Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.

Trail Runners I'm Looking at

Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Unique engravings about the Camino de Santiago from Gabriel and other art objects.

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
The great gift of this continuing pandemic is that you probably have time to wear through a pair of each before your next camino.

And now for a serious thought - You might want to check if these models are sold in Spain, because you may need to replace them before you reach the end of the VDLP, and you might prefer to wear a model that you can replace like for like.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Search through the posts from @davebugg he has some very good gear recommendations and evaluations.

Yes I've done that.
I was just seeking feedback on these two models.

@davebugg recommends the Hoke One One (various models)
I've yet to try those.
But I have been in touch with the company and it's been hard to find one of their shoes with a high enough drop for me. I need a higher drop due to tendon issues.

But I might end up trying those too.

I was so comfortable with my boots I'm really anxious about changing to trail runners.
So I might get 2 or 3 different ones to try out.

300 kms along the trail is too late to find out I don't like them :(
 

The Flying Scotsman

Yer a lang time deid
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Would also suggest trying Hoka One One Speadgoat 4 (for the reasons you mentioned)
 
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
The great gift of this continuing pandemic is that you probably have time to wear through a pair of each before your next camino.

And now for a serious thought - You might want to check if these models are sold in Spain, because you may need to replace them before you reach the end of the VDLP, and you might prefer to wear a model that you can replace like for like.

Great point!
Looking at Decathelon now.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Would also suggest trying Hoka One One Speadgoat 4 (for the reasons you mentioned)

Yes, I'll have another look at those.

This was the reply I got from the company.



Hi Rob,

Thanks for getting in touch re our trail shoes.

The best options for what you are needing would be (in order of protection) the Stinson ATR, The Speedgoat, The Challenger ATR.

None of theses shoes have a rock plate as the sheer volume of the midsole allows for adequate protection. Also the drop on the shoes is 4-5mm as the mild stable rocker allows for less stress to be placed onto the Achilles tendon. All the shoes have great grip, but the speedgoat is the one with Vibram megagrip 4mm lugs.

Have a look at these styles online and then get back to me with any questions.
 

The Flying Scotsman

Yer a lang time deid
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Yes I've done that.
I was just seeking feedback on these two models.

@davebugg recommends the Hoke One One (various models)
I've yet to try those.
But I have been in touch with the company and it's been hard to find one of their shoes with a high enough drop for me. I need a higher drop due to tendon issues.

But I might end up trying those too.

I was so comfortable with my boots I'm really anxious about changing to trail runners.
So I might get 2 or 3 different ones to try out.

300 kms along the trail is too late to find out I don't like them :(
With reference to your weight lost posts, I can't suggest strongly enough that you use the time to build strength. You may find that body issues you are looking for a podiatrist or shoe to solve become much less relevant. It is hard work but life changing IMHO.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
With reference to your weight lost posts, I can't suggest strongly enough that you use the time to build strength. You may find that body issues you are looking for a podiatrist or shoe to solve become much less relevant. It is hard work but life changing IMHO.

Good point. My Caminos to date have involved 'surviving'.
i.e. holding my body together long enough so I can make it :)
 

The Flying Scotsman

Yer a lang time deid
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Good point. My Caminos to date have involved 'surviving'.
i.e. holding my body together long enough so I can make it :)
Looking for a shoe to fit the body (foot fit is important :)) is a short term solution. The benefits of general Musculoskeletal strengthing allows you to change your body over time - injuries are also much reduced. Worth investing in a consultation with a good strength conditioning expert. A year's preparation before your next Camino will be a great time frame to making incredible changes.
 
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.
Unique engravings about the Camino de Santiago from Gabriel and other art objects.
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Looking for a shoe to fit the body (foot fit is important :)) is a short term solution. The benefits of general Musculoskeletal strengthening allows you to change your body over time - injuries are also much reduced. Worth investing in a consultation with a good strength conditioning expert. A year's preparation before your next Camino will be a great time frame to making incredible changes.

Where do a find a strength conditioning expert? Didn't even know that was a thing.

Is that a type of Physio or a type of personal trainer?

It was a personal trainer that caused by original achilles problem :)
 

The Flying Scotsman

Yer a lang time deid
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Where do a find a strength conditioning expert? Didn't even know that was a thing.

Is that a type of Physio or a type of personal trainer?

It was a personal trainer that caused by original achilles problem :)
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)

Harland2019

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April/May "2019"
I have thought about getting lighter shoes but I have always had concern whether it would reduce the cushioning effect of heavier shoes/boots. Whilst they would be Ok walking locally the added weight of the rucksack etc would put greater pressure on my feet/knees/hips and I would feel the ground underneath. Let us know how you get on. I am marginally overweight but in view of my height, I still weigh over 15 and a half stones.
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Rob
Hoka are nice enough. The latest clifton 7 has a lower cup to the back of the foot. My partner who has tendon issues swears by them. The only downside is that I think you can have too much grip. And they are pretty grippy.

I'd probably give them a try if I was you.


Fin

Edited due to poor listening skills. I originally suggested the challengers.
 
Last edited:
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Feet/shoes are so individual that you really have to try and find what suits you best. For myself, this is Hoka One One Speadgoat 4, my current pair is in fact the fourth. They are incredibly comfortable, light, and go well on gravel as well as on asphalt. I ordered them online directly from Hoka, where they are more expensive but their service is impeccable. (I ordered a half-size too large and had to return and replace them, no hassles, and within a few days. Oz might take a bit longer)

BC
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
Rob, i am sure you are already considering this, but just for safety's sake:

When you been hiking in boots(bootlike shoes) all your life, your tendons and ligaments and muscles might have gotten used to that kind of support. In trailrunners you will have a lot less of that support and that might lead to problems along the way.
So please be sure to train in this regard before taking on the camino in runners. (actually hiking at home in them is good training, so is doing stuff on a balance board. theres also videos on YT about how to train muscles for hiking.)
This will take time, but will be worth it once you set foot on the way again :)

btw: not sure about availability and if they are right for you: i LOVE my Inov8 Roclite G 290 Trailrunners and they did very good on the Frances.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I have walked in Brooks running shoes, and also walking sandals, both of which have been successful, its really whatever fits your feet best. I have tried most of the shoes recommended here and none of them worked for me - not one. It took months last time to track them all down and try them on all to no avail and great delay. Many of these were recommended by a podiatrist which proved to be either poor or completely ridiculous options. Why would they recommend a shoe that in order to fit the forefoot width would need to be 4-6 sizes too big! I have a size 38 length foot, with a wide forefoot, short toes, very high arch and narrow heels. I cant believe they would bring out a 45. It was like standing in clown shoes - even the retailer had to admit it was ridiculous. There were many shoes I would walk right out of, the shoe heel being 2-3 cm from my actual heel and not touching at the sides at all. Or that had the width in completely the wrong place for the metatarsal issue that I have. I have to admit to being sorely disappointed by podiatrists who knew the issues I had with my feet, and still recommended shoes which were completely wrong for me. It delayed proper training as I had eventually to order my usual Brooks which had to come from Sydney - another 4 week wait.
I have even purchased two pairs of shoes I have never been able to wear.
Feet are so individual that personal comfort and fit is everything. I now have a list of attributes that I can give a retailer - which normally narrows down the field to one or two shoes.
I now go to one specialist retailer who knows my feet and their issues, and only gives me suitable shoes to try on.
Go for what works for you. Buy a pair in plenty of time to test them out. And remember that they may not have the life of your regular boots, and you may need to buy a pair for training, and another pair for walking the Camino. I normally get about 800kms of tread from a pair, which doesn't last for both training and a long Camino.
 
Last edited:

Steven Light

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF (May - July 2018)
Meseta (October 2019)
Norte (Summer 2020)
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
I've done 2 Caminos in On Running shoes (a discontinued model, unfortunately). I love them! Super comfortable, durable, quick-drying. The concept of the tread is great. Highly recommend.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018, 2019
Looking at Decathelon now.
tldr: Saucony seems to be cheaper and more readily available in Spain.

In my experience, Decathlon's range is limited and leans to its in-house brands, such as Quecha and Forclaz clothing, B'Twin bicycles, etc. These products tend to be cheap and durable, but not "best in class," in terms of materials, design, or technology. If you want to smell bad before second breakfast, try one of their synthetic base layers.

Saucony's Spanish online shop has the Peregrine 11s at 140 EUR

The website also points to official retailers in Seville and Salamanca on the VDLP:

Since Saucony is part of the same group as Merrell, I guess you may come across their products in other stores.

I have read that the typical life of trail shoes is 500 to 800km. Salamanca is about 500km along the VDLP (roughly half way), it may be a suitable place for a planned change of shoes. If I were in your shoes (haha), I'd call ahead to confirm they have your size in stock:
DEPORTES CHACHE
Lugar
CL/BERMEJEROS,52-54
SALAMANCA 37001
Contacto
923 212318

Should they be out of stock, and you think that you'll need a change of shoes at some point before you reach Santiago, you would still have the option of ordering online and getting them delivered to a hotel in Zamora, for example. (Take rest days in Salamanca and Zamora in any case).

ON's Spanish website features the CloudUltras on its landing page. They're 190 EUR

ON's official retailers are not on the path that you will walk ... unless you continue north on the VDLP after Granja instead of turning left at the junction with the Sanabres:
AVENTURA DEPORTES
CALLE SAN ANTON VIEJO 7, BENAVENTE, ZAMORA, 49600, España
34980638389

Walking to Benavente would not be out of the question ... you can turn left there and cut across to join the Sanabres at Santa Marta. but overall I think it's "advantage Saucony" in terms of price and availability of replacements in Spain.

Back to my original post, I expect you do have time to walk a few hundred km before you start the Camino, so you might as well buy one pair of the models on your shortlist straight away and start assessing them under real world conditions.
 
Last edited:
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendant that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Sorry @Robo, this doesn't concern your original question but since conditioning has been brought up I would like to mention that I saw a forum post sometime back about walking barefoot in sand (there's sand in Australia right?) I suppose doing it the shoes of your choice would help too. Consider researching this cheap conditioning method.

Edit: A half hour after writing the paragraph above I saw this thread:
 
Last edited:
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
If you find a pair of shoes you like then buy and break in a second pair and bring them to Spain with you. Mail them to yourself general delivery to the town at the halfway point. Or, maybe better, to Ivar who might, for a few euros more, ship them fast to wherever needed. That way you could fully wear out one pair and maybe go home with one without too much use.
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
This is just my opinion, but I can not see the need to spend over $200 on any pair of trail runners for any Camino, even if you have bad knees. I have walked 800k several times and continue wearing the trail runners walking at home, however I do buy a new pair for each Camino to have the best cushioning starting out.
That said, I am a lightweight and realize that heavier people (mostly men) could wear out their shoes much quicker. I personally have always paid under $70 and been very happy.
EDIT...always buy when on sale.
 
Last edited:

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
@Robo Take your time switching to trail runners. Even the 4~5m drop might be 1/2 of what you have been walking in. Maybe start alternating days between your boots and new trail runners. I have used Hoka Bondis (n), and Altra Olympus, but I have stepped down in cushioning to a Altra Lone Peak. The former are like walking on air, but did not provide as much stability.

There are a lot of options that are lighter than boots. I have some leather New Balance 928v3 walking shoes that are great, and I know they have a lighter mesh versions. They do not have to be trail runners for the VLDP.

I do like the idea of a shoe available in Spain either for purchase or an extra pair. I only get about 350~500 miles (550 ~800km) out of my trail runners. It's not that I wear the soles out, but the infrastructure (cushioning) break down. Be mindful of this and switch them out, or it will catch you by surprise. I learned the hard way. You may consider a bounce box ... bring and extra pair and ship them to yourself general delivery in ~Merida.
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Casa Ivar Pin
Custom hard enamel pin badge with silver coloured locking pin. Size: 30 mm.

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
FYI, I wear orthotics in my shoes. Maybe it is specific to my foot anatomy, but they tend to cause additional wear to the inside back of the shoe. I have even worn through the material a couple of times, which can lead to blisters. I have tried a couple of different products, but I just put a layer of Leuko tape on the inside before I start the Camino. I change it as necessary.
 

Stewart K.

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
APril 2016
The Saucony Peregrines are excellent, altho I walked the Camino in a previous model. They excelled when the weather turned bad. Their grip is outstanding in mud, snow and on wet rocks. Otherwise, they walk like any other trail runners.
 

AncientMariner

Anticipate Spring 2022 Lisbon trek
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
If you find a pair of shoes you like then buy and break in a second pair and bring them to Spain with you. Mail them to yourself general delivery to the town at the halfway point. Or, maybe better, to Ivar who might, for a few euros more, ship them fast to wherever needed. That way you could fully wear out one pair and maybe go home with one without too much use.
I concur with this plan but I am basing the two-shoe decision on the surfaces encountered along my path. I am currently planning on Lisbon-Santiago camino in spring of 2022. The first portion of this trek is on hard, flat walkways ... sidewalks, roadways, boardwalks ... that point to shoes that are better suited for these surfaces. The latter part is more natural trails that indicate a different type of shoe. With a year to go, both pairs of shoes can be broken in prior to leaving the USA. I'm a newbie & open (and appreciate) all suggestions.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Please check out New Balance.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.

Of course proper fit and comfort are paramount in a walking shoe. And where you are using it is another factor to consider.

There was a discussion a few months ago-about Recommendation for Grippy
Souls
. I, personally, would not invest in a very expensive soft bottom shoe for much pavement walking like on the CF.....soft bottoms that would likely be worn out by the time I got to the end of the walk. For me it would not be a good investment. Besides fit and comfort, I want to get at least 1000km from a pair of shoes with about 600km on hard surface. So if I spend $150 on a pair of trail runners then that amounts to 15 cents per km...verses 600km for $300 which is 50 cents per Km. I tend to go with a hard bottom, Vibram shoe that I know will hold up. I toughen up my feet by doing a lot of slow walking on paved trail paths at home, as well as uneven rocky trails to get the muscles used to the instabilty. The shoes I use are great for mountain trail hiking because they grip trails, and offer great support for my feet on streets, but are slippery on wet tiles and-slate in cities. Something, I am willing to deal with.

 
Last edited:
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.

AncientMariner

Anticipate Spring 2022 Lisbon trek
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I concur with this plan but I am basing the two-shoe decision on the surfaces encountered along my path. I am currently planning on Lisbon-Santiago camino in spring of 2022. The first portion of this trek is on hard, flat walkways ... sidewalks, roadways, boardwalks ... that point to shoes that are better suited for these surfaces. The latter part is more natural trails that indicate a different type of shoe. With a year to go, both pairs of shoes can be broken in prior to leaving the USA. I'm a newbie & open (and appreciate) all suggestions.
My current shoes are: for hard surfaces: old & heavy New Balance ?? (already on hand), and for trails, Altra Lone Peak 5 (on order). My feet are very wide ... EE ... so room in the toe box is important.
 

Viggen

Vigo
Year of past OR future Camino
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Your choices have been reviewed in the following link, it may be interesting to you.
https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/best-trail-running-shoes.html.
I have walked caminos in La Sportivas and Saucony Peregrines. I am now trying out shoes for my next caminos. My favorites were the Altras, the Lone Peak and Timp, but became suspicious of Altra's zero drop and a pain that developed in my knee. Now I'm down to two trail runners, Saucony Pergrine ST and Salomon Sense Ride 3. I think I'm going with Sense Ride 3.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Yes I've done that.
I was just seeking feedback on these two models.

@davebugg recommends the Hoke One One (various models)
I've yet to try those.
But I have been in touch with the company and it's been hard to find one of their shoes with a high enough drop for me. I need a higher drop due to tendon issues.

But I might end up trying those too.

I was so comfortable with my boots I'm really anxious about changing to trail runners.
So I might get 2 or 3 different ones to try out.

300 kms along the trail is too late to find out I don't like them :(
I bet you have read that everybody is different my friend . I have always used trail runners. Just recently (I see you have checked it out) in the discussion that was started by our gear guru @davebugg. I wrote that I hate to change whatever works for me. My wife has suffered with knee problems for many years and a few years ago had surgery on both her knees. She was still having problems even just after walking 20-30 minutes. I got on the forum and saw how many people raved about Hoka One on One. I bought her (I believe) The Rincon. She says they are like walking on air. She loves them and they are very light. They have made a big change. Recently I bought a pair of Speedgoat 4's. They are great and I love walking in them. But even though I am surrounded by cobblestone streets and they absorb the shock better than my Brooks Cascadias that I have worn for all my caminos I am still going to wear the Brooks (I know you too want to walk the VDLP) from Sevilla. I have never had problems with them and have a minimal number of blisters over the years. My head tells me that I should wear the Hoka's but my heart and Camino gear neurosis makes it difficult to make rational decision especially, as all of us knows anything that has to do with our Cinderella feet.
 

BombayBill

Still Learning
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
tldr: Saucony seems to be cheaper and more readily available in Spain.

In my experience, Decathlon's range is limited and leans to its in-house brands, such as Quecha and Forclaz clothing, B'Twin bicycles, etc. These products tend to be cheap and durable, but not "best in class," in terms of materials, design, or technology. If you want to smell bad before second breakfast, try one of their synthetic base layers.

Saucony's Spanish online shop has the Peregrine 11s at 140 EUR

The website also points to official retailers in Seville and Salamanca on the VDLP:

Since Saucony is part of the same group as Merrell, I guess you may come across their products in other stores.

I have read that the typical life of trail shoes is 500 to 800km. Salamanca is about 500km along the VDLP (roughly half way), it may be a suitable place for a planned change of shoes. If I were in your shoes (haha), I'd call ahead to confirm they have your size in stock:
DEPORTES CHACHE
Lugar
CL/BERMEJEROS,52-54
SALAMANCA 37001
Contacto
923 212318

Should they be out of stock, and you think that you'll need a change of shoes at some point before you reach Santiago, you would still have the option of ordering online and getting them delivered to a hotel in Zamora, for example. (Take rest days in Salamanca and Zamora in any case).

ON's Spanish website features the CloudUltras on its landing page. They're 190 EUR

ON's official retailers are not on the path that you will walk ... unless you continue north on the VDLP after Granja instead of turning left at the junction with the Sanabres:
AVENTURA DEPORTES
CALLE SAN ANTON VIEJO 7, BENAVENTE, ZAMORA, 49600, España
34980638389

Walking to Benavente would not be out of the question ... you can turn left there and cut across to join the Sanabres at Santa Marta. but overall I think it's "advantage Saucony" in terms of price and availability of replacements in Spain.

Back to my original post, I expect you do have time to walk a few hundred km before you start the Camino, so you might as well buy one pair of the models on your shortlist straight away and start assessing them under real world conditions.
I'm always skeptical when I see soles that have holes through them. Just the kinda place a pebble will lodge in I think. Just my opinion.
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
I'm always skeptical when I see soles that have holes through them. Just the kinda place a pebble will lodge in I think. Just my opinion.
 

The Flying Scotsman

Yer a lang time deid
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I'm always skeptical when I see soles that have holes through them. Just the kinda place a pebble will lodge in I think. Just my opinion.

I'm always skeptical when I see soles that have holes through them. Just the kinda place a pebble will lodge in I think. Just my opinion.
Not a problem on these new On Cloud soles. The old models though... 😱
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20210308-184501_Chrome.jpg
    Screenshot_20210308-184501_Chrome.jpg
    169.4 KB · Views: 15
Unique engravings about the Camino de Santiago from Gabriel and other art objects.
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

Viggen

Vigo
Year of past OR future Camino
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Most running shoes are designed to last between 300 and 500 miles, that’s if you are running. I assume it’s safe to assume it should last 500 miles of walking.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I can not see the need to spend over $200 on any pair of trail runners for any Camino,
Yes, I noticed that high price too. However, if that is the best (or only) shoe to give freedom from pain while you walk long distances, and you can afford it, it is money well spent. Better to skip a dinner out, or something else, and spend the money on walking shoes. Some of us have no trouble with shoes, but others of us really do! Few women's shoes are available in Wide widths. I would spend an extra $100 with no regrets to make my feet more comfortable.
Feet are so individual that personal comfort and fit is everything.
...
I have tried most of the shoes recommended here and none of them worked for me - not one.
...
I have a size 38 length foot, with a wide forefoot, short toes, very high arch and narrow heels....
metatarsal issue...
...
...I had eventually to order my usual Brooks
Our feet sound like twins. I am back to my third pair of Brooks Ghost. I had to go without waterproofing (I wanted it for wet winter traiing) and they only provide adequate cushioning for about 800 km, but they are the most comfortable for me. I simply would not be able to walk the same distances with most shoes.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Quick note on the Hoka Speedgoats - they (and some other models) are now available in a wide fitting, that's D for women and EE for men. Not that women have to buy the women's version ... I have been walking in Speedgoats for years now, they are light, cushy, stable and have a part vibram sole that makes them last longer than the Cliftons and Challengers. I have the non-waterproof ones and take a spare pair of insoles to switch in if they get wet. The shoe in itself dries very quickly. They have the Nidarosa seal of pilgrim approval. YMMV.
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
@Camino Chrissy Shoes are the single one item i would not care for what it costs. A Camino can easily cost a couple of thousands, depending were you have to travel from (and sometimes: lost income). If my shoes are not perfect, the experience will be vastly worse. I'd rather go cheap on anything (or everything) else.

edit: that does not mean that more expensive is always better of course.
 

DeansFamily

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 18/916/10/17 Muxia/Finisterre 18/10-22/10/17 Norte 21/4-29/5/18 Primitive 20/9-5/10/18 VdlP
Regarding Decathlon In Zamora, it is very close to the Camino path which makes it super convenient. Also, depending on when you are considering starting the VdlP, it is convenient to update to warmer clothing as you walk into the Sanabres. Decathlon have great cold weather pants that are light, water proof and comfortable and a great price. We left Seville in 38C and by the time we crossed from Castile Leon into Galicia it was -1C. The important thing with any shoes on the VdlP is keeping dirt and dust out as you’ll be walking on lots of gravel and dirt. My husband uses Hokas because of his plantar fasciitis as recommended by his physio, I love my New Balance trail runners that keep all dirt out. It’s wise to get a wide fitting to allow for foot swelling that always happens by the end of the day.
 
Unique engravings about the Camino de Santiago from Gabriel and other art objects.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
I have a size 38 length foot, with a wide forefoot, short toes, very high arch and narrow heels.

I know what that is like
I also have the high top of arch and narrow heel.
I've found Keen Newport sandals to be quite a good fit.

Also had Asolo recommended but never tried any yet.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Quick note on the Hoka Speedgoats - they (and some other models) are now available in a wide fitting, that's D for women and EE for men. Not that women have to buy the women's version ... I have been walking in Speedgoats for years now, they are light, cushy, stable and have a part vibram sole that makes them last longer than the Cliftons and Challengers. I have the non-waterproof ones and take a spare pair of insoles to switch in if they get wet. The shoe in itself dries very quickly. They have the Nidarosa seal of pilgrim approval. YMMV.
I ordered mine wide as I do for my Brooks also. Whenever I take my Brooks out for a 5, 6 or more week walk I buy a size larger and wide. Amazing how my foot slowly but surely fills them out nicely.😊
 

AncientMariner

Anticipate Spring 2022 Lisbon trek
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
My current shoes are: for hard surfaces: old & heavy New Balance ?? (already on hand), and for trails, Altra Lone Peak 5 (on order). My feet are very wide ... EE ... so room in the toe box is important.
Just looked ... My older New Balance shoes are Model 608V4. There are enough miles on them to know they work well & they would also be good for commercial travel over. These are listed as Cross Training shoes & are a little heavy but have proven to be easy on my feet. The Altra Lone Peaks are my current choice for Trail Runners.

To me, shoes are in the same category with mattresses, tires, and carpet. We spend a huge amount of our lives on them so comfort and longevity outweigh their costs.
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Year of past OR future Camino
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Hi Robo
I have faced a similar issue as the weight difference between boots and walking footwear is substantial. My heaviest are Meindl Butan great in snow and mud but weight almost 2 kgs.

Apart from sandals, the Europeans have some purpose built walking shoes. The ones I like are Hangwag which I have had resoled, they weight about 800 grams.

The name "trail runners" conjures up in my mind running shoes for cross country and similar. So are they designed for long distance walking? I know people swear by them however my worry is that there might be unintended consequences in the long run (no pun intended). I know this will be heresy for some!
Good luck

Mark
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
@Camino Chrissy Shoes are the single one item i would not care for what it costs. A Camino can easily cost a couple of thousands, depending were you have to travel from (and sometimes: lost income). If my shoes are not perfect, the experience will be vastly worse. I'd rather go cheap on anything (or everything) else.

edit: that does not mean that more expensive is always better of course.
Well said @Anhalter. There are always exceptions of course and our feet are all different and important to insure a successful walk. I am fortunate that I have been able to wear most any trail runner with no problems.
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
@Camino Chrissy Shoes are the single one item i would not care for what it costs. A Camino can easily cost a couple of thousands, depending were you have to travel from (and sometimes: lost income). If my shoes are not perfect, the experience will be vastly worse. I'd rather go cheap on anything (or everything) else.

edit: that does not mean that more expensive is always better of course.

Tend to agree on that one @Anhalter. I don't mind cutting corners to reduce the cost of things. It would be too easy to spend a fortune on gear.

But footwear?

I'll take whatever fits me the best and does the best job, regardless of cost.

It costs me $2-3,000 just to get to Spain and back........
 

Jože HOJAN

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Hello,

I use Trail Runners Salomon 3D PRO (old model)
New model is XA 3d PRO. It was nice to walk. Alco quick dry after rain. No blisters!

 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Hi Robo
I have faced a similar issue as the weight difference between boots and walking footwear is substantial. My heaviest are Meindl Butan great in snow and mud but weight almost 2 kgs.

Apart from sandals, the Europeans have some purpose built walking shoes. The ones I like are Hangwag which I have had resoled, they weight about 800 grams.

The name "trail runners" conjures up in my mind running shoes for cross country and similar. So are they designed for long distance walking? I know people swear by them however my worry is that there might be unintended consequences in the long run (no pun intended). I know this will be heresy for some!
Good luck

Mark
I can’t speak for all brands of trail
runners but my shortest Camino was Lisbon to Santiago. I live in Mexico and have to buy my shoes, sneakers etc in the United States as they don’t have my size 14/15 here. The new Brooks Cascadias I walk in I still use for my daily walks when I return from Pilgrimage. I will wear a new pair about a month of so before my next Camino so I easily put about 12-1300k on my new pair and I never have any problems at all. I can only think of a couple
of a couple of times when someone said they had a problem with their trail runners falling apart on their Camino. Hope that elevates your fears some.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Here are a couple of things, based on some things mentioned in posts, which may (or not) add to the thread when deciding on the type and purposes for hiking or backpacking footwear.

Trail and street runners absolutely will not last as long as a boot or heavier hiking shoe. When a lighter weight and cushioning for the feet are the primary focus, the materials are more friable than those used on heavier footwear. Current technology in materials science for footwear cannot currently produce a shoe or boot that is light and highly cushioned AND that has long-term durability.

The actual reasons for choosing a trail or road running shoe for hiking or backpacking is what makes their overall lifespan shorter.

There are folks who report having worn trail or street runners for thousands of kms when the discussion of durability comes up. It is important to note that durability is not defined by the ability of the shoe to be used and worn, it is defined by the ability of the shoe to retain it's original purpose: cushioning or support or motion control.

I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail. I bought 6 pairs ahead of time and mailed one pair to a resupply point at defined intervals. Only one pair was truly trash-worthy when replaced; the other 4 pair had some good life left to them. I did not have the luxury of waiting for the BEST and optimal time for replacement of shoes as the hike proceeded, so I had to be exceedingly conservative on determining the margin for usability before replacement.

Why would I choose that type of footwear? Significantly lighter weight, lessened risk for injury, comfort with the cushioning, and the lessened drain on energy levels caused by lifting the weight on my feet while walking 24 to 26 mile days.

Those are my reasons. They are shared by the majority of backpacking enthusiasts in the US (I do not know about the rest of the world). Others prefer heavier footwear including more traditional hiking boots.

I do not let longevity of footwear determine what I wear. I focus on on comfort of the footwear's fit and feel, and what the overall energy expenditure will be in using them. Then I consider what the conditions are expected to be like (cold, snow, ice). From there, I make my decision.

There are specific times and needs when I use my Lowa Camino GTX boots; this is primarily when cold weather conditions in late fall and winter demand a change. They are stiff enough and insulated enough for snowshoes and 'partial' crampons. For true mountaineering and ice climbing, I have used (and still have) an even stiffer and heavier boot that can take and hold onto full length crampons.

My history of wearing hiking boots and hiking shoes lasted for over 30 years. I was overjoyed when I switched over to road or trail runners, and I gladly trade the shorter life cycle for happier feet.

Your mileage may vary :)
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail.
So that's one pair for every 530 miles, or in km one pair for every 853 km - so one pair should last an entire Camino, especially since you said
Only one pair was truly trash-worthy when replaced; the other 4 pair had some good life left to them
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
So that's one pair for every 530 miles, or in km one pair for every 853 km - so one pair should last an entire Camino, especially since you said
Theres plenty of examples where one pair lasted for a Camino. Mine included. Thats not to say that every pair of trailrunners is good for 800 or 1000km however. This might even be different for the same shoe worn by different people.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Theres plenty of examples where one pair lasted for a Camino. Mine included. Thats not to say that every pair of trailrunners is good for 800 or 1000km however. This might even be different for the same shoe worn by different people.
I agree, that's why I wrote should instead of will. 😉
Maybe could would be more accurate.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
The name "trail runners" conjures up in my mind running shoes for cross country and similar. So are they designed for long distance walking? I know people swear by them however my worry is that there might be unintended consequences in the long run (no pun intended). I know this will be heresy for some

Hi, happymarkos. A lot of folks probably wonder some of those same things :) I hope this may be of help with how footwear for hiking and backpacking tend to be defined.

Road Running Shoes. These are generally the lightest of the basic category of sporting shoe. Road running shoes are designed to provide comfort, and motion control while keeping the shoe as light as possible because of competitive running sports. Running on pavement and sidewalks and hard surfaces are the primary focus. The comfort levels in these shoes provide enough cushioning to make them wearable over shorter time periods with each use as most competitive and recreational running is done for shorter periods of time every time they are put on. Cushioning and support slightly increase for shoe marketed for distance running sports, like marathons.

Trail Running Shoes. The differences between Street Running and Trail Running shoes are:
  • traction and tread
  • materials used and their durability
  • levels of cushioning
  • amount of motion control and support
  • protection from off road and trail debris - getting poked in the sole by rocks and other sharp stuff which can make the bottoms of your feet sore or injured.
NOTE: A properly fitted shoe in this category should require no break in. These are not leather boots. The materials used do NOT 'break in' when worn, they break down. If there are suspicious pressure points, or if they feel a bit tight, they will typically not get better until the materials start to break down. This category of shoe for backpacking or hiking should feel comfortable and fit well immediately out of the box.

Do not get me wrong, trail and road running shoes will slightly stretch and the footbeds will slightly mold and get incrementally even more comfortable. BUT, when new, they should already be comfortable and not damage or hurt your feet when taken on a 10 mile /16.4 km walk.

Trail Shoes. These are the beefy cousins to road and trail runners. They are:
  • heavier due to design structures which include some use of leathers or thicker manmade materials in the uppers.
  • their cushioning gives up more 'plush' to the cushioning in favor of more durability materials in the midsole.
  • sometimes they will have a more aggressive tread design.
  • stiffer in the forefoot.
Generally, their usable life is better than either a road or trail runner. Again, a proper fitting trail shoe does not generally require much, if any, 'breaking in' to feel good on the foot. Due to the heavier materials used in the uppers, they will become even more comfortable with wear as the heavier materials do more stretching, but like the other two types of shoes, they can be worn right out of the box without the need for extensive 'breaking in'.

Trail/hiking Boots. I am not going to talk about mountaineering boots, which are not meant for trails, hiking, or backpacking.

Trail/hiking/backpacking boots (any name works) are:
  • less cushioned than the previous three types of footwear.
  • significantly heavier, utilizing more energy to walk in.
  • stiffer.
  • they can generally be resoled.
  • they can be insulated for cold weather walking (like my Lowa Camino GTX that I use in the winter), or not insulated.
  • will outlast the other three categories of footwear by wide margins.
  • takes the most time, and is the most challenging, to fit properly.

Depending on the boot's manufacturer and materials (fabric vs leather vs hybrid) it can take a considerable time to break-in a pair so that they feel really good on the feet and reduce potential issues like pinching and tightness and soreness to foot structures.

There are factors and characteristics for each category of footwear to consider; for example: when during the year will you be wearing them and what type of walking will you be doing. There are folks who prefer only going barefoot on one end of the spectrum, to those who wear the heaviest backpacking boot on the other end. Preferences in types and styles of footwear are subjective and personal. The reasons given to support one person's choice may or may not be valid for anyone else.

Over the years I have tested a lot of footwear from manufacturer's who specifically target backpacking, hiking, and mountaineering sports. I have tested shoes and boots which perform exceedingly well, but which I disliked wearing, and those which were wonderful to wear and I managed to be able to keep for my personal use.

For example, the Solomon Pro 3d series of shoes are great shoes, albeit a bit heavier than some other great shoes. A lot of people love them, including my oldest son (who now uses Hoka One One Speedgoats). When I tested them they performed extremely well ---- but I hated wearing them over the long run. That does not discount the fact that large numbers of users find them very comfortable to wear.

Patience plus trial and error. To find a great pair of shoes or boots that make your feet happy, requires an abundance of the former, and the willingness to be ruthless in your judgement for the latter.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
So that's one pair for every 530 miles, or in km one pair for every 853 km - so one pair should last an entire Camino, especially since you said

I would say yes, based on my experience. During three caminos, I started with a fresh pair out of the box, and they were in good shape at the end.

A big difference would be who the manufacturer is. Store brands and off brands of shoes may look like a trail runner or road runner, but they do not perform at the same level as the recognized brands due to how they were built and the materials used. Someone buying a cheap and cheaply made shoe from a Walmart, Amazon, or Decathlon, or Dicks Sporting Goods may end up doing this:

1615316232377.png

To save money on shoes for a Camino, I would look for older models of shoes from established manufacturers. For example, instead of a Hoka One One Speedgoat 4, I would look online for the SpeedGoat 2 or 3.
 
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendant that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
While we are at it, the following pictures are my "camino pair" and their replacement. 1000km (and a bit) vs brand new.
Problem was neither any damage, and the sole might have been good for another 100-200km, but the cushioning in the heel was pretty done and they were uncomfortable to walk longer distances (like 5-10km).
Honestly, i was impressed how good they did look after walking through Spain :)

1615317591246.png
1615317619404.png
 

linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Per the Altra website:

What is the typical lifespan of your shoes?
Simply put, the more you use them, the more they will wear. Most of our shoes will last between 300 and 600 miles, depending on your chosen activity.

I made the mistake of breaking in a pair of Olympus (~150 miles) before my Camino Francés in 2017. They did not need breaking in, and they did not last the entire Camino. They did not look worn out, but they felt it. My feet started to get sore, not just tired at the end of the day. I ended up buying a pair of Merrel Moabs. Unfortunately, I could not find a wide pair. I laced them differently to allow the forefoot to stretch, I used a broom handle whenever I could to try and stretch them, but I still ended up with some blisters. I gave them away to a street person in Madrid before I flew home.

Now, I always start with a fresh pair, and I always have a spare somewhere in country just in case (bounce box).
 

Chris RJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.

The best thing you can do to reduce the impact on your knees us is to carry a day pack and forward your bag using a baggage service. It might not be the pure pilgrim experience but it certainly makes a vast difference to your knees.

I walked the Frances in 2019 in Altra Lone Peak 4.0s. Unbelievably light and they lasted 500 miles + 100 miles build up. When I say they lasted, I mean the tread was a bit worn and they felt a bit used after a month of walking.

Like you, I didn't get blisters. I bought over-sized shoes, - the toe box in the Altra LP is huge so no issues with tightness. I also used Injinji toe sock liners under either smartwool or darn tough mid weight hiking socks. I am not sure if the liner socks were necessary on sub 25 km days. I gave several pairs away and it made a huge difference to those pilgrim's feet.

The Altra Lone Peak is the shoe of choice of the US tripple crown hikers so its more than up to Camino wear from the YouTube videos I have seen. Homemade Wanderlust and Darwin on the Trail seem to be the most reliable gear resource videos.

I have just looked up the Cloud Ultra and realize some of my friends have been wearing these for their daily walks in London park during lockdown. They look very smart I might do the same as you on my 2022 Camino

NB: I took a pair of Sealskinz merino waterproof socks which were a lifesaver on the few days there was heavy rain. The Lone Peaks are deliberately porous.
 

Eacinibulk

Eacinibulk
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 Camino Frances
I have thought about getting lighter shoes but I have always had concern whether it would reduce the cushioning effect of heavier shoes/boots. Whilst they would be Ok walking locally the added weight of the rucksack etc would put greater pressure on my feet/knees/hips and I would feel the ground underneath. Let us know how you get on. I am marginally overweight but in view of my height, I still weigh over 15 and a half stones.
I walked in the Hoka Bondi runners from SJPDP to Burgos. Super comfortable and I didn’t miss the lugged sole. Have two knee replacements and needed something with cushioning.
 

Opa Theo

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francais to Santiago
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
If your budget permits buy both models a size larger than you buy for street shoes. As you train alternate which shoe you wear so that , say, on Monday shoe A, Tuesday shoe B, Wednesday shoe A, etc.
Record how much mileage is on each pair because collective experience says trail runner shoes break down after 400 to 500 hundred mile and need to be replaced. I like ankle high compressions socks.
Buen Camino.
Ted
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

Trey Pitz

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Hi Robo! I love my Sauconys. They are lightweight and snug. I wear a US 12 mens NARROW. Saucony never rub or slip. NO blisters. I'm 65 year male and have been hiking all my life, usually in Solomon or Columbia boots. But for urban hiking it Saucony Trail Runners all the way!! Buen Camino Amigo!
 

Vince Rollason

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
Hi Robo
This is a personal opinion but my advice would be do not switch from boots especially for trail running shoes. You might save a little in weight but will sacrifice support especially for your ankles, I am a distance running coach and was a sub 30 minute 10k runner and 14.15 5k athlete. I cannot think of any trail shoe I would use on a Camino, Remember the true life of these things is 300 to 500 miles of running maximum so by the time you are finishing they will be as well. At 68 I have done 4 Caminos and would never abandon my boots.
Buen Camino
Vince
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I have thought about getting lighter shoes but I have always had concern whether it would reduce the cushioning effect of heavier shoes/boots. Whilst they would be Ok walking locally the added weight of the rucksack etc would put greater pressure on my feet/knees/hips and I would feel the ground underneath. Let us know how you get on. I am marginally overweight but in view of my height, I still weigh over 15 and a half stones.

I have felt the same. Though all the research I do seems to point at trail runners. Most Thru Hikers use Trail Runners now I think. Well According to Jessica 'Dixie' Mills. (great channel)

I have also had 2 or 3 physios (along the Camino) tell me to use lighter footwear.

And I think it was, @davebugg, who did some research on boots v trail runners and was of the view that boots don't really provide much more support. Maybe he can verify that?

I still love my boots, but even walking around the local area recently in them, I can feel the added 'pull' on my bad knees.
 

BombayBill

Still Learning
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Hmm Dr Google tells me that Altra Lone Peaks are 300g lighter per shoe than Vasque light boots. So 300g x 80 steps a minute x 60 minutes x 6 hours a day is 7000 kilos more weight a day for a boot versus a trail runner. Yikes ! Someone please point out I’ve had too much Vino and done the math wrong.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
And I think it was, @davebugg, who did some research on boots v trail runners and was of the view that boots don't really provide much more support. Maybe he can verify that?
Yes, @davebugg has debunked the ankle support theory of most boots in the past.
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
Year of past OR future Camino
April (2020)
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
I really like the Saucony Peregrine and was planning on walking in them on the Camino. I like the rock plate and I haven't slipped at all in the 2 years I've been wearing them.
 

Chris RJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Hmm Dr Google tells me that Altra Lone Peaks are 300g lighter per shoe than Vasque light boots. So 300g x 80 steps a minute x 60 minutes x 6 hours a day is 7000 kilos more weight a day for a boot versus a trail runner. Yikes ! Someone please point out I’ve had too much Vino and done the math wrong.
I read something similar when I chose Altra Lone Peak. I believe that the weight saving on feet is disproportionately higher than the weight saving one could make on cutting pack weight.

Counteverything is a Camino science-based YouTuber - I might have seen it there rather than read it.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I read something similar when I chose Altra Lone Peak. I believe that the weight saving on feet is disproportionately higher than the weight saving one could make on cutting pack weight.

Counteverything is a Camino science-based YouTuber - I might have seen it there rather than read it.

Love that guys channel :)
Here's one on boots v shoes
Not sure I agree on his views about footwear weight though.

 

woody66

This is my boy Yankee!
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Hi GUYS!
In the minefield!
As at the moment i am a SPONGE; in the sense i am learning and have no prior knowledge of Camino!
I wear walking boots everyday have done for over 20 years! On hard level surfaces but my favs have poor traction on an other surfaces.I walk through every summer heatwave "no blisters" but i only average between 5 and max 8 miles a day, i wear two layer merino s thick socks.

I had decided upon non waterproof trail runners (though not sure which model) because a lot of people on hear put forward, what i deemed good reasons for wearing them;including the large numbers of boots abandoned on the trail!

My main concern is to avoid blisters at all costs!!!!

Then along comes this guy in the video above who puts forward the case for fabric boots with gortex as being the best option and poo poo's the idea that heat is a problem in boots, and weight on the foot is more tiring and burns a larger amount of energy so i am confused as to which camp to heed!
I know you pay your money and take a chance;but so many different choices and opinions befuddle my brain.
I also think the choice is made harder by the fact that here in the UK you can buy and try a pair of shoes/boots in a shop or from online but how do you test them in the real World!!!
You can wear them indoors on carpet;but cannot return them if marked i had this problem with a pair of Hoka Stinsons i had literally walked up the concrete garden path in?
Woody
 
Last edited:

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
Hi GUYS!
In the minefield!
As at the moment i am a SPONGE; in the sense i am learning and have no prior knowledge of Camino!
I wear walking boots everyday have done for over 20 years! (on hard level surfaces;but my favs have poor traction on an other surfaces.I walk through every summer heatwave no blisters) but i only average between 5 and max 8 miles a day i wear two layer merino s thick socks.

I had decided upon non waterproof trail runners (though not sure which model) because a lot of people on hear put forward, what i deemed good reasons for wearing them;including the large numbers of boots abandoned on the trail!

My main concern is to avoid blisters at all costs!!!!

Then along comes this guy in the video above who puts forward the case for fabric boots with gortex as being the best option and poo poo's the idea that heat is a problem in boots, and weight on the foot is more tiring and burns a larger amount of energy so i am confused as to which camp to heed!
I know you pay your money and take a chance;but so many different choices and opinions befuddle my brain.
I also think the choice is made harder by the fact that here in the UK you can buy and try a pair of shoes/boots in a shop or from online but how do you test them in the real World!!!
You can wear them indoors on carpet;but cannot return them if marked i had this problem with a pair of Hoka Stinsons i had literally walked up the concrete garden path in?
Woody
You will always have a risk, but you can much improve your chances of ending up with the right runners if you...
- select a shop specialized in outdoor sports, trekking, etc (avoid fashion and "trend" stores)
- weight matters! Make a pre-selection of the lighter pairs in the offerings. (Note: If a shop, physical or virtual, does not indicate weights, walk out!)
- Look out for the right sole-material and profile like Vibram to give you good track in all kinds of terrain.
- Socks are an entire subject of their own....when trying out shoes, wear the socks that you intend to also use on the trail.
- try out shoes at the end of the day, preferably after an extended walk, choose a size about 1 or 1 1/2 size larger than your normal street-shoes
- your Camino shoes must be comfortable right away, the toebox ample, the heel fit soft but firm, and the foot-bed without pressure-points. Eliminate shoes that give you the slightest irritations, they never get better.
- Brand names should not be your first criteria; there may be names that you never heard of but who enjoy an excellent reputation in the trekking world; familiarise yourself with this world by browsing forums such as this one, but take all advice with a grain of salt; let YOUR FEET take the final decision. Avoid unusually low prices but also, do not think that the highest-priced products give you any better chances.

While these common-sense recommendations will reduce your risk of picking-up a totally unsuitable pair of shoes, but as you said very correctly: The final test is the real World! If your runners give you any pain or discomfort on your Camino, don't hesitate to replace them in one of the many shops you find on the Way; when it comes to your feet, the extra cost should not be a consideration.
Btw: If you follow the above "rules", runners –unlike boots– do not strictly require "running-in".
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino de Santiago planned for end April 2020 now 2021
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
I have the Hoka Stinson ATR Love them. I tried the Hoka speedgoat but they had a too narrow toe box. The Stinson have a quite wide toe box.
 

Hebridean

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
May2019 Camino Frances
Hi Everyone.

After 3 Caminos in Salomon Boots, I'm going to convert to Trail Runners.
I love my boots and have never had a blister in them, but sadly I need to change.

Due to bad knees, I need to reduce the weight on my feet.

I've been along to a Professional Sports Footwear store for some fittings.
They take an hour per person measuring and trialling different types of shoes and sizes!

I'm looking at 2, and wondered if anyone had experience of these.

The On Cloud Ultra. (yet to try this one, they just called to ask me to come and try it)

Or the Saucony Peregrine. I really liked this.
I bought the cloud ultras for my Camino 2 years ago. By the time I got to Roncesvalles one of my knees was agonising so an unpleasant crawl as far as Pamplona, where I went to buy new shoes. The shop owner was less than impressed with the Ons, saying that they had no support and were just not suitable for the Camino. I ended up coming away with a pair of very reasonably priced Joma treks ( and very good advice) and after a couple of days to let my knee settle, walked the rest of the way to SdC without difficulty. Happy days!
 

BombayBill

Still Learning
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Love that guys channel :)
Here's one on boots v shoes
Not sure I agree on his views about footwear weight though.

Love the guy’s video and the calculator. However I disagree with the logic. You support weight in your knapsack and lift the weight in your shoes. 2 different things. Lifting your foot thousands of times a day is different than supporting weight on your back much of the time by your skeletal structure.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
I'm surprised people like the Vibram soles for camino.
I find them so *hard and slick*.
I had them on a pair of Scarpa boots (that I otherwise loved, and which remain my preferred climbing and approach shoe) and they wore down really fast and were very slippery on any kind of hard surface when it was wet. Thinking of the paved trail between Burguette and Zubiri, the shale hills heading from El Acebo to Molinaseca... the descent in Mos...
I like a stickier sole for anything like that.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I'm surprised people like the Vibram soles for camino.
I find them so *hard and slick*.
Not all Vibram soles are the same. They make soles for different conditions. I have some "water sandals" with Vibram soles which are excellent on slick surfaces.
 

MisterH

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018 neither successful
I have felt the same. Though all the research I do seems to point at trail runners. Most Thru Hikers use Trail Runners now I think. Well According to Jessica 'Dixie' Mills. (great channel)

I have also had 2 or 3 physios (along the Camino) tell me to use lighter footwear.

And I think it was, @davebugg, who did some research on boots v trail runners and was of the view that boots don't really provide much more support. Maybe he can verify that?

I still love my boots, but even walking around the local area recently in them, I can feel the added 'pull' on my bad knees.
When I was in the USMC I broke my ankle and had steel pins in it for over a year. I have been wearing hiking boots for over 40 years now and like the little extra ankle support I get. I'm well over 70 now and the ankle support is the most important feature of my foot coverings. It would be nice to reduce the weight but it will probably never happen.
 

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
I'm surprised people like the Vibram soles for camino.
I find them so *hard and slick*.
I had them on a pair of Scarpa boots (that I otherwise loved, and which remain my preferred climbing and approach shoe) and they wore down really fast and were very slippery on any kind of hard surface when it was wet. Thinking of the paved trail between Burguette and Zubiri, the shale hills heading from El Acebo to Molinaseca... the descent in Mos...
I like a stickier sole for anything like that.
Boots are more rigid in comparison to trail runners, which affects the characteristics of the sole. I used to slip with boots (Hanwag Yukon with Vibram Fuora) in situations when my runners (Hoka with Vibram Megagrip) would be rock-stable and sticky. Moreover, as pointed out by @trecile, there are different Vibram soles.
Wearing said runners, I never had any slipping incident on my past 3 Caminos, regardless of terrain or weather. In fact, I was recently surprised how well they hold up even on ice and snow (I have no commercial interests or ties with any of the mentioned brands)

@MisterH
The OP asked for info about lightweight runners. I can only recommend you try them out. Good hi-tech runners are surprisingly sturdy and give you excellent support while being so much more comfortable than boots on trails like the Caminos, where rocky conditions are rare.
 
Last edited:

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I do not let longevity of footwear determine what I wear. I focus on on comfort of the footwear's fit and feel, and what the overall energy expenditure will be in using them. Then I consider what the conditions are expected to be like (cold, snow, ice). From there, I make my decision.
Sage words Señor Dave. What good is durability when you have shooting pain in your foot or have developed crippling blisters.

So that's one pair for every 530 miles, or in km one pair for every 853 km - so one pair should last an entire Camino, especially since you said
Yes it should and your shoe could last almost any camino length!
Good to see we are all back to discussing and debating the minutiae of every aspect from shoelaces to toe of what to put on our delicate feet when we walk!
See things are starting to get back to normal!
Once again trail runners/Brooks/maybe Hokas ALL THE WAY!
 
Last edited:

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
IF you have a choice between several equally-comfortable shoes, then you might start comparing slight differences in weight, longevity, waterproofness, etc. But until you reach that comfort decision, all of this analysis is academic. (Still good entertainment, though.)

I consider myself lucky to find one or two pairs of very comfortable shoes. I take them to an indoor shopping mall for a brisk 20-minute walk around the mall, comparing them for comfort. A preference (in terms of comfort only) usually always becomes obvious. If any discomfort emerges, I return them to the store (having already confirmed that they will accept such returns). If the shoes seem good after the mall walk, then I'll try them on longer outdoor walks. Even if they fail the distance walking test, I have a pair of shoes that is good for normal use.
 
Casa Ivar Pin
Custom hard enamel pin badge with silver coloured locking pin. Size: 30 mm.
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
IF you have a choice between several equally-comfortable shoes, then you might start comparing slight differences in weight, longevity, waterproofness, etc. But until you reach that comfort decision, all of this analysis is academic. (Still good entertainment, though.)

I consider myself lucky to find one or two pairs of very comfortable shoes. I take them to an indoor shopping mall for a brisk 20-minute walk around the mall, comparing them for comfort. A preference (in terms of comfort only) usually always becomes obvious. If any discomfort emerges, I return them to the store (having already confirmed that they will accept such returns). If the shoes seem good after the mall walk, then I'll try them on longer outdoor walks. Even if they fail the distance walking test, I have a pair of shoes that is good for normal use.
My Hoka Speedgoat last almost exactly 2 Camino Frances if I don't use them in between, and on condition that I consume some 3 glasses of good Tinto on the way every evening. (This provides balanced wear of the soles) 😎
 

MisterH

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017, 2018 neither successful
Boots are more rigid in comparison to trail runners, which affects the characteristics of the sole. I used to slip with boots (Hanwag Yukon with Vibram Fuora) in situations when my runners (Hoka with Vibram Megagrip) would be rock-stable and sticky. Moreover, as pointed out by @trecile, there are different Vibram soles.
Wearing said runners, I never had any slipping incident on my past 3 Caminos, regardless of terrain or weather. In fact, I was recently surprised how well they hold up even on ice and snow (I have no commercial interests or ties with any of the mentioned brands)

@MisterH
The OP asked for info about lightweight runners. I can only recommend you try them out. Good hi-tech runners are surprisingly sturdy and give you excellent support while being so much more comfortable than boots on trails like the Caminos, where rocky conditions are rare.
I tried an ankle brace but boots did better.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
So many choices of Footwear!

I've done as much research as I can online, but ultimately I'm going to need to just try some.
So a 3 shoe trial is coming up.

What happened to me?

For my first Camino in 2015 I walked into our local outdoor store.
I told the sales guy what I needed the footwear for.
He just said "try these". As he handed me a pair of salomon boots. (my current style)

I asked him if I should try a few alternatives ?

His response?

"Sure you can, but you'll only come back to these"...........which I did of course. :rolleyes:
3 Caminos later, I still love them.
But as explained above, I 'need' lighter footwear now.

So suddenly I'm researching all manner of footwear and have about 30 styles + to choose from.
maybe I should just go back to that store :oops:

But. I have done my short listing and will head out in the next week to get 3 pairs of shoes to try out!
Unless they fail any comfort test right in the shop!

It will probably be:


  1. Hiking Shoe. SALOMON XA PRO 3D V8 GORE-TEX MENS BLACK. These are the shoe version of my current boots, which I love for fit and comfort. And never had a blister (touch wood) So they have to be in the trial. And Yes they are Gore-tex. I don't care! I don't like wet feet. With care and proper airing during the day, my feet stay dry. These are tried and tested for me over 2,000 kms..... 370 g 8 mm drop
  2. Trail Runner. HOKA ONE ONE SPEEDGOAT 4 (Or Stinson ATR). I think a Hoka needs to be in the trial, as so many people use them. that's reason enough. The 'wisdom of the crowd'. And of course @davebugg says they are good ;).. 335 g 4mm drop.
  3. Trail Runner. SAUCONY PEREGRINE 11 GORE-TEX MENS. I have tried a pair of these and really liked the fit. Great soles, width, sturdy. (and they have a rock plate) As they have a Gore-tex version I'll get those. (I like gore-tex footwear, did I mention that). 365g. 4mm drop (might be too low for me)
I think these will give me a fair test in terms of different styles and features.

Though the Salomon drop of 8mm might suit me better.

My current boots are Saloman X ULTRA 3 MID GTX SHOE MEN'S
558 g and 11 mm drop (and I put 4mm heel wedges in those too for achilles problems)

My only concern moving from a boot to a shoe might be debris getting into the shoe. Fine gravel and stuff. So I might use an Ultra light gaiter if that happens.

And I might find the much lower drop over time aggravates my Achilles. (with the Trail Runners)
Only time will tell.

But reducing 200 g of each foot sounds like a really good idea! :)

On my very short local walks in my boots, I feel the weight of the boots 'pulling' on my bad knees.
 

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
So many choices of Footwear!

I've done as much research as I can online, but ultimately I'm going to need to just try some.
So a 3 shoe trial is coming up.

What happened to me?

For my first Camino in 2015 I walked into our local outdoor store.
I told the sales guy what I needed the footwear for.
He just said "try these". As he handed me a pair of salomon boots. (my current style)

I asked him if I should try a few alternatives ?

His response?

"Sure you can, but you'll only come back to these"...........which I did of course. :rolleyes:
3 Caminos later, I still love them.
But as explained above, I 'need' lighter footwear now.

So suddenly I'm researching all manner of footwear and have about 30 styles + to choose from.
maybe I should just go back to that store :oops:

But. I have done my short listing and will head out in the next week to get 3 pairs of shoes to try out!
Unless they fail any comfort test right in the shop!

It will probably be:


  1. Hiking Shoe. SALOMON XA PRO 3D V8 GORE-TEX MENS BLACK. These are the shoe version of my current boots, which I love for fit and comfort. And never had a blister (touch wood) So they have to be in the trial. And Yes they are Gore-tex. I don't care! I don't like wet feet. With care and proper airing during the day, my feet stay dry. These are tried and tested for me over 2,000 kms..... 370 g 8 mm drop
  2. Trail Runner. HOKA ONE ONE SPEEDGOAT 4 (Or Stinson ATR). I think a Hoka needs to be in the trial, as so many people use them. that's reason enough. The 'wisdom of the crowd'. And of course @davebugg says they are good ;).. 335 g 4mm drop.
  3. Trail Runner. SAUCONY PEREGRINE 11 GORE-TEX MENS. I have tried a pair of these and really liked the fit. Great soles, width, sturdy. (and they have a rock plate) As they have a Gore-tex version I'll get those. (I like gore-tex footwear, did I mention that). 365g. 4mm drop (might be too low for me)
I think these will give me a fair test in terms of different styles and features.

Though the Salomon drop of 8mm might suit me better.

My current boots are Saloman X ULTRA 3 MID GTX SHOE MEN'S
558 g and 11 mm drop (and I put 4mm heel wedges in those too for achilles problems)

My only concern moving from a boot to a shoe might be debris getting into the shoe. Fine gravel and stuff. So I might use an Ultra light gaiter if that happens.

And I might find the much lower drop over time aggravates my Achilles. (with the Trail Runners)
Only time will tell.

But reducing 200 g of each foot sounds like a really good idea! :)

On my very short local walks in my boots, I feel the weight of the boots 'pulling' on my bad knees.
Your shortlist looks great! And don’t worry too much about the gravel, happens rarely and when it does, you’ll have a great excuse to make a bar stop...or to get rid of boring company🙂
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I walked my first Camino in boots. I quite liked them as I had been tramping in boots for over 50 years. For my next Camino I wore trail runners and will never go back to boots. The shoes I have are New Balance Fuel Core T590 v4. They have a good one piece sole and a fairly hard sole so that you do not feel rocks, stones and cobbles. I bought two pair and wore one pair for 500 kilometres to see how they went, and they were perfect for me. I ended up wearing the same pair on my 2019 Camino and some walks around Barcelona, which came to a total of about 1500 kilometres. Two years alter I still wear them for my daily 5k to 8k walks. I calculate that they have now covered 3000k and still going. The other pair are, as yet, still unworn but I will wear them on my next Camino, which should have been last year but is looking more likely to be next year. I had no more problems with stones getting inside the shoes that I did with the boots.
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
It will probably be:
  1. Hiking Shoe. SALOMON XA PRO 3D V8 GORE-TEX MENS BLACK. T
  2. Trail Runner. HOKA ONE ONE SPEEDGOAT 4 (Or Stinson ATR).
  3. Trail Runner. SAUCONY PEREGRINE 11 GORE-TEX MENS.

My Quest continues.
One of the downsides of living in a small population country like Australia (25 million ish), is that we often have a reduced choice of products. as our market is quite small.

I tried the Salomon today. They are a totally different shape to the boot version I have. Far too narrow.
The build quality also doesn't look as good as it used to be.
A trend in most things I think, as things are made with every cheaper materials and processes.
So Salomon might be out of the running. I might try a couple of other styles though, if I can find them anywhere.

I have found 2 stores that may stock the Hoka I'm looking for. That will be next weekends trip, though finding the precise style and size can be a bit of a lottery. So I got in touch with Hoka directly and they suggested which stores I should go to.

Saucony has been the most disappointing.
I really liked the Peregrines that I tried on bit need a larger size.
So Yes, I contacted Saucony directly.
None available anywhere in my State!
Way to go Saucony...

Maybe 'someone' is telling me to stick to my boots :)
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CFx2, CPx1
Best of luck with your selection Robo.
I am also Australia based and have for many years taken my direction from those Americans doing their long distance hikes, eg the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail, altho there are many others.
The sheer number of US walkers, reflecting the population size, and its relative wealth, ensures there is a plethora of brands, styles, and sizes available.
And the number of reviews available on Utube! When viewed critically I find them invaluable in helping with selection.
Then its time to find a local retailers if possible, who stock preferred brands, to fit them and walk about the shop for a while. After a decision is made its time go looking for a bargain!
In addition to local retailers the price notification website CamelCamelCamel is one way of getting alerted to price drops, and the Amazon Australia website advises of locally warehoused stock as well as products that are able to be shipped from the US with price, shipping costs and any applicable tax stated in A$.
I shrink from a recommendation as selection is an extremely personal matter, being important and very specific to the individual.
Regards
Gerard
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
My Quest continues.

Did you have a chance to look at the Inov8 ? I am really happy with mine (Roclite G 290), but they have other models with less drop and wider toes (Terraultra). From their website, there seems to be a specialist store in Sydney called Pace Athletic, they'll likely have other brands in stock aswell. Maybe visit them sometime?
(assuming the Sydney in your profile is still valid, AUS seems to be funny in terms of distances)

edit: Pace, judging from there online store, might actually not have them in stock. There seems to be another online(?) store called wildfiresports, that does have them and seems to offer free returns if you don't like them
 
Last edited:
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Did you have a chance to look at the Inov8 ? I am really happy with mine (Roclite G 290), but they have other models with less drop and wider toes (Terraultra). From their website, there seems to be a specialist store in Sydney called Pace Athletic, they'll likely have other brands in stock aswell. Maybe visit them sometime?
(assuming the Sydney in your profile is still valid, AUS seems to be funny in terms of distances)

edit: Pace, judging from there online store, might actually not have them in stock. There seems to be another online(?) store called wildfiresports, that does have them and seems to offer free returns if you don't like them

Thanks, I'll check them out.

I've looked at a few online stores, but I just don't see how that is going to work.
3 different shoes, it's unlikely I'll get the sizing just right.
So a size either way just to try on.
9 pairs of shoes, 6 to be returned.

Whilst I now buy 95% of everything online, I think for shoes, I need a shop. :rolleyes:
 
Unique engravings about the Camino de Santiago from Gabriel and other art objects.
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Thanks, I'll check them out.

I've looked at a few online stores, but I just don't see how that is going to work.
3 different shoes, it's unlikely I'll get the sizing just right.
So a size either way just to try on.
9 pairs of shoes, 6 to be returned.

Whilst I now buy 95% of everything online, I think for shoes, I need a shop. :rolleyes:
Yes I'm with you on that, trying shoes from online sites makes for a long and frustrating experience of weeks per shoe - waiting with keen anticipation for the courier, then the disappointment of finding out they dont work, and then the hassle of getting them sent back , all the while still shoeless. Such a roller coaster of hope and despair.
Versus trying on instore and knowing immediately (before paying for them).
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Hi @Robo. First, you deserve a solid gold medal for your wonderful work on giving yourself a boost for a lighter, longer life! next, I have scrolled through and read a lot of the posts. Then I was distracted with an incoming email. So now, what did I intend to say to you? There are many nuggets of wisdom in many of the responses. Your feet will tell you. I think it was Pepi who said, the best places are the shops that have lots of experience and expertise in the kind of walking you plan to undertake. I have adverted previously to one such - or may be two - one in Dublin, but that is useless to you, and the other one is called Muga, in Pamplona. They know their stuff. I could go on about the cheap runners my walking companion used for the CF, and the oft repeated Meindl shoes I wear day in and day out in real life because they are like manna from heaven if that can be translated into shoes! Someone else said: pay no attention to labels, tell the people in the specialist shop what you want to use the shoes for. You have time so be patient, go local, and all the very best - your feet will be so thankful for all the effort you have put into lightening their load!
 
Last edited:
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Casa Ivar Pin
Custom hard enamel pin badge with silver coloured locking pin. Size: 30 mm.
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Hi @Robo. First, you deserve a solid gold medal for your wonderful work on giving yourself a boost for a lighter, longer life! next, I have scrolled through and read a lot of the posts. Then I was distracted with an incoming email. So now, what did I intend to say to you? There are many nuggets of wisdom in many of the responses. Your feet will tell you. I think it was Pepi who said, the best places are the shops that have lots of experience and expertise in the kind of walking you plan to undertake. I have adverted previously to one such - or may be two - one in Dublin, but that is useless to you, and the other one is called Muga, in Pamplona. They know their stuff. I could go on about the cheap runners my walking companion used for the CF, and the oft repeated Meindl shoes I wear day in and day out in real life because they are like manna from heaven if that can be translated into shoes! Someone else said: pay no attention to labels, tell the people in the specialist shop what you want to use the shoes for. You have time so be patient, go local, and all the very best - your feet will be so thankful for all the effort you have put into lightening their load!

Great points @kirkie . Just a pity when the 'local' stores don't carry much stock.
I'll end up buying what they 'have' rather than what I would 'like'.
But hopefully I'll find something that suits ;)
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
The renowned Altra Lone Peak is available in Oz at https://www.altrarunning.com.au/

I might check them out.
Though what I am finding, is that the shoe might be shown on a retailers website, but that does not mean they have it in stock near me.

Someone at 'Athletes Foot' head office (big retailer here) told me that online product availability is shown on a National basis!

i.e. That shoe in my size, might be in stock, 2,000 miles away!

Or as previously experienced, I found a shoe that was great (Saucony), but the shop did not have my size.
And they can't get any more stock from Saucony.
Contacted Saucony....... no stock in my size anywhere in the country.......

Maybe I'll fly to the US to but my shoes? :)

LA is the closest point for us.
Any good outdoor footwear stores in LA? ;)

As they say 'First World Problem'.
I have my trusty boots if all else fails.
 

AncientMariner

Anticipate Spring 2022 Lisbon trek
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I might check them out.
Though what I am finding, is that the shoe might be shown on a retailers website, but that does not mean they have it in stock near me.

Someone at 'Athletes Foot' head office (big retailer here) told me that online product availability is shown on a National basis!

i.e. That shoe in my size, might be in stock, 2,000 miles away!

Or as previously experienced, I found a shoe that was great (Saucony), but the shop did not have my size.
And they can't get any more stock from Saucony.
Contacted Saucony....... no stock in my size anywhere in the country.......

Maybe I'll fly to the US to but my shoes? :)

LA is the closest point for us.
Any good outdoor footwear stores in LA? ;)

As they say 'First World Problem'.
I have my trusty boots if all else fails.
 

AncientMariner

Anticipate Spring 2022 Lisbon trek
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I believe luck is with me today. Just ordered the last pair of Lone Peak 5's in 12-1/2 Wide in North America! No color choice but that's a small sacrifice for the trouble this search has been.

Every place I tried didn't know when they would have my size in stock but were very happy to "put me on a waiting list". This order guy told me he had these shoes in his hands and sent via UPS Monday. I'll be starting my strength training program this week.

I am finding a lot of my sailing stuff will work fine for the Camino, too. The next major purchase is a pack. Frequent Flyer miles will cover airline fare so things are coming together. Maybe the Sep/Oct date will work out after all.
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 100 ratings
Downloads
14,995
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,657
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,515
Updated

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.7%
  • March

    Votes: 61 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 212 14.9%
  • May

    Votes: 348 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 104 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 27 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 31 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 413 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 173 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 19 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 11 0.8%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top