog and to other pilgrims.
Not everyone enjoys the company of domesticated animals, and many see them only as a tool of sorts. That is the way I grew up around dogs. They were a working asset. They had a job.
hi, I walked the camino madrid in 2016 and spend about a week walking with an argentinian pilgrim and his little dog ...... for the most part it was fine but the lodging and restaurants were an issue he had issues were the dog was not permitted and even the local and long distance transportation (alsa)did not let him board and the locals were not happy and in some cases he was not received ........... I felt bad in some cases as there were zero tolerance at the albergues and i would continue with them on to the next town .....
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
But your Camino is not for dogs.
Maybe, maybe not.
A number if reactions in your post seem to come from a place of simple aversiom, or from not having read what the OP said.
  1. Responsible owners do not subject their dogs (or others) to ectoparisites, but medicate so that the dog has none.
  2. Responsible owners understand that others may not want the dogs in their face, and so make arrangements to have a tent or something so that the dog can sleep in safety and other pilgrims are not impacted.
  3. Responsible owners understand their dog's limits and do not push that - and in this case it seems that the OP knows what this is very well.
  4. Responsible owners DEFINITELY pick up after their dogs, and do not have a
    barking, whining, smelly, dog
And honestly? A dog - even a smelly, whining, and barking one - is less obnoxious than a drunk peregrino. Off topic, but can we ban them too? And then there are the putrid smells of socks and bodily odors (of all sorts) that people emit.
My two experiences of walking around responsible people who had brought their dogs were completely positive, as clearly was @Joziane 's:
The joy that little bundle of fur gave me and the wonderful encounters we had each few days was lovely, fulfilling. The couple did share with me that they had to hunt for places that would accept dogs,but always managed. In Santiago the threesome arrived very happily. It was great to see.
And these were not toys, but in one case a Border Collie and Alsatian Mix-breed, and in another case a huge Newfie.

So welcome, @Tamargrace - I will be one of the "Goodie two shoes" who says try it and see for yourself.
The main concerns assuming you are a responsible dog owner who's thought about all of that stuff above (and think you and your dogs will be OK) is accommodation and dealing with locals - human and canine alike.
Bars and albergues do not welcome dogs, and cities can be a real challenge.
And (especially in Galicia) there are farm dogs who may take umbrage at intruders.
Buen Camino and pax to all!
 
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martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Maybe, maybe not.
A number if reactions in your post seem to come from a place of simple aversiom, or from not having read what the OP said.
  1. Responsible owners do not subject their dogs (or others) to ectoparisites, but medicate so that the dog has none.
  2. Responsible owners understand that others may not want the dogs in their face, and so make arrangements to have a tent or something so that the dog can sleep in safety and other pilgrims are not impacted.
  3. Responsible owners understand their dog's limits and do not push that - and in this case it seems that the OP knows what this is very well.
  4. Responsible owners DEFINITELY pick up after their dogs, and do not have a
And honestly? A dog - even a smelly, whining, and barking one - is less obnoxious than a drunk peregrino. Off topic, but can we ban them too? And then there are the putrid smells of socks and bodily odors (of all sorts) that people emit.
My two experiences of walking around responsible people who had brought their dogs were completely positive, as clearly was @Joziane 's:

And these were not toys, but in one case a Border Collie and Alsatian Mix-breed, and in another case a huge Newfie.

So welcome, @Tamargrace - I will be one of the "Goodie two shoes" who says try it and see for yourself.
The main concerns assuming you are a responsible dog owner who's thought about all of that stuff above (and think you and your dogs will be OK) is accommodation and dealing with locals - human and canine alike.
Bars and albergues do not welcome dogs, and cities can be a real challenge.
And (especially in Galicia) there are farm dogs who may take umbrage at intruders.
Buen Camino and pax to all!
Walked three Caminos. Biked one.
Never saw a drunk p e r e g r I n o....
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Wow, Marty I want to walk your Caminos!:D
I have had several 'interesting encounters,' including one at the Municipal in Burgos when a drunk peregrina tried to evict me from my bunk in the middle of the night insisting it was hers (it wasn't).
(Off topic but amusing....)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013) San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
This message is for the original op. I speak from limited experience (of pilgrims with dogs) as hospitalera on the CF. I have not seen many, and the one that stands out was a young French woman. A day or so after she passed through, she returned, heading home to France ( the albergue is early on the route). She was deeply upset because of the difficulty, or near impossibility, of having her beautiful dog accepted... She had walked through France with her dog without difficulty. You will have to make up your own mind, after your trial run, which will tell you about what your dogs are capable of. Buena suerte.
 

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
[ Via Francigena 2019]
Such a ' carry on ' over dog poo , admittedly nasty stuff but then I saw , and [ unfortunately ] smelled what seemed like tonnes of uncovered undisguised and utterly nasty human excrement . Invariably in the only shady spot available for kilometres , especially while walking the Meseta and sometimes and far more worrying within metres of water sources.
Perhaps we should ' train ' pilgrims to pick up after themselves .
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (Oct 2015), Camino Primitivo (Apr 2019)
I'm a worrier and I fell anxious every time I go out with my dogs. That is the only reason I wouldn't even try to take them on the camino.
I think the camino is not dog friendly mostly because people have misconceptions about dogs. I don't remember ever feeling scared about dogs on the camino, and I'm the type of person who will try to pet every single one that isn't behind a fence (those I just say hello to).

Besides the issues on the trail walking. Such as pooping on the trail (nice to smell dog poop on shoes in the A'burg)
Most dogs will choose grass and dirt to roads, you have poop on sidewalks from dogs that only walk on sidewalks and the owner is responsible for picking that up. But with the culture of picking poop up, we've gone a bit too far... how is a plastic bag better than a poop in the woods (where other animals poop too)?

I am hoping for a more dog friendly camino, and I wouldn't mind sleeping next to a smelly dog - always smells better than a smelly human, and let's be honest, on the camino that is all of us.

EDIT: a part of my post is missing, I quoted something about local dogs minding other dogs passing... And wrote that it is the same as everyday life, you meet other dogs and sometimes they get along great with your dog and sometimes they don't and a good owner knows how to handle the situation. I've seen this argued on the forum before and don't understand the issue.
 
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martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Wow, Marty I want to walk your Caminos!:D
I have had several 'interesting encounters,' including one at the Municipal in Burgos when a drunk peregrina tried to evict me from my bunk in the middle of the night insisting it was hers (it wasn't).
(Off topic but amusing....)
I did see a drunk guy laying on the side walk on Run do Franco in Santiago.
But that was day after I finished the Ingles last May.

Biking the VdlP in April. Hope I don't see drunks or dogs on the ride.
The bad boy farm dogs really scare me.
Anyone interested...will be biking mostly on N 630. Great bike ride across Spain.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I am one of the veteran pilgrims and repeat Pilgrim Office volunteers who take a dim view of people bringing their dog on a Camino. First, let me establish, as I have previously, that I love dogs.

Personally, I am a cat person, as that suits my lifestyle better. I am frequent traveler and cats do better with the separations. But, I love interacting with other people's dogs.

On my five Caminos to date I have encountered many dozens of dogs along the way and have never had problems. When on Camino, I am the 'dog whisperer.' I talk to them in Spanish and calm them down as I approach and pass by. It seems to work.

At the Pilgrim Office in Santiago, we have had to call animal control far too many times each summer for dogs who straggle in with peregrinos, after attaching themselves to the walkers as they walked though some village or hamlet along the way. These dogs do not wear collars, nor are they chipped. It is truly sad. In Spain, larger dogs are considered working or farm dogs, They are typically treated as domesticated animals on a farm, not as family pets. Anyone who shows them the least bit of kindness or food is likely to quickly pick up a new best friend for life. PLEASE, DO NOT DO THIS.

The dialog above from many persons aptly explains most of the reasons why it is not a particularly wise idea. I will not pile on except to add two observations from several years of experience:

1. A dog will follow its master into hell and back. It will put loyalty ahead of personal comfort, safety and health. That is why dogs are considered 'man's best friend.' However, this loyalty is a two-way street. The master must be observant enough to know the dog's limits. Just because the dog is seemingly keen or eager to follow the master along on a Camino, does not mean the dog is not stressed, over-taxed, or particularly happy about it. They just do it...until they drop. An owner must be the responsible adult in the partnership.

2. Depending on the route followed and the time of year you choose to walk, there will be more pilgrims of all cultures, and from countries all over the world. Many of these people will speaks neither Spanish nor English, so their ability to communicate effectively is diminished. Many of these people are dog averse, some from personal experience, and some from phobias. I have seen some folks, from some parts of the world, positively quake with fear in the presence of an untethered dog. The dog does not have to do anything, or make a sound. It does not matter that you are nearby. In many parts of the world, even today, authorities use trained dogs to quell disturbances or to enforce compliance from their populations. At the risk of incurring the wrath of the moderators, I shall not be more specific. Just consider some of the media coverage from around the world to insert your own vignettes to this argument.

So, while I support each pilgrim doing their individual Camino, and I do not judge how you choose to accomplish yours, I nonetheless take a dim view of people who bring dogs on the Camino. There is a time and place for everything. The Camino, at least from June through September, is not the place for your dog, at least IMHO.

Hope this helps.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The bad boy farm dogs really scare me.
Yeah. On a bike particularly. It brings out the chase instinct - but a squirt in the face with a water bottle harms no-one and keeps them at bay.
Buen dog- and drunk-free Camino, Marty!
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
I am one of the veteran pilgrims and repeat Pilgrim Office volunteers who take a dim view of people bringing their dog on a Camino. First, let me establish, as I have previously, that I love dogs.

Personally, I am a cat person, as that suits my lifestyle better. I am frequent traveler and cats do better with the separations. But, I love interacting with other people's dogs.

On my five Caminos to date I have encountered many dozens of dogs along the way and have never had problems. When on Camino, I am the 'dog whisperer.' I talk to them in Spanish and calm them down as I approach and pass by. It seems to work.

At the Pilgrim Office in Santiago, we have had to call animal control far too many times each summer for dogs who straggle in with peregrinos, after attaching themselves to the walkers as they walked though some village or hamlet along the way. These dogs do not wear collars, nor are they chipped. It is truly sad. In Spain, larger dogs are considered working or farm dogs, They are typically treated as domesticated animals on a farm, not as family pets. Anyone who shows them the least bit of kindness or food is likely to quickly pick up a new best friend for life. PLEASE, DO NOT DO THIS.

The dialog above from many persons aptly explains most of the reasons why it is not a particularly wise idea. I will not pile on except to add two observations from several years of experience:

1. A dog will follow its master into hell and back. It will put loyalty ahead of personal comfort, safety and health. That is why dogs are considered 'man's best friend.' However, this loyalty is a two-way street. The master must be observant enough to know the dog's limits. Just because the dog is seemingly keen or eager to follow the master along on a Camino, does not mean the dog is not stressed, over-taxed, or particularly happy about it. They just do it...until they drop. An owner must be the responsible adult in the partnership.

2. Depending on the route followed and the time of year you choose to walk, there will be more pilgrims of all cultures, and from countries all over the world. Many of these people will speaks neither Spanish nor English, so their ability to communicate effectively is diminished. Many of these people are dog averse, some from personal experience, and some from phobias. I have seen some folks, from some parts of the world, positively quake with fear in the presence of an untethered dog. The dog does not have to do anything, or make a sound. It does not matter that you are nearby. In many parts of the world, even today, authorities use trained dogs to quell disturbances or to enforce compliance from their populations. At the risk of incurring the wrath of the moderators, I shall not be more specific. Just consider some of the media coverage from around the world to insert your own vignettes to this argument.

So, while I support each pilgrim doing their individual Camino, and I do not judge how you choose to accomplish yours, I nonetheless take a dim view of people who bring dogs on the Camino. There is a time and place for everything. The Camino, at least from June through September, is not the place for your dog, at least IMHO.

Hope this helps.
Excellent comment! Thank you.

Since I voted no dogs on the Camino, I am sure when I ride the VdlP next month the dogs will be looking for me! Dog mail -- sniff, sniff, every where a sniff... (meaning e mail for humans) is a dog www. They will pass the word, from sniff to sniff, about me from spot-to-spot. Soon there will be packs of mad barking dogs running after me.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I don't remember ever feeling scared about dogs on the camino, and I'm the type of person who will try to pet every single one that isn't behind a fence (those I just say hello to).
Of course you weren't scared about dogs on the Camino because you aren't innately scared of them. Many people do have a fear of dogs and do not appreciate having dogs imposed on them. I grew up very afraid of dogs because a large dog attacked me and bit me in the face when I was only three years old. My parents kept this fact from me, and I never knew that it had happened until I was an adult, and a relative told me about it. Slowly, over the years I have overcome the fear, but I still have no desire to have dogs jumping and sniffing around me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked part of the Camino Frances and plan to start over in April 2018.
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
I agree with Martyseville. Please leave the dogs at home.
 

Victoria65

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's SJ to Sahagun 2015, Sahagun to Santiago 2016, Le Puy Route, SJPDP to Santiago (2018)
Such a ' carry on ' over dog poo , admittedly nasty stuff but then I saw , and [ unfortunately ] smelled what seemed like tonnes of uncovered undisguised and utterly nasty human excrement . Invariably in the only shady spot available for kilometres , especially while walking the Meseta and sometimes and far more worrying within metres of water sources.
Perhaps we should ' train ' pilgrims to pick up after themselves .
Ladies (and occasionally men) please stop leaving piles and piles of non-biodegradable tissues and TP. At least doggy poop disappears after a while. I love dogs and would love to get my daily "dog fix" while on the Camino. I have always had three large dogs at the same time and they love to go hiking. But that being said I am not so sure about how kind it would be on the dog. Long hot days, concrete walking. My Golden burned the pads of her front paws on hot concrete! Highly recommend against it. Your decision obviously. What a happy reunion you will have upon your return! Buen Camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
RJM stated it very well.

This was mentioned before on the forum. I didn't say much. Though it over and now time to speak up and tell it like it is.

Sorry, not everyone enjoys and loves your dogs.
Please don't bring dogs on your Camino.
Leave them at home.

Not a good idea. If you like, read on. Lets really get down to the nitty gritty of this idea of yours......

You are correct, majority of the people on this forum do not want your dogs on the Camino.

A major airline recently did a survey of so called "comfort dogs" "service dogs". ((yes there are many bonified cases where these dogs are helpful and warranted. BUT, the survey revealed that the majority of people were fakes! Over 65 to 80 % were fakes! The majority of customers did not want dogs on the flights. So why did these people keep on bringing these so called "comfort dogs?" Cause it was about them. Not others. ))

I am sure you are going to have the goodie too shoes on here who will say bring them...

Let me be frank about this.............leave them at home and do us a favor.

Besides the issues on the trail walking. Such as pooping on the trail (nice to smell dog poop on shoes in the A'burg), barking at other walkers who want peace and quite, jumping, snapping and barking at bikers (there are enough problems between walkers and bikers as it is now -- why add more problems?).

Lagging more food and water along for the dog (unless they can carry their own in doggie packs). Biting some one ((yes it does happen - even with the nicest puppies out there)) and having to deal with that. I know walkers who would be scared to pass you and your dogs on a tight section of the trail. Leaving them tied up outside a cafe/bar to bark while you are inside buying something or enjoying your morning what ever....
Transportation? How are you going to get them to the start of your Camino and back home? How are you going to do that? Not on most buses in Spain. Nor on trains. So more problems for you.

I am sure you love your dog. That is good. But, what about the dog? What happens if it gets hurt? or cannot walk due to hurt pads? Sick? Your walk is hard enough. You signed up for it. The dog didn't. Why put him/her through it?

Now, lets talk down to earth reality in the A'burg:

Did you ever consider that others have allergies to dogs? And DO NOT want your dogs around them?

Here we go....dogs inside the A'burg. Smell. Fleas. Ticks. Barking. Potty time? Dog food on the floor. More smell...
Stinky feet are enough. Why add more?

Snoring is enough of a problem on the Camino. So why don't you add barking, whining, dogs ?? duhhh

Don't care how well you take care of your dogs....on a long distance walk like the Camino... fleas and ticks will find their way to your dog. And in turn to us.
We have enough worries with bed bugs.
Rainy days... ughhhh ... adds more smell. Yes, dogs smell when wet.

How are you going to care for your dog all night long?
Dogs bark and whine. We want our peaceful sleep.
Your dogs will bark at other dogs, cats etc. Of course you will say they won't bark and keep others up at night. That may be so. But when they see a stray cat or dog the WILL bark.

What you gonna sleep with them in the bed?
Great for the next walker.
Nothing like dog smell residue in the bunk - bunk area.

So you tie them up outside. Most dogs will bark. Waking us up anyway.
So you keep them by your bunk. People are going to have to step over them.
When a dog is stepped on by a stranger = the dog bites. More problems.

Oh forgot about the very mean big boy farm dogs. They would eat your dogs for lunch. And you won't dare put your hands in the middle of it. So why do that to your dogs?

List can go on and on.

Hey, can I bring my pet pig along? Let him sleep inside with me in my bunk?
How about other animals?
Where is the line drawn?
Good enough for your barking, whining, smelly, dog...why not chickens? Pigs?
Rabbits? Crocs? Birds?

IMHO I would say the majority of people on this forum do not care for your idea.

With the greatest respect, one must ask, if you are one of these "all about me" types? Could care less how your dogs are a nuisance to people (barking, smell, poop, pee, whining, biting, etc)?? You don't sound like that type. But, there are many of them out there. Who will follow suit and bring their dogs.

Of course, everyone who has a dog will say:
"oh no, not my dog"

Dont get me wrong. I love and enjoy all animals. Especially cats and dogs.
But your Camino is not for dogs.

If addressing it head on now on this forum is not for you, then how are you going to cope with someone being very straight forward to you face to face on the Camino and tell you "your dogs dont belong in here on the Camino". ??

Better to get true open feed back now on this forum than waiting to run into the rude person on the Camino who has his/her fill of dogs and lets you have it.
While my response may sound rude, I am sorry. I feel it is better to get your attention and have you think it out. Than to be sorry on the Camino.

Think about it...

The way you sound about your dogs makes one to believe you would be very sensitive to someone saying something negative face-to-face about your dogs.
Then what? Makes not a pleasant Camino for you, the dogs, and others.
Advice and responses can be given without being cruel .....surely ??
Best wishes
Annette
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
Dogs are welcome in many places in European countries where they are not in the USA. ( I notice that many people responding to this post are from the US.) I walked in France (Le Puy to Conques) with friends who had a big dog-- it was fine. --We had a tent, but we were welcome in restaurants and cafes. Really, there was no problem. You're living in Northern Spain so you can always take them home if there is a problem with them or with pilgrims interactions with them. Personally, I loved seeing dogs on the Camino. Dogs bring people joy. If your dogs are up for it-- walk Irun to Bilbao and see how it goes. I'd bring a tent just to make sure you'l have shelter for the night.

Kate
 

JanelMcB

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2018)
I enjoy the occasional contact with a dog as much as anyone. They can bring a smile to one's face and be calming and relaxing. They can also be unpredictable and become aggressive for no apparent reason. It is for that reason that I would rather not see dogs on the Camino.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Ladies! Ladies! and Gentlemen too of course!

The OP is planning to walk the trail between Irún and Bilbao and would like some advice about this as a try out.


Seems that advice in general is available in ample abundance. Now, if someone has tips about the Irún - Bilbao trail, this would also answer the question of the OP.

Tamargrace, in the good old days when there were no forums to speak of, pilgrims walked the Caminos too. Perhaps you should stick to pre-forum days and just go for it. Make sure you have some back-up, someone who will come to fetch you and the dogs in case of problems. and GO. It is only a week, for crying out loud. Chop the entire Camino into separate stretches of one week, many Spaniards do it that way, avoid the heat of summer, cherish your back-up and you'll be doing just fine.

@lilakmonoke has some amazing pictures from the area, he walked there with dogs; he writes: i walked from bilbao to irun which is my favourite walk along the stunning basque coast between deba and zumaia

thread here:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/rdlp-in-spring-2018-with-dog-canine-companions.52258/#post-576784
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I cannot imagine staying in albergue where a fellow pilgrim has a dog tied up outside and the dog is constantly barking and howling. It's just not fair to the dog and to other pilgrims.[/QUOTE said:
I can - it's awful. Every dog in town responds. Think 'Twilight Barking' if you've ever read Dodie Smith.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
Oh wow !! Thankyou all for all the effort and passion you all put into the responses. I have already made plans NOT to take the dogs but seeing as I am only down the road from the section I am walking I just wanted to know wat it was like for dogs. Which I am still slightly unaware of as the post seemed to take its own turn about dogs in general rather than the irun to bilbao section in march which was stated in my original post. My main concern is not being welcome which they clearly are not by most (which I fully understand and accept) and that is why i am trialling it on my own. SIN PERROS!!!

But one day I do want to bring my babies with me as they protect me and they feel protected with me. They are great hiking companions and I have had no problems with people here in the Basque Country yet, people love them.

I would never stay in an albergue with them. I would do what i did on the cornish coast and carry a tent. Its not fair on anyone involved, especially me and the dogs-this was NEVER my intention. I am a very responsible dog owner regarding tethering dog poo fleas etc but I dont have to justify this to anyone.

I still have many Basque mountains to climb and trails to walk with my dogs so I will leave the dogs at home for this one. I am currently walking the idiazabel cheese trail with them(which is worth checking out if you ever want to see some beautiful scenery)but we go home at night

Thankyou for your input even though I am still unaware of my original question, which was what is the irun to bilbao section like in march for dogs. We all have opinions and fear, I just wanted factual information on this subject. It would help to have advice how to make the trip easier for all involved. Dogs will always be near walks and paths do lets try to work together

I think I might bring my pygmy goat instead as that is much more fitting for a pilgrim. (Wink wink)

Buen camino sin o con perros xxx
 
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kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
I enjoy the occasional contact with a dog as much as anyone. They can bring a smile to one's face and be calming and relaxing. They can also be unpredictable and become aggressive for no apparent reason. It is for that reason that I would rather not see dogs on the Camino.
I've got to disagree here. These dogs the OP is talking about are socialized and fit. Also-- your generalization about unpredictable and aggressive is painting with a very broad brush. I work in elementary schools that have dogs in the classrooms and it's worked out wonderfully for the kids and the dogs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2008
2013
(2018)
I walked for a long stretch on the camino with a man and his rescue dog. They were part of some organisation and trying to create focus on the harsh conditions many spanish dogs live under.

They were accepted almost everywhere, but they also slept in a tent every night outside the albergues, and then he payed to use the bathing facilities. The dog was well behaved, never strayed from the spot his human showed him and never ever barked.

When I was sleeping inside the albergues, amidst human smell and sounds, I often envied them the peace and quiet of the tent and the fresh outdoor air.

For my sake, if your dogs are well behaved and well trained as you write, I for one see no problems and hope to meet you on some trail some day.

In Denmark, Norway and Sweden a lot of people bring their dogs for the various trails. I think it is better for the dog than living in an apartment in the city somewhere and only walking on pavement.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I think that maybe what it comes down to in the matter of walking with a dog on the Camino is when and where? A busy Camino route in the height of the walking season? I would say it is a bad idea simply because the majority of fellow pilgrims (many of which own dogs and love dogs) prefer not to share sleeping quarters and restaurants with a dog. One should strive not to be egocentric when on something like a busy Camino where you come in contact with many people and live and at times eat communally. One should put away any notions and assumptions that everyone should love dogs and that dogs bring them the same joy they bring you. That can be naive and selfish to think that way.
If you are walking a less busy route and camping outside. Sure, why not. Just don't wear the animal out. It is cruel.
As far as intoxicated pilgrims on the Camino, I saw a few and on a couple of occasions had them try and get back in the albergue after the doors were locked. Knocking loudly on the doors and begging to be let in. I remember one guy wailing "peregrinos, please let me in.....pleeeease". ha ha. That was at about 2:00 am and went on for 30 minutes or so. I saw him the next morning curled up sleeping outside near the doors. A young Italian guy. All the other pilgrims leaving were giving him wide berth like he had the plague or something, ha ha. I woke him up, helped him get his stuff sorted and on the path again. Getting pissed like that when staying in an albergue, that's selfish and egocentric too. As they say, get a room.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
7
Tamargrace, in the good old days when there were no forums to speak of, pilgrims walked the Caminos too. Perhaps you should stick to pre-forum days and just go for it. Make sure you have some back-up, someone who will come to fetch you and the dogs in case of problems. and GO. It is only a week, for crying out loud. Chop the entire Camino into separate stretches of one week, many Spaniards do it that way, avoid the heat of summer, cherish your back-up and you'll be doing just

Yes i might just trail a day or two wild camping (near my home too) with my furry buddies and Im pretty confident it will be an enjoyable experience for everyone.

Poco a poco ...
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
I walked for a long stretch on the camino with a man and his rescue dog. They were part of some organisation and trying to create focus on the harsh conditions many spanish dogs live under.

They were accepted almost everywhere, but they also slept in a tent every night outside the albergues, and then he payed to use the bathing facilities. The dog was well behaved, never strayed from the spot his human showed him and never ever barked.

When I was sleeping inside the albergues, amidst human smell and sounds, I often envied them the peace and quiet of the tent and the fresh outdoor air.

For my sake, if your dogs are well behaved and well trained as you write, I for one see no problems and hope to meet you on some trail some day.

In Denmark, Norway and Sweden a lot of people bring their dogs for the various trails. I think it is better for the dog than living in an apartment in the city somewhere and only walking on pavement.

nice comment. Thank you.

When I did my camino, and when I do the VdlP next month, I use my hammock or small tent. Get a better nights sleep in it. I pay the A'burg. Shower. Do clothes. Eat. Visit with others and then to my home.

Yep little extra weight. But well worth the privacy. No snoring. No bed bugs. Always have my little familiar home with me each night. Many of the A'burgs I stopped at let me sleep in the garden, or back patios, in my tent. Loved it.

The OP sounds like a very responsible, nice person. And her dogs seem to be well maintained, disciplined and loved. They most likely would not present a problem on the Camino. Since she is caring and considerate. But, others with dogs may not be like her. Thus the problem(s).

Many excellent comments on here regarding dogs on the Camino. Guess we could have a hate-love debate about bikers on the Camino. Some love 'em. Some do not like them (bikers).

I am in a world of hurt next month. Being a biker and the dogs will be out for me.

Most important >>>> enjoy YOUR Camino. Bless all of you.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
Here are the dogs in question. This photo was taken in Cornwall, England on my smallholding. Joey in the front is 5 years and Dusty at the back is 4 years. I have had them from puppies and they are very intelligent and caring animals. Brilliant around livestock as they had their own in Cornwall and just really happy dogs. Dusty does get nervous when she is on her own but she always has Joey so its not an issue that much. They have high endurance and stamina and they keep me going too. We are spoiled for choice out here in Gipuzkoa with so many walks and places to explore. But unfortunately the weather has been pretty volitile up untill now...

Thankyou for all your responses xx
 

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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
One should put away any notions and assumptions that everyone should love dogs and that dogs bring them the same joy they bring you. That can be
Exactly. And also put away the idea that people who don't love your dogs are heartless and horrible people.
Sorry to get off the OP's topic.
I have to say that the Spanish dogs that I saw generally didn't bother me at all, as they were generally disinterested in pilgrims. And I've been in Guatemala for a month now, and there are dogs in the street everywhere here, none of whom have bothered me at all. It's usually people's pets that are not trained well, who jump and slobber on everyone that they meet that I would rather avoid.
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
Actually who can you trust more? Dogs or humans.

Sorry folks ... I say dogs.

I have stealth camped many times on the Camino. ((yes, yes, no fires, no trash, etc and when possible get permission).

I never feared four legged things when in my hammock in the woods.
I do fear the two legged species.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
As long as taking your dogs back into the UK comfortably for them rabies-inoculation-wise and so on, pilgrim dogs accompanying human pilgrims are non-problematic -- but you will find that they will restrict to some extent your accommodation possibilities and/or conditions. Many of the albergues that do allow dogs, and not all of them do, will basically require you to be actively in charge of them all night long -- though I'm sure that's what your dogs and yourself would expect anyway, but there's a difference if it's someone else imposing it upon you.

As a result of this, you'd need to prepare for the occasional need to sleep outdoors.

So add a solid sleeping bag and some manner of inflatable mattress to what your dogs would need from you, maybe even an ultra light tent.

This isn't so much prejudice as the fact that most albergues cannot materially accommodate dogs.

As for martyseville's opinion ? Ignore it.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
My concern walking with a dog(s) would be doing the stretches where one is road walking sharing the route with cars and trucks. You would want to tether them for sure and now you are being pulled or pulling some 50 pounds or so with a backpack, no way!
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
As long as taking your dogs back into the UK comfortably for them rabies-inoculation-wise
They have passports and are rabies vacinated as I live in Spain and dont plan on going back to the uk anytime soon. Its tapeworm that I need to have done the day before I go back which is a legal requirement.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I never feared four legged things when in my hammock in the woods.
You need to do some wilderness camping in Montana or Alaska. One definitely does think about things with four legs at night more than things with two legs.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
She was in tears as she explained that Kafka's paws were raw and bleeding from the walking. I'll paraphrase her words: "The camino is something I wanted to do. Kafka didn't have a vote. She came along because I wanted her with me and now look at her, I have caused her pain". Grite was so sad and she felt so guilty. See Kafka with new booties.
Dogs need training and physical capability and endurance same as we do -- if your dog is hurting, rest.

Take inspiration from the horse and donk pilgrims -- their number ONE concern is the animal, not themselves.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
My concern walking with a dog(s) would be doing the stretches where one is road walking sharing the route with cars and trucks. You would want to tether them for sure and now you are being pulled or pulling some 50 pounds or so with a backpack, no way!


This was my original concern and question regarding the stretch between irun and bilbao.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
There is also a thread running about lists of dog friendly places to stay. Post #4 has a link to a good list but it is very sparse and many days' walking between most of them.
I also put a note about some-one we saw on the Norte past Santander #7 on the same thread.
I think you are making the right decision to walk without your dogs, for their good as well as any possible problems with accommodation, walking near roads etc.
Buen (relaxed) Camino
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
So in conclusion

I will only take the dogs if i am very prepared for camping and for a bit of negative feedback but its best to leave them at home.

Be prepared for lots of extra work should i take them and dont even consider doing a peak route in peak season.

Dont ever take anything personally
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
So in conclusion

I will only take the dogs if i am very prepared for camping and for a bit of negative feedback but its best to leave them at home.

Be prepared for lots of extra work should i take them and dont even consider doing a peak route in peak season.

Dont ever take anything personally
Sounds sensible
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I'll just add that (somewhat paradoxically) I've seen personally that it's easier with dogs in the final 100K from Sarria than elsewhere -- even some of the more ludicrous lapdogs are capable of it.

It's short enough that an exercised dog can manage it without overly risking harm ; and the accommodation possibilities are more numerous and therefore varied than elsewhere, including canine welcome.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
This was my original concern and question regarding the stretch between irun and bilbao.
I know this part of the world because I have lived there for a number of years. Between Irun and Bilbao you will be walking on lots of city sidewalks and streets, there is not a lot of "wilderness." Granted I have not walked the stretch myself and only recently have made plans to start the Norte from Bilbao in a few months. The contour of the land between the border and Bilbao has the characteristics of fjords and I hate climbs like that.
 

Terry W

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2017
April 2018
April 2019
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
This is a real hard one I to love dogs and most of us treat them like family and when I walked in Aug last year I wanted to take one of my younger family. As it turned out I am so pleased I did not as the journey is a self centered spiritual one even if you dont start out this way. Now some points to concider.
At the hostels you would not be allowed a dog in them.
Cafes could move you on because of the dog.
In the small villages you will walk through you come across many dogs on the loose and big ones just sitting in the middle of the lanes and they just look at you and let you go. I do not know if that acceptance would go as far as your dogs we all know they are territorial .
Please I am not being negative just realistic. Good luck God bless.
 

Maybee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk Camino del Norte in May
Met a couple walking with a dog last September (Way of Le Puy). The weather was too cold and wet to camp as they had intended and they had to take taxis some distance to gites that would accept the dog. Some people just don't like dogs or are fearful of them. Saying, 'He/She won't hurt you,' is of no use if a dog is barking and jumping up. If you clear up after the dog, keep it on a lead throughout and make sure it is kept away from other walkers and farm animals, having a dog around might be tolerable for other walkers. Any animal, though, can be unpredictable, annoying or even dangerous. On balance I would say leave the hound at home.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
I have walked the whole Cornish coast with them and they were ace. They are welsh sheep dogs, pure working stock. Good endurance, tolerance and really happy peopledogs too.

I have seen alot of negative feedback regarding dogs on here and the last thing I want to do is annoy someone or dusturb someones camino. That would ruin the experience for me aswell!

My partner has said he can keep hold of the dogs but I cant help but feeling guilty as I know they would love it and miss me. Luckily I live in Northern Spain too so I can have visits from them or trail them on a good busy road free section...

Im doing irun to bilbao to test the water in a few weeks. What are your views on trailing them out on this section first???? Honest realistic and negative feedback welcome... but also keep in mind that these dogs will not have problems with stamina or poorly feet. They are so hardcore if they are broken , I will be broken waaaay before!!! I always flag first
Not a good idea to take them. There are many stray dogs along the way or dogs belonging to property owners close to where we pass through. I am not sure how they would react to other dogs. I had two dogs, stray, that walked with me for 8 km one day; very delightful experience.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
RJM stated it very well.

This was mentioned before on the forum. I didn't say much. Though it over and now time to speak up and tell it like it is.

Sorry, not everyone enjoys and loves your dogs.
Please don't bring dogs on your Camino.
Leave them at home.

Not a good idea. If you like, read on. Lets really get down to the nitty gritty of this idea of yours......

You are correct, majority of the people on this forum do not want your dogs on the Camino.

A major airline recently did a survey of so called "comfort dogs" "service dogs". ((yes there are many bonified cases where these dogs are helpful and warranted. BUT, the survey revealed that the majority of people were fakes! Over 65 to 80 % were fakes! The majority of customers did not want dogs on the flights. So why did these people keep on bringing these so called "comfort dogs?" Cause it was about them. Not others. ))

I am sure you are going to have the goodie too shoes on here who will say bring them...

Let me be frank about this.............leave them at home and do us a favor.

Besides the issues on the trail walking. Such as pooping on the trail (nice to smell dog poop on shoes in the A'burg), barking at other walkers who want peace and quite, jumping, snapping and barking at bikers (there are enough problems between walkers and bikers as it is now -- why add more problems?).

Lagging more food and water along for the dog (unless they can carry their own in doggie packs). Biting some one ((yes it does happen - even with the nicest puppies out there)) and having to deal with that. I know walkers who would be scared to pass you and your dogs on a tight section of the trail. Leaving them tied up outside a cafe/bar to bark while you are inside buying something or enjoying your morning what ever....
Transportation? How are you going to get them to the start of your Camino and back home? How are you going to do that? Not on most buses in Spain. Nor on trains. So more problems for you.

I am sure you love your dog. That is good. But, what about the dog? What happens if it gets hurt? or cannot walk due to hurt pads? Sick? Your walk is hard enough. You signed up for it. The dog didn't. Why put him/her through it?

Now, lets talk down to earth reality in the A'burg:

Did you ever consider that others have allergies to dogs? And DO NOT want your dogs around them?

Here we go....dogs inside the A'burg. Smell. Fleas. Ticks. Barking. Potty time? Dog food on the floor. More smell...
Stinky feet are enough. Why add more?

Snoring is enough of a problem on the Camino. So why don't you add barking, whining, dogs ?? duhhh

Don't care how well you take care of your dogs....on a long distance walk like the Camino... fleas and ticks will find their way to your dog. And in turn to us.
We have enough worries with bed bugs.
Rainy days... ughhhh ... adds more smell. Yes, dogs smell when wet.

How are you going to care for your dog all night long?
Dogs bark and whine. We want our peaceful sleep.
Your dogs will bark at other dogs, cats etc. Of course you will say they won't bark and keep others up at night. That may be so. But when they see a stray cat or dog the WILL bark.

What you gonna sleep with them in the bed?
Great for the next walker.
Nothing like dog smell residue in the bunk - bunk area.

So you tie them up outside. Most dogs will bark. Waking us up anyway.
So you keep them by your bunk. People are going to have to step over them.
When a dog is stepped on by a stranger = the dog bites. More problems.

Oh forgot about the very mean big boy farm dogs. They would eat your dogs for lunch. And you won't dare put your hands in the middle of it. So why do that to your dogs?

List can go on and on.

Hey, can I bring my pet pig along? Let him sleep inside with me in my bunk?
How about other animals?
Where is the line drawn?
Good enough for your barking, whining, smelly, dog...why not chickens? Pigs?
Rabbits? Crocs? Birds?

IMHO I would say the majority of people on this forum do not care for your idea.

With the greatest respect, one must ask, if you are one of these "all about me" types? Could care less how your dogs are a nuisance to people (barking, smell, poop, pee, whining, biting, etc)?? You don't sound like that type. But, there are many of them out there. Who will follow suit and bring their dogs.

Of course, everyone who has a dog will say:
"oh no, not my dog"

Dont get me wrong. I love and enjoy all animals. Especially cats and dogs.
But your Camino is not for dogs.

If addressing it head on now on this forum is not for you, then how are you going to cope with someone being very straight forward to you face to face on the Camino and tell you "your dogs dont belong in here on the Camino". ??

Better to get true open feed back now on this forum than waiting to run into the rude person on the Camino who has his/her fill of dogs and lets you have it.
While my response may sound rude, I am sorry. I feel it is better to get your attention and have you think it out. Than to be sorry on the Camino.

Think about it...

The way you sound about your dogs makes one to believe you would be very sensitive to someone saying something negative face-to-face about your dogs.
Then what? Makes not a pleasant Camino for you, the dogs, and others.
Ditto!!
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Here are the dogs in question. This photo was taken in Cornwall, England on my smallholding. Joey in the front is 5 years and Dusty at the back is 4 years. I have had them from puppies and they are very intelligent and caring animals. Brilliant around livestock as they had their own in Cornwall and just really happy dogs. Dusty does get nervous when she is on her own but she always has Joey so its not an issue that much. They have high endurance and stamina and they keep me going too. We are spoiled for choice out here in Gipuzkoa with so many walks and places to explore. But unfortunately the weather has been pretty volitile up untill now...

Thankyou for all your responses xx
They are beautiful
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
No, just no. You are making your choice theirs which is not appropriate. Enjoy your Camino and enjoy, even more, the welcome your dogs will give you when you get home.
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
Here are the dogs in question. This photo was taken in Cornwall, England on my smallholding. Joey in the front is 5 years and Dusty at the back is 4 years. I have had them from puppies and they are very intelligent and caring animals. Brilliant around livestock as they had their own in Cornwall and just really happy dogs. Dusty does get nervous when she is on her own but she always has Joey so its not an issue that much. They have high endurance and stamina and they keep me going too. We are spoiled for choice out here in Gipuzkoa with so many walks and places to explore. But unfortunately the weather has been pretty volitile up untill now...

Thankyou for all your responses xx
Beauties!!
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Dogs have all too often bitten me. They make me nervous. But I think you should take them if you want. You are a grown up, local, and know your dogs. It's your choice to choose where and when you walk your dogs, and how far.

Anyway, I'm off to Rome this year...
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
Here are the dogs in question. This photo was taken in Cornwall, England on my smallholding. Joey in the front is 5 years and Dusty at the back is 4 years. I have had them from puppies and they are very intelligent and caring animals. Brilliant around livestock as they had their own in Cornwall and just really happy dogs. Dusty does get nervous when she is on her own but she always has Joey so its not an issue that much. They have high endurance and stamina and they keep me going too. We are spoiled for choice out here in Gipuzkoa with so many walks and places to explore. But unfortunately the weather has been pretty volitile up untill now...

Thankyou for all your responses xx
Gorgeous! Thanks for posting-- :)
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
I can’t believe I just read this whole thread that I am completely dispassionate about!
But the comment about smuggling a dog in an albergue bed nearly got me going. Surely no one would ever do that?
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
I can’t believe I just read this whole thread that I am completely dispassionate about!
But the comment about smuggling a dog in an albergue bed nearly got me going. Surely no one would ever do that?
Yep. Seen it done. Puppy that some walker found on the camino. Carried in bag attached to pack.
And, yep, a parrot. That spoke his mind when he wanted to. Especially if you moved close to him...day or night. One nasty guy. Guess he was cursing at all of us in his own language. Few started cursing back at him.

People would laugh saying "don't walk by that damn bird in the night or he will curse you and wake everyone up.

That Mr Parrot was bout ready to go on his final one way flight.

The amazing thing is he was kept under the covers late at night!

You know what parrots do??? they surely don't use a liter box...and they don't use toilet paper either!

Dont think parrots can be nasty and naughty, ask around.

Hey threads like this are good rainy day reading! or when you are bored and have nothing else to read.

Wonder if dogs are winning or no-dog folks are winning ?
 
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Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Wonder if dogs are winning or no-dog folks are winning ?
My preference if at all possible is to find a compromise that can be acceptable to all rather than having a dichotomy that becomes necessarily alienating.
I would probably aim for a resolution of “if you can care for the needs of your animal and be considerate of other people and animals you come across on the way, then by all means try it”. Some of the posts may have raised issues that the questioner had not considered and could help in her preparations.
But I could not stretch to being generous about animals using pilgrim beds!
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
My concern walking with a dog(s) would be doing the stretches where one is road walking sharing the route with cars and trucks. You would want to tether them for sure and now you are being pulled or pulling some 50 pounds or so with a backpack, no way!
There are actually well trained dogs that don't pull on a lead, and/or will stay in a heel position when told to without a lead. i own one. He works the sheep and always looks to me for instruction.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
No, just no. You are making your choice theirs which is not appropriate.

But arent you trying to make my choice your own. Surely I know what my sheepdogs enjoy more :p

Wonder if dogs are winning or no-dog folks are winning ?
And I would hate to think of this as a battle or war. Thats everything thats wrong with the world surely. Life is about acceptance and tolerance to other peoples beliefs and customs. Lets work together and try to make the most enjoyable journey for all involved, including non human species.

I would like to emphasise once again, I NEVER said I was taking the dogs. All I wanted to know was what is the route between Bilbao and Irun like should I take the animals that live in Gipuzkoa anyway (the province of donostia/san sebastian- it takes me 45 minutes to drive to Zarautz).

Buen camino x
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
My preference if at all possible is to find a compromise that can be acceptable to all rather than having a dichotomy that becomes necessarily alienating.
I would probably aim for a resolution of “if you can care for the needs of your animal and be considerate of other people and animals you come across on the way, then by all means try it”. Some of the posts may have raised issues that the questioner had not considered and could help in her preparations.
But I could not stretch to being generous about animals using pilgrim beds!
I agree. To me, an ideal solution to any conflict is win-win, rather than having a winner and a loser. I certainly don't mind sharing the Camino with well trained dogs. My posts were just to point out that everyone has a different reaction to dogs, and that considerate dog owners need to realize that. @Tamargrace seems to be considerate of other pilgrims and the needs of the dogs.
 

kelleymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
You need to do some wilderness camping in Montana or Alaska. One definitely does think about things with four legs at night more than things with two legs.
Yes! (ha.) But when wilderness camping I worry about bears, raccoons, coyotes-- not dogs.
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
mmm possibly this thread has arrived at a dogs end.

The OP has wonderful dogs. As stated, now has some other points of view that may or may not be helpful to her.

If she does bring her dogs along, best wishes for her.

Seeing how nice the dogs are, she may have another problem:
people wanting to pet, feed and love them
 
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Houlet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Via de la Plata 2015
Camino Sanabres 2015
Camino Norde 2017
Cards on the table, I am a dog lover, and am delighted to say that they seem to like me too, so from a personal point of view I would have no problem sharing accommodation with a well behaved dog.

I doubt if I would take a dog on camino though, mainly because the routes go through small farms where the local dog population take exception to any invasion of their territory. Bear in mind most of the dogs I encountered on Camino were pretty big and are used to guard the sheep from wolves etc.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Yes! (ha.) But when wilderness camping I worry about bears, raccoons, coyotes-- not dogs.
True. All depends on where you hang your hammock or pitch your tent. I can't say I have ever been concerned with dogs while hiking and camping. Even the coyotes I have encountered wanted no part of me, but they do have some slightly spooky howls and calling to each other with yelps at night. I did see one run down and kill a fawn deer once. That was definitely dramatic.
I've run across feral (I guess they were) dogs before in the woods, in small packs. They're nothing to fear and they did not have an interest in me. It may have been different had I a dog accompanying me. There's bound to be that territorial and pecking order thing animals like them live and die by. My strange and new dog to them warrants their investigation.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
One thing I have found, walking with a dog attracts other dogs. At home, there are many places I walk past, with fences I cant see through. When I walk alone all is quiet. When I walk my babies, the barking follows me all the way into town.
 

Tamargrace

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet
One thing I have found, walking with a dog attracts other dogs. At home, there are many places I walk past, with fences I cant see through. When I walk alone all is quiet. When I walk my babies, the barking follows me all the way into town
Yes Dusty seems to attract males far and wide here, we always get the local farm dog tagging along with us. She must have a nice scent aswell as being very pretty and foriegn !!!
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
I am planning a solo Camino, the Frances again, maybe I might meet you and your dogs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
But arent you trying to make my choice your own. Surely I know what my sheepdogs enjoy more :p



And I would hate to think of this as a battle or war. Thats everything thats wrong with the world surely. Life is about acceptance and tolerance to other peoples beliefs and customs. Lets work together and try to make the most enjoyable journey for all involved, including non human species.

I would like to emphasise once again, I NEVER said I was taking the dogs. All I wanted to know was what is the route between Bilbao and Irun like should I take the animals that live in Gipuzkoa anyway (the province of donostia/san sebastian- it takes me 45 minutes to drive to Zarautz).

Buen camino x
I would rather not rush to judgement on what the sheepdogs might enjoy. Think of what dogs like: 1) their masters, 2) their homes/familiar surroundings, 3) their food. Does walking with them on Camino cover all three?

I have done lots of Caminos (planning my 10th) and have talked with a number of dog owners along the way and observed their dogs. Of about 20 dogs, I think I would have said that only 2 were having a good time. The others were doing what their masters wanted, and looked tired, and sometimes it was very difficult to find accommodations (the happy spaniel stayed in a tent with his mistress, and the happy mutt in hotel rooms with this master).

Most Spanish dogs are tied up, or behind fences, so should not cause your dogs trouble. However, if you are in an area where dogs are sheepherding, they may be seen as rivals or problems by the working dogs. Irun to Bilbao is a lovely stretch, and most humans I know will love it. I can't say I know dogs well enough to say.
 

marylynn

Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-12-14-15-16-17-18-(19) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
No, not one! In fact, I have heard several conversations about being able to drink much more Spanish wine and/or beer on the Camino and not feel inebriated or hungover in the morning, as we might at home if we drank the same amount. There were discussions about possibly a lower alcohol level in the beer or the lack of preservatives in the wine. I have experienced pilgrims having a good time, but not drunk or even seeming tipsy - and I'm not a prude. :)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
No, not one!
I know dogs gravitate to me sometimes (I do like them a lot).
But maybe also drunk peregrinos? This is a worry.:eek::D:D
Very off topic, mods. Sorry.

And I would hate to think of this as a battle or war. Thats everything thats wrong with the world surely. Life is about acceptance and tolerance to other peoples beliefs and customs. Lets work together and try to make the most enjoyable journey for all involved, including non human species.
Beautifully said, @Tamargrace! Yes. Please, let's.
 
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kaixo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Camino del Norte 2012
Geneva/Le Puy/SJPP/Bilbao 2015
Prague/Geneva ?
All I wanted to know was what is the route between Bilbao and Irun like should I take the animals that live in Gipuzkoa anyway
I have walked this section twice. I follow the coastal route and it is absolutely beautiful. It's so green, the vastness looking out to the Bay of Biscay and the roar from the waves is truly a gift along the way.IMG_1757.JPG
IMG_1762.JPGI swam in San Sebastian, Zarautz, and Deba (which may not work with the dogs ;)).
IMO, this section is more strenuous than the Frances, fewer pilgrims too, accommodations less frequent, it just feels more rural. The food is delicious, as you know. Basque culture and history is rich along this route and spending the day in Guernika is a highlight.
I love this section (I wish I were there right now) and I wish you buen camino.
 

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