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What percentage receive a Compostela?

Hermanita

Active Member
I had read that in any given year, only 15% of those that embark on the Pilgrimage actually complete it. Or at least that only 15% receive a Compostela.

That seems like a very low figure, so I am curious to know if there is a place that I might get these figures. I have seen in the forum numbers of pilgrims who complete the pilgrimage, but never the percentage as compared to those who started it.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I would doubt the accuracy of any statistics because it depends on what question is being asked. Thousands walk in France with no intention of reaching Santiago. Thousands of Spanish walk for a few days on weekends. Tens of thousands walk just the last 100 km on various routes into Santiago de Compostela. If the question is how many who set foot on the thousands of kilometers of path that eventually lead to Santiago, then 15% may be a good guess. If the question is how many will be competing for a bed each night on the Camino Frances all the way to Santiago, the percentage will be much higher.
 
N

nathanael

Guest
On this subject, when I was in Santiago this summer June 23/09 I stayed in the city for 5 days to kill time before returning to Madrid. Two rude young Frenchmen with dreadlocks were refused the compostela due to not receive two stamps from their 100k onward. They were very angry and therefore very rude..but I believe their rudeness towards us was just their nature sorry for this assumption. I felt sorry for their two dogs who were under nourished and needed a good meal. I was fascinated by the dogs who had shells around their neck and wanted to take a picture of them but the owners were trying to extract money off of us and kept shouting shut up shut up and making signs of wanting money..their English was only the words of shut up, we refused and laughed at them and went our merry way. So yes their might be some truth of not everyone receiving a compostela. yet someone we got to know on the route who shouldn't have received a compostela received one. He took many buses so he didn't have to walk up those steep hills we know this by the fact that we left before him in the morning he never passed us and yet he was there ahead of us.
Nevertheless the route enables one to meet many individuals who struggle and complete the Camino.
ciao
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
This was posted on another forum a couple of years ago.

It is estimated that the number of pilgrims on the roads compared with those who receive the Compostela is about 5 to 1.
The Sociology department of the Cathedral, headed by Don Juan Jose Cebrian (brother pf Don Genaro, who heads the Pilgrims' office) has estimated the number of pilgrims on the Camino at any one time by using the registration in albergues, the data given when the credential is obtained, and other sources, such as the tourist information offices throughout the Camino.
The vast majority of pilgrims from Spain complete the Camino over four segments, as do a great many Latin Americans who have only two weeks vacation. There are also some pilgrims who do not complete the pilgrimage in a manner that would entitle them to a Compostela because of illness, tiredness or other reasons. And then there are some who do not request, or get a Compostela for one reason or another.
If pilgrims arrive in Santiago when the pilgrims' office is closed, and are unable to get a Compostela and they might then leave that night or early the next morning.
The 5 to 1 estimate has proven steady and reliable over the last ten years or so.
 

Javier Martin

Veteran Member
nathanael said:
On this subject, when I was in Santiago this summer June 23/09 I stayed in the city for 5 days to kill time before returning to Madrid. Two rude young Frenchmen with dreadlocks were refused the compostela due to not receive two stamps from their 100k onward. They were very angry and therefore very rude..but I believe their rudeness towards us was just their nature sorry for this assumption. I felt sorry for their two dogs who were under nourished and needed a good meal. I was fascinated by the dogs who had shells around their neck and wanted to take a picture of them but the owners were trying to extract money off of us and kept shouting shut up shut up and making signs of wanting money..their English was only the words of shut up, we refused and laughed at them and went our merry way. So yes their might be some truth of not everyone receiving a compostela. yet someone we got to know on the route who shouldn't have received a compostela received one. He took many buses so he didn't have to walk up those steep hills we know this by the fact that we left before him in the morning he never passed us and yet he was there ahead of us.
Nevertheless the route enables one to meet many individuals who struggle and complete the Camino.
ciao

There's many pilgrims who never receive their compostelas. For them the only important thing is to walk and enjoy the Camino, not a piece of paper. It's something normal when you have arrived several times to Santiago.

Buen Camino, ¿is it important the Compostela?

Javier Martin
Madrid, Spain.
 

kubapigora

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
On the Camino since 2008
On one of our polish forums someone wrote: Camino is in your heart, not on the piece of paper.
Some people are walking their camino for that piece of paper, but hopefully, when they arrive in Santiago, they will know, that it is only a piece of paper.
 

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
Hmm. The Pilgrimage itself was of the utmost importance to me, and of course the Pilgrimage continues in all sorts of ways now I am home. But receiving the Compostela was also really important to me. Something I think to do with recognition by the Church that I'd done it. And hearing at the Pilgrim Mass the next day that I had arrived the day before. It still makes me really emotional to think about it.

Andy
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I know what you mean Andy - in 2002 when the priest said "y tres dall Sud Africa" we hugged each other and said, 'that's US!"
Although I am not a Christian I professed to having walked the camino for spiritual reasons and have 2 Compostelas. But, subsequently, I asked for the other certificate instead, knowing that I did not walk the camino for religious reasons. For me, the credencial with all its sellos is more valuable.
The Compostela - as a certificate of completion - is a relatively new invention. It was introduced in this form in 1953 although records before 1970 have been lost.
Although it is based on a 14thC document, it is now considered to be a 'souvenir' no longer necessary for proof to earn an indulgences as it was in the 14thC.
Prior to the 'Compostela' or Autentica document a scallop shell was given as proof that one had walked to Santiago.
 

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andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
Yes Sil, and I know what you mean too. The Credencial and the sellos are so important aren't they. They are the thing, along with the photos, that I love to get out and look at and which help so much with remembering and reflecting.

I had the great pleasure of lunch with Johnnie Walker last week at La Terazza in London. As John writes in his blog, the owner spent a long time looking at my Credencial from the Levante and talking about the Camino.

Andy
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I've been thinking about this, the importance I do or don't attach to the Compostela. When I actually finished, the Compostela seemed just like a nice souvenir. The best part of getting it for me came when I was nearly at the front of the queue, and a French couple I had shared the room with the previous evening in Monte de Gozo pushed me ahead of themselves to get mine first. They knew how far it was from Le Puy, and they were acknowledging my achievement.

Now my Compostela sits on my wall here at home, and funnily enough, it is becoming more important to me as time passes. For one thing, I realise it is quite possibly the only one I will ever get. Though I do have plans to walk other routes, I doubt I will ever walk the last 100km into Santiago again. I might visit Santiago again- but to see it as a tourist: as a pilgrim who walked in the last 100km, I was far more interested in seeing people I knew around the city than I was in seeing the sights.

As time passes, the magnitude of my 'achievement' in walking all the way from Le Puy, becomes clearer to me. While I walked, I knew there was dogged determination required at times, but I was into the 'rhythm' and just kept going, even when my feet hurt and my ankles were painful. The Compostela is my tangible record of walking on to the end.

But Compostela or not, I think my most wonderful moment on the whole Camino was reaching the top of O'Cebreiro on a fine day with clear views, and spending the afternoon and evening there in that historic and special place. It was the mountaintop of the whole experience. And after that, it just seemed like the last 150km was a 'walk in the park', to walk slowly and savour, as the end was nigh. But in my memory, being on top of O'Cebreiro will always be the real pinnacle of it all, and perhaps for me, that is my 'real' Compostela.
Margaret
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Maggie - there is a similar discussion on the Compostela on another forum. Your post almost bears out what I said yesterday.

By placing much of the value on the camino itself and not on St James, the journey has become more important than the destination.
I don't think I've ever heard anyone say "I am going to visit the tomb of Saint James?" They always say, "I am going to walk the camino." And so, unlike our medieval pilgrims who probably only ever had one shot at it, we fall in love with walking the caminos and plan our holidays around walking the different routes - sometimes with no intention of reaching Santiago.
I also hear people say over and over again, "its the journey that is important, not the destination. " That statement would have sounded ludicrous to most medieval pilgrims whose only reason for a long, dangerous journey was to reach the shrine in order to earn indulgences for the remission of sins and time spent in purgatory.
On the Santiago Archdiocese website, they say, " The most important thing here is the Goal, Not the Way. Jacobean Pilgrims do not go on pilgrimage for the sake of the Way. Through the Way they do get to the Tomb of Saint James the Great".
I appears that in our modern times The Way has become the destination - not the tomb of Saint James.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I guess that the Walking is what is important for me sil....not the Destination. Though, having said that, my 'planning' for 'next time' includes a re-visiting of Le Puy- an important early Marian shrine- and a re-visiting of Lourdes. So maybe as a 'pilgrim' I identify more with Our Lady than with St James, and just don't fit the 'Compostela' mould.

For a woman from Quebec who I walked with often from Cahors to Santiago though, it was reaching the Tomb of the Apostle in Santiago that was her goal, and she had to suffer with some intense knee pain to do it. She was carrying with her some medals owned by a friend of hers who was suffering from terminal cancer. She knew her friend was not going to recover, but it was an act of prayer to carry those medals and to finally place them on the tomb of St James for her friend.
Margaret
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I was just re-reading a CSJ paper by Laurie Dennett on the Origins of the Compostela.

Pilgrim's motives for wanting a dated proof of pilgrimage were varied. In the case of those impelled along the Way of St James by the force of law, the reason is patent.
Similarly, those being paid to undertake a 'proxy' pilgrimage on behalf of someone else needed proof that the contract had been fulfilled in order to collect the payment or favour due to them.
Some confraternities demanded proof of having reached Compostela before accepting newly returned pilgrims as members.
Exemption from certain taxes was a privelege afforded by some towns to returning pilgrims on proof of status.
The Compostela .... could prove that the bearer had been there and served as an additional form of safe-conduct on the return journey.
 

Northern Light

New Member
The Compostela

I would have thought that more than 15 % recieved it , by judging of the line outside the office :).
Anyway it s a beautiful memory of the walk even of the main importance of all journeys or walks is the way we travel or go there.
I m a very spiritual rock n roll atheist , if it makes sense but I m not religious so I assumed that I would not get the one written in latin. I was happy to discover that I actually could since there was a third alternative.
I threw wishes out of my heart in Santiago , for people I carry and since I had to do the steps also a small wish even for me :). That meant more than the piece of paper. /M
 

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JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
There is a lot we don't know as data is not collected. We don't know the number of families or couples who walk together. We don't know the number of people who don't want the Compostela but simply ask for the sello of the Cathedral. The small number who are refused a compostela for whatever reason are not recorded. Also not recorded is the number of times Certificates are given to people people who, for example, walked a huge part of the journey but because of illness or another legitimate reason were not able to complete part of the the last 100 kms. Simlarly not recorded are the number of children under the approximate age of 7 who get certificates when walking with adults who recieve the Compostela.

Add that to all the others who simply walk parts of camino routes all over Spain and never get to Santiago and we begin to realise why albergues are full :)
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
The small number who are refused a compostela for whatever reason are not recorded.
I refused a Compostela in 2007 and 2009 but asked for the other document. My details were still recorded.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Sil

You misread - you had travelled the distance and were invited to register. You then chose to tick the third box indicating you had no religious or spiritual motives for your pilgrimage. You then recieved the Certificate. For a variety of reasons some people are not invited to register and are therefore refused both the Compostela and the Certificate.

Regards

John
 

gaulsdog

Member
I am sure the 2 French chaps and their dogs are just as entitled to a compostela as the hoards of Spanish that were arriving out side the small towns in their cars and mini buses when I walked in July and filling up the beds of genuine peligrinos which I think the 2 French chaps probably were. Just because how somebody might look to you is no reason to look down on them.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Thanks Johnnie.
I actually asked for the other certificate and they were happy to give it to me.

Oy - Gaulsdog!
You will re-open the old can of worms with a term like 'genuine peligrinos'!!
Previous debates have asked the question: Who is a genuine peregrino?
Are they the Spaniards who walk to the tomb of their patron saint from the required 100km mark in order to revere the tomb of the saint, say confession, earn the indulgence - and the Compostela?
Or, are 'genuine pilgrims' those who prefer a longer hike and then say that it is the journey that is important not the destination?
The Archdiocese does not approve of the above statement. They say that the purpose of the pilgrimage is to arrive at the tomb of the saint, that it is this motivation that makes you a pilgrim, that walking the camino is not the important thing.
They also do not care how many kilometers you have walked, as long as you have walked the last 100km to Santiago.
They don't care if you did not carry a backpack - as long as you walked the required distance.
It is modern day pilgrims who have added on all the other requirements.
Remember - 12 million genuine Catholic pilgrims are expected to visit Santiago this year - only 225000 of those will walk some of the ways.
 

Northern Light

New Member
800 km , with a backpack I came to learn how to carry . Loaded with life , sold out princess ways :) and a diabetic type 1 who dont get through a day without 4-5 injections. I m a fighter by heart and would like to think of myself as a peregrino :) . Ultreia!
We all have different stories and reasons attached to us . I respect that others are there on their own journeys . Of course it isnt nice to arrive to full albergues and know that some made it there and took place in perhaps not so genuine ways - Hopefully somewhere inside them they are also aware of this. But we didnt walk to judge others . And I met so many beautiful souls throughout my ways -that weighed up those who werent . People cut out of a different kind .
I can only speak of del Norte and the 3 last days before Santiago when we joined the other caminos we re different for me, but all experiences matters. Lets not do hierarki even in between pilgrims or the way of them. Some things are like the wild flowers - better left untouched .

Buen Camino / M
 

daesdaemar

Camino-holic
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles - twice
I have done the Camino Ingles and received a Compostela. I plan to do the Camino again, and can't really get too excited about whether I get another Compostela. So, I could be one of those who completes the Camino but doesn't get a Compostela (the second time around) simply because it's not that big a deal. The experience is the really big deal!
 

zakosdad

CaminoWalkers
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2013 CF Sept (2019?)
It was important to us to receive the Compostela - we did walk it for both spiritual and religious reasons - but the Compostela to us is more than that. It is a visual reminder to us and our family and friends that we stepped out of our comfort zone and placed our lives - our very well being - not only into the hands of God - but into the hands of everyone else along the Camino Frances - the residents who cared for us - the fellow peregrinos we walked and slept with. It is a reminder that as "older kids' at 67 & 68 we could do the Camino and do it well. The people we have inspired is unbelievable - they may not walk the Camino - but they do walk other paths - many much more difficult than the Camino - unemployment - sickness - among a few. We are so proud of our compostelas and credencials we had a frame made to display them - to encourage others.

Buen Camino
Dale
 
D

Deleted member 12253

Guest
I had read that in any given year, only 15% of those that embark on the Pilgrimage actually complete it. Or at least that only 15% receive a Compostela.

That seems like a very low figure, so I am curious to know if there is a place that I might get these figures. I have seen in the forum numbers of pilgrims who complete the pilgrimage, but never the percentage as compared to those who started it.

Compostela means noting to me, I got one in 2000, 2010, 2011, bur did not bother on 4 other occasions. The camino is in my heart not on piece of paper. Buen camino and happy Christmas to all pilgrims all over the world.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
On my first arrival in Santiago, I contemplated the need for a Compostela. After a couple of days of t-shirt store overdose, it came to me that it was the best souvenir available, and I headed for the Pilgrim Office. I have gotten one every time since. (I still do not have a miniature botafumeiro in silver-like plate, but I have purchased a miniature mojone.)
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
Hmm. The Pilgrimage itself was of the utmost importance to me, and of course the Pilgrimage continues in all sorts of ways now I am home. But receiving the Compostela was also really important to me. Something I think to do with recognition by the Church that I'd done it. And hearing at the Pilgrim Mass the next day that I had arrived the day before. It still makes me really emotional to think about it.

Andy
Both my husband I are delighted to have received the much-coveted Compostelas. Sadly, we arrived on the day of the train crash on 24th July, and so would not have known if our names were given out and at which service. But the whole experience, we rode our bikes from Bayonne in France to Santiago, was amazing and we are thinking of doing it again if only because it has burned a loving place in our hearts that refuses to be extinguished.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
They don't actually read the names of each pilgrim. It is done at the noon mass of the following day. It is a cumulative description, such as "two pilgrims from the USA who started in Sarria." I don't know if that makes you feel better, that you did not miss a great deal, but the sense of loss on that day must be enormous for those who were in Santiago.
 

colinPeter

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
We are so proud of our compostelas and credencials we had a frame made to display them - to encourage others.
Good for you, it is an achievement that you can be proud of, and if it encourages someone else to step out and achieve something, not necessarily the Camino, then all the better.
Buen Camino
Colin
 

zakosdad

CaminoWalkers
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2013 CF Sept (2019?)
They don't actually read the names of each pilgrim. It is done at the noon mass of the following day. It is a cumulative description, such as "two pilgrims from the USA who started in Sarria." I don't know if that makes you feel better, that you did not miss a great deal, but the sense of loss on that day must be enormous for those who were in Santiago.
We picked up our compostelas the day we finished - spent the next day in the hospital trying to get an x-ray for an injured finger - went to Finisterre - then attended the Pilgrim Mass - so no we did not hear our names or countries identified - but that was not the point - it made no difference to us - our focus was on the Mass itself.
 

Debra Andrew

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning August 2015, Portuguese way
I am walking In August, and it is important to me to get the compostelas ... What are some of the reasons the don't give it to you ??
 

vgen5122

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (August 19-sept 30,2013) (8/2017)
I completed my Camino on 9/30/15 and received my certificate. Some pilgrims have to come back and complete parts of this pilgrimage before receiving theirs. In the long run, it does not make their pilgrimage any less true than my own. It is just that simple.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
On my pilgrimage last year, I saw that the rule was one stamp/day on the last 100 KM for hikers ; two stamps/day for cyclists. But really, if you're only doing the last 100/150/200 KM that particular year, getting the two stamps daily, whatever your situation, would be a wise precaution ; if you've walked all the way from SJPP or Le Puy or Lourdes or wherever, and have the stamps to show for it, then one stamp/day on the last 100 KM will obviously be sufficient, administratively anyway -- though one can never have too many sellos on one's credencial IMO !!! :)

--

JW explained the question of people not getting their compostelas very clearly -- just to be completely exhaustive, there's a marginally small number of people who can get two compostelas instead of one ; if you walk to Compostela, and then walk to Fisterra and back again to Santiago, perhaps because you're doing the return journey, the second walk into Compostela would entitle you to another compostela certificate, assuming religious/spiritual motivation, as you'll have technically completed the pilgrimage over 100 KM+ a second time.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
On my pilgrimage last year, I saw that the rule was one stamp/day on the last 100 KM for hikers ; two stamps/day for cyclists. But really, if you're only doing the last 100/150/200 KM that particular year, getting the two stamps daily, whatever your situation, would be a wise precaution ; if you've walked all the way from SJPP or Le Puy or Lourdes or wherever, and have the stamps to show for it, then one stamp/day on the last 100 KM will obviously be sufficient, administratively anyway -- though one can never have too many sellos on one's credencial IMO !!! :)

--

JW explained the question of people not getting their compostelas very clearly -- just to be completely exhaustive, there's a marginally small number of people who can get two compostelas instead of one ; if you walk to Compostela, and then walk to Fisterra and back again to Santiago, perhaps because you're doing the return journey, the second walk into Compostela would entitle you to another compostela certificate, assuming religious/spiritual motivation, as you'll have technically completed the pilgrimage over 100 KM+ a second time.
What about this: Camino Gironi + Cami Catala I + Camino Castellano-Aragones + Camino Frances + Ruta del Salvador + Camino Primitivo (names by Mundicamino) = 5 Caminos walked in entire lenght. Can I get 5 Compostellas? I guess not. That's why I thinks it's unfair if a person walk first (let's say) 500kms and last 10kms and can't get Compostella. Or am I missing something?
 

Hanne

Hurricane-Hanne
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés(2007&2008), Finesterre&Muxía(5times), Portugués(2009), Aragonés(2008), Primitivo(2011), Vasco del interiór(2012), Inglés(2009), Via de la Plata(2013&2015), Sanabrés(2013), Del Norte(2013), San Salvador(2015) and Inverno(2015).
Camino Baztan and Le Puy in the future.
The rule to get a Compostela is quite clear: As a walking pilgrim you must walk the last 100 km to Santiago de Compostela. It is important to get 2 stamps a day the last 100 km.
Walking Camino del Salvador from León to Oviedo, Camino Finesterre from SdC to Finesterre and/or Camino Muxía from SdC to Muxía (ex. Sdc-Finesterre-Muxía) gives you the opportunity to obtain other diplomas than the Compostela.
You can get them in the finishing Towns: In Finesterre (Public albergue), Muxía (Town Hall) and Oviedo (Salvador Cathedral).
All other caminos connecting to caminos finishing in SdC only gives you the joy of walking!...But isn't that enough?
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
The rule to get a Compostela is quite clear: As a walking pilgrim you must walk the last 100 km to Santiago de Compostela. It is important to get 2 stamps a day the last 100 km.
Walking Camino del Salvador from León to Oviedo, Camino Finesterre from SdC to Finesterre and/or Camino Muxía from SdC to Muxía (ex. Sdc-Finesterre-Muxía) gives you the opportunity to obtain other diplomas than the Compostela.
You can get them in the finishing Towns: In Finesterre (Public albergue), Muxía (Town Hall) and Oviedo (Salvador Cathedral).
All other caminos connecting to caminos finishing in SdC only gives you the joy of walking!...But isn't that enough?
Hola, Hanne!

If you're referring to my post (not clear because you didn't use "reply" button) let me tell you that I know all the facts about receiving the Compostela. I may add that for me personally this is just another piece of paper in my home. Exactly for the reason you've stated - it's a joy of walking, not a joy of compiling pieces of paper.

I was just putting on a question why those last 100kms are so much more important than previously walked 500kms??? I guess for the CdS Office my dental technician, which in her 60's walked from SJPdP to Portomarin and bussed to SdC because of heart realted problems, is worthy (yes - WORTHY) less than a tourigrino walking without a backpack that most possibly walked just half of last 100kms and bussed the other half. If it would be for me - no big deal, but Compostela means very much for her because of religious beliefs.

Therefore I decided I'll go to the office this year and collect the Compostela in her name (my name, but stated that I've walked for her - that can be done).

I'm a pilgrim, not a sheep!

Edited by moderator.
 

Hanne

Hurricane-Hanne
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés(2007&2008), Finesterre&Muxía(5times), Portugués(2009), Aragonés(2008), Primitivo(2011), Vasco del interiór(2012), Inglés(2009), Via de la Plata(2013&2015), Sanabrés(2013), Del Norte(2013), San Salvador(2015) and Inverno(2015).
Camino Baztan and Le Puy in the future.
Hi KinkyOne,

I don't understand your aggressiveness !
Rules are rules. You can't make your own rule, just because you don't like the once made by the Pilgrims office i SdC.
Are pilgrims walking from SJPdP better pilgrims, than the ones starting in Burgos or Sarria ? They are all pilgrims.
It's nice of you to make a pilgrimage for your friend.
On Camino Francés I have seen pilgrims taking the bus or taxi in the last 100 km. They got the Compostela anyway at the office. It is a question of moral and people willing to lie, that they have walked the last 100 km.
I would never be happy getting the Compostela on a lie.​
 
I had read that in any given year, only 15% of those that embark on the Pilgrimage actually complete it. Or at least that only 15% receive a Compostela.

That seems like a very low figure, so I am curious to know if there is a place that I might get these figures. I have seen in the forum numbers of pilgrims who complete the pilgrimage, but never the percentage as compared to those who started it.

The Oficina del Peregrino gives figures on this on their website: http://peregrinossantiago.es/eng/pilgrims-office/statistics/
About 7% put down 'cultural reasons' for their motivation and get the certificate of completion. If you put down religious or religious and other (i.e. spiritual) motivations, you get a compostela. Completion rates are really nothing to go on. Most people can't take a month off work to walk the Frances from St Jean Pied de Port. Most Spanish people on longer route only do a week a year. As one man told me: I have two weeks of vacation. I spend one with my family and one on the Camino. Once you start a route, you can leave and come back to the same point and continue to use your credencial. This also applies to the shorter routes. You can start off in Sarria (116km from Santiago) walk as far as Melide (about 50km away), twist an ankle, go home and come back when every you are better to complete the route and get your Compostela.
 

Starsend

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leaving for my first Camino on 2nd September
Do you really need two stamps a day to get the compostela once past Sarria as suggested above? Surely one stamp from your Albergue each eve is sufficient. Where would you get the other one each day anyway?

Need to know please as I'm two weeks in already. Thanks
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Do you really need two stamps a day to get the compostela once past Sarria as suggested above? Surely one stamp from your Albergue each eve is sufficient. Where would you get the other one each day anyway?

Need to know please as I'm two weeks in already. Thanks
Get two. The Pilgrim Office can be very rules-oriented. You will hear stories of those without two sellos per day after Sarria, but you also will hear stories of those who are declined. If you want the Compostela, follow the rules and get two per day, one from your lodging. They are easy to get!
 

SabineP

Camino = Gratitude + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Do you really need two stamps a day to get the compostela once past Sarria as suggested above? Surely one stamp from your Albergue each eve is sufficient. Where would you get the other one each day anyway?

Need to know please as I'm two weeks in already. Thanks


Yes , you will absolutely need the two stamps a day past Sarria.
Do not worry, every bar has a stamp aka sello. Often it will be visible on the barcounter. I prefer to always buy a coffee or a snack and then ask for a stamp.
But don't worry the local town hall can provide a stamp, as can the local police, a small shop or the pharmacy.
And don't forget those churches that are open.
Don't worry : especially on the Camino Frances you will find stamps in abundance.

Here is a link to the website of the Oficina de Peregrinos.
https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/pilgrimage/the-compostela/
 

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